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The Legendary Jacktown Fair Celebrates the 150th Edition T

rapeze artists, mud bogging, homegrown produce, and horse races, each have its place in the 150 year history of the Jacktown Fair. Originally called the Jacksonville Fair, it was held the first time on Oct. 3-4, 1866 by The Richhill Agricultural, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Association. The association formed just months earlier on July 6. Located in Wind Ridge, the name Jacktown Fair isn’t an obvious one without delving into the history of how Wind Ridge got its name. At one time, Wind Ridge was called Jacksonville. According to a history recorded by late post mistress Goldie Wright, Jacksonville was first settled around 1831 on the Elk Ridge Indian trail. It didn’t become Wind Ridge until 1849. Wright said this was believed to have occurred to avoid confusion with another post office with a similar name. When the fair was formed a piece of that history remained when it was called The Jacksonville Fair, later shortened to Jacktown Fair. Through the years, large extravaganzas were held at the fair, including an “international circus,” balloon ascensions, aerial acts and tight rope walkers. It even drew actor Burt Lancaster as a high wire entertainer in the years before he found celebrity on the silver screen. “And there were of course the contests that created the inevitable bragging rights of farmers, homemakers and craftsmen. Entries were taken in a large variety of categories – livestock, linen and clothing, cotton, leather, needlework, farm machinery, grains, produce, arts, furniture, flowers, bread, preserves, and even horse shoes,” according to Zack and Kayla Patton, official historians of the Richhill Agricul-

tural Society the organization that continues to present the fair today. The Patton’s said the first mention of rides at the fair was reported in the True Blue newspaper in 1886, referring to two large swings that “did a good business.” A story from 1893 shows just how fitting the name Wind Ridge is for the village. Madame and Professor Zeno were performing a balloon ascension at the fair when the balloon suddenly caught fire. Madame Zeno escaped in the nick of time as the balloon was caught by the wind and blown into the side of a house about 500 yards away. Regardless of what entertainment is booked each year, “the fair

offers more than just rides and attractions,” according to Zack and Kayla. “As stated in the Waynesburg Messenger, October 1, 1879, ‘If there was nothing on exhibition, except the large crowd of people, it would pay to spend thirty-five cents and a half day on the fair grounds. It is worth all it cost, and more too, merely as a grand reunion, and, day of recreation and social employment.’” For more information about the fair and its colorful history, or to purchase 150th anniversary commemorative apparel and collectibles visit the Jacktown Fair website at www.jacktownfair.org.

Still the place to go before you die I

t is doubtful that 150 years ago the members of the Richhhill Agricultural, Mechanical and Manufacturing Association would have envisioned the fair it started still going strong today. In fact, it holds the distinction of being the longest continuously running fair in the country. And, as anyone who has ever heard of the fair knows, “You Can’t Die Happy Until You’ve Been to the Jacktown Fair.” This year is certainly no exception to that sentiment. In fact, if you haven’t been yet, this is the year to make the trip to the western end of Greene County for the 150th celebration! Attention all mud boggers, back by popular demand is the old mud bogging competition. This event has been left out of the fair for a few years now, according to Kayla Burns Patton, but at one time there were as many as 100 drivers participating. Its return should bring out those nostalgic to get back out there and the newcomers who think they have what it takes to show the old guys and gals how it is done. Only those 18 and over will be permitted to compete in the mud bog and passengers are prohibited. There is to be no open footwear, helmets are required and seatbelts must be worn in all classes. Complete contest rules and entry forms are available at the fair’s website, www.jacktownfair.org. One of the new events at the fair for 2015 is the 150th Year Mini Float Contest. Floats can be constructed on a child’s wagon, a wheel barrow, garden cart, small cart, etc. to be pulled by hand or a lawn size tractor. Entries in this category will receive prizes of $40, $30, $20, and $10. “This new contest will be in addition to our normal Float

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Contest for which winning entries will receive $100, $75, $50, and $25,” Patton said. The float contests will utilize this year’s fair theme, Harvest the Fun. Both mini and regular sized floats will be judged on their attractiveness, design, workmanship, use of the theme, originality and other elements. Anyone desiring to enter a float or entry corresponding to this year’s theme is encouraged to do so, Patton said. Other special additions for the anniversary fair is an extra night of fireworks to be held on Tuesday evening after a performance by headlining band, Hillbilly Way singing its hit songs, “Mr. Right Now,” and “One Night in New Orleans,” plus many newer songs. For the uninitiated, Hillbilly Way is comprised of six of the original members of the defunct Povertyneck Hillbillies. For fans of the former group it is a treat to hear the these guys back together again from the vocals of Abby Abbondanza to the fiddle playing, now taken on by the always amazing John Parrendo. The final new act for the fair will be a roaming artist from the Cincinnati Circus who will be tying balloon animals, juggling and possible even strolling the grounds via unicycle each day of the fair. Anyone interested in learning more about the history of the Jacktown Fair can log onto the redesigned fair website at www. jacktownfair.org. There you will find old photos, a fair entry book, and a history comprised by Kayla and Zack Patton. It seems the torch is being passed to the younger generation who have obviously been raised with the same enthusiasm and love of the Jacktown Fair.

Limited edition hats, t-shirts,ceramic mugs and medallions celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the Jacktown Fair can be purchased online at jacktownfair.org

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It’s not about the medals

hrough the power of sports, people with intellectual disabilities discover new strengths and abilities, skills and success,” reads the Special Olympics mission statement. “Our athletes find joy, confidence and fulfillment--on the playing field and in life. They also inspire people in their communities and elsewhere to open their hearts to a wider world of human talents and potential.” In Greene County, the Special Olympics has changed lives since the 1980s but in recent years there was a gap in the program due to a lack of new volunteers. Fortunately, that is changing thanks to a group of parents, university students, and repre- Erika Heagin, 9, a Greene County Special Olympics athlete, helps volunsentatives from the state Special teer Breanna Watt, a Senior Education Major of Waynesburg University Olympics organization intent on hand out information about the program. bringing back the once thriving Greene County Special Olympics. out the years that we have lived here but first the “It means a lot to me personally,” said Kristi timing wasn’t right with what was going on in White of Waynesburg whose father, Jim Brown, our lives and then it didn’t exist,” Chambers said. got her involved as a teen. “Things have just fallen into place now at the best “My dad was with the Lions Club that got possible time for Syndi.” it started in Greene County and I became a Sydni’s first couple of years out of high volunteer coordinator when I was in college at school were rough, according to Chambers. Waynesburg. When my dad passed away in 1990 “There wasn’t a program out there like this the Greene County Special Olympics was dedi- for her and she was bored and miserable,” Chamcated to him that year,” White said. “My daugh- bers said. Now, she can’t wait for the next opporter, Erika, 9, is special needs so it has even more tunity to get together with her fellow athletes, she significance to me now.” added. White said Erika has already benefitted after Greene County Special Olympics is curjust a few practices. rently looking for management team members, “She loves getting out there and interacting volunteers, and especially athletes with tentative with those other kids. It is a good team-building sports of bocce, basketball, long distance runexercise for her as well as social,” she said. “In ning/walking, and volleyball. Greene County in general there is not a lot out Volunteers can come from all walks of life, there for these special needs kids to do. I was ages and income brackets. The amount of time so excited to see that we were bringing Special devoted is entirely up to the volunteer. Students, Olympics back to Greene County.” senior citizens, teachers, coaches, and anyone For Randi Chambers, the program gives her who wants to make a difference in the life of a special needs daughter, Sydni, a 2010 Waynes- special needs athlete should contact the Greene burg Central High School graduate an opportu- County Special Olympics by contacting greenenity to do something outside of her daily routine. countyspecialolympics@gmail.com. For more Sydni works at GreeneARC and attends Second information, visit the www.specialolympicspa. Sam 9 and this will be the perfect addition to her org or check out the Special Olympics of Greene daily routine. County, Pa. Facebook page. “I had looked into it a few times through-

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t is that time again, when singers of all ages and all genres of music will plan a trip to Wind Ridge for a shot at $1,800 in prize money for winners of the Jacktown Idol competition. This years’ competition will take place on July 15 & 16 with finals to be held at 8 p.m. on July 17. In addition to first, second and third-place prizes of $1,000, $500, and $300, 50 hours of recording time is up for grabs from Silent Wing Audio of Bobtown.

In past years, contestants have hailed from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia and of course Pennsylvania. Occasionally, they’ve traveled even farther for a chance to wow the judges. This year, the preliminary rounds will be held on July 15 and 16 with eliminations taking place in an American Idol-style format. With only 3 - 4 out of roughly a dozen entrants making it to the final round, vocalists have to bring their best game right out of the gate. For one lucky contestant it is the audience who sends them on, rather than the panel of judges. Audience members pay $1 per vote with the proceeds going to the Richhill Agricultural Society, the non-profit organization behind the Jacktown Fair. Those who attend the competition as spectators are charged a $5 admission fee for the preliminary rounds and $10 for the final. With the admission price comes one vote per dollar charged or 5 votes during the preliminary rounds and 10 votes for the final round. Whether you sing rock, gospel, Broadway, country, or pop, Jacktown Idol is your local shot at local fame and fortune. For an entry form and complete rules for Jacktown Idol, visit www. jacktownfair.org or for more information, call the GreeneSaver at 724-627Pictured are, 2014 Jacktown Idol winners, first-place, Lexie Rohlf of Browns- 2040. ville, center, second-place, Ben Pimental of Mt. Pleasant, left, and thirdplace, Alexa Ponick of Carmichaels on the right.

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Waynesburg Teen Doubly Rewarded For Anniversary Of Scholarship

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aylor Crowe, 18, of Waynesburg became the recipient of the 25th annual Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce scholarship with his winning essay on the topic “How do you plan to use your education to make a difference in your life and your community.” Taylor plans to attend Liberty University in the fall to pursue a degree in business administration. The son of David and Kellie Crowe, Taylor is a homeschooled student. He maintained a 3.9 grade point average. The Waynesburg Chamber’s Educational Scholarship Fund provides $1,500 scholarships to recipients.

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However, to mark its 25th anniversary of presenting the scholarships, the chamber increased the amount this year to $2,500. In addition, John “Skip” Frownfelter, owner of PCsquared in Waynesburg, donated a fully-loaded laptop with leather carrying case and Barb Wise of the Greene County United Way donated a custom backpack to be given to the winner.

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W

hen an academic team from a small school consistently places in a state competition it certainly would qualify as something ‘cool.’ Such is the case for the Carmichaels Area High School Envirothon Team who finished with an overall score of 509.33 points, out of a possible 600, for the 2015 Pennsylvania Envirothon, a mere 18 points from a second place finish. Led by team coach, Kevin Willis, the 5-member team from Carmichaels seems to have a magic formula for staying on top. Willis attributed it to “how hard the kids are willing to work.” “When you take a step back and get to see these kids work it is amazing,” he said, noting a time when his wife, a fellow teacher, watched his homeroom one morning as an example. “Most of them were Envirothon kids. There wasn’t a lot going on this day and on their own they were giving this all-out effort prepping for it.” Willis said the students were bouncing questions off of each other and using flash cards to get ready. That “desire,” has been steady from year-to-year for this team. Willis, who competed at the state level competition when he was in high school said he wanted to share that experience with his students. As a student, Willis was a member of 11th and 4th place finishing teams. As the Carmichaels’ coach, he’s seen his team secure six straight top five finishes at the state level, getting there seven times overall. Carmichaels teams have not dropped out of the top ten at the competition for a decade. There is a lot that goes into an Envirothon. Teams participate in a series of field station tests focusing on five topics; soils and land use, aquatic ecology, forestry, wildlife, and environmental issues. They prepare and deliver oral presentations to panels of judges who evaluate then on problem-solving capabilities, oral presentation skills, and its recommended solutions to a specific environmental challenge. “It all goes back to support. People care about it and they support us, from the school board to the administration,” he said, referencing times when playoffs for spring sports conflicted and administrators ensured both could happen, one way or another. “A few years back two of our kids were softball players. They were 7 hours across the state and John Menhart (now superintendent) brought them to the state Envirothon after their game.” Willis said you can’t be more “all in,” in your support than that.

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Pictured from left, Emma Lowry, coach Kevin Willis, Philip Mikalik, Kaleb Wilson, Blake Conard, and Ashley Dotson. GreeneSaver •

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2015 Carmichaels NHS

Shelter Animals Receive $10,000!

The National Honor Society at Carmichaels Area High School inducted 30 new members for 2015 at a ceremony including guest speaker and 1993 Carmichaels graduate, Nancy J. Kerr, PhD, DVM. Officers installed for 2015-16 were Kenzie Blasinsky, president; Journey Crutchman, vice-president; Katlyn Allison, secretary; Katelynn Schooley, treasurer; and Charlette Dickey, historian/public relations. New members, front row, from left, Michaela Rush, Victoria Russian, Odyzza Centro, Katlyn Allison, Katelynn Schooley, Jessica Reeves and guest speaker, Kerr. Row two: Sarah Juliani, Hailie Hixenbaugh, Journey Crutchman, Brenna Sadlek, Loretta McKahan, Emma Lowry, Remington Swartz, and Victoria Jade

The animals at the Greene County Humane Society are assured a little extra special care thanks to the Subaru “Love Promise” program. The generosity of customers of Bortz Subaru in Waynesburg and Subaru of America resulted in the society being awarded a check for more than $10,000. The Love Promise program was established to lend support to charities and organizations deemed most important to the community to give back “not because it’s good for business, but because it’s the right thing to do.” Humane society director, Jane Gapen said the donation was a big surprise. “This is really big for us--huge,” Gapen said, noting the monies would go a long way proEight Greene County students were recipients viding and veterinary care, food, and other essential of scholarships through the Greene County Comneeds for homeless, neglected and abused animals in the munity Foundation for 2015. shelter. Waynesburg Central High School graduate, John-Glen Davis was awarded the $1,000 Army From left, Mike Gyurke, board president of the Greene County Humane Specialist Gregory A. Cox Memorial Scholarship Society, accepts a check from Rich Bortz, general manager of Bortz and the $1,000 Rocky Doman Memorial ScholarSubaru in Waynesburg. ship. Davis will study criminal justice at Waynesburg University. Jefferson-Morgan High School graduate, Dejia Jordan was awarded the $1,500 Dove Award and the $1,000 R.A. Matteucci Family Scholarship. Jordan will study studio art at Indiana University. Mapletown High School graduate, Marissa Twenty-five individuals won awards during a second-place honors was Ron Virgili of Jefferson. Ferrier, was awarded the $1,000 William and Shirbenefit shoot hosted by the Greene County Hunt- Second-place went to Nick Clarke of Carmichaels ley Hanley Scholarship and the $1,000 Darlene ing Hills Hawkeyes Scholastic Clay Target Shoot- and fifth-place to Andrew Buchtan of Greensboro. Phillips Scholarship. Ferrier will study elementary ing team at Hunting Hills in Dilliner. Categories In the team category with five-member teams par- education at Slippery Rock University. ticipating, the Hawkeyes took both first and second included: youth, ladies, male individual and team. Carmichaels Area High School graduate, Among the winners were several Greene place. Members of the first-place Hunting Hills County participants, including Parker Woodring Hawkeyes team, from left, with a total team score of of Carmichaels who took honors for the highest 432 are: Chris Popernack, Will Abbott, Nick Clarke, male youth overall and the senior varsity champi- Parker Woodring, assistant coach Matt Friend and on. Brandon Sanders of Waynesburg was the senior assistant head coach Randy Coss. The second place varsity runner-up. Kyleigh Kozel of Carmichaels Hawkeyes team, with an overall score of 416, inStudents in the West Greene Middle School were was the highest female youth overall. The junior cluded: Bruce Headman, Hunter Scott, Scott Scott, recognized by state Senator Camera Bartolotta for varsity champion was Zach Abbott of Rogersville Seth Wilson, and Zach Wilson. being three-time winners of the Edmentum Master and runner-up was Garrett Ross of Aleppo. EarnChallenge. Students in 952 schools across the couning intermediate advanced try competed in the Master Chalwas Noah Haines of lenge where they were challenged Greensboro with runnerto demonstrate standards mastery up, Arran Hinerman of by earning as many Blue Ribbons Waynesburg. Intermediate as possible in Edmentum’s Study entry champion was Zach Island software. Study Island comWilson of Waynesburg bines rigorous content customized with runner-up, Thaine to meet state standards in math, Miller, also of Waynesreading, writing, science, and soburg. Runner-up Rookie cial studies while engaging students champion was Payton Rawith its interactive features to reinber of Waynesburg. Highforce and reward learning achieveest overall female, adult, ments. From left, Senator Camera was Pam Blaker of CarmiBartolotta, West Greene teacher Jeff chaels. Taking the adult,

Whipkey. Row three: Kenzie Blasinsky, Charlette Dickey, Rebecca Conklin, Zachary Juliani, Michael Ludrosky, and Jeffrey Pratt. Row four: Nathan “Billy” Bowlen, Connor Spangler, Jacob Kinsell, Reed Long, Blake Conard, Jacob Barnish, Jacob Wamsley, Joshua Bogucki, Christopher Ross, and Kevin Willis, advisor.

Fourteen Thousand Awarded In Community Foundation Scholarships

Hawkeyes Score 20 Awards At Benefit Shoot

Baliegh Gray, was awarded the $1,000 William and Shirley Hanley Scholarship. Gray will study communications at California University. West Greene High School graduate, Anthony Jacobs, was awarded the $2,500 Thelma S. Hoge Scholarship. Jacobs will study business administration and pre-law at W&J College. West Greene High School graduate, Renee Salai, was awarded the $2,500 Thelma Hoge Scholarship. Salai will study psychology at W&J College. Jefferson-Morgan High School graduate, David Blosser, was awarded the $1,000 R.A. Mateucci Family Scholarship. Blosser will study biochemistry and Spanish at Dickinson College. Carmichaels Area High School graduate, Ashley Dotson, was awarded the $500 Walter Samek III Scholarship. Dotson will study creative writing at Chatham University.

Bartolotta Visits West Greene

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Polander, Elizabeth Brudnock, Krysten Debolt, Jersey Wise, Caleb Rice, Jud Meek, Dominic Russo, Emily Cooke, and Megan Jacobs. Not pictured: Max Cunningham, Bailey Fredericks and Morgan Mooney.

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Monster Trucks T

he roar of the crowd won’t be a match for the engines of Raminator Ram, Samson Chevrolet and Virginia Giant as a monster truck competition comes to the Greene County Fairgrounds for the first time ever. Joining these three fan favorites will be Megasaurus Fire Breathing Transformer. Fair attendees can look forward to Raminator, Samson and Virginia Giant taking on each other in competition like wheelies, obstacle course, side-by-side and the audience favorite, freestyle. Also, Megasaurus Fire Breathing Transformer will be “looking for a car to fill its appetite,” according to Performance Motorsports, Inc. And how does Megasaurus fill that appetite? It uses its claws to pick up cars and trucks to rip and crush with its hydraulic jaws. At 30 feet tall, Megasaurus is an imposing figure as it shoots flames from its mouth and nostrils while enjoying a snack. “The Monster Truck Jam is one of the biggest attractions this year at the fair,” said Debbie Stephenson, PA State Fair Director and secretary/treasurer of the Greene County Fair. Stephenson said she is also very happy to be able to bring gospel music to the Greene County Fair for 2015 in the form of the Gospel Harmony Boys Quartet. “People have been asking for this for years. This is the closest thing to the Oak Ridge Boys you are ever going to get, without the Oak Ridge Boys. They are that good,” Stephenson said of the quartet. Outside of the realm of entertainment, also new at the Greene County Fair for 2015, is a paperless system for fair entries.

Featuring MEGASAURUS

“You just go online, download the form, fill it out and send it back,” Stephenson said. “Most everybody has a computer these days and if they don’t they know someone who does.” The deadline for fair entries is fast approaching. All entries must be post-marked by June 30, no exceptions. A fair booklet with the downloadable form can be found on the fair’s website at http://www.greenecountyfair.org/. To help ease the paperless transition Stephenson sent postcards out earlier in the year letting previous entrants know about the change. “So far it’s been received pretty well,” she said.

The Gospel Harmony Boys

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he Gospel Harmony Boys promises audiences a mix of “hand-clapping rhythms, soul-stirring ballads, traditional southern gospel classics and some great old hymns.” Members of the Christian Music Hall of Fame, the Gospel Harmony Boys is currently based out of Charleston, W.Va. but got its start in Huntington, W.Va. in 1952. Since that time, the group has performed on stages with some of the biggest names in gospel music and been on the Christian music charts multiple times with its original recordings.

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The Original Jacktown Fair Queen W

hen Kathy (Orndoff) Guthrie was crowned the Jacktown Fair Queen in 1965 it would be the first and the last queen at the fair until 1977. It isn’t exactly clear why the queen competition stopped for a dozen years but Guthrie said she is proud to have the distinction of having been the first. “That year the queens were chosen by different organizations to represent them and I was selected by the Rogersville Lions Club. I was quite honored for them to have asked me to represent them,” Guthrie said. “It was the 100th year of the fair and we all dressed in period Kathy Orndoff is crowned the 1965 Jacktown Fair Queen costumes.” Guthrie recalled riding in the parade and being introThe couple lives in Graysville, as does their son, duced onto the stage at the fairgrounds to face a Chad (Heather) Guthrie and two grandsons. Staypanel of judges. ing close to home as well, the couple’s other son, “We were asked a question by a monitor. I Travis and his partner, Rhonda Crawford, make don’t recall how many judges there were at the their home in Pine Bank. time but I know Ivan Guesman was one of them,” “Kevin and I go to the fair every year,” she said. she said. “There was no state fair competition back This year will be no exception as Guthrie acceptthen, like today, so there wasn’t an opportunity to ed the fair committee’s request to join her fellow go any farther.” queens on a special float in recognition of 150 years Today, Guthrie is married to Kevin Guthrie. of the Jacktown Fair.

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Clarksville Christian Church

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n the Clarksville area the Clarksville Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) has been a gathering point for decades. It has opened its doors to Girl and Boy Scouts as a meeting place. During an especially cold winter it welcomed those in need of warmth and a hot meal. And, it has been the go-to place for various dinners, home-cooked by church members as a means to supplement the tithes of its small congregation. At various times in its lengthy history the church has seen a large following and at others a more modest one. But, no matter how large or small the congregation, the church has found a way to continue its reach into the community. Many a child from Clarksville has spent a week of their summer at the church’s annual Vacation Bible School. A year ago the church underwent a major restoration project made necessary by a crumbling sandstone foundation under a portion of the 121 year old building. Church elders, Lois and Joe Davis, of Braden said the cost to fix the effected area was more than $50,000, that’s quite a lot of chicken and biscuit dinners.

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“It had to be done. The contractor told us we were lucky it didn’t just cave in one day while we were in church,” said Joe Davis. It wasn’t the first time church members faced such a dilemma. Around 1920 much of the church building was destroyed by fire. Not only did the congregation repair the building it also enlarged it at the time, again attesting to the resilience of the Disciples of Christ. The history of the church is much older than the building itself. Church documents indicate it is an offshoot of the First Christian Church of Greene County, located in Pumpkin Run. The congregation eventually chose a more central location for its congregants in the early 1800s. When that building too was destroyed by a fire, some of the church members splintered off, erecting a new building that would be owned by the church membership, rather than the community or the religious hierarchy. Those members became known, as they are to this day, the Clarksville Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). The church is located at 330 Market Street. Services are held at 10:30 a.m. each Sunday with Pastor Brad Edgar.

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CONGRATS TO OUR LOCAL CHALLENGE PROGRAM AWARD WINNERS! S

elect Greene County seniors from area schools were recently selected as recipients of Challenge Program awards. The Challenge Program, Inc. celebrates student successes in five categories, including: attendance, academic improvement, academic excellence, STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), and community service. The goal of the program is to partner with local businesses to motivate high school students and assist them in developing good study habits for use in and out of the classroom. Partner businesses are rewarded with the obvious tangible results as attested to by the 11 students pictured. Without these sponsors, the program would not be possible. Representatives of the sponsors of West Greene High School, the Greene County Career and Technology Center and Waynesburg Central High School presented a mock check for the combined $15,000 contributed by their companies. Pictured from left, Karen Zalom of Alpha Natural Resources and Jessica Kearns of CONSOL Energy.

West Greene Challenge Award Winners At West Greene High School, where CONSOL Energy is the sponsor of the award, the following seniors were recognized, from left, Lee Ann Lippencott of CONSOL Energy; Anthony Jacobs, academic excellence; Brittany Gorby, STEM, and Renee, Salai. Not pictured is Emily Hoag who received the award for academic improvement.

Greene County Career and Technology Center Challenge Award Winners At the Greene County Career and Technology Center, where Alpha Natural Resources is the sponsor of the award, the following seniors were recognized, from left, Michaela Milliken, academic excellence; Harry Inghram, STEM, and Trystan Weir, community service. Not pictured are Austin Kiger, attendance; and Cameron Henry, academic improvement.

Waynesburg Central High School Challenge Award Winners At the Waynesburg Central High School, where CONSOL Energy is the sponsor of the award, the following seniors were recognized, from left, Matthew Desrosiers, community service; Caitlin Brooks, STEM; Brittany Straight, academic excellence; Kevin “Alex” McCrea, academic improvement; Kellie Taylor, attendance; and Jessica Kearns of CONSOL Energy.

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Congratulations! 13


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Community Bank President is World Class T

he Southpointe CEO Association has named Barron “Pat” McCune as its 2015 World Class CEO. A native of Washington, Pa., McCune started with Community Bank in the late 1980s as its legal council before joining its board in 1992. McCune left the practice of law in 1999 to become president of the now $850,000,000 bank. Six years later, McCune was named president, CEO and vice-chairman of its parent company, CB Financial Services, Inc. McCune originated the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expos and is the president of Tri-County Energy Development Alliance. His efforts to embrace extraction and development of the Marcellus Shale earned him the distinction of being selected by the Pittsburgh Business Times as a member of its 2012, 2013, and 2014 Who’s Who in the Energy Industry. Today, the Community Bank boasts 16 offices across southwestern Pennsylvania under McCune’s leadership.

GreeneScene by Laura Zoeller

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Clipper

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“Keep On Clipping!”

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by Tara Kinsell

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ames “Jamie” Henry of Waynesburg embarked on a labor of love earlier this year when he set out to have his late grandfather, Fred Lightner’s 841 Ford Powermaster tractor restored. “My (maternal) grandfather bought it new in 1957 when Fox Ford in Waynesburg used to sell tractors,” Henry said. “When my grandfather was up in his years we more or less inherited it.” Henry recalled flipping it when he was 15 or 16 and wondering what damage it might have done. When they turned the tractor back over it fired right up with just some fender and wheel damage. “Dad (Tom Henry, 78) wanted to have it restored for me as a surprise and then he had a stroke and he can’t do a whole lot now. I had a friend who had one restored for his mom and dad and he gave me the name of a guy in prosperity who did it,” Henry said. Unfortunately, that person was no longer doing tractor restoration work. After a little online research, Henry came up with Arthurs Tractors in Indiana, Pa. At the end of January, right as Henry, an air national guard member, was about to be deployed to the south Pacific, he took the tractor to Indiana. He returned about the same time the tractor was completed and none too soon. Henry’s mom, Marna, 74, was having a birthday and he wanted to give it to her as his gift. Besides, she was getting suspicious. As it happened, the tractor was a week late but that didn’t lessen the impact of Henry’s efforts. “She knew the tractor disappeared and was concerned about where it had gone to,” Henry said. “When we unloaded it I could tell by the look on her face I’d done good and my dad started crying. He was worried that with his health he’d never see it look like that again.” It was the fastest he’d seen his father move since his stroke when they pulled into the drive and saw the tractor.

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BEFORE

AFTER “It was amazing how quick he got out of the car and went around the tractor checking it out,” Henry said. The oldest son in his family, Henry remembered riding on the tractor with Lightener. When he was old enough to drive solo he still couldn’t reach the pedals so he had to stand up the whole time. The before and after photos of the tractor are like day and night. The before shot depicts the tractor after Henry’s dad had primed it with the intent to restore it himself. He could not have imagined that one day it would look factory new again in its original paint color. “A lot of people put some new paint on and say it’s restored,” Henry said. “They (Athurs Tractors) do a complete tear down of the transmission, engine and body and make it completely new, exactly like it was when it came off the showroom floor.” The only difference from the tractor’s original state is that Henry replaced the old steel seat with a more comfortable one but not for himself. “Just so he can sit in it again,” Henry said of his dad.

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The Perfect Arrangement I

f you think it’s only there for special occasions, The Perfect Arrangement, 694 High Street in Waynesburg, invites you to stop in and discover one of Greene County’s most exciting and – well - FUN stores! Remember the name is The Perfect Arrangement Floral and Gift. It’s true – this florist makes special occasions really stand out, and the gift shop can make any day a special occasion! With a large showroom brimming with gifts and décor for inside and out, it’s a place you need to visit. Locally owned and operated, the shop has grown into an area favorite over the past ten years. As a florist, the Perfect Arrangement staff knows this community, because we are a part of it. We are a part of your celebrations, and we’re there to help through the hard times, too. We enjoy serving the needs of our local civic organizations, schools, offices, businesses and residents. Floral designer, Gwen Wendell, has been with the Perfect Arrangement since the very beginning. Called a “miracle worker” by many, Gwen’s ability to create beautiful arrangements from a seemingly endless array of materials has earned her a farreaching reputation. There are people who call us from all over, because they specifically want Gwen to take care of their arrangements. They know what’s she’s able to do,” says manager Janet Hopkins, a long-time colleague of Gwen’s, and skilled designer as well. “It’s a very special shop – with a much larger selection of gift and décor than most florists. Because we stock such a nice selection of

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gifts, as well as live plants, silks, and of course the best fresh flowers, we are able to produce very custom arrangements that deliver the emotion and message you want to send,” Janet says. One thing customers really enjoy is the way that the Perfect Arrangement staff can transform personal objects into integral parts of an arrangement or special displays. Old lanterns, baskets, even distressed, re-purposed kitchen chairs can have new life breathed into them, creating truly custom pieces that reflect an individual’s sense of style. Whether you have your own items that you would like to have woven into a design, or you are looking for that perfect piece, that’s the beauty of Perfect Arrangement’s wonderful showroom filled with unique décor and special items. “People often bring in pictures, or fabric swatches so we can customize something just right for their needs,” Gwen says. Another wonderful advantage of The Perfect Arrangement is the corner of the showroom dedicated to sympathy and funerals. So many meaningful ideas and special ways to share your love during difficult times. The carved stones, wind chimes, lanterns are just a few of the many choices

you’ll find to express your sympathy in a beautiful and lasting way while the fresh floral arrangements created by this skilled staff always make a touching and appropriate tribute. The best way to place your order is to call directly to the Perfect Arrangement, so they can make it just the way you want it, or help you figure out what’s best. Call 724-627-3191. The Perfect Arrangement offers daily deliv-

ery to all of Greene County and beyond. And remember, it doesn’t have to be a holiday or special occasion to send flowers. You can bring a smile to someone’s face today. It just takes one call. The Perfect Arrangement does it all. 724-627-3191. Or better yet, treat yourself to a store visit, then you’ll be smiling, too. Summer Hours are Mon-Fri 9am -5pm and Saturday’s 9am – Noon.

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Bud Behm Remembers

f there were a contest to see who had the most memories of the Jacktown Fair, Bud Behm would certainly be the name that comes to mind for many people. At 89, Behm shared a sampling on a break from putting up hay. Although some of his memories he felt were better left to the sands of time, one of Behm’s favorite stories is of his mother as a young girl of 9 or 10 going to the fair. She was born in 1902, Behm said. “My grandfather took her to the fair and gave her 2 cents to buy an ice cream horn, ice cream in a little cone. They called them horns,” he said. “She told me she wanted to go back the next day to get a horn of ice cream but they didn’t go.” Although the price of that horn and admission to the fair itself might seem incredibly cheap today, at the time it was considered a large amount, especially for larger families. Imagine today taking even two kids to the fair and having to pay for rides and feeding them, not to mention the games they might want to play. It adds up quickly. Behm recalled one hard-working farming family that would ride to the fair in the wee hours with a lantern hanging from the front of their wagon to be seen by any automobiles on the roads. “The mom would pack them food for the day. They’d bring feed for the horses and water and make a day of it,” Behm said. “With five or six kids the admission price added up quickly.” Behm has a bevy of other stories and he has promised to record the ones he sees as fit for public consumption when he gets a moment. After hearing some of them, that recording will be a treasure for the people of Wind Ridge and archivists of the Today Bud continues to serve on the board of the Richhill Agricultural Society, and was named Outstanding Fair Am- Jacktown Fair. bassador by the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture in 2013.

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2015 Riverfest

Having A Ball Holding an animal balloon, Milo Snyder, 11 months, of Jefferson was all smiles at the Rices Landing Riverfest. Milo is the son of Kevin and Annie Snyder.

Fun Not Dampened By Rain

Riverfest patrons didn’t let a little rain stop them from enjoying themselves at the Chevron sponsored 2015 festival, held June 12-13 in Rices Landing.

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New Coordinator for The

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he GreeneSaver is happy to announce the addition of award-winning writer Tara Kinsell as its new coordinator. A native of Greene County, Tara is well-known throughout the area for her insightful stories about the people and places that make Greene County great. “It is definitely a change in pace coming off of several years where I was also tasked with covering hard news. That type of daily negativity works on you, if you have a heart,” Tara said. “I absorbed much of it. It was the feature writing that offset and kept that balance for me. I love that the GreeneSaver is all about the positive side of Greene County.” Tara grew up in Clarksville Borough and is a graduate of Waynesburg College. From there she went on to work for the National Geographic Society and multiple print publications, including a stint as a sports’ editor. “My time covering sports showed me the need for stories that highlight the accomplishments of individual athletes, both male and female, in all sports,” Tara said. “In this issue you will see a combined story that does just that.” Although her base will be out of her Carmichaels’ residence, Tara said she plans to be out and about seeing the many friends writing has brought into her life around the county.

Tara Kinsell “We are excited to see the ways in which Tara takes the GreeneSaver and puts her unique flare on it,” said Pam Blaker, co-owner of the GreeneSaver. “She brings a lot of experience to the table, loves and understands the history of Greene County and its residents. This was a win-win for the GreeneSaver and our readers.” Kinsell said she welcomes reader input. “I seize every chance I get to ask someone to keep me in mind when they learn of a possible feature story and that has paid off many times,” Tara said. “With the GreeneSaver I will already have a great pool of information it receives each month. I hope to not only see that continue, but expand as people realize I am on board.” To contact Tara, email tara@greenesaver.com.

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Clarksville Seeking Vendors For Celebration The fourth annual Clarksville Festival will kick off on Friday, Aug. 14 at 6 p.m. with DJ Mickey D, vendors and food on Center Street. It will continue on Saturday, Aug. 15 with allday activities, including crafts, music, free face painting, motorcycle games and live music. Local band, Bad Mother Truckers will perform from 8:30 until 12:30 p.m. Street magician Joey Nuzim will also entertain. A flea market will

be held in the community center. On Sunday, Aug. 16 the festivities will continue with free train rides for kids from noon to 3 p.m. and a car/motorcycle/truck show. Registration for the show will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. with a cost of $10 per entry. Awards will be given out at 4 p.m. For more show information, contact 724-377-0217. Vendor spaces are available by calling 724-377-0155.

Lifeguard Training Being Offered The Greene County Department of Recreation is offering a lifeguard training program for those interested in becoming a lifeguard at any of the county’s three swimming pools. Classes will be held from 8 a.m. to noon from July 20-24 at the Alpha Aquatic Center, located at 200 E. Roy Furman Highway in Waynesburg. Participants must be 16-years of age and able to pass courses for professional lifeguards,

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including; first-aid and CPR/AED training. Modest bathing suits are required, defined as a one-piece suit for women and trunks or Jammers for men. Goggles and towels must also be worn at all sessions. The deadline to pre-register is July 10. Six registrants are necessary to hold the class. For more information, contact the Department of Recreation at 724852-5323.

2015 Senior Games

eniors, ages 50 and over from Greene, Fayette and Washington counties competed June 17 at the 2015 Senior Games, held at the Central Greene School District’s Raider Field of Pride. Among the events that seniors participated in were horseshoes, onemile walk, putting, 50-yard dash, basketball toss, bocce, corn bag toss, stationary bike, football throw and putting. Pictured are the seniors from the Beth-Center Senior Center.

Collections For Veterans

The Greene County Department of Veterans Affairs is collecting donations of nonperishable food, clothing and shoes for men, women and children, coats, household items, and anything needed to keep a household running. Gift cards for local grocery stores are also welcome. All of these items will be distributed to veterans of Greene County October 10th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in building 10 at the

Greene County Fairgrounds. Veterans must present a copy of their DD214 or veterans administration identification. Donations will be accepted through Sept. 18 at the veterans affairs office, located at 22 W. High St., Suite 100 in Waynesburg. If pick-up is necessary, contact Dalene Watson, Director of Veterans Affairs of Greene County at 724-852-5275.

Lamb And Wool Queen Contest To Be Held The 2015 Greene County Lamb and Wool Contest is scheduled for the evening of Aug. 10 during the Greene County Fair in the livestock barn at the Greene County Fairgrounds. Entry forms are due by July 31. Candidates must be 16 to 21 years of age by Jan. 1, 2015, residents of Greene County, and wear a wool garment during the contest in the form of a dress, skirt or outfit. They must also own sheep, be from an active sheep producing farm, or have carried a 4H or FFA sheep project in 2014. The title-winning candidate will represent Greene County and the sheep and wool industry at various events throughout

the year. Events include, but are not limited to, the 2015 Greene County Fair, the Pennsylvania Lamb and Wool Queen Contest in October, and the Waynesburg Sheep and Fiber Festival in May 2016. Candidates will be evaluated by a panel of judges on their general knowledge of the industry, poise and speaking ability through a prepared speech and brief interview session. Participants are also required to create a display board and a six-foot table display that will be judged by the public. For more information, contact Shelley Harner at 804-516-0085 or via email at shelleyharner2012@gmail.com.

Greene County Day At Kennywood

Carmichaels American Legion Band helps kick off games.

The annual Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce’s Greene County Kennywood Park Day is schedule for July 2. Tickets are available at the chamber office, located at 143 E. High St., Waynesburg through 3 p.m. July 1. The price for a ride-all-day ticket is $28, a $14.99 savings off the regular gate admission. The dicounted tickets can also be used through June 30, weekdays in July, July 4-5, weekdays only in August through Aug. 25, and Sept. 5-7, 12, 13, 19-20. A $10 surcharge will be imposed at the gate if tick-

ets are used on any other dates than those listed. Bus transportation for the July 2 Greene County Kennywood Park Day is available for $14 per seat and must be purchased when buying admission tickets for a total of $42 per person. Bus seating is limited and available on a first-come basis. The bus will leave Greene County at 10 a.m. July 2 from the lot next the to arena barn at the Greene County Fairgrounds, rain or shine and is non-refundable. For more information, contact the chamber office at 724-627-5926.

Led by director Frank Ricco, the Carmichaels American Legion Post 400 Community Band added musical accompaniment to the opening ceremony of the 2015 Senior Games, held June 17 in Greene County.

There Is Such A Thing As A FREE LUNCH! Greene County kids ages one through 18 are invited to visit one of eight sites, including: Bowlby Library, WWJD, Mon View Park, Lions Club Park, Wana B Park, Flenniken Library, West Greene High School, and Rogersville United Methodist Church. These locations are working in conjunction with the Southwestern Pennsylvania Food

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Security Partnership to provide nutritionally balanced lunches to Greene County Youth. No paperwork is required to receive lunches or snacks where included. For a schedule of days and times lunches will be available, visit the Greene County food security partnership Facebook Page, facebook.com/GreeneCountySFSP.

Flag Day was observed with the raising of the flag, comments and special music at the Greene County Courthouse on June 14, 2015 at 8am, coordinated by the Greene County Sons of the American Revolutionary. The James L. Farrell Post 330 American Legion Honor Guard rendered the 21 gun salute to our Nation’s Colors. Photo by Michele Deems

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GreeneScene of the Past

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group of men and boys operate a threshing machine at the Jacktown Fair. Threshing loosens the grain from the surrounding chaff for harvesting. Mary Jane Kent of Wind Ridge recalled being a young girl on the farm during threshing time. “Not everybody owned a threshing machine,” she said. The farmers worked out a schedule when an available machine

could make the rounds each fall and the neighboring farmers would all come to help, according to Kent. “It was hard work. I remember setting up a long table in the side yard where the men would all come and eat after working all day. They’d have chaff all over them,” she said. “They’d be at our place for two days and then move on to the next.”

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Greene Libraries Have Something For Everyone

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ark your calendar, the Bowlby Library in Waynesburg and Flenniken Library in Carmichaels have programming available for all ages on various topics.

Upcoming at Eva K. Bowlby Public Library • The Bowlby Book Club has selected The Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline for its next selection. The club will meet at 6 p.m. July 13. New members are welcome and encouraged to attend. • Summer reading programs for teens and adults are ongoing. • The library is sponsoring a free American Red Cross CPR/First Aid training through the Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 25. Space is limited. • The library’s annual trip to the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium will take place August 15. The cost per ticket is $12. Children under the age of 2 years are free. Bus transportation from the library is included. The bus will depart at 8:15 a.m. and return at 4:30 p.m. All participants are required to bring a bagged lunch or purchase lunch at the zoo. • The library will be operating on its summer schedule until Labor Day from Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. • The Bowlby Public Library will be closed on July 4. For more information about programming at Bowlby Public Library, located at 311 North West St., Waynesburg, contact 724-627-9776. Upcoming at Flenniken Memorial Public Library • Summer reading programs at Flenniken are in full swing with lunches being provided to participants. • An SAT preparation class will be held at 1 p.m. on Fridays through July 24. • Field trips to the Little Lake Theater and the Heinz History Center are also on the calendar in Carmichaels, as well as a pool party on July 24 at Wana B Park. • Teens interested in gaming will have an opportunity to attend a gaming program beginning on June 26 and being held at 3 p.m. each subsequent Friday. • The Doc Dixon Magic Show will be at the museum on July 8 at 6 p.m. Admission is free. • A new round of Gale Courses, the online, free educational program delivering hundreds of instructor led courses for continuing education we start its next round on July 15. For more information about programming at Flenniken Public Library, located at 102 E. George St., Carmichaels, contact, 724-966-5263.

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CAMPS AROUND GREENE instruction, contact the Greene County Department of Recreation at 724-8525323. Free Vocational Camps being offered for Greene County youth Southwest Training Services, Inc. is sponsoring two week-long camps where students will have a hands-on opportunity to learn about the welding and building construction trades. Welding camp is being offered from June 22 to July 1, followed by Building and Construction Camp from July 6 to July 10 at the Greene County Career and Technology Center, located on the campus of the Central Greene School District in Waynesburg. For more information, contact Jillian Chappel at 724-852-2900, ext. 248, or Ester Barnes at 724-229-1350, ext. 241. Scouts have Opportunities for Advancement at University Camps Waynesburg University is offerGreene County Day Campers experience the UP STREAM lesson on Rockets during week 1 of Six Seek Day Camp ing two camps for Boy Scouts this summer, Life to Eagle Camp and STEM (sciP STREAM Comes to Greene County Day the campers and to emphasize physical activity. We ence, technology, engineering, and mathematics) for Camp also wanted to provide our counselors with better Scouts Camp. Specialized merit badges can be earned Thanks to a generous donation from the Greene opportunities in leadership and teaching,” stated recby campers in both camping experiences. Instructing County Memorial Hospital Foundation, Greene reation director Jake Baker. “Once the idea for UP the camps will be Waynesburg University professors County children ages 5 to 15 years old are enjoying STREAM was developed, we approached the Greene who are experienced in their badge topic and regfree programming this summer during the county’s County Memorial Hospital Foundation for funding. istered with the Laurel Highlands Council as Merit Day Camp six week program. The camp began June They have truly stepped up to the plate for the kids of Badge Counselors. 15 and will run from 10 am to 3 pm, Mon-Fri, until Greene County to sponsor this program.”

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July 24. The hospital foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides outreach programs that emphasize healthcare, is the sole sponsor, donating $40,000, for the county’s exciting new program called “UP STREAM”. This program’s title stands for yoU being Physical in Science, Technology, Recreation, Engineering, Art and Math. There are ten different lesson plans including topics like rocket history, human skeletal system, honeybee society and behavior of light travel and more. Each lesson plan consists of an interactive discussion and hands-on activity that engages campers to use their creativity to construct various arts and crafts. Campers also test various experiments that allow them to see science in a fun light. These lessons allow them to improve their strategizing and problem solving skills. After the lessons and activities, the camp participates in a game or sport related to the lesson for the promotion of physical activity. “At the end of last year, we knew we wanted to take the day camp program into a different direction. We wanted the program to be educational for

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During the last week, the 5-8 year olds will be bussed to the Waynesburg Fairgrounds to enjoy a Lego Day and Water Park field trip. The 9-15 year olds will be bussed to Nemacolin Woodlands Adventure Center which features foot ropes courses, climbing walls, and miniature golf. Although the day camp program has already begun, enrollment may still be available, for more info call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323. Get your Game on at Instructional Tennis Camp July 8 is the deadline to register for summer tennis camp with U.S.T.A. certified instructors Ron Headlee, Jessica Bazzoli, and John Buchanan at the Greene County Tennis Courts, 900 Rolling Meadows Road, Waynesburg. The camp will run from July 1317 at a cost of $50 per participant. This fee includes 5 days of instruction and a camp T-shirt. Two sessions will be offered daily. The first for campers from 7-10 years of age will take place from 8:30 am to 9:45 am. Session two, for campers 11 and up will be held from 10 am to 11:30 am. Private tennis lessons for all ages will be offered throughout the summer with Headlee. For more information about tennis camp or private

Class size will be small and individualized with registration limited to the first 36 scouts to sign up. Roommate preferences can be made at the time of registration. The cost of this camp is $200 and includes merit badge instruction, meals and lodging. The Life to Eagle Camp will be held from July 20 through July 24 for scouts entering sixth grade through current high school seniors. Scouts will have an opportunity to earn up to five science, technology, engineering and math-related merit badges. Scouts may choose the topic of the five badges from 15 different badges being offered by Waynesburg University, including: astronomy, aviation, bird study, chemistry, digital technology, environmental science, electronics, engineering, geocaching, photography, and oceanography, among others. Badge choices may be designated when registering. The total cost of the camp is $350, including lodging in air-conditioned dormitories, three meals a day in the campus dining hall, the five merit badges, a t-shirt, a patch and all activities. Activities include evening campfires, and handson STEM activities. Scouts will also work on Boy Scouts of America NOVA science awards at the camp which incorporates learning with fun activities while being exposed to STEM-related fields. For more information, visit http://info.waynesburg.edu/STEMcamp or contact scouting@waynesburg.edu.

GreeneScene by Dennis Snyder

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GreeneScene by Patricia Johnson

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Several Artists Rock Chalk Downtown 1ST PLACE

PEOPLE’S CHOICE

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Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful

Summer Open House

2ND PLACE

3RD PLACE

rainy evening didn’t deter the nine artists who participated in this years’ Rock the Chalk competition, one of the activities at the Waynesburg Downtown Summer Open House. The winners for 2015 are: Peoples’ Choice, Carmichaels High School art instructor, Marlynn White;1st place, Calyssa Lavery of Carmichaels; 2nd place, Heidi Marx of Waynesburg; and 3rd place, Bonnie Hagyari of Fredericktown. Pictured from left, White’s Frankenstein, Lavery’s skull portrait, Marx’s young girl and Hagyari’s mushrooms and fairies.

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SPORTS SHORTS W hen it comes to sports in Greene County, the crosstown rivalries can be fierce. As they say in Carmichaels, “Once a Mike, Always a Mike,” but school loyalties always seem to be set aside when the regular season has ended and one Greene team or player is still standing. Such was the case of the 2015 Jefferson-Morgan Rocket softball team that not only had the support of its local competitors but that of opponents it faced in the state playoffs. For those who are unaware, the Rockets suffered a loss greater than losing any playoff game when assistant coach, Chris Dugan, 45, lost a battle with cancer on May 15, 2015. It was in the midst of the playoffs. Chris was more than just an assistant coach. He was the father of player, Camryn Dugan. He had coached seven of the nine starters on the team since they began playing softball as six and seven year olds. Chris was embedded in every fiber of the team. As long as he was able, Chris was at the games, even being brought there by ambulance to watch. The rallying cry became #TeamDugan. Head coach Tony Barbetta said this team was the one that both he and Dugan knew had what it took to go the distance. All

Photo by Kim Coles

Kalsey Reaching New Heights ot many athletes can say they are a 6-time AllAmerican in their sport but Westminster University pole vaulter Marissa Kalsey, a 2012 Waynesburg Central High School graduate, can say it. Marissa racked up the titles by winning at both the indoor and outdoor Division III, NCAA events for her freshman, sophomore and junior years in college. Not only is she a multi-time All-American, Marissa holds the distinction of being the 8th overall highest vaulter in Division III history with a 13 ft. 3.5” vault.

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It would be easy to feel the pressure to win two more All-American titles for her senior year but dad, Rick Kalsey, said he has reminded Marissa that anyone can have an off day. “I’ve told her to set her sights on getting the best jump ever (for her) in Division III and not focus on becoming an 8-time All-American right now,” he said. Rick said his daughter’s focus and work ethic amaze him. He gives a lot of credit for her skill level to his own former high school track coach, Howard Brunell. When Marissa was figuring out what sport she wanted to focus on in high school Rick sent her to talk to Brunell. “She’d tried everything from softball to soccer to cheerleading,” Rick said. “The morning before track practice started I told her she needed to get with Coach Brunell. That was in March and in May she’s at states her freshman year in high school. Coach Brunell was a big part--still is.” She finished her high school career tied for the AA WPIAL vault record with another superb Waynesburg athlete, Jocelyn Lindsay. Rick said Marissa competes against Division I athletes and could have went elsewhere but the small town feel of Westminter suited her. After graduation she will be pursuing a career as an elementary education teacher but a run for the Olympic team is not out of the question. “Who knows? You never know. That’s her goal,” Rick said.

of the components were there and Barbetta, 3 years retired from teaching at Jefferson-Morgan, had the additional time to invest. “They wanted to win. Our girls just never quit. With everything going on, the week before the playoffs we lose my good buddy Chris and Camryn didn’t miss any games, she is such a leader,” Barbetta said. Team shortstop Morgan Simkovic said things became “a little bit more personal as we kept winning.” They began to see the faces of opponents from the local teams showing up in support of them when they reached the WPIAL finals. “A lot of us were talking. We didn’t want to let anybody down. We owed it to our coach and the fans,” Simkovic said. They began to face teams they’d never even heard of who would greet them before the game to express their sympathy to Camryn and the team for its loss. “It was very classy and heartfelt.” When the run ended with a loss in overtime in the state quarterfinals there was nothing to “hang their heads about,” Barbetta told his team. “He said it was a ‘great season, the best he’s ever seen and probably will see,’” Simkovic said.

Gavin Teasdale, in black, works to pin a competitor.

Teasdale Sets Lofty Goals hen one begins to look at the wrestling career of JeffersonMorgan’s Gavin Teasdale, it is hard to believe he is only going to be a sophomore in high school this fall. In August, Teasdale will be wrestling in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Hercegovina. This is not his first trip abroad to wrestle and it certainly won’t be his last. Currently the unbeaten state champion at 110 pounds, Teasdale is ranked second in the country by Intermat. When talking to Teasdale about flying around the world to wrestle it is like discussing a match cross-county, he is unphased. “I know how the competition is over there,” he said, noting he has wrestled in Slovakia and mentioning the Pan Am Games in Hvana, Cuba with Team USA’s junior wrestling team. At 16, Teasdale

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speaks with the maturity of someone much older. He knows his weaknesses and his strengths. “I lost to Iran in the World Cup with five seconds left. I wasn’t good at finishing. I’ve been working on my finishing, going to a lot of different camps,” he said. “My goal for this year is to become a world champion.” Before that, Teasdale has his sight set on getting better through the summer. “I’ve been lifting a lot and first I need to focus on the upcoming high school season,” he said, taking things one step at a time. “Ultimately, my goal is to try out for the 2020 Olympic team.” If Teasdale continues on his current trajectory as a wrestler and honor student there is little doubt he will make that goal and join the likes of former Greene County wrestler’s Coleman Scott and Cary Kolat as Olympians.

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June July GreeneSaver 2015  

Here it is again! Our annual Fair Issue of the GreeneSaver! Check out what's going on during the Greene County and Jacktown Fairs. Full sche...

June July GreeneSaver 2015  

Here it is again! Our annual Fair Issue of the GreeneSaver! Check out what's going on during the Greene County and Jacktown Fairs. Full sche...

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