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The General Hazzard Big Truck for BIG RIDES Monday –Saturday Aug 7-12th 5-10pm nightly At the Greene County Fair! JULY / AUGUST

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irect Results joined local dignitaries and fans in front of the courthouse in downtown Waynesburg this month to celebrate the outstanding accomplishments of several Greene County Athletes including Three Times State Champion Wrestler Gavin Teasdale, Two-Time State gold medalist Ben Bumgarner, and NCAA Division 3 National champ in pole vault Marissa Kalsey & the West Greene Girls PIAA State Champion Softball Team.  We presented each athlete with one of our custom canvas pennants – a souvenir of the great season featuring a picture of the team or individual and name and number of each athlete.    

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We’re proud to support and outfit so many great Greene County Athletes, and we LOVE all the “Good News’ you give us for the GreeneScene Community Magazine! The WG Girls Team and coaches even came on to Direct Results offices, art studios and manufacturing facilities after the community parade and celebration… here they are showing off their custom canvas pennants! We LOVE our Pioneers!  And all the outstanding athletes we’re proud to support in Greene County! Photos compliments of Greene County Tourism Promotion Agency.

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Rain Day Celebration Starts Friday night! This year, the Special Events Commission has put together a kick-off celebration the evening before Waynesburg’s famous Rain Day festival on July 29. Live music, games and fun on Friday with such hilarious new activities as the 1st annual diaper derby and “life size” games for all ages of Connect Four, Jenga, checkers, Bowling and Tic-tac-toe. The Wonders of Unicycle Club will be performing on the streets and many of the community’s mascots will join Wayne Drop wandering the sidewalks. Many merchants Sponsored by: will extend their hours and offer special dewy deals as we all prepare for Rain Day. July 28, Friday Night Kick-off Celebration 5pm – 8pm 5:00pm........... Brother Short Band live on stage 5:30pm........... Registration for Diaper Derby 6:00pm........... Diaper Derby Race (crawlers only) 6:30pm .......... The Land Lines live on stage All Evening: The Wonders of Unicycle Club Demos The Next Day…. The Annual Rain Day Celebration is on a Saturday this year, with official operation hours of 11am – 10pm, though many start their preparations long before that. Actually, after the entertainment ends on Friday night, Local Boy Scout Troop 1280 will camp out on the courthouse lawn to spend the night and begin a midnight vigil of when the first drop of rain falls, should that happen before the day’s activities get really buzzing, shortly after dawn. The Special Events Commission continues the tradition every year on July 29th with a street fair in the heart of town, live entertainment on the courthouse steps, arts and crafts booths, food booths, children’s games and assorted other diversions. Vendors will be pulling in and setting up as soon as the sunrises. As always, the street is closed to through traffic and we take over downtown for Rain Day! There is no admission, tons of food, plenty of games and contests. Greene County’s recently formed Civil Air Patrol will be operating the dunking booth, and don’t forget to decorate your umbrella! An additional treat this year is a professional fireworks display sponsored by EQT and presented by Starfire Corporation. The Fireworks are scheduled to begin at 9:45pm. A special viewing area will be set-up in the Borough #3 Parking lot near PNC Bank – bring your lawn chairs! Saturday July 29, Rain Day Celebration commences from 11am - 10pm 7 - 10 am

Buckwheat Pancake Breakfast at St. Ann Church

Main Stage 10:45 am......... West Greene Lady Pioneers - WPIAL & PIAA State Champs 11:00 am......... Umbrella Contest 11:30 am......... Bon Journey 12:30 pm........ Bon Journey 1:00 pm.......... Barbara Moschetta Dance School 1:30 pm.......... Lexie Van Dyne, Cassidy Chambers, Courtney Ross 2:00 pm.......... Lexie Van Dyne, Cassidy Chambers, Courtney Ross 2:30 pm.......... Cole Leathers & Will Behm 3:00 pm.......... Cole Leathers & Will Behm 3:30 pm.......... Elevate (Stomp Act) (Games & Giveaways) 4:00 pm.......... 8th Street Rox 4:30 pm.......... 8th Street Rox 5:00 pm.......... American Judo Hapkido 5:30 pm.......... Liquid Cure 6:30 pm.......... Rain Day Contestants 7:00 pm.......... Company K Salute - Moment of Silence Award Presentations (Window Decorating Contest, Best Decorated Baby Rain Day Can, Baby Rain Day Winners & Jack McCracken Award) 7:30-9:30 ........ The Hillbilly Way 9:45 pm.......... EQT FIREWORKS Presented By Starfire Corporation (Reserved viewing area in Waynesburg Borough Lot 3 near PNC Bank) Courthouse Lawn Area 12 - 7 pm ........ Children’s Carnival Games presented by First Assembly 11:00 am......... Meet Author Joseph Moore “Maxwell the Raindrop books”

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1 - 4 pm ......... JMS Balloon Art 1 - 6 pm ......... Barnyard Petting Zoo 2 - 6 pm ......... Face Painting--Tom Savini’s Special Effect School Second Stage area (Waynesburg University lawn area by First National Bank) 11:30 am......... Bowlby Library Story Time 12:00 pm........ Author Joseph Moore “Maxwell the Raindrop Books” 1:30 pm.......... Bowlby Library Story Time 2:30 pm.......... Author Joseph Moore “Maxwell the Raindrop Books” Music: 3:00 pm .......... Zack Yenchik, Jeromy Mackey & Brady Hogue 4:00 pm.......... Rick Gibson 4:30 pm.......... Elizabeth Galligan 5:00 pm.......... Compost in Training 6:00 pm.......... Cole Leathers & Will Behm

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I Love this P l ace

t’s the rocks along the road to the forgotten town of Deep Valley in Springhill Township that give a hint just how deep the waters and geology run around here. “This is the closest you have to mountains in Greene County,” lifelong resident Keith Johnson of

Nebo Ridge Road tells you, and you believe him. Huge boulders embedded in feet-thick layers of sediment 100 million years in the making were once higher than the Himalayas. This hilly corner of the county was not easily farmed, but harvesting lumber, gas and coal brought in generations of outside workers, and their descendants still remember the stories of those good old days. Routes 18 and 21 meander west from Waynesburg until 18 forks off beyond Rogersville and heads south. From there you still have twelve miles to go before the “Deep Valley – 2 miles” sign takes you through New Freeport into the steep, shady twists and turns that will eventually lead you to town. Go a little further and you’ll cross the Ellicott Line and find yourself in another forgotten town – Georgetown, in the northern panhandle of West Virginia. The Pennsylvania fork of Fish Creek, flowing West into the Ohio River, is on your left as you approach the state line and those great slabs of rock that loom over the road on every bend show you what you’ll find if you four-wheel it to the big swimming hole below Alum Cave. That’s where

DEEP VALLEY, PA

a Crow brother died in a shoot out with indigenous hunters in the 1700s and that’s where folks used to square dance in the 1930s with only a cable bridge to get them there. After more than 200 years of boom, bust and hard farming, Deep Valley remains a wild and wonderful place as many transplants from the city have found when they buy an old farm or cabin and move in. Settlers were late coming because land speculators had bought up most of this area before and after the Revolutionary War and “who wanted to buy land when you could go ten miles in any direction and settle for free?” Keith pointed out. A lifetime’s worth of newspaper clippings, photos and reference books were lost when his home burned in 1985, but his memories are still vivid. The tale about the Crow brothers coming to Alum Cave while hunting elk is one Keith, age 78, remembers hearing as a kid. One brother “threw a dead duck in the cave to startle his brothers – at that moment he was shot by

Deep Valley’s last two commercial buildings still standing are the funeral parlor on the right, that used to have a pool table in the front room and Deep Valley Market, which is now a private residence. Both buildings sit at the intersection of Nebo Ridge and Deep Valley roads.

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by Colleen Nelson

Indians. He ran and escaped - the brothers in the cave and another guy fought it out. They built a wall to hide behind but one brother got killed. They buried him by a big sycamore tree in the bottom and carved his name on it.” The wall and the sycamore were still there in the mid 1930s when a massive ceiling rock fell into the cave. “They danced on Saturday night and it fell the next day. I had the newspaper clipping and the headline said ‘Tragedy Narrowly Averted.’” Keith’s love of history is enriched by the research he’s done on the internet to tell the story of this place he calls home. The first wave of good paying jobs came in the 1850s when the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad began its push west to Wheeling. Workers were needed to cut tunnels through those old mountains and white oak was needed for railroad ties. Irish miners were recruited to dig the Board Tree Hill tunnel that connected Littleton to Wheeling and the hills around Deep Valley had the trees. Fish Creek was dammed beyond Alum Cave, on a bend where the space between hills was only 200 feet, Keith said. It was the Cheat Lake reservoir of its time. The hollows filled with water all the way to Deep Valley and logs were turned into railroad ties at the water powered Deep Valley sawmill. Today the dam is breached and the tunnel is walled up at both ends but the cemetery for the Irish workers on the Littleton, WV side of McGuffey Ridge Road tells just how dangerous it was to use black power to blast a hole through those hills. Keep driving on McGuffey Ridge Road and when the name changes to Young Road you’ve crossed the Ellicott line again and are back in Pennsylvania. When the resurveying of the line was done by Cephas H. Sinclair in 1883, Greene County’s first gas and oil boom was already in full swing and more workers were coming in to lay pipelines and drill wells. After that boom and into the 1960s, Deep Valley kept its own backwoods pace with the times but jobs were fewer now. By the 1920s there was a doctor on call and a funeral parlor with a pool table in the front room. At one time there were two gas stations and three stores to choose from. Those businesses are gone now but some of the old buildings remain. Rizor’s Deep Valley Market at the intersection of Deep Valley and Nebo Ridge Road is being remodeled as a private residence (see related story on page 10). The stately funeral parlor with its fancy trim and upstairs porch sits vacant and the stone wall beside it is all that’s left of McGuffey’s store. Vacant lots up and down the road open onto grassy meadows that once sported barns, houses and an industrial strength sawmill. Vietnam veteran Danny Debolt pointed across the road from his trim white house with its tall American flag. “See where those crows are – the post office used to be there. When the coal company came in, they tore a lot of buildings down. We used to have a sign at both ends of town. Now there’s just the one.” Debolt is one of the surnames to be found in Deep Valley that go back to those first settlers of the 1700s. Danny’s great grandfather served in the Civil GreeneScene Magazine •

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The big swimming hole below Allum Cave on Fish Creek. It takes a four-wheeler to cross the creek to get there, now that the cable bridge is gone.

Dave Debolt, Brenda Jones and Winston in front of the huge rocks of Allum Cave, just above the Fish Creek swimming hole. The cave was so large that people used to come here to square dance under its ledge until the upper rock fell in the 1930s, luckily hours after the dancers had left for the evening.

War and later, his father took the family to Ohio when he went where the jobs were, working as a pipe liner. “I went to school in New Freeport up until fifth grade and we came back when I was 15. I graduated from West Greene in 1967,” Danny said. Over the years others have come to Deep Valley from suburbia to settle in and enjoy the beauty and quietude of being surrounded by hills but close enough to civilization to drive to work or run a business from their own back yard. Further up the road another Debolt – Danny’s cousin Dave, was busy with his tractor and all-terrain vehicle in Harry Rhodes driveway, helping his neighbor and sometimes boss move a length of pipe. Harry retired from Rhodes and Hammers Printing in Waynesburg and is now busy with wife Pam making beautiful boxes, trunks and tables from hardwood cut from his farm, or from old church pews or recycled barn siding. “Dave helps me cut timber up there.” Harry pointed to the forest on the steep hillside behind his farmhouse and workshop. So what do you love about living here? “This is a great place to live. Peaceful. Quiet. You’re in the country here,” Dave said, rubbing his chin and smiling. “You got neighbors, some good, some bad but you have that anywhere. Hey if you have time, I’ll show you the swimming hole where everybody used to swim. Some of us still do. It’s right below Alum Cave. If you think the rocks along the road are big, wait till you see Alum Cave. It’s just up the road a ways. Come on, jump in.” I admit I used the seatbelt when we forded Fish Creek and my little dog Winston rode in back, safe in the arms of Dave’s helper Brenda Jones. Yeah, Fish Creek is big and rocky, those hills sure are steep and the sycamore trees are huge, but nothing beats the rocks of Alum Cave!

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The Irish miners who died building the Board Tree Tunnel for the B &O Railroad in the 1860s are buried in this cemetery on McGuffey Ridge Road that turns into Young Road when it crosses the Ellicott line back into Pennsylvania.

Vietnam veteran Dan Debolt in front of his house in Deep Valley. Only a few residents remain in what was once a lively country town with three stores and two gas stations.

While Dave Debolt watches, Brenda Jones gets inside one of the sycamore trees along Fish Creek to show just how big this old tree is. A Crow brother who lost his life to an Indian attack in Alum Cave in the 1700s is said to have been buried nearby, beside a big sycamore tree.

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HELPING HANDS FROM DC TO PA

s an intern on the staff of the 1st Baptist Church of Herndon, Virginia, K Scarry recently had an inspiring idea for youth development and community engagement, her area of responsibility with the church. Her first name is K – just the letter – and K is a native of this vibrant, fast-paced suburb of Washington D.C., where she grew up; yet in her paternal line are some roots that have a home in western Pennsylvania. K Scarry continued a family tradition when she chose Waynesburg University for her college education, and for those of you who are thinking that name seems familiar, K’s grandfather was Mo Scarry, for whom the sky box at Waynesburg University’s football stadium is named. Mo was a player and later coach for the Yellow Jackets in the early 60s before moving on to coach for the Miami Dolphins. Sadly Mo passed away in 2012, just a year before his granddaughter graduated from WU with a bachelor’s degree in psychology and minor in biblical ministry studies. She has put her education to work, which brings us back to the real story here – that inspiring idea of K Scarry’s that brought her - and a bunch of urban kids with her - back to Greene County, Pa.

We came to help the people who help people… “Growing up and living in the Washington D.C. suburbs is completely different from what people in rural southwestern Pa experience…the pace, the culture, the environment, the industry, everything…except basic human emotions and needs, - those are the same,” explains K, “Poverty, hunger, homelessness, loneliness – these things exist pretty much everywhere, even when it’s not easy to recognize.” “These kids in the youth group from our church come from a

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By Shelly Brown

varied background, from a variety of cultures and circumstances and places. Some of them have traveled from far, some have been there all their lives, but they have a commonality in their willingness to serve, and I wanted them to have a hands-on experience that would produce empathy and a deep calling to help all people. Because of the formative service learning I received at Waynesburg University, the inspiration of professors like Dave Calvario, and the welcoming I knew we would receive from the community, I believe this trip to Greene County will help achieve that goal in this youth group,” K said. The plan was to spend a week in Waynesburg working with local groups and service organizations. “Chuck Baily was a local contact who helped in coordinating our projects. We worked with Ashley Beaman of the Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach & WWJD, Keith and Joe of Habitat for Humanity and others,” K said. Waynesburg University Graduate K Scarry and her youth group from the 1st Baptist “We came to help the people who help people here,” Church in Herndon, Virginia helping on the renovation of a house for Greene County said 8th grader Annabella Takacs, one of the youths pullHabitat for Humanity. ing weeds at the Greene County Corner Cupboard Food Bank’s new community garden on the group’s first day in down in a totally “foreign” environment, we have to ask questions town. They moved on to assist with a summer camp for elementary school kids, cleaning and working on a house renovation and seek to understand the needs of people and how best to address for Habitat for Humanity, a visit to the Pennsylvania Livestock Auc- them…and be motivated to take action – that is something I am strivtion to learn about agricultural practices, visit with residents at Rolling ing to teach with this experience, something they can take home with Meadows to learn about challenges facing the elderly and their care- them,” K emphasized. In the meantime, the local recipients of all these givers…each day brought a new task. At the end of the day, K and the helping hands got a little further ahead in their work and inspired as kids would hold a “de-briefing” to review their work and the feelings well by the youthful enthusiasm the team exuded. It’s a win all around. The youth group from the 1st Baptist Church in Herndon Virginit produced, the new goals it may have inspired and the deeper calling ia capped off their visit to Pennsylvania with a fun trip to Kennywood they may be hearing. “When we’re at home, we’re comfortable, and don’t always find on their last day, before heading home to put their practical learning ourselves engaging critically, but when we are in a different place, set experience to use there with, perhaps, a deeper calling.

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2017 Hat Bet with Huggins

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The Many Faces of Huggs

aynesburg Mayor Duncan Berryman has made his famous wager this year with one of the winningest college basketball coaches in America and our neighbor to the south, Mountaineer Basketball Head Coach Bob Huggins. A much loved figure and even nicknamed “Huggs,” this proven program builder and game strategist has led his own alma mater (He is a 1977 graduate of WVU) to 229 victories, the 2010 NCAA Final Four, the 2010 Big East Championship and nine postseason appearances, including eight NCAA Tournaments (four NCAA Sweet 16s), during his 10 seasons in Morgantown. Prior to becoming head coach at WVU in 2007, Huggins coached at Kansas State, University of Cincinnati, University of Akron and Walsh College. Last season, Huggins became the 10th coach in NCAA Division I history to win 800 games when the Mountaineers defeated UMKC on Dec. 17. During his career, he has been to 23 total NCAA tournaments, including 22 in the last 25 seasons. He has led his teams to eight Sweet Sixteen appearances, four Elite Eight appearances, and two Final Four appearances (1992 with Cincinnati; 2010 with West Virginia). As of March 2017, Huggins has averaged 23 wins per season over the course of his career, with a record that currently stands at 819-330. However successful he is on the court, however, we fear he’ll experience a significant loss on July 29th when he has to fork over his hat to Mayor Berryman, because of course, it WILL RAIN - in Waynesburg PA at least - on that day…right?

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G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

ne of the few images to be found of life as it once was in Deep Valley, Springhill Township, is this photo taken inside the Deep Valley Market. Four-year-old Lori Rizor is sitting on the counter wearing pajamas and a pair of boots and that’s her mother Marcella minding the store that grandparents Harold and Wilma Rizor operated in the early years of the 1960s. There’s no photo to be found that shows

what the store looked like on the outside, but it did have gas pumps by the road and a Gulf sign hanging somewhere nearby. The building still stands beside Fish Creek where Nebo Ridge Road joins with Deep Valley Road. It’s not large but back in the day it was big enough to hold whatever it was you didn’t feel like driving to town to get! These family photos tell the story of a town that has all but disappeared. But when Lori was a

kid, impatiently waiting to be old enough to ride the bus two miles up the road to New Freeport Elementary School, there was plenty still going on around the store that the Rizor family bought from John and Olive Smith. The Deep Valley post office was once in this old store but by the time Lori’s family took over, it had moved up the road and by 1977 everyone went to New Freeport to pick up their mail.

by Colleen Nelson

“We didn’t live right in Deep Valley. We lived in Ned on Nebo Ridge and I was rather young when our family had the store,” Lori recalls in an email that came with the photos. “It had an upstairs and I remember finding great hiding spots up there. During the holidays Santa would be sitting at the top of the stairs and I remember waiting impatiently for my older siblings to be dropped off by the school bus at the store. My grandmother Wilma’s stepmother Pearl Miller lived across the street and I spent time at her house, especially around the holidays eating her sugar cookies - the best I’ve ever had to this day. She put a hint of orange in them. I remember gathering Buckeyes that fell from a tree across the road from the store. They were a treat from Ohio in a young child’s mind.” Also pictured, another, older family photo from the early1950s shows the covered bridge that spanned Fish Creek right beside the store. “That’s my grandmother Wilma straightening up my father Robert’s shirt and pants. My father’s timber business was initially called DVM after Deep Valley Market,” Lori noted.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenescene.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneScene Community Magazine can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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COLORING CONTEST WINNERS 6 & under WINNER Wyatt Sherman - was the winner of our 6 and under division. No picture available, but here is his masterpiece.

7-12 WINNER Haley Sanner - was excited to say the least as she came to collect her certificate for Fair tickets. She is looking forward to going to the fair with her mom and 2 siblings. When asked she said her favorite part of the fair is deep fried oreo’s – the rest of the family is looking forward to funnel cakes.

13 & up WINNER Rhonda King was our adult winner - She plans to give her tickets to some people that wouldn’t be able to attend the fair without a little help. She actually colors a good bit with her grand children- as you can tell practice definitely helps.

PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER It was MILITARY DOG TAGS! The 2nd round on our Memorial Day picture puzzle contest did the trick, as we received a large number of correct entries this time. Winner of the random drawing for $25 was Erma Anderson of Waynesburg.

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MONEY Magazine Says It’s the BEST

Powerful Scholarships Awarded

Waynesburg University has been named to MONEY Magazine’s 2017-2018 “Best Colleges For Your Money” list, ranking in the top 7 percent of all colleges and universities considered nationwide. Out of the 2,400 colleges considered, 711 met the minimum requirements to be included in the ranking, which examined three primary factors: quality of education, affordability and outcomes. Waynesburg ranked No. 170. “Ninety-eight percent of our 2015 graduates are working or studying in their chosen field within a year of graduation, and 70 percent of them choose to remain in the region, creating a consistent and positive impact on region’s economy,” said Stacey Brodak, vice president for institutional advancement and university relations at Waynesburg University. In compiling this ranking, MONEY utilized research and advice from dozens of the nation’s top experts on education quality, financing and value, according to their website, “to develop a new, uniquely practical analysis of more than 700 of the nation’s best-performing colleges.” Twenty-seven data points were examined, including quality of education, graduates’ earnings, estimated market

value of alumni’s average job skills, affordability and outcomes. “This ranking recognizes the amazing commitment of our faculty, staff and university community to the mission of this university,” said Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee. “Through their consistent devotion, we are achieving these types of results in a time filled with challenges in higher education.” As stated on MONEY’s website, “MONEY’s Best Colleges for Your Money rankings are the first to combine the most accurate pricing estimates available with all reliable indicators of alumni financial success, along with a unique analysis of how much ‘value’ a college adds when compared to other schools that take in similar students.”

First National Bank Contributes $3,000 Pictured L-R, 1st row: Sarah Bish; Samantha Lambeth. 2nd row: Rev. James Tinnemeyer, Vice President for Student Services, Dean of Students and University Chaplain; Anthony Pecjak; Abigail McIntire; Joseph Headlee. 3rd row: Commissioner Archie Trader; Hunter Davis; Christopher Feather; Commissioner Blair Zimmerman. 4th row: Aaron Sielski; Emily Tedrow; Commissioner Dave Coder. (Not pictured: Keiriel Neel)

Ten Greene County high school graduates have been selected as the recipients of the 2017 County of Greene/West Penn Power Scholarship. The scholarship is awarded annually to eligible graduating seniors who plan to attend Waynesburg University and represents a $1,000 award to be used toward each student’s first year of enrollment. All ten students will begin courses at Waynesburg University this fall. The scholarship recipients are: Sarah Bish, Waynesburg Central, daughter of Mary and Matthew Bish, has not declared a major at this time; Hunter Davis, Carmichaels, son of Leah McKenzie and Glenn Davis, will study nursing; Christopher Feather, Carmichaels, son of Amy and Scott Feather, will study nursing; Joseph Headlee, Jefferson-Morgan, son of Nicole and Joseph Headlee, will study accounting; Samantha Lambeth, West Greene, daughter of Jane and Kurt Lambeth, will study early childhood education with certification in special education; Abigail McIntire, Mapletown, daughter of Nancy and Doug McIntire, will study nursing; Keiriel Neel, Carmichaels, daughter of Amy and Ryan Neel, will study nursing; Anthony Pecjak, Mapletown, son of Lisa and Michael Pecjak, will study athletic training; Aaron Sielski, Waynesburg, son of Mary and Paul Sielski, will study mathematics education; Emily Tedrow, West Greene, daughter of Shirley and Sonny McDiffitt, will study nursing. “On behalf of the Greene County Commissioners, we are proud to support this scholarship opportunity for the youth of Greene County,” said Commissioner Blair Zimmerman, chair of the Board of Commissioners. “Congratulations to the scholarship recipients on their dedication throughout their academic careers and we wish them well

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in their studies at Waynesburg University.” The ten recipients met the scholarship’s criteria, which included a cumulative high school GPA of at least 3.0 and acceptance to Waynesburg University entering as a new, non-transfer student for the Fall 2017 semester. Applicants also had to submit a list of honors and activities and responses to two essay questions. Scholarship applications were sent earlier this year to high schools in the county’s five school districts – Carmichaels Area, Central Greene, Jefferson-Morgan, Southeastern Greene and West Greene. Funding for the scholarship was made available through Allegheny Energy, Inc., as part of an agreement reached with Greene County in 2008 related to the Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line (TrAIL) project. In the agreement, Allegheny Energy subsidiary Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line Company (TrAILCo) agreed to contribute $750,000 to the county for educational, environmental, public health and community infrastructure projects. In June 2009, the Greene County Commissioners and officials from Allegheny Energy, Inc. – which subsequently merged with FirstEnergy Corp. – presented Waynesburg University with $100,000 to start the scholarship, and a second $100,000 gift was presented in 2010. In 2011, the commissioners and officials from FirstEnergy made a final donation of $50,000 to the scholarship fund, bringing the total to $250,000 and ensuring the scholarship’s permanent endowment at Waynesburg University. Formerly known as the County of Greene/Allegheny Energy Scholarship, the merger necessitated a slight change in the scholarship’s name to include West Penn Power, FirstEnergy’s Pennsylvania subsidiary.

The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) has been presented with a generous contribution of $3,000 from First National Bank of Pennsylvania, the largest subsidiary of F.N.B. Corporation (NYSE:FNB). This contribution can be used toward grants for Greene County public schools as part of the Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) Program. “At First National Bank, we have made it a part of our mission to improve the quality of life in our local communities,” said Rick Cordes, Market Manager for First National Bank. “By supporting organizations like the Community Foundation of Greene County, we are investing in our youth to ensure that our communities continue to flourish for generations to come.” Since 2005, the Community Foundation has provided grants for innovative curriculum improvement in each of the five Greene County school districts for projects such as Artist in Residence programs, STEM curriculum and equipment, Robotics programs, EMT Certification curriculum, to list just a few. “It is wonderful that First National Bank continues to support advanced curriculum improvements in the schools,” said Dr. Morris Harper, Chairman of the CFGC Board of Directors. “Their contribution provides students with access to new learning opportunities leading to success both in and out of school.” Through the Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program, administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED), a business may receive a tax credit for contributions to approved organizations, such as CFGC, to support Educational Improvement projects in public schools, or provide scholarships for students to attend private K-12 schools or Pre-Kindergarten programs. Businesses authorized to do business in Pennsylvania who are subject to one or more of the following taxes may apply for tax credits through the

Sheila Stewart (left), Manager of First National Bank’s Waynesburg Office, presents a contribution to Bettie Stammerjohn (right), Executive Director, Community Foundation of Greene County, for the Foundation’s EITC Educational Improvement Fund. The Fund supports advanced academic curriculum projects in Greene County public schools.

Pennsylvania DCED: Personal Income Tax, Corporate Net Income Tax, Bank Shares, Title Insurance & Trust Company, Shares Tax, Insurance Premiums Tax, Mutual Thrift Tax or Retaliatory Fees under Section 212 of the Insurance Company Law of 1921. If you would like more information about, or to make a contribution through the EITC program, contact the Community Foundation at 724-6272010 or email at cfgcpa@gmail.com. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Rain Day Pageant Time! It wouldn’t be Rain Day without the Rain Day Pageant!

Photos by Bruno & Bruno Surely one of the most anticipated tradi- day, July 23, beginning at 4pm at Waynesburg tions of Rain Day is the selection of the new Miss Central High School. Those competing for the Rain Day for the next 12 months. The 39th An- title of Miss Rain Day 2017 and the schools they nual Miss Rain Day Scholarship Pageant is Sun- attend are as follows:

LAKELYNN

RORY

Lakelynn Martin, the 14 year old daughter of Mike and Kristy Martin of Waynesburg; she will be a freshman at Waynesburg Central High School.

ALIZAH

Rory Black, the 15 year old Alizah Beth Roberts, the 14 year daughter of Rob and Betty Jo old daughter of Mary Annette and Black of Wind Ridge; she will Charles Carter Roberts of Carmibe a sophomore at West Greene chaels; she will be a freshman at Carmichaels Area High School. High School.

EDEN

CLAIRE

ALICEON

Eden Rogers, the 15-year old daughter of Jason and Shelly Rogers of Sycamore; she will be a junior at Waynesburg Central High School.

Claire Dursa, the 15 year old daughter of Joyce and David Dursa of Carmichaels; she will be a sophomore at Carmichaels Area High School.

Aliceon Clark, the 15 year old daughter of Mike and Marcie Clark of Greensboro; she will be a junior at Mapletown High School.

CROWN BEARER

2016 Miss Rain Day Miss Rain Day 2016, Bryn Patton, who has served the past year, is the 15-year-old daughter of Randy and Michelle Patton of Waynesburg. Bryn is a sophomore at Waynesburg Central High School.

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Isabella Marie Wise, our crown bearer, is the daughter of Brian and Heather Wise of Mather.

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The Victory 5K Returns for 2017

he 2017 Victory 5K will be held August 12, 2017, beginning at Rolling Meadows Church of God in Waynesburg. “We’re gearing up for another exciting event!” said spokesperson Larry Calvert, “the organizers are working hard to make this year’s event something special.” The Victory 5K is a joint venture between Bethlehem Baptist Church of Ruff Creek and Rolling Meadows Church of God, and serves as a charitable fund raiser. The beneficiary for 2017 is

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the Crisis Pregnancy Center of Greene County, a Christian centered organization that helps women and couples facing the difficulties of unplanned pregnancy while protecting the life of the unborn. A food drive will also be held to benefit the Corner Cupboard Food Bank. “The mission of The Victory 5K is to achieve victory in our Lord Jesus Christ, victory over uncertainty and victory over personal hardships. Together we can help those who are struggling in our community. This is a family focused event with fun, fitness and fellowship!” adds Larry. The event includes a 5K run/walk and mile run. The route will remain the same as last year with the exception of the start/finish location. Awards will be given for top three 5K runners and walkers, both male and female, as well as Children’s Challenge Mile Run (ages 12 and under). Additional awards will be given by age group categories for the 5K run/walk, both male Participants run The Victory 5K and female.

The atmosphere will be festive as well with raffle prizes, food drive, chicken roast, live music and children’s activities at the start/finish site. Ambassadors for Christ will provide live gospel, country and Christian rock music. Whole roasted chickens by Jason Hopkins will be available at $10 each. Nonperishable, non-expired food items will be accepted for the event’s food drive. Each food donor will receive raffle tickets for a food drive prize. There will also be a bouncy house, face painting and other activities for the kids. Adults may participate in the Children’s Challenge Mile Run if they register, however only children up to 12 years are eligible for an award. Several community organizations will be set-up with freebies, information and activities, including Crisis Pregnancy Center, Corner Cupboard Food Bank, Greene County Drug Prevention, Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach and Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA. To guarantee an event t-shirt, pre-register by July 28 for $15 for 5K run/walk and $9 for mile run. Register online at www.runsignup.com, by searching for “The Victory 5K”. Or pick up a race brochure at First Federal Savings and Loan, Four Horsemen Comics and Gaming, LPS Guitar, Made In America Shoppe, The Locker Room and C & S Tire Pros or Bethlehem Baptist and Rolling Meadows Churches. Printable brochure is also posted on “The Victory 5K” Facebook page. You can also email thevictory5k@yahoo.com or message from the event Facebook page.

GreeneScene Magazine •

JULY / AUGUST

2017


2017 Community Builders Sessions Slated to Begin in August

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he thirteenth series of Community Builders of Greene County will begin August 28, 2017. The program will meet every other Monday through December 11, 2017. Classes will be held from 5:30-8:30 each evening in the CFGC Foundation Room at 106 E. High Street, Waynesburg. Applications are being accepted through August 18th. Community Builders provides training for persons interested in volunteering their time and talents to support Greene County nonprofit organizations. The nonprofit leadership program explores leadership, nonprofit development and board governance, financial management, strategic planning, marketing, resource development and volunteer engagement. The series is geared to helping citizens become better volunteers and employees with nonprofit organizations in the community, whether it be through activities such as serving on nonprofit boards, volunteering on fundraising committees, or serving as a program staff. Eight learning sessions are conducted by one or more local experts in the field of that week’s topic. A achievement ceremony is held at the end of the program when participants completing the course receive a Community Builder Certificate.

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Each participant is asked to pay a $150 tuition fee which covers some of the cost of their materials and a light meal during each session. In some instances, the participant’s employer or organization may cover all or part of the fee for their employees or board members. A limited number of scholarships are available on a need basis for one-half of the tuition. Nearly 200 individuals have completed the course since 2004. Many have become active members of local nonprofit boards. while others have expanded their roles as employees of nonprofit organizations. One Community Builder graduate recently said, “As a board member of one nonprofit and employee of another, I can’t tell you how much I have used what I learned in Community Builders to help make these programs stronger.” Several graduates also shared how the series helped them to build self-confidence and become more involved in their work and community. Applications and schedule are available online at http://www.cfgcpa.org/communitybuilders/ For more information on Community Builders of Greene County call 724-627-2010, or email cfgcpa@gmail.com.

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Above: A picture of East Ward School taken in the 1990s, showing how it looked just before Landmark Baptist Church began its renovations and improvements 20 years ago. Below: An older picture of some students having fun in front of East Ward school, we are guessing circa 1930s or 1940s, photo courtesy of the collection belonging to Waynesburg Borough

LANDMARK BAPTIST CHURCH

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By Colleen Nelson

any old neighborhood schools can sit empty after their days of teaching are over, but happily, East Ward School on 176 N. Porter St. Waynesburg has a different story to tell. The building is still as stately and trim as it was when it was first built in 1914 and East Ward was its own borough. Neighborhood kids from kindergarten through grade eight walked to school here until the 1950s. As Central Greene School District grew, a Many generations of area children enjoyed what were once playmiddle school was created and East Ward grounds for the old East Ward School. Today, youth still enjoy fun, became an elementary school for kinderfellowship and recreation at Landmark Baptist Church. garten through fourth grade. When it closed in 1996, the old building only sat he teaches in and says that much of the work done empty for a few months before a new mission for since the church opened twenty years ago has been teaching was launched. done by volunteers. “We’re celebrating our twentieth anniversary There are plenty of converted classrooms for here this year,” Pastor Arnold Watts of Landmark the church to reach everyone – from preschoolers Baptist Church said, beaming as he stood on the to questioning teens to adults and seniors looking carpeted stairway that once led hundreds of kids for guidance to suit their age and circumstance. to the hallways on three floors where classrooms Sunday services begin at 10 a.m. and the waited. church offers a broad range of classes – a Pastor It is a pleasant surprise to see the interior of class for new and adult members, Jubilee for Sea school, the kind that nearly everyone of a certain niors, Ladies of Landmark for women, S.A.M.S. for age remembers attending as a kid, transformed by single men, Young Ambassadors for boys age 12 to wall-to-wall carpeting, fresh paint and new signage. 18, Rubies for girls age 12 – 18, Jewels for Christ – Now the big cross and the church’s name em- girls 2nd through 6th grade, LBC Troop for boys up blazoned on the outside of the refurbished building to age 11 and God’s Little Ones for kids from 4 years tells the world that spiritual lessons are being taught to first grade. There is also a Little Lambs nursery here and the invitation is out to stop by and learn for infants to age three to allow parents some quality about God. time to hear the Word. “Our mission is to take the Gospel to the peoClubs meet at the church on Wednesday at 7 ple,” Pastor Watts said. “We’re an Independent Bap- p.m. for kids age four to eleven and teens ages 12 tist Church and we go into the community to spread and up. “Soul Winning” happens on Wednesday at the word. We knock on doors and we do outreach – 5 p.m. and Saturday at 10 a.m. and men get together in nursing homes and in the Greene County Jail…” on Friday night for prayer and Bible study. The school bus and van in the parking lot are In keeping with the spirit of this old building what the church uses to spread the word beyond the that was once a neighborhood school, Landmark neighborhood by bringing those with transporta- Baptist Church offers Discipleship, a Bible study tion needs in for services and events. workbook program for members to aid their spiriThe old playground is gone but a basket ball tual growth and Landmark Baptist Academy for stuhoop by the side entrance is there waiting for a pick dents Kindergarten through 12th grade. up game and the kids who attend Sunday School Landmark’s Vacation Bible School, “Soul Wars manage to have fun the way generations of kids who – the Savior Comes Back” using the Star Wars as its attended school here did – by playing together in theme, is August 3-5 starting at 10 a.m. All children between singing, reciting verses and attending to are welcome and parents are invited to services on the words of their elders. Sunday, August 6 to hear the kids sing. For more Landmark pays special homage to God’s given information email lbcwaynesburg@outlook.com or talents, especially music, with instruments, choirs stop by any Sunday at 10 a.m. You will certainly be and solo and group performances. made welcome. Don’t be surprised if you run into Sunday school teacher Rich Keys admits he some of your neighbors. did a lot of the enlarging and remodeling the room

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Greene: Earth and Sky

By Pete Zapadka

COAL RIDES THE RAIL FROM THE MINE ON WAY TO THE CONSUMER

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ith all the weight he has to bear each day, it’s amazing Rodney Grimes maintains such a relaxed attitude and friendly demeanor. After all, when he heads off to work on weekdays, Grimes knows he literally has tons of work to do. His office is a titanic, thundering metal machine on wheels, and he rides it alone as it shakes and meanders though some of Greene County’s more bucolic areas. Grimes, 60, of Khedive, is a mobile equipment operator with the Cumberland Mine Railroad, whose large blue engines and a line of silver cars often can be seen passing beneath busy Interstate 79 near Exit 7, or rumbling through state Game Lands 223 near Garards Fort and crossing Whiteley Creek near Mapletown. The railroad runs about 17 miles from the Cumberland Mine near Kirby to Alicia along the Monongahela River, where coal is loaded onto waiting barges. The hour-long trip beats the view from nearly any office windows. “We’re away from things and we do see some more animals, some undisturbed areas, not a lot of traffic, not a lot of people,” he said, adding there are walls of ice gleaming in winter, and tumbling waterfalls in warmer weather. Grimes’ job title belies his duties on the 38-car train, which utilizes locomotives on both ends since there is nowhere on the line to turn around. During working hours for the past 3 ½ years, he has served as its engineer, conductor, brakeman, and coal loader and unloader. When he’s off duty, five other workers take over the train during the week with three workers on weekends. “This past February was 42 years” working with coal, and “of that 30 years was underground. I started in 1975 with Consol and in 1978 I came to Cumberland,” he said. The mine and railroad’s parent is Contura Energy, a Tennesseebased company with mining operations in coal basins in Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and Wyoming. The rail line is most unusual. It runs alone in the wilderness, connecting with no other railroad. Additionally, it intersects with no public roads – it passes beneath Mapletown Road and Interstate 79, and rides above Route 19, Route 88 and the road near the White Covered Bridge, where the view is wonderful. Upon arrival at the mine, Grimes leaves the train and climbs into a control booth from which he is able to direct the coal as it is loaded, car by car, from above. The process takes about an hour, 10 minutes. During that time, Grimes moves the train forward by using a remote control box. When it returns to Alicia, the train pulls into a dump area, where

there are open grates beneath the tracks. Grimes again disembarks, moves the train forward by remote control, and turns a crank on each car that unleashes a torrent of rushing coal from the bottom. After about an hour, the train has been emptied. All at the hands of one man. Grimes has become accustomed to working alone for the most part. “At first, it’s intimidating knowing you have 38 cars with better than 100 tons in each car behind you, and so much horsepower,” he said. “But, you know, you get adjusted and used to it. . . . you just have to be aware and conscious.” On a recent run between Alicia and the mine, Grimes took along two wide-eyed passengers who, with the company’s permission to ride, briefly experienced what to them was the thrill of life on the rails. They marveled at the rocking and vibrating of the locomotive as it moved along the line, reveled in the scenery, cringed when crossing the narrow bridges, and stared at several vultures, who were dining on a carcass but had to flee as the train approached. Grimes always is on the lookout for problems on the line: “I had a young boy on a dirt bike who jumped the tracks in front Rodney Grimes stands on front of the trailing locomotive No.1 before he begins his run to the mine. of me, a guy wandering along the tracks through the Game Lands, and he didn’t hear me. I had to blow the horn and he jumped off the tracks. I’ve had three bears . . . one was sitting on the tracks. But nothing that did not get out of the way.” The train is the only immediate source to move the coal from the mine to the barges, so Grimes made it clear there is no room for error on this job. A rail accident could force work to be halted at the mine. “You have to be conscious that if you make a mistake,” he said emphatically, “you could put 600 people out of work for a short period or a long period of time.”

Wanna Ride Along? Join Pete & company and take a virtual ride on the Cumberland Mine Railroad in this online video at https://youtu.be/jGAgUU8xrn8

Some of the railcars loaded with coal at the Cumberland Mine.

En route back to Alicia, the train gets ready to pass beneath Interstate 79.

Pete Zapadka is a Greene County property owner and a retired local news editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. He can be reached at pzapadka@yahoo.com. JULY / AUGUST

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

Engine No. 22 of the Cumberland Mine Railroad stopped at the Alicia unloading facility.

Looking over Rodney Grimes’ shoulder as the coal-loading process continues. The yellow box is the remote control device that moves the train.

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S por t Sh or t s Hunting Hills Hawkeyes Take 43 Awards at State Championship

Pictured are the members, coaches and sponsors of the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County’s Scholastic Clay Target Program team. Thirty-two members recently received a total of 43 awards during the Pennsylvania Scholastic Clay Target Program Sporting Clays Championship, held Saturday, June 17, at Factoryville Sportsman Club in Factoryville, Pa.

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hirty-two members of the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County’s Scholastic Clay Target Program team, received a total of 43 awards during the Pennsylvania Scholastic Clay Target Program Sporting Clays Championship, held last month at Factoryville Sportsman Club in Factoryville, Pa. The event involved over 280 youth shooters from across the state competing in a 100-target shoot to determine state winners in seven skill divisions: rookie, intermediate entry, intermediate advanced, junior varsity, varsity, open and collegiate. Awards were given to the top three teams in each division, as well as the highest overall and firstthrough third-place individual scorers in each division. A total of 53 Hunting Hills Hawkeyes members participated in the shoot. Hawkeyes squads took first-place in four divisions, second-place in five divisions, and thirdplace in one division, along with eleven individual and two collegiate awards. Rookie The squad with Brendan Cole, Dylan Hughes and Samuel Riley took first-place in the rookie division with a combined score of 159. Cole and Riley tied with individual scores of 58. Placement was decided in a shoot-off with Cole winning first, and Riley taking second. Intermediate Entry The Hawkeye squad with Robert Dillon, Cole Jones and Jacob Stroud took first-place in the intermediate entry division with a combined score of 234. The second-place squad with a combined score of 204 included Ivan Pavick, Devon Pezzino

and Nicholas Campbell. Dillon placed first with an individual score of 84 and Jones placed third with a score of 77. Intermediate Advanced The Hawkeyes placed first, second and third in the intermediate advanced division. The firstplace squad consisting of Tucker Hughes, Landon Friend and Owen Hughes had a combined score of 230. A combined score of 225 placed Kolby Smith, Zach Wilson and Ethan Wise in second-place. Third-place was awarded to Brady Jones, Kyleigh Kozel and Parker Grimes for a combined score of 212. Hughes placed third with an individual score of 78 and Kozel won first-place among the females with an individual score of 74. Junior Varsity Hawkeye squads placed first and second in the junior varsity division. The squad with Tristan Cole, Hunter Orrahood and Justin Popovec won with a combined score of 237. The squad with Dalton Stansick, Coloton Anderson and Arran Hinerman placed second with a combined score of 232. Cole placed first with an individual score of 89. Abby Ozohonish also placed first with an individual score of 74 for the female category. Varsity Cameron Cernuska placed second with an individual score of 91 followed by Randy Durr in third-place with an individual score of 90 in the varsity division and overall among all shooters. Kaitlin Orrahood won second-place with an individual score of 77 in the female category. The squad consisting of Zach Abbott, Cameron Cernuska and Branden Sanders placed second in the division

with a combined score of 255. Open In the open division, the squad of Kaitlin Orrahood, Abby Ozohonish and Sarah Donaldson placed second with a combined score of 211. Collegiate Parker Woodring placed second with an individual score of 87 in the collegiate division. Kelsey Laurine won first-place for the ladies’ category with an individual score of 69. The team’s home base of Hunting Hills is owned and operated by Sally and Roy Sisler. More than 60 students in grades five through 12 have participated each year since the pilot program began in 2009. Overseeing this year’s program were head coach Chuck Mallory and assistant head coach Randy Coss, along with several assistant coaches. Nationally, the programs are sponsored by the Scholastic Shooting Sports Foundation. Locally, the Greene County Commissioners, Hunting Hills and the Department of Recreation sponsor the program with support from the Friends of the National Rifle Association, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Midway Foundation, Big Covey Quail, LOLA Energy, Hartley Inn, and First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Greene County. The program’s mission is to promote and teach young people the fundamentals of gun safety, team work and outdoor sports. For more information on the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us.

GreeneScene by Tonya Gump

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Rain Day Scene of the Past

GreeneScene by Herbert Thompson

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his Rain Day Scene of the past from 1996 shows two young participants in the Annual Rain Day Race having some fun with the sliced oranges organizers always prepare for the runners. The photo was provided to us by Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Keith Davin, who speculates that the young girl on the right may be Michelle Tompkins, though he wasn’t sure. It was over 20 years ago! Chances are both girls will recognize themselves, though – so let us know if you see yourself here! 2017 will see the 39th running of the Rain Day Race which includes a 5KRun/Walk & one mile kids fun run. The event is on Saturday, July 29th, 2017, with registration beginning at 7:45am. The fun run will commence at 8:30am and the 5K at 9am. Registration will be in the parking lot behind McCracken Pharmacy at 595 East High Street in Waynesburg. The course begins right there at the intersection of High & Porter Streets. It is an “out & back” course

containing some rolling hills with a volunteer led water stop at the half way mark. Awards are given to top three overall runners, male & female in the 5K; also in each age group, male & female for 5K and fun run, and to the top three walkers, male & female. All finishers in the kid’s fun run receive a ribbon. All participants will also be entered into drawings for more prizes. The Rain Day Race is coordinated by a volunteer committee for Greene County Habitat for Humanity, which receives the proceeds from the event to further its goals to eliminate poverty housing and homelessness from our communities, and to make decent shelter a matter of conscience and action. Habitat works with people of all backgrounds, races and religions to build houses together in partnership with families in need. You can learn about how Greene County Habitat for Humanity works online at www.greenecountyhabitat.net.

This newspaper clipping, provided by Athena Bowman of the Special Events Commission and Waynesburg Borough, shows a 1988 scene of some Rain Day devotees creating a “Rain Machine” credited to the Bowlby Library, in preparation for Rain Day. Pretty intricate… Though, our research shows that 1988 was one of the rare NO RAIN years, so we’re not too sure how well the contraption worked.

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BOWLBY BITS Creative Crafting for Adults – Classes offered 2x a month -- August 3, at 5:00 pm. and August 12 at 10:00 am. Project is a lighted canvas. Cost for materials: $20. Please call library for more info at 724.627.9776. It’s Movie Night – August 9, watch the NEW “Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul,” beginning promptly at 5:00 pm. FREE popcorn and beverages! Summer Reading Program @ Bowlby - Through August 18. Clubs and Story Classes for ages 0-12yrs. Teen Advisory Group meets Wednesdays at 4 p.m. Theme this year is “Build a Better World!” Adults can also read/listen, write reviews and compete for prizes! FREE CPR/AED Certification - Saturday, August 19, 10:00am-1:00pm. Sponsored by Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation. Limited seating; call to register at 724.627.9776. Annual Zoo Trip - Saturday, August 19, from 8:30am-4:30pm. $14 admission ticket for ages 2yrs & older. Bus transportation provided. Bring a bagged lunch or buy at the zoo. Order your tickets today from Library! FREE S.A.T. Prep Classes - a series of 3 classes to be held for high school students on Saturdays, September 9, 16 and 23, from 10am - 2pm. Call to register. T.O.P.S. - weight management support group meets every Sat., 9:30-11:30am. Lego Club – August 5 & 19 at 11am. All ages! Library provides the Legos. Bowlby Book Club – August 14, 6pm. Discussion on “All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr. Free test prep for adults studying for SAT, GED, Civil Service exams, Drivers Licensing and Life skills, and for basic reading and math skills. Free after school tutoring for school-age children. Call to schedule appointments with the Family Literacy Department Color Outside the Lines - adult coloring group meets every Wed., 11am-1pm or 6-7pm. Brainfuse - Free online tutoring database, with one-on-one tutoring available daily 2-11pm. Writing lab, study guides, and skill building resources available 24/7. Access using your library card at www.evakbowlby.org. Freegal - Enjoy free music! Library patrons can stream or download with mobile apps, visit www.evakbowlby.org. Rocket Languages - 15 online Language courses are available through your library website, with your library card. Or download mobile app, visit www.evakbowlby.org. Call or stop in Eva K. Bowlby Public Library for more info or to register for any of the above events. 724-627-9776 • 311 N. West St., Waynesburg, PA 15370

Greene County Chamber

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fter more than 75 years of serving its member businesses throughout Greene County, the Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce has announced its new moniker as the Greene County Chamber of Commerce. The new name better represents the Chamber’s longtime service area and its current membership. The change to the organization’s by– laws reflecting the new name was approved at its April 2017 board meeting. The new logo was unveiled and public announcement made in early July. The Chamber, established Executive Director, Melody Longstreth and Chamber President in 1901, has operated under the Jeff McCracken display the new Greene County Chamber logo. name “Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce” since the late • Represent member businesses, agricul1930s. The current membership roles list 368 member businesses, individual tural, professional, industrial, educational, and members and Lifetime Honorary members. The community interests that enhance economic and office, located at 143 East High Street in down- civic wellbeing. • Promote business development in contown Waynesburg, is staffed by full-time Executive Director Melody Longstreth, part-time junction with other appropriate entities through Membership Services Coordinator Michelle King coordination, not duplication, of efforts. • Provide value-added programs and beneand part-time Communications Specialist Kayla fits to promote membership and to help members Coss. “We have been serving the entire county for achieve success. • Maintain a positive, productive alliance many years, and the new name will simply reflect what we currently do,” said Melody. “The idea with other Chambers. EQT partnered with the Chamber to design has been discussed for quite some time and is exand create a new membership plaque featuring pected to bring more growth to our organization, which in turn will enable us to offer additional the new name and logo. The new plaques were valued-added services and benefits to our mem- distributed to members this month. “The Chamber appreciates the support of bers and the county.” The Chamber has already distinguished its member businesses and organizations and is itself among its peers with an impressive mem- very excited for this change,” added Melody, “The bership for a community the size of Waynesburg goal will be to continue serving Greene County and even Greene County at large. Each year, Pitts- area businesses and communities just as it has burgh Business Times releases a list of the top 20 in the past.” The Chamber is directed by an ExChambers (by membership) in the “Pittsburgh ecutive Board: President Jeff McCracken, Vice Region” which consists of nine counties in south- President Janice Blair-Martin, Secretary Cassie western, PA. The Waynesburg Chamber has ap- Teegarden, Treasurer Elizabeth Menhart, Officerpeared on that list for the last ten years, ranking at-Large Bettie Stammerjohn and ten additional board members: Keith Herrington, Randy Durr, #16 in 2016. As the Greene County Chamber of Com- Alan Laick, Don Chappel, Ben McMillen, Sandy merce, the organization will continue to provide Wilson, JoAnne Marshall, Jeanine Henry, Caitlin services and programs to increase the success of Carlisle. You can now find Greene County Chamber member businesses and organizations, enhancing the quality of life in Greene County. It will re- of Commerce online at www.GreeneChamber. main a politically neutral, enthusiastic resource to org; Email info@GreeneChamber.org and the phone number stays the same at 724-627-5926. its members and the community at large. The goals of the organization are to:

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Radiant Rainbow

2017 Little Miss Firecracker Congratulations to six-year-old Alaya King, daughter of Lauren Keys, who was crowned 2017 Little Miss Firecracker on Tuesday, July 4, 2017 at the Waynesburg Lions Club 4th of July Celebration. She was crowned by last year’s queen, Alaina Jonelle Moore, daughter of John Moore and Shannon Fuller.

2017 KING COAL 10U TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONS Molly Cheek submitted this photo taken of her and husband Price Cheek’s Greene County ridge top home on Behm Rd. in Aleppo Twp. The photo was taken on June 18 as a magnificent rainbow spanned the verdant hills on the hori-

zon in the background. Thank you for sharing Molly. We hope it will bring a sense of comfort to all those out there who have been wading in the flood waters….too much! The rain won’t last forever, believe it.

Pre-Kindergarten Scholarships

Congratulations to the Waynesburg Mustang All-Stars who captured the championship title & trophy at this year’s King Coal 10 and under baseball tournament. The winners and coaches are pictured here (L-r), front row kneeling: Kory Taylor, Nickolas Willard, Jake Thomas, Daryn Henry, Alex VanSickle and Bat Boy Connor Van-

Parents of Greene County children attending approved pre-kindergarten programs may apply for a scholarship to help with tuition costs. The Community Foundation of Greene County is accepting pre-kindergarten scholarship applications for the 2017/2018 school year. Sickle. Middle row: Vince Maley, Austin Surber, According to Bettie Stammerjohn, executive Tyler Groves, Braydon Phillips, Derek Turcheck, director of the Foundation, the Greene County Travis Tedrow, Jarius Baker. Back row: Coaches; EITC Pre-K Scholarship program provides chilCraig Thomas, George Taylor, Dustin Surber, dren and families with an opportunity to participate in a quality Pre-K program which gives Gerald Baker. children a good start toward being successful in school and beyond. The Pre-K scholarships are made possible by contributions to the Community Foundation of Greene County from businesses participating in the Pennsylvania Educational Improvement Tax ley Anderson, Carole Gideon, Brenda Guthrie, Credit Program (EITC). EITC Pre-K Sponsors and Traycee Bosle, along with board members for 2017/2018 are First Federal Savings and Loan Bill Groves, Dave Antonini, and Paul McMinn. Association of Greene County, and Highmark. “We are pleased to partner with our EITC Membership in the Society is open to anyone who would like to join in their mission to pre- sponsors this year to provide these educational serve Carmichaels Area and Cumberland Town- opportunities for families in our community,” ship history. Members can access genealogical said Dr. Morris Harper, chairman of the CFGC services from within the collection for free with board of directors. “This scholarship opportutheir paid membership. There is a membership nity offsets the cost of tuition to help make prefee schedule and application on their Facebook kindergarten programs more affordable, even for page at Carmichaels-Area-Historical-Society- middle income families.” Families may apply for a scholarship which Inc. To contribute artifacts, photos, documents, is paid directly to an approved preschool proand/or memorabilia to the collection—or for any other question or comment—please contact the vider or private school to help offset tuition for Society at 724-966-2731.

OOPS – We Made a Mistake In last month’s article highlighting the Baking Contests at our local County Fairs, we had a misprint saying the entries for the baking contests at Greene County Fair were due on Aug 18. Entries for Greene County Fair will be accepted only on Aug. 6, 2017. If you have any questions on the baking contests at Greene County Fair call Jean Scott at 724-627-9756. In last month’s story about recent donations to the Carmichaels Area Historical Society, we incorrectly identified donor Marianne Gideon as a board member. We apologize for any confusion this may have caused. The Society is led by Executive Board members Shel-

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the child. The deadline for applications is August 21 to be considered for a scholarship for the 2017/2018 school year. Application forms are available on the CFGC website at http://www.cfgcpa.org/pre-kindergarten-scholarships/ as well as from an approved preschool provider. While eligibility is based on income, the guidelines are generous to provide scholarships for moderate and low-income families. For both scholarships programs, the household income, including all adults living in the house, must not exceed $77,648 with an additional $15,530 for each dependent child (as defined by the IRS). This means that a family with one child may earn up to $93,178 to be eligible for the EITC scholarship programs. For the Pre-K scholarships, eligible children must be living in Greene County, be at least 3 years old by August 21. Children must be registered in the pre-school before applying for a scholarship. Participating preschool programs include: Building Blocks Preschool, Greene Valley Christian School, Calvary Chapel Preschool, Christian Sandbox Preschool, Here Wee Grow Preschool, Nanny’s Creative Learning Center, Open Door Christian Preschool, Rainbow’s End Learning Center, and St. Ann Catholic Church Preschool. FMI: 724-627-2010, or email at cfgcpa@ gmail.com.

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July Aug GreeneScene 2017  

Get your Rain Day And King Coal schedules! Win Pirates Tickets, Kennywood Tickets or money! Find out what you never knew about Deep Valley,...

July Aug GreeneScene 2017  

Get your Rain Day And King Coal schedules! Win Pirates Tickets, Kennywood Tickets or money! Find out what you never knew about Deep Valley,...

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