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B owlby B i t s

he Bowlby Book Club will meet on Aug. 10 at 6 pm to discuss “The Johnstown Flood,” by David McCullough. New members are always welcome to join this

group. Lions and Tigers and Bears; Oh my! The annual Bowlby Library trip to the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium has been scheduled for Aug. 15. Tickets are $12 for ages two and older. Children 23 months and younger are free. The ticket price includes bus transportation. The deadline to order tickets is Aug. 12. For more information, contact the library at 724-627-9776. Library Night at the ballpark will be held Aug. 12 at Consol Energy Field as the Washington Wild

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Things take on the Frontier Greys of Highland, Illinois. Game time is scheduled for 7:05 pm. Summer reading program participants will receive free admission to this game. All other tickets are $7. No transportation is provided. For more information, phone the library at 724-627-9776. Free SAT preparation classes will be offered at the library to help students planning to take the test this fall. The course consists of three Saturday sessions on Sept. 12, 19, and 26 from 10 am to 2 pm. The course will cover math, language arts, and writing. Those taking the classes who own scientific calculators are encouraged to bring them, along with a bagged lunch. Pre-registration is required. Phone the library today to register.

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G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

hen Larry Durdines started writing a blog about Greene County it wasn’t long before others began to send him photos and stories to go

along with them. Durdines passed away in 2010 but the blog lives on at http://tenmilecreekcountry. blogspot.com. As we looked at Clarksville for “I Love this

by Tara Kinsell

Place,” it was easy to turn to Durdines’ work. A Clarksville native himself, Durdines loved baseball. It was something that was handed down from his father, John “Hoss” Durdines.

In 1953, at just 18-months, Larry, in the shadow of his father, swung a bat at the baseball field in Clarksville, located on the Washington County side. “Hoss was remembered by all his friends as a serious fan of baseball,” Larry wrote. “I remember his joy when the Pirates won the World Series in 1960. He recalled to me the last time they had won, in 1927, when he was 15 years old.” Larry’s father passed away in 1963. His wallet contained the 1964 baseball schedule for the Pirates. “He was ready,” Larry wrote. When games were played in Clarksville in the 1950s and 1960s it was the place to be. It wasn’t just for kids either. There were teams of miners from local coal companies that competed too. No matter who was playing, baseball brought out the spectators. In those days they were dressed in their Sunday best and hundreds would often turn out. It was Little League, not Pony Baseball, that was played in Clarksville. These teams were named for the major league ball clubs and players wore uniforms that looked like they were part of the big leagues. Case in point, the 1961 Clarksville Orioles,

in front, from left: Billy Murphy. John Chesney, Larry Durdines, and Bert Kiefer. Second row : Wally Meyers, Bruce Hager, Nick Vuckovich, Dave Saunders, and a boy by the last name of Harris. If anyone knows his first name please let us know. Third row: Phil Knapik, Russ Deems, Monk Santucci, Bobby

Garrett, Phil Rebottini, and Mickey Beringo. In back is Coach John L. “ Hoss “ Durdines. Permission to use the images and text from http://tenmilecreekcountry.blogspot.com was given by Larry Durdines’ son, Casey.

Larry Durdines 18 mos.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Message In Bottle Leads To Amazing Journey For Mother And Daughter by Tara Kinsell

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he slip in her mailbox indicating there was a package waiting at the post office was perplexing for Diane Horner of Bobtown. “I wasn’t expecting anything so I had no idea what it could be. I thought it may have been a mistake,” Horner said. “When I picked it up and saw it was addressed to me I still had no idea what it could be.” When she opened the envelope the plain cover of the book inside it did not give away the secret of what it contained. As she began to turn the pages a flood of emotions were brought to the surface. It had been a tough few years for Horner. She had lost both her sister, Tonya, and her mother, Helen Kundly, just two years apart. She’d thought for quite a while what she could to do to honor their memories in a way that would be meaningful to them. Both ladies loved to travel, were fun-loving and free-spirited. Horner made a decision to place some of mom and sis’s ashes inside tiny bottles and place those inside soda bottles with a letter explaining what it was. She included a dollar in each of the soda bottles for postage in the hope that she’d hear back from someone who happened across one. On a trip to the beach, Horner sent four bottles into the bay and the Atlantic Ocean. So much time had passed when the book arrived that the thought didn’t enter her mind that this could somehow be tied to the gesture but page-after-page spoke of an amazing journey taken by Helen and Tonya. It was more than Horner could have hoped for or imagined, she said. Opening to page one Horner saw a photo of one of the bottles and its contents. “I wrote a note saying, ‘These are the ashes of my mom, Helen, and my sister Tonya. They both loved to travel so I thought they could continue to travel this way,’” Horner said.

Sue and Britt baker of Altoona, PA

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“The Girls” Bag

On the boat for the British Virgin Islands

Flashing forward to nearly one year later, Sue Baker and Britt Baker of Altoona were vacationing in Ocean City, Maryland. When Sue decided to take an early morning walk on the beach. She returned with a bottle, the contents of which intrigued the couple. “We saw from the return address on the note inside that it had not got very far,” Britt said. “At dinner we were discussing it and thought ‘maybe we should take it a little farther.’” And so, the Bakers took “the girls,” as they began to refer to the tiny Estee Lauder bottle of Helen and Tonya’s ashes on an amazing journey. The couple had plans to visit several locations and the idea to share the journey with ‘the girls,’ “just kind of snowballed,” according to Britt. The book Horner received documented trips to Las Vegas for Bike Fest, Utah, Oregon, Arizona, New York City, and the British Virgin Islands to sail with a group of friends. The couple purchased a small purse to serve as a suitcase of sorts for ‘the girls’ to travel along in style. At each location the Bakers introduced ‘the girls’ to any new acquaintances they encountered, photographing the experiences. “On Angels Landing (in Zion National Park, located in Utah), a crazy high place, we decided to release some of the ashes,” Britt said. “We were thinking it was a good place. The wind did it for us actually. It picked them up and took them away.” There wasn’t a real plan, the couple just did what felt right to them and hoped ‘the girls’ loved ones would not be offended by the choices made. “The morning after we released the last of the ashes (in the British Virgin Islands) we saw a double rainbow,” Britt said. Although not uncommon, Britt and Sue, like to think it was a sign from their ‘girls’ that they had done well by them, he said. Horner certainly thinks so. “I still don’t even know what to say. I really do not have the words to tell them how much they touched my heart,” Horner said. “That two strangers would do something like this just really affirms that angels do walk among us. Thank you Britt and Sue from the bottom of my heart.”

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or those who are having trouble teaching their teenager to drive or are in need of driving lessons themselves, there is an option in Greene County to not only learn how to drive, but it may save on car insurance as well. For a fee, retired Jefferson-Morgan High School driving instructor, Alan Rafail, offers a comprehensive course that prepares new drivers to successfully complete the steps required for the Graduated Driver Licensing program, administered by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. For three consecutive weeks, students in Rafail’s program will be responsible for completing reading assignments and taking quizzes based upon a textbook (provided), the Pennsylvania Driving Manual and videos. A minimum of six-hours of behind the wheel instruction will run concurrently with the theory instruction. Rafail taught driver’s education for 26 years at Jefferson-Morgan High School and four years as an after-school program in the Bentworth School District. As a driving instructor, Rafail has taught basic driving skills to nearly 1,000 high school students, teaching them how to be successful, low risks drivers. The course taught by Rafail is PennDOT approved and recommended. Goals of the course are: • Teaching new drivers to be proactive, safe and responsible on the highways. • Assessing and managing risks while driving. • General vehicle maintenance, trip planning, driving while distracted, and the social pressures that can impact safe driving. • How to drive under various lighting, weather and roadway conditions. • Responding in emergency situations. • Responsibly sharing the road with others, including: pedestrians, bicyclists, motor cycles, busses, trucks and trains. For more information, contact Rafail at 724-883-3291 or visit his website at http://arafaildrivingschool.weebly.com.

GreeneScene by Dan Dishart

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Aviation Day in Waynesburg will be especially “sweet” this year

Photo by Brittney Menear

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mong the traditional activities that take place on SOAR of Greene County’s Aviation Day, to be held from 10 am to 5 pm on Aug. 22, will be a candy bomber drop by the C-54 Spirit of Freedom, one of 225 C54s used to drop food and supplies into West Berlin in 1948-49. “This is brand new. We’ve never done it in the past,” said Max Loughman of SOAR. “We are doing more and more in terms of expanding and doing new things.” Loughman said SOAR was approached by Timm Chopp, whose family lives in Carmichaels, about bringing his C-54 to the Greene County Airport. “It was good timing,” Loughman said. Recounting the story of the C-54 candy drops, Loughman said, “It was right after WWII. The Russians had surrendered Berlin but we wanted to ensure enough food, etc. was getting to (the people of) Berlin. This was the largest humanitarian air lift in history.” Loughman said the intention was, not only to ensure food and other life sustaining supplies were being received, it was “to win hearts and souls, so to speak.” During these historic drops, candy bars were added to the mix for the children. Just as these parachutes of supplies made its way into Berlin more than 65 years ago, so too will small candy-filled parachutes descend upon children at the Greene County Airport Days.

Although the Spirit of Freedom will be at the airport in the days leading up to Aug. 22, the “flying museum,” as Loughman called it, will not be open to the public until Airport Day. At that time it will be available for viewing until it readies for the drop which will take place following the other scheduled flying activities of the day. Loughman said the C-54 will do a flyover of the airport and on its second pass will conduct the candy drop. He estimates this will take place sometime between 4:30 and 5 pm. As always, free Young Eagle plane rides will be available for children from 8 to 17 years of age. To be eligible for Young Eagle rides kids must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian who must sign a consent form in person at the event. Due to Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) rules, parents or guardians are not permitted to accompany Young Eagles on their flight. As always, there will be something for everyone, men, women and children alike at Greene County Airport Day. “Our airport is just such a tremendous asset and I think many people just don’t realize it,” Loughman said. “A lot of pilots have gotten a good start in their aviation careers at this little airport.” For more information on the Greene County Airport Day, visit www.soarofgreenecounty.org. For more on the Spirit of Freedom, visit the Berlin Aircraft Historical Foundation website at www. spiritoffreedom.org.

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n September, the Rogersville United Methodist Church will mark its 175th anniversary with a weekend long celebration planned. The festivities will begin on Friday, Sept. 25 from 5 to 6:30 pm with an open house at the church to coincide with the church’s monthly community dinner. Church member, Joyce Conklin has prepared a history of the church and its stained glass windows with handouts to be presented in the church. Those attending the dinner may make their way into the church to view the displays and learn about the history of Rogersville UMC. On Saturday, Sept. 26, all are welcome to attend a homecoming celebration hymn sing from 6:30 to 8 pm with Heaven Bound Ministries and the Rogersville UMC congregation. There is no charge for admission but a free-will offering will be accepted. The traditional Sunday worship service on Sept. 27 will be moved up from 11:15 am to 11 am with special guests, Rev. Dr. William B. Meekins, Jr., the assistant to Bishop Thomas J. Bickerton, bishop of the UMC Western Pennsylvania Conference; and Rev. Dr. Brad Lauster, superintendent of the Washington District of the W. Pa. UMC. Meekins will lead the worship service. Special music will also accompany the service. A catered luncheon, following the worship service, will conclude the anniversary celebration. The congregation again “welcomes anyone who would like to attend the luncheon,” said congregant, Linda Jones. “We are asking that they let us know so we can tell the caterer how many will be attending.” Jones said RSVPs can be made by phoning her at 724-986-2690. From a meeting held in a barn in the summer of 1840 to today, the Rogersville UMC has an especially tenacious history. Launched from a barn meeting 175 years ago, the church began as the Methodist Protestant Church of Rogersville. It was decided that services would be held in the (former) Center Township High School building. This would be one of multiple schoolhouses the congregants would gather in until the current

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church building was dedicated on May 21, 1905. When there was a merger of the Methodist Protestant and Methodist Episcopal churches in the late 1930s, the Rogersville church officially became a United Methodist Church. At its 100th anniversary, a history of the church concluded with a quotation from “The New Day,” “We are told that nothing is permanent except change. But, God has endowed us with the capacity to face the new and untried because change is part of his creative plan and purpose.” It continues, “In light of history we would be craven cowards to fear it. Rather, we would sing with the Psalmist, ‘This is the day which the Lord hath made, we will rejoice and be glad in it.’” In its 175th year, the Rogersville UMC website expands on these ideas. “Church doesn’t just happen when we’re sitting in the pew. Church happens when we reach out to those who are hungry, sick or  forgotten; when we stand together for  justice  and inclusion; and, when we open our hearts to those who are struggling. That’s putting beliefs into action. That’s what it means to RETHINK CHURCH.”

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Co ol at Sc h ool

by Tara Kinsell

Culinary Entrepreneur On His Way

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n invention of Greene County Career and Technology Center culinary arts student, Richard Sager, could very well become a staple in busy households across the country. That seemed pretty cool to us. After returning from the national SkillsUSA competition in Washington, D.C. earlier this month, where he won a silver medal competing against students from all across the United States, Sager spoke to the GreeneSaver about the invention he calls, “In and Out Foods.” “My culinary instructor, Dan Wagner, told me to think of something outside of the box, something original. I asked myself, ‘What do people want,’” Sager said. Looking around he started to see a trend toward health consciousness, losing weight, and keeping in shape, he said. Sager started to ponder ways of bringing healthy, gourmet meals to the public that one can take with them and eat when time prevents them from having such an option. “I began testing methods of cooking and preserving foods. Freeze drying proved to be the most successful,” he said, noting that he considered dehydrating the food or using dry ice but found both processes lacking for his purposes. “It works similar to the military’s ready to eat meals. On one layer of the meal you have the entree. In a separate layer the chemical reaction takes place that heats the food. It is designed so the chemical,

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calcium oxide, can’t reach the food,” Sager said. “There is a small access point for you to add water that causes the chemical reaction that heats it.” So far, Sager has mastered a shrimp, pineapple, rice stir-fry with other entrees being developed. He kept it simple with the one entree as he prepared to compete at the state and national levels in culinary. At the state competition, Sager walked away with the gold. One other item that he has prepared, utilizing his freeze dried method, is yogurt. Obviously, no heat is required with this one, just a small amount of water to make it reconstitute. Yogurt also comes with the stir-fry meal, Yager said. “The shelf life is over 20 years. You can leave it in the car in the heat and it won’t spoil,” he said. Yeager noted that many people are always on the run. He said his meals are a good option for hikers, sports moms, those who work long hours, students, and many more. “It is a quick meal that is healthy and higher end than places like McDonalds,” he said. A senior at Waynesburg Central High School, Yager hopes to find backers to bring his product to market. He is currently working on the provisional patent, a process he learned is “very expensive,” he said. When he gets In and Out Foods off the ground, he is hoping it will provide him with the funds to pursue a degree in business and hospitality

management as well as other ventures in his future. An honor student with a 3.9 grade point average, and multiple successes in the field of culinary arts already behind him, he won gold last year for his detailed plans of bringing an upscale Italian restaurant to Greene County, backing Yeager seems like a good investment for the right person. We certainly find his invention worthy of the “Cool at School” title! Sager is the son of Dan Sager of Carmichaels, and Emily Dunfee of Waynesburg.

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Clipper Coloring Contest Winners Category A: 6 years & under

WINNER

Will Pulkownik

Category B: 7 years - 12 years

WINNER

Category C: 13 years and up

WINNER Jackie Kliuk

of Greensburg, PA

winner

Chesney Hixenbaugh

Picture Puzzle

WINNER of the

$50 VISA Gift Card Compliments of Tri-State Health Care

Bobbi Neighbors Greensboro, PA

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Answer: Uncle Sam

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“Keep On Clipping!”

of

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Kennywood Tickets is Caitlyn Fess Waynesburg, PA JULY / AUGUST 2015

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winner

WINNER

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Hawkeyes Win 33 Medals At State Championship Rotary Scholarships Awarded To J.M. Students The Rotary Club of Waynesburg selected two 2015 Jefferson-Morgan High School graduates as the recipients of its annual rotary scholarships. The scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic performance, community service, letters of recommendation, and the student’s response to the essay question, “What does the rotary motto, ‘service above self ’ mean to you?” Two $1,000 scholarships were awarded for 2015 from among 12 applicants. The winners were Gavin Koratich, son of Michaels and Tammy Koratich of Waynesburg and David Blosser, son of Greg and Michelle Blosser of Jefferson. Koratich was in the top ten of his graduating

class with a cumulative 4.12 grade point average. His long list of community service projects include benefits for the American Cancer Society and American Lung Association. He was a member of the National Honor Society, foreign language club, academic team, golf team and debate team. Koratich will attend W&J College in the fall for history and pre-law. Blosser was the class valedictorian and part of the Penn State 4.0 Club. He placed first in the Greene County Law Day essay contest and received challenge program awards for community service, academic excellence, and attendance. Blosser was also a member of Big Brothers and Big Sisters, the Leo club, science Olympiad team, The Future is Mine, and served as the vice-president of the National Honor Society and president of the foreign language club. Blosser will attend Dickinson College in the fall to pursue a double major in biochemistry and Spanish.

From The Greene County Hills To Beverly Hills It isn’t often that a residence in Greene County is among a top ten list with a $195 million mansion in Beverly Hills. One might say that never happens; never say never. Erik Gunther of realtor. com was as surprised as Waynesburg real e s t at e agent Rob Baily with C ol dwel l Banker. How does a

house in Mt. Morris make the list? Each week realtor.com compiles a top ten of listings based upon how many clicks it received on the Internet. Baily attributed the clicks on his 483 Dutch Run listing to its 10 plus acres and close proximity to the interstate. The 3 bedroom, 2 full bath, 1 1/2 story home made number three on the list. Gunther said the list typically comes in with a mix of properties in varying price ranges. Baily’s listing and eight others ranged from just under $260,000 to just shy of $400,000. You’d think the mansion would sit at number one. Instead, it was just ahead of the Mt. Morris residence. The popularity of ABC’s Extreme Makeover: Home Edition helped a home in Nebraska, listed at $249,000, to grab the number one spot.

Twenty-three members of the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County Scholastic Clay Target Program team, earned 33 awards and medals at the Pennsylvania Scholastic Clay Target Program Sporting Clays Championship at the Blue Ridge Sportsman Club in Harrisburg on June 20. Fiftyeight members of the Hawkeyes participated. The event involved 237 youth shooters from across the state, competing in a 100-target shoot to determine state winners in six skill divisions: rookie, intermediate entry, intermediate advanced, junior varsity, varsity and collegiate. Awards were presented to the top three teams in each division. The highest overall male and female individual shooters of the entire competition also received awards. Robert Dillon, III, of Adah; Landon Friend of Pt. Marion; and Owen Hughes of Rogersville took first place for rookie squad. Cole Jones of Jefferson; Payton Raber of Waynesburg; and Ethan Wise of Morgantown, W.Va. took second place in the rookie division. Tucker Hughes of Rogersville; Thaine Miller of Waynesburg; and Zach Wilson of Waynesburg won first place in the intermediate entry division. Miller and Hughes had the second and third place individual scores in the division with a 76 and 71, respectively. Kyleigh Kozel of Carmichaels was the

University Promotes Two Senior Administrators

Mt. Morris Man Recognized By Aflac

Waynesburg University senior, Thaddeus Statler, a native of Mt. Morris, was named the 2015 winner of the nationwide Aflac Elevate Intern contest. A business management major, Statler was selected based upon the total accounts opened, as well as the overall production of all interns with Aflac. Statler sold the most policies of the Aflac interns and opened three new accounts during the contest time frame from Feb. 9 to May 8. “Waynesburg University prepared me for this

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opportunity,” Statler said. “I have taken a few classes that I was able to apply towards understanding people and the product I was offering, as well as the presentation of that product. Being comfortable with people was my most valuable resource, which the climate at Waynesburg has definitely influenced.” Statler gave specific credit to professors Neely Lantz and Christian Ola for preparing him with topics he would utilize during his internship. “Their openness and willingness to talk on their own time, give me personal advice and even share their own experiences with me was more than I could have asked.” For being selected, Statler was awarded a $5,000 scholarship and a trip to the Columbus, Georgia headquarters of Aflac. Statler is pictured receiving his scholarship and award from Crystal Martin, Aflac District Sales Coordinator, and Jay McCord, Aflac Regional Sales Coordinator.

division’s highest overall female scorer with 57. The squad of Cameron Cernuska of Jefferson; Tristan Cole of Waynesburg; and Arran Hinerman of Waynesburg took first place in the intermediate advanced division. Cole and Cernuska placed first and third in the division with individual scores of 85 and 81, respectively. Caitlyn Dugan of Waynesburg was the division’s highest female scorer with 69. In the junior varsity division, Lou Dobish of Jefferson; Chase Faddis of Carmichaels; and Dylan Miller of Waynesburg won third place. With a total score of 244, Randy Durr of Greensboro; Kyle Grahek of Fredericktown; and Nathan Hinerman of Waynesburg finished first in the varsity division and first overall among all teams in the shoot. Placing third in the division with a combined score of 241 were Luke Pecjake of Dilliner; Branden Sanders of Waynesburg; and Parker Woodring of Carmichaels. Sanders placed first in the division and third overall among all shooters. Camryn Dugan of Waynesburg placed third for highest overall female with her score of 67. In the collegiate division, Nick Clarke of Carmichaels won third place with an individual score of 82.

Waynesburg University recently announced the promotions of Heidi Szuminsky, a ten-year staff member, and Bill Dumire, who joined the staff of the university in 2013. Szuminsky has been named the vice-president for institutional advancement and university relations. During her time at the university, Szuminsky has assumed various leadership roles. In her most recent position as the executive director of institutional advancement, Szuminsky guided the alumni relations and development team in informing and engaging university graduates and promoting philanthropic giving. She is the current president

of the Waynesburg Rotary Club and a member of the Southwest Regional Medical Center Advocacy Committee. Previously, she served on the board of directors for the Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce and as a board member of the Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency. Szuminsky has a B.A. in communications and an M.A. in business administration from Waynesburg University as well as a certificate in leadership development from Leadership Pittsburgh’s development initiative. Dumire came to the university as the executive director of information and technologies with over 15 years of previous I.T. and leadership experience in the higher education, healthcare and private sectors. Dumire currently directs the overall management and operation of campus-wide information and technology resources. Dumire holds a masters in information systems. Among his accomplishments since coming to the university, Dumire led the design, planning, and implementation of a new information system infrastructure to better support the current and future needs of the university.

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Rain Day Pageant Time! A

Outgoing Miss Rain Day Used Title to Make A Difference

It wouldn’t be Rain Day without the Rain Day Pageant!

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nd your 2015 Miss Rain Day is...’ There are five young ladies who hope to hear their name at the end of that phrase on July 26 at the 37th Annual

Miss Rain Day Scholarship Pageant. The event begins at 4 pm in the auditorium of the Waynesburg Central High School.

Those competing for the title and the schools they attend are: (portraits provided by Bruno & Bruno)

Claire

Elayne

Claire Kreider, 16, a junior at Waynesburg Central High School. Claire is the daughter of Lowell and Dani Kreider of Waynesburg. She will perform an acro-contemporary dance to “I Dreamed a Dream.”

Elayne LoFiego, 17, a senior at Waynesburg Central High School. Elayne is the daughter of Tom and Pam LoFiego of Mount Morris. She will perform an Irish dance to “Hornpipe.”

Caitlyn

Taylor

Caitlyn Ricco, 15, a junior at Carmichaels Area High School. Caitlyn is the daughter of Tom and Carrie Ricco of Carmichaels. She will perform an acro-lyrical dance to “Jar of Hearts.”

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Taylor Staley, 17, a senior at Waynesburg Central High School. Taylor is the daughter of Mark and Jackie Staley of Waynesburg. She will perform a lyrical dance to, “French Speaking.”

Kayla

Kayla Pendland, 17, a junior at Jefferson-Morgan Junior Senior High School. Kayla is the daughter of Kalem and Melinda Pendland of Clarksville. She will be performing the vocal selection, “Thousand Years.”

s the reign of 2014 Miss Rain Day Morgan Voithofer nears its close, the Carmichaels High School junior, has had a full year giving back to the people and pets of Greene County. “You can do as much as you want to or as little as you want,” Voithofer said. “You can make it yours.” Voithofer did just that. It wasn’t required that she complete an individual service project as Miss Rain Day, but Voithofer had spent enough time through the years volunteering at the Golden Living Center in Waynesburg that she felt compelled to do one. “My mom works there and I came to work with her one day,” she said, “It was fun visiting with the people there.” That was the start of her volunteering at the facility on a regular basis and how Voithofer became aware that many residents are visited infrequently or not at all. As Miss Rain Day, she knew there was an opportunity for her to do something special for them, and what better time then Christmas? “After collecting items for them (those who may not receive visitors for the holidays) there were so many gifts that everyone ended up getting something for Christmas,” Voithofer said. “I also sang Christmas Carols to them.” When she gave a large bag of gifts to one particular resident the reaction brought tears to Voithofer. She knew this lady was one who never received visitors and “she was so excited,” Voithofer said. As July began to wind down, and the days re-

maining in her reign dwindled, Voithofer and the 2015 Miss Rain Day contestants, worked together in support of the Greene County Humane Society. A service project with the new contestants is required of the outgoing queen but she chooses which philanthropy to support. “I love animals and I have two dogs at home so I chose the Greene County Humane Society,” she said. “I worked with the girls to put collection boxes at local banks and we will take what is donated to the Humane Society’s shelter in Waynesburg.” Continuing to make the most of her title from the start, Voithofer participated in the Coal Show Parade, Waynesburg Veterans’ Day Parade, and sang the National Anthem at several events, including a Wild Things Game. Most recently, she participated in the Jacktown Fair Parade. These were in addition to the Waynesburg Christmas Parade, and speaking appearances at the Waynesburg Rotary and Chamber of Commerce luncheons, requirements of the Miss Rain Day title. As for where she goes from here, at just 15-years old, Voithofer has some time to figure it out. “I haven’t made up my mind completely what I want to do after high school but I do plan on going to college,” she said, having considered pursuing theater at Point Park University along the way. Whatever decision the 2014 Miss Rain Day makes, it would appear that it will be a success. After all, she is currently first in her class, maintains a 4.0 grade point average, and then there is also the obvious drive to do more than is expected of her.

Five year old, Gina Isabella Colarusso will carry the crown for 2014 Miss Rain Day Morgan Voithofer to place on her successor. Colarusso is the daughter of Vince and Nikki Colarusso of Carmichaels.

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I Love this P l a ce

hen we chose Clarksville for the “I Love this Place,” feature, it soon became clear that first we would have to define which town we meant. “How are you going to do that? You know there are two Clarksvilles,” one person asked. Fortunately for me, I grew up in Clarksville, so it made my job writing about it that much easier. Initially, it seemed like starting from the beginning was the way to go but I soon learned the early history of my former hometown was quite muddled. In part, this was due to the Horn Papers, a famous set of forged historical documents that two local newspapers ran and then found out were a hoax. So, instead of starting in the days of the Native Americans that lived in the ‘Clarksvilles,’ it seemed more appropriate to talk about the history still remembered by many. Although there is really only one Clarksville in my mind, the area sandwiched between bridges on either end of what is Clarksville Borough, I knew what the person had meant when she referred to two. And, sometimes the lines between the ‘two’ Clarksvilles did get blurred, so much so, that we found the distinction wasn’t as important as their shared history. As those who are familiar with the town(s) know, when you cross the bridge on the northern side of Clarksville Borough you are in Washington County. While growing up, this Clarksville, also known as Williamstown, always seemed a continuation of its Greene County counterpart. The only difference was the kids living there attended Bethlehem- Center School District and we went to JeffersonMorgan. The bridge between us just made it easier to cross the water of Ten Mile Creek. And yes, growing up in Clarksville we did call it ‘the crick.’ Clarksville in its Heyday, on both sides of the county line bridge, is probably hard for younger residents to wrap their minds around. At one time businesses lined both sides of the street from the company store on the far end of Williamstown to the barber shop all the way at the other end of Clarksville Borough, a straight stretch. Greene County Clarksvillians (yes, I made that up) shopped at the company store on the Washington County side and they got haircuts and appliances on our side. Looking at the two sides of Clarksville today, it might be hard to

CLARKSVILLE, PA by Tara Kinsell

Clarksville in 1988 believe there was a time when hundreds gathered for baseball games in their Sunday best, or when kids from both sides would come together after school to ride bikes, fish, or collect empty glass pop bottles to cash in for penny candy at stores on either side. It was quite simply a ‘simpler time.’ And, thus, the catalyst for current and former residents who still recall those times to start the Clarksville Festival, founded four years ago. From that first 100th anniversary commemoration of the town, named by early pioneer Samuel Clarke for himself, came a book by journalist and former Clarksville native, Randi Ross Marodi, with stories, photos and as much history as could officially be documented of Clarksville. The book and festival were such a success that the gathering has

become an annual tradition with this year’s event slated for Aug. 1416. For those who knew Clarksville back when, it is a time to run into old friends, make new ones, dance in the street, and for those three days give a new generation of Clarksville kids a tiny taste of the “gold old days,” as resident Tom Shumaker referred to them in Marodi’s book. For Shumaker that would be the 1940s and 1950s. Marodi would say, for her, they were the 1970s and 1980s. But, whatever era one grew up in Clarksville, we are glad there are those fond enough of it to continue to “Love This Place” and share its stories with others. For more information on the Clarksville Festival or to purchase a copy of Marodi’s book, contact the borough office at 724-377-0155.

Lola and Charles Wortman’s Store, 1951

Ida Mary Haftman on the new bridge being built over the south fork of Ten Mile Creek, 1942

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Clarksville Today 19


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84th Annual Reunion of the John Corbly Descendants Association Descendents of the Rev. John Corbly and Abagail Kirk families met June 28 at the historic John Corbly Memorial Baptist Church in Garards Fort for the 84th Annual Reunion of the John Corbly Descendants Association. Over sixty were in attendance from seven states and Washington, D.C. thanks to the reach of the new reunion website, http://johncorblydescendants. org. Attendees were given a presentation from association President Bill Miller on the lifetime accomplishments and travails of Corbly and his family. Featured speaker and certified genealogist, Candice Buchanan, gave examples of period

Love And Romance At Waynesburg Theater

Relationships: An Evening of Short Plays about Love and Romance will be presented July 31 and Aug. 1 at 7:30 pm in the Goodwin Performing Arts Center at Waynesburg University. Admission is $5 per person and the production clothing and photographic techniques. The 2016 reunion will be held on June 26, not only for Corbly descendants, but also anyone interested in local history. For more information, contact Miller at billkathymmiller@yahoo.com or 724627-7129.

Jefferson Summer Classic Has Something For All Ages

Events for the 13th Annual Jefferson Summer Classic will be held July 31 and Aug. 1 at the Jefferson-Morgan Junior Senior High School. On July 31 a corn hole tournament for pairs will be es, scissors, glue sticks, notebooks, folders and held at 7 pm. The schedule of events for Aug. 1 children’s books are being requested. Monetary includes: a one-mile fun run for kids and teens donations will also be accepted. For information at 8:45 am, a 5K run/walk immediately following about how to donate, contact the Greene County the fun run, and a three-on-three double elimiUnited Way at 724-852-1009.

Time To Stuff The Bus The Greene County United Way’s 13th Annual Stuff the Bus for low income students in Greene County is currently underway with box pickup scheduled for July 31. Donations such as: pencils, backpacks, crayons, markers, lunch box-

Skyview Drive-In Show To Offer Support For Humane Society The 2015 Skyview Drive-In Car Show will be held Aug. 1 from 11 am to 3 pm at the drivein. Registration will begin at 10 am with a $10 cost to enter. Participants and spectators are encouraged to bring pet care items to the show for distribution to the Greene County Humane Society. Those bringing items such as pet food, cat litter, dog/cat toys will receive three free Chinese auction tickets. A list of the needs of the Greene County Humane Society is on its website at www.greenepet.org. The proceeds of a 50/50

raffle will also be given to the humane society. The car show will be emceed by WANB Radio’s Doug Wilson. Windshield plaques will be given to the first 100 cars entered and trophies awarded in various judged categories. Proceeds from registration will help the drive-in with its ongoing digital projection conversion, required to continue operating under current industry standards. For details, including early car registration, contact the Skyview Drive-In at 724-966-9433 or email the drive-in at skyview@atlanticbb.net.

King Coal 5K Registration Kicks Off Organizers of the 2nd Annual King Coal 5K Run/Walk and Kids Fun Run will accept pre-registration for the Aug. 22 event until July 30 to guarantee race t-shirts. Race-day registration will begin at 7:45 am with the 5K run/walk starting at 8:30 am from the Carmichaels Volunteer Fire Department. The fun run will begin following the 5K run/walk. The

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cost to pre-register for adults and children 12 and older is $20. Race day registration for adults and children 12 and older is $25. There is no difference for early registration for children under 12. That fee is set at $10. Registration forms are available at www.kingcoalshow.org and can be mailed with checks made out to the King Coal Association, Attn: 5K, PO Box 275, Carmichaels, Pa. 15320.

is open to the public. The plays will be put on by university alumni, current students, local high school students, and community members. These humorous and touching short plays will reflect on falling in love, proposing marriage, finding new relationships, and the pitfalls that often ensue. Join the actors as they portray a honeymooning couple experiencing their first fight, a farmer’s marriage proposal to his neighbor’s daughter, two college graduates wondering if marriage is right for them, a lonely man’s attempts to rekindle a past relationship, and two teenagers’ discovery of the overall unimportance of popularity. Tickets will be available for purchase at the door. For more information, contact Edward L. Powers, director of the Waynesburg University Theater Program at 724-852-3226.

nation basketball at 10 am. Activities for children will be held from 10 am to 11:30 am to include: football toss, three-legged races, water balloon toss and a cake walk. The single entry fee for all participants for both days is $15 in advance with a guaranteed t-shirt, or $20 the day of registration with no guarantee of a shirt. A special family rate will be offered for pre-registration of $45 with an increase of $55 if registration occurs at the classic. All early registrations must be received by July 29 with checks payable to the Jefferson Baptist Church, PO Box 218, Jefferson, Pa. 15344. Registration forms are available under community events at www. co.greene.pa.us. Sponsored by the Jefferson Baptist Church, proceeds from the classic will be used to aid in digging water wells in impoverished Burkina Faso, Africa. For more information, contact the church at 724-8834088.

LPN Program Registration Begins If you are interested in becoming a licensed practical nurse (LPN), the Greene County Career and Technology Center in Waynesburg can get you there in just 12 months. The practical nursing program is currently accepting applications for the 2015-16 school year. The GCCTC

LPN program has a 93 percent pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examination. For information on the admission process, financial aid, and pre-entrance requirements, contact the GCCTC at 724-627-3105, ext. 201.

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MissWV R

epresenting the state of West Virginia at the Miss America Pageant in September will be Chelsea Malone. Malone, 23, who was crowned Miss West Virginia in July, is the daughter of 1980 Carmichaels Area High School graduate, Nancy Antonelli Malone. Chelsea’s grandparents are Marion and Shirley Antonelli of Carmichaels. Nancy said Chelsea would of course like to win the title of Miss America but, “If she doesn’t win, she would be proudly representing the state of West Virginia for the next year. That would be her full-time job with (public) appearances, and over 100 or more school visits.” Singing publicly since she was just 9-years old, Chelsea has earned several titles, including: 2008 West Virginia Idol, 2011 Mountaineer Idol, 2013 Miss Capitol City, 2013 Jacktown Fair Idol, and 2014 Miss Northern West Virginia. She won the Mountaineer Idol competition while attending her alma mater, West Virginia University where she earned a degree in finance in 2010. Chelsea competed for Miss West Virginia as the 2015 Miss Wheeling, a title she was awarded in July 2014. At the 2016 Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City in September, Chelsea will continue with the platform, “Mental Health Advocacy at its CORE: Community Outreach, Research, and Education.” Reducing the stigma and raising awareness of mental health among public school students is close to her heart and rooted in her collegiate days when she was a group leader of the Morgantown Chapter of Mental Health America.

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GreeneScene by Lori McGinnis

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Spo r t Sh o rt s Golfing cousins bet their hats on sunshine in Greene

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hen considering who would be included in this month’s Sports Shorts, the name Rachel Rohanna easily sprang to mind as she climbs the ladder to the LPGA. Rachel is currently sixth for earnings on the 2015 Symetra Tour, the sister tour of the LPGA, with a little over half of the season under her belt. The top ten finishers for earnings receive an LPGA Tour card for 2016. While Rachel is wowing on the Symetra Tour, cousin, Robert Rohanna is competing fulltime on the PGA LatinoAmerica/Canada Tour. In 2014, Robert was in the top 10 of the Latino/ America Tour 6 times out of 15 events played with two top three finishes. With conditional status on the Web.com Tour for 2015, like cousin, Rachel, he is knocking on the door of the top level of the sport. So, we weren’t surprised when we opened the email from the Rain Day event’s committee and learned Rachel and Robert were dual hat bettors for 2015. Robert, 29, began golfing at the age of 4, while Rachel, 24, started at 7-years of age. Both quickly began making a name for themselves in tournament play as youngsters. One might say

the Rohannas were blessed with golfing genes. Rachel’s maternal grandparents, Dick and Roseann Schwartz, both golf pros, are her coaches. Of course Rachel and Robert grew up on the links of Rohanna’s golf course in Waynesburg. From their alma mater of Waynesburg High School to their collegiate careers, the accolades are lengthy for Rachel and Robert. Rachel was 2009-10 and 2010-11 first team All Big Ten at Ohio State University. Robert was two-time All Big Ten Conference and two-time Academic AllAmerican at Penn State. In April of this year, Robert took his game all the way to the next to final match of the Golf Channel’s Big Break, The Palm Beaches. He did it while still healing from a hand injury. That same month, Rachel went five under par to win the Symetra Guardian Retirement Championship at Sara Bay Country Club in Sarasota, Florida. Should it rain on July 29, the Rohannas would join storied golfer, Arnold Palmer on the list of celebrities who have lost their hat to the Waynesburg phenomenon, certainly not bad company to find themselves in, win or lose.

by Tara Kinsell

Fayette County Hall recognizes Marisa

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he 2015 Fayette County Sports Hall of Fame inductees for coaching included a name synonymous with collegiate basketball in its neighboring Greene County, Rudy Marisa. Born in Fredericktown, Marisa played high school basketball at the former East Bethlehem High School before moving on to earn a spot on the basketball team at Penn State University. After college, Marisa would find himself teaching and coaching basketball in Fayette County at Dunbar Township High School and later at Albert Gallatin, taking the A.G. Colonials to two WPIAL Class A Section Championships. His resume growing, in 1969, Marisa had an opportunity to become the head men’s basketball coach at Waynesburg College, a position he would hold for the next 34 years. And what years they were! Basketball fans who lived in Waynesburg or attended the college in the 1980s can attest to the raw energy that surged through the gymnasium as the Waynesburg College Yellow Jackets worked their way toward seven NAIA National Tournaments in Kansas City. Who could forget the 1987-88 season when the team took it all the way to the NAIA Final Four after winning 32-straight games. At the end of the game that led to the final four, held in the Waynesburg gymnasium, that would later be named for Marisa, chaos followed the final buzzer. Strains of “Kansas City Here I Come” echoed off the gym walls, fans spilled onto the court, and Marisa was hoisted onto his players’ shoulders. The

Jackets gave fans a team to believe in. Fans sat glued to ESPN as the team was pitted against Grand Canyon University in the semi-final match. In the end, it was a one basket difference that put the Grand Canyon Antelopes ahead of Marisa’s boys by a score of 108-106 but nearly 30 years later, we’d take a bet that fans from the era can still recall the likes of players such as Harold Hamlin, Darrin Walls, Vance Walker, and Shawn McCallister. All totaled, Marisa amassed an amazing 565 wins as the head coach of the Yellow Jackets before retiring after the 2002-03 season. He was a twotime Presidents Athletic Conference Coach of the Year. The team joined the PAC in 1990. Wearing the dual hat of athletic director, along with head coach, almost as long as he coached the team, Marisa was also a five-time NAIA District 18 Coach of the Year. In 2012 he was inducted for his coaching career at Waynesburg into the Pittsburgh Basketball Club’s Hall of Fame. With just this brief snapshot of Marisa’s career from player to coach the recent induction by the Fayette County Sports Hall of Fame is obviously quite fitting.

OFFICIAL LIST OF RAIN DAY HAT BETTORS 1939- Al Abrams, Sportswriter* 1940- No Record* 1941- Chester Smith, Sportswriter* 1942- No Record* 1943- No Record* 1944- Whitney Martin, Correspondent* 1945- Harry Keck, Football Coach* 1946- Jack Dempsey, Boxing Champ 1947- Bing Crosby, Singer/Actor* 1948- Bob Hope, Comedian/Actor* 1949- Vince Johnson, Correspondent 1950- Eddie Clover, Magician 1951- Captain Roach, Harrisburg 1952- Tex Litman, Restaurateur* 1953- Tex Litman, Restaurateur 1954- No Record

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1955- Bob Prince, Sportscaster 1956- Dr. William McClellan, Coroner 1957- Bob Considine, Sportswriter 1958- Major Don Johnston, Air Guard* 1959- Karl Ide, TV Newsman* 1960- Three Stooges, Comedians/Actors 1961- Eleanor Shano, Weather Reporter* 1962- Eleanor Shano, Weather Reporter* 1963- Cassius Clay, Boxing Champ* 1964- Arnold Palmer, Golf Pro/Champ* 1965- John Charles Daily, TV Moderator* 1966- Punxsutawney Phil, Weather Prognosticator* 1967- Del Miller, Harness Racer* 1968- Linda Richards, TV News Reporter* 1969- Paul Long, TV News Reporter* 1970- Red Donley, Sports Reporter*

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1971- Jack Bogut, Disc Jockey* 1972- Al Abrams, Sports* 1973- Bill Curry, TV Sports Reporter* 1974- Jack Fleming, TV Sports Reporter* 1975- Bob Kudzma, TV Weatherman* 1976- Myron Cope, Sports Reporter* 1977- Johnny Carson, Tonight Show Host* 1978- Bob Kudzma, TV Weatherman* 1979- Lou Brock, Baseball Star* 1980- Bill & Patty Burns, TV News* 1981- Joe DeNardo, TV Weatherman* 1982- Myron Cope, Sports Reporter 1983- Willard Scott, NBC Weatherman 1984- Franco Harris, Pittsburgh Steeler 1985- Willard Scott, NBC Weatherman 1986- Rick Woods, Pittsburgh Steeler*

1987- Harry Anderson, Actor 1988- Harry Mitchell 1989- Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguin 1990- Andy Van Slyke, Pittsburgh Pirate 1991- Sophie Masloff, Mayor of Pittsburgh* 1992- City of Niceville, Florida* 1993- Mason City, Iowa* 1994- Mike Love, Beach Boys* 1995- Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguin* 1996- Troy Aikman, Dallas Cowboy* 1997- Fran Drescher, Actress 1998- Jay Leno, Tonight Show Host* 1999- B94, FM Radio* 2000- Mr. Rogers & Mr. McFeely* 2001- Dixie Chicks, Country Singers* 2002- Sara Rush & Kent Tekulve, Pittsburgh Pirate*

2003- Chubby Checker, Singer 2004- Will Ferrell, Comedian/Actor 2005- Donald Trump, Taj Mahal Casino Owner* 2006- Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh Steeler 2007- William Sanderson, Actor* 2008 - Luke Ravenstahl, Mayor of Pittsburgh 2009 - Miss America Katie Stam* 2010 - Annise D. Parker, Mayor of Houston Texas* 2011 - Josh Koscheck, UFC Fighter* 2012 - Brett Keisel, Pittsburgh Steelers 2013 - Coleman Scott, 2012 Olympic Bronze Medalist* 2014 - Patricia Heaton, Actress, Producer and Writer*

* Designates a rain year.

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St. Ann’s to celebrate

175 years

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t is hard to believe that part of the property purchased by Father Patrick Lonergan in 1799 to erect a Catholic church in Waynesburg is, in fact, where St. Ann Catholic Church is today. But, that same piece of property, located at the corner of High and Cumberland streets, is where the church was eventually built and the church body will celebrate its 175th Anniversary this month. The July 25 celebration will begin at 5 pm with the children’s play, “Ten Days in the Life of Our Parish,” followed by mass at 6 pm. Proceeding the mass will be a covered dish picnic on the grounds of the church at 7:30 pm. Meat and beverages will be provided for attendees. For more information, contact the church office at 724-627-7568.

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A REUNION & A RESTORATION A Reunion to be held at Whiteley Elementary reunion of the students, faculty, staff and administrators of the former Whiteley Township Elementary School is being planned for Sept. 5 from 10 am to 2 pm. Built in 1938, the school opened its doors on Sept. 4, 1939 and closed them for good following the 1993 school year. The reunion will be held at the two-story brick school building, now privately owned, through the generosity of its current owner. Former student, Linda McCracken, is part of the reunion group that is collecting the names and contact information of those who attended or worked at the school over its 60-year existence. Reunion invitations an-

nounce the opportunity to “renew friendships and share fond memories of past school days and happenings of the present.” A great deal of effort is being put out by the reunion committee to trace the history of the school to be able to provide reunion goers with a snapshot of Whiteley Elementary through the years. McCracken is encouraging anyone who attended the school, taught there, or was affiliated in anyway to share photos and memories of the school on the Facebook page, Whiteley Township School Alumni, or via email to mccrackenl@hotmail.com. These items may also be shared in-person at the reunion. For more information, phone McCracken at 724-627-8379.

Restoration efforts taking place at Crouse Schoolhouse

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ne can almost hear echoes of the ringing bell that summoned children to begin the school day at the one-room Crouse Schoolhouse, located west of Waynesburg on Route 21. From 1908 to its closure in 1960, the schoolhouse, with its potbelly stove, ink wells, and hard wood floor taught everything from reading to plant identification. Students of all ages shared the space, roughly the size of a single classroom today. The building was acquired by the Greene County Historical Society in 1986. Since that time it has held up pretty well, considering its age, location and lack of regular usage. Rogersville native, Buzz Walters, is hoping to restore the school to its former glory, in the process making it a satellite location for the historical society to display items and hold functions.

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Some of the more recent work done on the building has been fixing of rotting wood on the front porch, restoring the original wrought iron school desks, and completing work on the windows. All of this has been a volunteer effort. Walters said that is the crux of the situation. With little money available, volunteers, like brothers, Chuck and Allen Anderson, who did the porch and desk work, are invaluable. The Anderson’s mother, Louise Crouse, attended the school that was built on her family’s land. The new front door was replicated by Rich Lang of Jefferson, working from an old photograph. In the years since its closure, it has been people like those mentioned here, offering a labor of love, that continue to breath life into the structure. Monies brought in by the defunct West Greene Community Development Group and from recent fundraising efforts of the historical society, along with private donations are helping to finance the replacement of the school’s decaying roof. A portion of the work was previously completed and then stalled by a company formerly contracted to do the work, according to Eben Williams, administrator of the historical society. Williams said a new contractor has been hired and he hopes to see the work completed in time for a re-

organizational meeting at the school to be held by Walters in late August. Williams said he is excited to have Walters spearheading the movement to complete the restoration. “Buzz is a great guy and when he says he will do something he does it,” Williams said. “I have no doubt he is the person who will get this accomplished.” Walters said it does take a village to get projects, such as this one, completed. He is requesting that anyone with a love of history who would like to see the Crouse Schoolhouse open its doors once again contact the Greene County Historical Society at 724-627-3204 or Walters directly at 724499-5332 to volunteer labor, supplies, or finances to the project. Checks can be mailed to the Greene County Historical Society, Crouse Schoolhouse Fund, 918 Rolling Meadows Road, Waynesburg, Pa. 15370.

GreeneScene by Kristin Haywood

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ain Day headliners, the Stonestreet Band, from Charleston, West Virginia, plays a mix of Top 40 from the 70s, 80s, 90s, and today mixed with country and pop dance tunes. An opening act for Sheena Easton, Michael McDonald, Jefferson Starship, and others, Stonestreet encourages dancing in the streets!

7:30 PM • July 29th

Clockwise from bottom, left: Steve Fish, David Fitzwater, Chris Blaze, Sonya Lea, and Kersey Mata.

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ailing from Cary, North Carolina, Drew Johnson spent the past several years living and making music in Nashville, Tennessee settling in Greene County following his recent nuptials to Waynesburg High School graduate Laura Swanson. Johnson continues to travel around the east coast performing a gritty, southern rock style of music, reflective in his original recording, “Off the Tracks.” Check out Johnson at www.drewjohnsonmusic.com.

3:00 PM • July 29th

NOON 9th July 2

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July Aug GreeneSaver 2015  

It's Rain Day! Our annual Rain Day issue is out! See the schedule of events including several great bands. Find out who will lose their hat...

July Aug GreeneSaver 2015  

It's Rain Day! Our annual Rain Day issue is out! See the schedule of events including several great bands. Find out who will lose their hat...

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