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GreeneScene by Beverly Yoskovich

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You Bet Your Hat It’ll Rain! B

Patricia Heaton…Prepare to lose your Hat! 1939- Al Abrams, Sportswriter* 1940- No Record* 1941- Chester Smith, Sportswriter* 1942- No Record* 1943- No Record* 1944- Whitney Martin, Correspondent* 1945- Harry Keck, Football Coach* 1946- Jack Dempsey, Boxing Champ 1947- Bing Crosby, Singer/Actor* 1948- Bob Hope, Comedian/Actor* 1949- Vince Johnson, Correspondent 1950- Eddie Clover, Magician 1951- Captain Roach, Harrisburg 1952- Tex Litman, Restaurateur* 1953- Tex Litman, Restaurateur

y now, the story of how the Waynesburg Rain Day Hat Bet originated has become the stuff of myth. As John Owen, chairman of the Special Events Commission from 1979 to 2005 relates on the event’s website, www. raindayfestival.com, “Rain Day got its beginning in the Daly & Spraggs Drug Store, located in the center of Waynesburg. Legend has it that one day a farmer was in the drugstore and mentioned to Byron Daly that it would rain the next day, July 29. Mr. Daly asked him how he knew and he replied that it was his birthday and that it always rained on his birthday. He had a journal for several years in which he recorded the weather and always had noted rain on July 29th. Mr. Daly thought this was too sure a thing to let pass, so he started betting salesmen who came into his drugstore that it would rain in Waynesburg on July 29. The bet was usually a new hat, which of course he would win.” Byron’s son, John Daly, carried on the hat wagering tradition, and, in later years, the Special Events Commission, which oversees the Rain Day festivities, took over those duties. As can be seen on the accompanying list, the luminaries who have participated in the bet are diverse and extensive, to say the least! This year, the celebrity at risk of losing her hat is the multi-talented actress, producer, and writer, Patricia Heaton. Patricia is perhaps best known for her role as Debra Barone, long-suffering wife of Ray Romano’s character on the CBS series, Everybody Loves Raymond. Since 2009, she has enjoyed continued success portraying Frances “Frankie” Heck on the popular ABC show, The Middle. What you may not know is that Patricia has a strong “local connection” to the area. In 2005, she produced the film, “The Bituminous Coal Queens of Pennsylvania,” which was directed by her husband, David Hunt, and presented by their production company, Four Boys Entertainment. This documentary followed actress Sarah Rush, who was the “Coal Queen” in 1972, as she returned home to Carmichaels to witness the 50th anniversary Coal Queen Pageant in 2003. Filming took place throughout Greene and Fayette counties, and featured that year’s contestants, as well as many other local residents. Sarah was the “connection” to Patricia, according to Waynesburg mayor, Duncan Berryman. “Sarah starred in the original ‘Battlestar Galactica,’ and she’s had movie roles, as well,” he points out. “When she moved to the west coast, she befriended Ms. Heaton, and I got in touch with her through a gentleman in Waynesburg named Sam McCollum.” Sam, of course, is a well-known local performer, whose son, Braxton, was featured in the November, 2013 edition of the GreeneSaver. “Sam keeps in touch with Sarah through Facebook,” Duncan continued, “and Sam contacted her on my behalf. Sarah contacted Patricia Heaton, and she agreed to do it.” As for the actual hats involved, Duncan says, “Ms. Heaton would lose whatever hat she’d like to send to the borough; that’s her decision. We have a ‘Rain Day hat’ that the committee has put together every year, and, of course, we would send it to her if it does not rain.” Hats are typically put on display in the Greene County Museum, he notes, though that has not always necessarily been the case. “There have been a few instances, years and years ago, where some of the mayors kept the hats rather than turning them in, so we’re a little short. But, more recently, all the hats have been donated to the museum.”

Official List of Rain Day Hat Bettors

1954- No Record 1955- Bob Prince, Sportscaster 1956- Dr. William McClellan, Coroner 1957- Bob Considine, Sportswriter 1958- Major Don Johnston, Air Guard* 1959- Karl Ide, TV Newsman* 1960- Three Stooges, Comedians/Actors 1961- Eleanor Shano, Weather Reporter* 1962- Eleanor Shano, Weather Reporter* 1963- Cassius Clay, Boxing Champ* 1964- Arnold Palmer, Golf Pro/Champ* 1965- John Charles Daily, TV Moderator* 1966- Punxsutawney Phil, Weather Prognosticator* 1967- Del Miller, Harness Racer* 1968- Linda Richards, TV News Reporter*

1969- Paul Long, TV News Reporter* 1970- Red Donley, Sports Reporter* 1971- Jack Bogut, Disc Jockey* 1972- Al Abrams, Sports* 1973- Bill Curry, TV Sports Reporter* 1974- Jack Fleming, TV Sports Reporter* 1975- Bob Kudzma, TV Weatherman* 1976- Myron Cope, Sports Reporter* 1977- Johnny Carson, Tonight Show Host* 1978- Bob Kudzma, TV Weatherman* 1979- Lou Brock, Baseball Star* 1980- Bill & Patty Burns, TV News* 1981- Joe DeNardo, TV Weatherman* 1982- Myron Cope, Sports Reporter 1983- Willard Scott, NBC Weatherman

1984- Franco Harris, Pittsburgh Steeler 1985- Willard Scott, NBC Weatherman 1986- Rick Woods, Pittsburgh Steeler* 1987- Harry Anderson, Actor 1988- Harry Mitchell 1989- Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguin 1990- Andy Van Slyke, Pittsburgh Pirate 1991- Sophie Masloff, Mayor of Pittsburgh* 1992- City of Niceville, Florida* 1993- Mason City, Iowa* 1994- Mike Love, Beach Boys* 1995- Jaromir Jagr, Pittsburgh Penguin* 1996- Troy Aikman, Dallas Cowboy* 1997- Fran Drescher, Actress 1998- Jay Leno, Tonight Show Host*

1999- B94, FM Radio* 2000- Mr. Rogers & Mr. McFeely* 2001- Dixie Chicks, Country Singers* 2002- Sara Rush & Kent Tekulve, Pittsburgh Pirate* 2003- Chubby Checker, Singer 2004- Will Ferrell, Comedian/Actor 2005- Donald Trump, Taj Mahal Casino Owner* 2006- Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh Steeler 2007- William Sanderson, Actor* 2008 - Luke Ravenstahl, Mayor of Pittsburgh 2009 - Miss America Katie Stam* 2010 - Annise D. Parker, Mayor of Houston Texas* 2011 - Josh Koscheck, UFC Fighter* 2012 - Brett Keisel, Pittsburgh Steelers 2013 - Coleman Scott, 2012 Olympic Bronze Medalist* * Designates a rain year.

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New and exciting career opportunities await you as a Professional Truck Driver! This is your life. This is your dream. OWN IT.

GreeneScene by Logan Dunlap

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GreeneScene by Carol Andrews

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S.O.A.R. Annual Airport Days Look! Up in the sky! Is it a bird? Is it a plane?!

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ctually, it is a plane. If you were anywhere near Waynesburg on the weekend of July 19th and 20th, you may have noticed an unusual number of airplanes flying overhead, and not the kind you’re probably accustomed to seeing. No large jetliners flying tens of thousands of feet in the sky, these; small planes are the order of the day for S.O.A.R.’s (Support Our Aviation Resources) 4th Annual Airport Days, held at the Greene County Airport. Held in cooperation with the Experimental Aircraft Association’s “Young Eagles” program, Airport Days offers a remarkable opportunity for children ages 8-17 to take a free airplane ride, with written consent from a parent or legal guardian. Adults can enjoy the exhilaration of taking off and seeing the community from the air, for a $20 donation, which helps defray fuel costs. The question may arise: “Free airplane rides? Come on, what’s the catch..?” Spending just a few moments chatting with Waynesburg’s own Max Loughman, a professional commercial airline pilot with over 30 years’ experience in the air, quickly reveals that the only “catch” is an unassailable passion for flying. “I learned to fly in Greene County,” he says. “You know—a high school kid hanging on the fence out there. I just wanted to fly airplanes.” It was retired pilot Frank Van Cleef, who still lives in Waynesburg, who turned Max’s youthful desire into full-throttle passion for taking to the air. “I was a kid hanging out here, and Frank’s flying a J-3 Piper Cub that he owned here on the field,” he recalls, the excitement in his voice growing as he reaches back to the memory. “He looked over and yelled, ‘Come on, let’s go for an airplane ride!’ and that was it. It was just wonderful. There’s all that history, and it’s really cool stuff,” he concludes. “You just don’t ever want that to go away.” In previous years, there were two separate Airport Days, one in spring and one in fall. This year, the event is concentrated into one spectacular summer weekend. Max reports that, on average, 80 to 90 young people have lined up for their free flight, eager to watch people turn into ants scurrying around miniature houses on the ground, with an additional 40, 50 or more adults taking the donation rides. The EAA/Young Eagles program typically brings in six to eight pilots for the event. An additional four or five volunteer pilots not directly affiliated with that program were expected to participate, also. Airplane use is “donated,” as well. The event featured various airplanes on display, food, entertainment, and much more. With so many things going on during Airport Days, it’s almost unavoidable that everyone attending had a great time, but, for some, it may turn out to be a life-altering experience as it was for Max. “A lot of kids learn to fly in these little airports,” he notes, “and get a start and a love of aviation.” He is eager to mention that there is a wealth of career opportunities available for those who have their interest sparked. “The airlines are not the only jobs out there. There are lots of great corporate jobs. Those are very high paying jobs with good benefits. There are quite a few professional pilots that live in Greene County,” he adds, “and they are able to work, and a lot of people don’t realize that.” He outlines the vast infrastructure of people who make it possible for planes to fly, whether in a small craft across state, or a gigantic superliner that spans continents, non-stop. “You don’t have to be a pilot,” says Max. “There are mechanics, avionics technicians, air traffic controllers; there’s a whole list of jobs that are aviation related, and this is a good start.” Bringing the community together, giving young people what may be their first experience taking to the air, educating folks about the resource that is the Greene County Airport, and having a chance to hang out with a bunch of flyboys (and flygirls!), talking shop and trading stories… could there be anything better about Airport Days for a pilot? Well, maybe… Says Max, “The biggest thing with the Young Eagles, for me, is watching these young kids when they get off the airplane. They’re just grinning from ear to ear. Unfortunately, the line is too long to let them go again!” For more information about S.O.A.R.’s Greene County Airport Days, or other regional S.O.A.R. or Young Eagles activities, contact Max Loughman at 724-344-9693, or John Strope, of Strope Aircraft Maintenance, at 724-984-4587.

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ne of the highlights of this year’s Rain Day celebration is sure to be the infectious beat of the 80s, as provided by the, like, totally awesome band, Simon Sez, hailing from Cumberland, Maryland. A five-piece group consisting of Jim Corley, vocals; Ray Wagner, keyboards, guitar, and “Keytar”; Tim Wilhelm, lead guitar and “all important 80s vibe”; Jim Robinette, bass; and John Robinette, drums (with lighting, lasers and video production by Dave Mawhinney of Sight & Sound Productions), the band comes by its authentic 80s groove honestly. “We all grew up in the 70s and 80s,” says Jim Corley, “so our high school and college time was all during the 80s. That music is something that ‘stuck’ for us, and when we decided to get together, we wanted to put together a tribute band, not to any particular group, but to the decade.” A big part of the appeal of the music, aside from having it as the formative soundtrack of their youth, was how many unique artists emerged. “The music of the 80s was so diverse, and there were a lot of ‘one-hit wonders’. We try to pay attention to those, as well as the more popular bands that are still performing and thriving.” Among those surviving stalwarts, songs by Bon Jovi and Poison are cemented into the band’s repertoire. The audience will also be treated to what Jim calls “quintessential 80s music,” like A Flock of Seagulls, Men Without Hats, and many others. And what of Frankie Goes to Hollywood? “Oh, absolutely,” Jim immediately responds. “It’s kind of one of the focal points of the show. In fact, we have shirts that were printed up that say ‘Simon Sez Relax,’ instead of ‘Frankie Say Relax’!” The band has been together for four years, total, with the current lineup performing for 2 ½ years. Since this will be their first Rain Day performance, one wonders how the band is approaching the opportunity to entertain Waynesburg’s rainy revelers. “It sounds like a great time,” says Jim, noting that the whole band is looking “very much forward” to playing at the festival. “It’s not too often that we play an outdoor gig that we’re praying for rain! There’s something kind of bizarre about that,” he concludes, “but we’ll take it and run with it!” Simon Sez will be hitting the stage at 7:30—missing it would be grody to the max, fer sure…

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Rain Day Pageant Time!

GreeneScene

It wouldn’t be Rain Day without the Rain Day Pageant!

The 36th annual Miss Rain Day Scholarship Pageant, sponsored by Rain Day Scholarship, Inc, will be held Sunday, July 27, at 4:00 p.m. in the Jefferson Morgan Jr. Sr. High School auditorium. Miss Stephanie Mitchell, 2013 Miss Rain Day, is the 17-year old daughter of Becky and Jim Mitchell of Carmichaels. The crown bearer at the pageant will be Miss Bailey Barnyak, the 6 year old daughter of Nikki Gasti of Carmichaels and Jeff Barnyak of Clarksville.

Those competing for the title and the schools they attend are as follows (portraits provided by Bruno & Bruno):

Kayla

Kayla Pendland, the 16 year old daughter of Kalem and Melinda Pendland of Clarksville; Junior at JeffersonMorgan Junior Senior High School

Carly

Carly Riggi, the 15 year old daughter of John and Josey Riggi of Rices Landing; Junior Jefferson-Morgan Junior Senior High School

Nina

Caitlyn

Nina Rivera, the 16 year old daughter of Chad and Eryan Coss of Waynesburg; Senior at Waynesburg Central High School

Caitlyn Ricco, the 14 year of daughter of Tom and Carrie Ricco of Carmichaels; sophomore at Carmichaels Area Junior Senior High School

Morgan

Morgan Voithofer, the 14 year old daughter of Jason Voithofer and Heather Tokarcik, both of Carmichaels; sophomore at Carmichaels Area Junior Senior High School

Miss Bailey Barnyak, 2014 Crown Bearer

The GreeneSaver extends sincere thanks to Stephanie for her year of dedicated service as “Miss Rain Day 2013,” and wishes best of luck to all of the 2014 contestants!

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Just a Guy and His Dog By Regis Whetzel

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t would take a jaded soul to watch without thinking, “Wow, this is really cool…” A sealed, zip-top plastic bag with a tiny amount of what is referred to in the trade as a “controlled substance” is hidden somewhere in the building. A coal-black German Shepherd, relaxing in her kennel, suddenly springs to life, tail flying back and forth, smiling in that special way that only dogs can smile, as she observes “her human” taking out a large, reflective collar with the word “POLICE” emblazoned on it. The kennel door is opened, and the Shepherd, clearly wanting to bound a thousand feet straight up into the air, becomes an instant statue at the sound of a single command. The collar is fastened around her muscular neck, the word is given, and this dog clearly knows it is time to go to work. Within less than a minute, she homes in on a general area, refines her opinion, comes to the decision she knows is correct, and sits down in front of the exact location where the plastic bag was hidden: deep in a garbage can lying halfway underneath a desk. The bag is retrieved, a shout of, “Good girl!” fills the air, and then comes the best part: the toy… This impressive display is only a small part of life for Officer Asa Winters and K-9 Officer Izzy, of the Waynesburg Borough Police Department. For Asa, the secret to Izzy’s success is no secret—it’s all about training. “Every single thing that we do is a training exercise,” he says, confidently. “From when we wake up in the morning, I let her out of her crate, and it’s obedience training. She has to heel on my side ‘til she gets to the door. It’s all for that reward. She knows, ‘If I follow him on his hip until he gets to the door, then I get to go outside and run.’ One of the most important things is the obedience; if they don’t listen, we don’t really have anything.” Obedience and listening hardly seem to present a problem for Izzy. She responds instantly to Asa’s commands, many of which sound peculiar Think long and hard before messing with Officer Asa Winters and K-9 Officer Izzy. at first, until he explains: “It’s in German. Some of the words I use with her are in English, but for the most part, it’s a foreign language.” Is this a safety measure, so that Izzy will only respond to Asa’s commands? “That’s actually a common misconception,” he clarifies. “She’s my dog, and she listens to me, and nobody else but me.” Asa notes that teaching commands in the dog’s “native language” is common practice for police dogs. “It’s based on their heritage. Dutch Shepherds, they use Dutch; the Belgian Malinois, they use Belgian.” Asa purchased Izzy with his own money when she was a puppy nearly 3 ½ years ago, and has a dog lover’s memory of their first meeting. “When I picked her, one of the reasons was because she had such a strong drive,” he remembers. “When they got her out of the car the first time, and I had a ball, she went nuts. That showed me that she was going to be easier to train, because she’s not going to get bored with it.” Izzy’s enthusiastic drive is just one of her strong suits. Asa continues, “When I watched her track for the first time, her nose never came off the ground, just the whole way until she found what she had to find.” Partnership with Izzy is the current chapter in a story that began several years ago, Asa says. “I was a lifeguard when I was younger, and got into the medical side of it; I was a firefighter for a little while, and got really interested in being a first responder.” What truly planted the seed, though, was when, “I got into a summer camp through the state police when I was 16 or 17, and they brought a K-9 to that camp. I watched, and I was just amazed at the things you could teach this dog to do,” he recalls. “When I got into law enforcement after college, being a dog lover my whole life, and always having dogs, I got really into it.” He credits Craig Miller, police chief and K-9 handler in Cumberland Township, and his K-9, Artis; and Mike Yeager, K-9 handler and patrolman in Masontown Borough, and his K-9, Brawny, with providing him with the education needed to be able to train Izzy. One of Izzy’s milestone accomplishments came in October of 2013, on Asa’s birthday, when she became certified to conduct article and field searches, aggression control, and other functions through NAPWDA, the North American Police Work Dog Association. It was a birthday to remember for Asa, who recalled “talking to Izzy on the way there, saying, ‘Hey, if there’s a birthday present you want to give me, it’s today!’” NAPWDA is a nationwide organization whose objective, in part, is to, “Establish a working standard for all police work dogs, handlers and trainers, through an accreditation program” (www.napwda. com). If any of Izzy’s actions while on a case are ever called into question, a NAPWDA representative can be subpoenaed as an expert witness to vouch for her training and abilities, thanks to her certification. Such a special dog requires some special tools to get her job done. There’s the reflective “POLICE” collar, of which Asa says, “There are laws that say we have to identify ourselves as police. It’s the same thing with her—she has to be identified.” Izzy has boots to protect her paws in harsh conditions; drug-scented tennis balls to keep her skills honed under the guise of “just playing”; a heavy-duty “tracking harness”; and—potentially most important of all—a bulletproof, stab-proof vest, donated by the group Vested Interest in K-9s (www.vik9s.org). Donated to the Waynesburg Borough Police by Masontown Borough Police, the Jeep Cherokee that serves as Izzy’s “home on wheels” is outfitted to hold all of her tools and supplies (and a few toys, of course) in the rear, while the backseat area has been transformed into a kennel. The vehicle’s biggest “cool factor,” though, is the remote control door-release button. Resembling a small garage door opener remote, and worn on the lapel of Asa’s K-9 handler uniform, the button, “Pops that door, so if I’m on a traffic stop or something, and somebody starts to, for lack of a better term, ‘get the best of me,’ I can always get her to me.” “I can always get her to me” might be an excellent motto for the relationship between the two. Izzy lives with Asa full time when off duty; “She’s just like a pet when we go home,” he says, smiling. “When my parents come around, or when my sister comes around, they just spoil her rotten.” Work is work, though, and is taken seriously. “When she works an 8 hour shift, she’s with me the whole time. She’s very multi-purpose.” Asa concludes thoughtfully, “I’m biased, because of how much I get along with Izzy and with other dogs, but “Let’s roll!” Izzy, ready to hit the streets in the “kennel compartment” there’s not a situation I can think of where you couldn’t use the dog for something.” of the K-9 Unit.

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GreeneScene

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n this, the second installment of a three part series, Driving the Future takes a look at careers in the oil and gas industry that require some additional, post-graduate learning after high school through either a Professional Degree, as might be obtained through a vocational-technical or “trade” school, or a two-year Associate’s Degree. While obtaining this type of degree is more time consuming and expensive than simply entering the workforce immediately after high school, there are also advantages. The potential for higher earning power and greater upward mobility within one’s field can make a two-year degree an appealing option. In addition, post-high school training can increase a candidate’s value to possible employers. Finally (and most obviously), the positions posted below require additional schooling; anyone interested in these jobs will need to obtain the type of degree mentioned in each description in order to be considered for employment in one of these jobs. As was the case last month, earnings figures are only guidelines, and were obtained from 2011 reports in the Oil & Gas/Energy Career Directory with statistics provided by the Pennsylvania Center for Workforce Information and Analysis. Architectural and Civil Drafter: As the name suggests, this job involves creating precise drawings of buildings and other structures. Some drafters even specialize in a certain type of building material. Drawings and maps prepared by architectural and civil drafters are used in construction or civil engineering projects. Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) is now used by most drafters, as it allows for easy revision or duplication of a design, though manual, “paper and pencil” drafting may still be used in some cases. Average yearly earnings for this type of drafter in the Southwest Corner of PA is $48,590, and the work requires what is known as a Professional Degree as described above. Truck and Diesel Engine Mechanic: Even a passing glance at any road in the tri-county region should reveal the necessity for legions of people able to service the engines of the countless large trucks in use, not to mention caring for the wide range of other kinds of construction vehicles at work on a daily basis. Requiring a Professional Degree, the average statewide annual wage for a bus, truck, and diesel mechanic is just over $41,000, with plenty of room to grow. Troubleshooting, repairing, and installation skills are needed, and knowledge of electronic components becomes increasingly important, as engines become more complex and electronicallycontrolled. Chemical Technician: An Associate’s Degree is a pre-requisite for this job, which has a statewide yearly average salary of just over $44,000. Chemical technicians work with chemists and chemical engineers, developing and using chemicals and related products and equipment. Research technicians work in experimental laboratories, while process control technicians typically work in manufacturing or other “in the field” type industrial plants. Critical thinking, quality control, and operations monitoring are among the skills needed to successfully perform the work of a chemical technician. Civil Engineering Technician: An experienced Civil Engineering Technician earns upwards of $60,000 per year in our region, and involves a unique combination of research, science, and mathematics, alongside practical, hands-on situations. This work involves using a specific, learned skill-set to solve technical problems in research and development, construction, inspection and maintenance. They may build or help set up equipment, conduct experiments, collect and record data and results, and help oversee many facets of structural construction. Naturally, this is but a sample of the types of career opportunities that open up for those who choose to go beyond high school with a Professional or Associate’s Degree. For more information about the programs available, and the jobs that can be obtained as a result, you may want to contact your local technical or trade school, community college, or a standard “four-year” college that offers Associate’s Degrees in their course catalogue. Next month, this series concludes with a look at some careers available for those with a Bachelor’s Degree, or who are considering whether or not to make that their next step after high school.

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2014 Community Builders Sessions Slated to Begin in August

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he eleventh series of Community Builders of Greene County will begin August 25, 2014. The program will meet every other Monday through December 15, 2014. Classes will be held from 5:30-8:30 each evening in the new Community Foundation meeting room at 106 E. High Street, Waynesburg. Applications are being accepted through August 15th. Community Builders provides training for persons interested in volunteering their time and talents to support Greene County nonprofit organizations. The nonprofit leadership program explores leadership, nonprofit board governance, financial management, communication and team work, strategic planning, public relations, resource development and volunteer engagement. The series is geared to helping citizens become better volunteers and employees with non-profit organizations in the community, whether it be through activities such as serving on non-profit boards, volunteering on fundraising committees, or serving as a program staff. Eight learning sessions are conducted by one or more local experts in the field of that week’s topic. A graduation/achievement ceremony is held at the end of the program when participants completing the course receive a Community Builder Certificate. Each participant is asked to pay a $150 tuition fee which covers some of the cost of their materials and a light meal during each session. In some instances, the participant’s employer or organization may cover all or part of the fee for their employees or board members. A limited number of scholarships are available on a need basis for one-half of the tuition. Nearly 150 individuals have completed the course since 2004. Many have become active members of local nonprofit boards, while others have expanded their roles as employees of nonprofit organizations. One Community Builder graduate recently said, “As a board member of one nonprofit and employee of another, I can’t tell you how much I have used what I learned in Community Builders to help make these programs stronger.” Several graduates also shared how the series helped them to build self-confidence and become more involved in their work and community. Applications and schedule are available online at www.cfgcpa.org/commbuilders.html. For more information on Community Builders of Greene County call 724-627-2010, or email cfgcpa@gmail.com.

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Clipper

Winners Announced! I

t was a tight contest, with a bevy of fantastic voices ringing in the air over the 2014 Jacktown Fair Idol competition. In the end, three emerged victorious. The first place winner, who received $1000 and 15 hours of recording time at Silent Wing Audio, in Bobtown, PA, was Lexie Rohlf, of Brownsville, PA (pictured at center). In second place, taking home $500 and 10 hours of recording time at Silent Wing Audio, was Ben Pimental, of Mt. Pleasant, PA (pictured at left). The third place winner, who received $300, was Alexa Ponick, of Carmichaels, PA (pictured at right). Congratulations to the winners, and thanks to all who participated for bringing three evenings of great music to the 2014 Jacktown Fair Idol competition!

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“Keep On Clipping!”

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Honoring Flag Day

A Big Check Making a Big Difference Local businesses contributed $30,000 to The Challenge Program, Inc. to support the program’s efforts to motivate and reward students during the 2013-2014 school year in Greene County high schools. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who excel in the areas of Attendance, Academic Improvement, Academic Excellence, STEM Excellence, and Community Service are awarded a monetary reward. Participating Greene County schools and American Legion Post 330, Commanded by George Barnhart, participated in the Flag Day ceremony their sponsoring businesses are: Carmichaels High alongside the Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution at the Greene County Courthouse June 14, School, Chevron; Jefferson-Morgan High School 2014. Photo courtesy of Michelle Deems. and the Greene County CTC, Alpha Natural Resources; Mapletown, Waynesburg Central, and West Greene high schools, CONSOL Energy. Pictured from left are Jessica Kearns with CONSOL Energy and Karen Benson with Alpha Natural Resources.

Kudos to County Scholarship Recipients!

Bridge Naming Bill Forwarded to Governor State Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Fayette/Greene/Washington, recently announced that her bill naming a bridge in Greene County to honor the distinguished 36-year Army career of Lt. Col. Cephus Lee Roupe of Waynesburg is heading to the governor for his signature. “The House sent the governor my House Bill 1972, which calls for the bridge on state Route 18 over Fish Creek in Freeport Township to be named the Lieutenant Colonel Cephus Lee Roupe Memorial Bridge,” Snyder said. “Colonel Roupe’s service and devotion to our nation deserve this recognition.” Snyder said Roupe, a native of Waynesburg, passed away March 2, 2012, after proudly and courageously serving his country in the U.S. Army for 36 years. His untimely death at age 54 came soon after he submitted his retirement papers to the Army. “The colonel’s sacrifices and service put him in the ranks of a true patriot,” Snyder said, “and the generations ahead should be reminded of what he did for each and every one of us in service to our nation.”

Ten Greene County high school graduates have been selected as the recipients of the 2014 County of Greene/West Penn Power Scholarship. The scholarship is awarded annually to eligible graduating seniors who plan to attend Waynesburg University and represents a $1,000 award to be used toward each student’s first year of enrollment. All 10 students will enter Waynesburg University this fall. “Congratulations to the recipients for all of their hard work throughout their academic careers,” said Commissioner Chuck Morris, chair of the Board of Commissioners. “We wish them the best in their future at Waynesburg University.” The 10 recipients met the scholarship’s criteria, which included a cumulative high school GPA of at least 3.0 and acceptance to Waynesburg University entering as a new, non-transfer student for the fall 2014 semester. Applicants also had to submit a list of honors and activities and responses to two essay questions. Scholarship applications were sent earlier this year to high schools in the county’s five school districts – Carmichaels Area, Central Greene, Jefferson-Morgan, Southeastern Greene and West Greene. No applications from Southeastern Greene were received.

Lost and (Finally) Found! When Waynesburg resident Jennifer Noska King and her daughter, Lindsay, both received a Facebook message from a stranger named Michelle Davis Maxwell, it was the beginning of a story that, if it couldn’t be supported with facts, you might think that someone simply made up. “She - Michelle - was curious as to whether I was related to Linda D. Oplinger,” Jennifer recalls. Linda, it turns out, was Jennifer’s mother; “Oplinger” was her maiden name. An employee of Kennywood, Michelle was helping reorganize a seldomused attic area, and reported to Jennifer that, “They found an old wallet with my mom’s name and high school pictures in it.” Linda had been a student at Jefferson-Morgan high school when the wallet went missing. “She said she had been doing some research,” Jennifer continues, “and had found my mother’s memorial in the Observer-Reporter, and it listed myself and my children in it. She said that she had her fingers crossed, checked around with Facebook, and that I was the only ‘Jennifer Noska’ that she could come up with!” Once Jennifer’s identity was confirmed, Michelle sent the wallet. “It was a very nice surprise,” Jennifer says. The wallet contained some of her mom’s senior class pictures, a picture with a friend that appeared to have come from a “Photo Booth” attraction at Kennywood, a dollar bill, and her mom’s Social Security card. Pictured, L-R: Commissioner Chuck Morris; Commissioner Archie Trader; scholarship recipients Ian Bish of Waynesburg, “The wallet was in excellent condition, as were the pictures,” according to Jennifer. Hillary Berry of Waynesburg, Karley Isiminger of Holbrook, Kirsten Stoneking of Jefferson, Courtney Rush of Waynesburg, And how long had the wallet been missing? “Someone had written on one of the pictures; she said it was Jenna Hellen of Jefferson, Vincent Morrow of Waynesburg and McKenzie Bowser of Carmichaels; Commissioner Blair their Senior Day at the park. It was dated May 19th, 1968.” Thinking back on this remarkable chain of events, Zimmerman; scholarship recipient Michelle Frye of Carmichaels; and Diane Holder, FirstEnergy area manager of external affairs. Not pictured is scholarship recipient Jacy Shriver of Waynesburg. Jennifer concludes, “I can’t tell you how much I am thankful that somebody took the time to research it. I’m sure it was not an easy task. It was just a wonderful piece of my mom to have.”

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Chimp-Pansy Adventures T

he first few days of Greene County Day Camp had campers literally taking their projects to the skies. Birds, planes and even Superman couldn’t compete with the hundreds of special balloons filling the air over Greene County. Thanks to a partnership with Penn State Cooperative Extension, the first learning program for Day Camp attendees this summer was a very unique one – “Chimp-Pansy Adventures,” an activity involving ape-faced balloons and bags of flower seeds. The program was presented from June 16 to 20 at all five Day Camp locations: Jefferson Township Park in Jefferson, Lions Club Park in Waynesburg, Mon View Park in Greensboro, Ryerson Station State Park in Wind Ridge and Wana B Park in Carmichaels. Instructors from the Extension office traveled to each of the camps and taught campers about the pansy, which has many uses and health benefits. As part of the lesson, campers released helium-filled balloons, in the semblance of a chimp’s face, carrying burlap bags filled with fertilized potting soil and pansy seeds. The hope was for the balloons to travel at least five miles above the ground, at which point they would burst, dropping the soil and seeds down to earth to grow. All items used for the program are environmentally friendly, with the balloons, burlap bags and jute twine used to tie the bags all biodegradable. Children learned of the pansy’s many health benefits, as the flower is edible. Pansies are used to reduce blood pressure and prevent heart failure, and are also used to treat skin ailments such as psoriasis, acne, eczema and itching. The pansy herb can be used as a salve or boiled down into a tea. At the end of each program, Day Campers were served salads dressed with pansy petals. “Chimp-Pansy Adventures” was designed to teach the children in attendance about horticulture, history, natural science and the impact the actions of humans can have on the environment. The Day Camp program is funded through various sponsors, the Greene County Commissioners, and Department of Recreation fundraisers. Major sponsors of this year’s Day Camp include Alpha Natural Resources, Chevron, CONSOL Energy and Noble Energy.

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The Jaycees that Jacked-Up Rain Day Written by Colleen Nelson and originally published in 2009

(Editor’s Note: Rain Day 2014 is fast approaching, and the GreeneSaver loves nothing more than celebrating with the community! In that spirit, we offer what we’d call a “vintage GreeneSaver story.” It ran in the Rain Day edition a few years ago, but the story and accompanying pictures are so priceless, we wanted newer readers to have a chance to enjoy!)

O

ne enduring image of Rain Day is Recorder Of Deeds Tom Headlee grinning broadly, a tiny paper cocktail umbrella stuck jauntily in the end of his cigar. Is it raining? It doesn’t seem to matter. What matters is how much fun everyone is having. Anyone who knows the history of Rain Day knows that Tom has a lot to smile about.  An unknown farmer in 1875 may have started the tradition of watching for rain and betting on it has abounded ever since, but it was Headlee and his Jaycee buddies who turned the promise of rain on July 29 into a full blown festival for downtown Waynesburg. “We all had businesses and we were young,” Headlee said. “After age 35 you were no longer a Jaycee.  I joined in 1962. We weren’t together long but we did some good things.” Headlee had been invited to be a part of an innovative and energetic group of young businessmen, not to be confused with the Chamber of Commerce. The “Junior Chamber” (Jaycees) consisted of young businessmen, with young families, dedicated to volunteerism and community service. Talk to anyone who was once a Jaycee, and you’ll discover they were more likely to do their community building outside the boardroom. In other words, do some hard work together, get something done - and have fun doing it. Is it any wonder that their first order of business was to throw a good party and invite the entire county? Rain Day 1964 took the old tradition of people sitting around on the courthouse wall waiting, sometimes all night, for rain to a new level.  The Jaycee’s got permission to shut down High Street for a carnival, set up displays of the latest innovative products and equipment of interest to the community and for the icing on the cake, hold a “bathing beauties” contest in front of the courthouse for the first Rain Day Queen. From a field of 27 contestants, West Greene senior Carla Gray was selected and crowned by Rain Day Prophet John L. Daly himself. Prophecy was not long in coming. At 4:29 p.m. the lowering clouds rewarded Lewis Swan and Calvin Smitley with the bragging rights to catching the first sprinkles. Then came the thunder and the 20-minute deluge. The word got out swiftly on the wire services to the rest of the world that the legend of Rain Day had been proven true once more.  Delighted festival-goers danced and sang in the rain. Photo of Tom Headlee and his cigar The newspaper reports trumpeted “July 29 downpour Gives Rain Prophet Expected Victory” over golfer Arnold Palmer, who had bet his hat that it wouldn’t rain. But Arnold Palmer never wore a hat, the reporter noted.  Never mind that. Arnold had joined the ranks of Bob Hope and Bing Crosby in losing their bets with Mother Nature.  With this auspicious beginning, the Jaycees got down to the business of doing something that was close to their hearts - building a community park for families to use. Today it is known as Lions Park in East Waynesburg, mowed and tidy. But when the Jaycees threw themselves into the sweaty task of clearing the land and building the first pavilions, it was hard work, plain and simple. “Dr. Powell gave land to the Jaycees and the community for Jaycee Park,” Tom Martin remembers. “We used our own trucks and equipment and donated a lot of material. When we built the main pavilion, Fred Blaker wired it and the rest of us put in the plumbing.” “My husband Fred was a Jaycee - he had Blaker Electric,” Ruth Blaker said.  “I worked right along with him on that park. At Rain Day we raised money for it by selling food and drinks from the Coca Cola trailer donated by Gene Lee’s father Bob. My husband and Tom Headlee’s brother Wayne saw a dunking booth at another festival and came back and built one. Tom Martin and Andy Rohanna got the lumber to build it - we’re still not sure where they got it! But that booth made quite a bit of money because no on had ever seen one around here.” “I remember one day we worked all day - I was so tired I could hardly hold the hammer, then Wayne and Andy had me drive the truck into the park - in the dark,” Martin said. Finally, the forgotten parcel of land was a park, thanks to the sweat equity of the Jaycees and their families and the moneys raised from three good years of Rain Day festivities, which sometimes ran two or three days, depending on what day July 29 fell on. The main pavilion was a testimony to hard work - it had electricity, running water and restrooms. The playground was just what every kid dreams of - swings, slides, see saws, sand boxes, all right next door to the county pool. “We used to sit in the shade and watch our kids swim - it was a nice place to go and I’m glad we went to all the trouble to build it,” Ruth said. “My grandkids play in it now.” The age limit for Jaycees has inched up over the years - now it’s 41. But the Waynesburg chapter had other issues as well. Members moved away and there were no older members -aptly named Exalted Roosters, or Exhausted Roosters depending on whom you talk to - who were staying on to mentor and encourage.  Fewer friends were able to meet at Rohanna’s Restaurant every Tuesday and by 1967 it was time to turn over management of the park to another organization. “The deed to us was recorded in May 1967,” Waynesburg Lions Club treasurer Lance Weaver said. The original Jaycee pavilion still remains, with its name on a plaque. This spring the old structure was completely renovated. There are two other pavilions dedicated to their donors - the Lion’s Scott Pavilion and the Moose pavilion. In 2008 a Lions community building was completed, with electricity and enclosed sides.  Photo of the Jaycees taken during the construction of Jaycee Park (now Lions Park) in Waynesburg, also the organizers of a All buildings are available for rent from May through September and the playground multi-day street festival creating many Rain Day memories through the 1960’s. part remains open to the public year round.

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Run Between the Raindrops O

By Regis Whetzel

bviously, the questions on everyone’s mind as Waynesburg’s Rain Day approaches are, “Will it rain?” “When will it start?” “How much will there be?” Then there’s the question that no one wants to ask, though it’s hard to avoid: “What if it doesn’t rain at all?!” Of course, this is exactly as it should be; it’s not called “Rain Day” because people aren’t thinking about the anticipation of precipitation! Remember, though, that the full name of the event is the “Rain Day Festival,” which means that, rain or no rain, Waynesburg is going to be one of the most fun spots in the state at the end of July. Part of that fun, which also provides much needed support to a worthy cause, is the Rain Day 5k Run/Walk on Saturday, July 26th. From the starting line at the intersection of High St. and Porter St., the 5k race runs along Porter Street about a mile and a half before reaching a “turnaround point,” and heading back to complete the route. In addition, there is also a “Kids’ Fun Run,” which follows the same route, but only extends for half a mile out and back to the start. Dawn Wood, Executive Administrative Assistant for Greene County Habitat for Humanity, calls the race, “One of our main fundraisers here at Habitat,” adding that last year Major sponsors Alpha Natural Resources’ Karen Benson, left, and Ron Lewis Automotive brought in nearly $6900 to help build or remodel safe, afChrysler, Dodge, Jeep Ram in Waynesburg’s Scott Spehar, right, join Habitat for Humanity Executive Director Keith Davin in showing off the 2014 Rain Day Race t-shirts, proudly sponfordable housing for area residents who benefit from Habitat sored in part by Direct Results. Free t-shirts are given to pre-registered participants, and same for Humanity’s services. Dawn notes that, on average, about day sign-ups as long as they last. 200 people enjoy the race, although last year was especially packed, with nearly 300 taking part. The race began in 1979, with many different individuals at the helm through 2001. In earlier days, County Commissioner Blair Zimmerman was an instrumental figure in organizing the race, often serving as its director. He recalls that the route had, “Changed half a dozen times or more” since the race’s inception, noting that, “It used to run from the Armory, out Perman Run, and then finished at the Armory.” In 2002, Habitat for Humanity took over the reins, and the route has remained unchanged ever since. For 2014, the race preparations and fundraising efforts are in full swing. Says Dawn, “We start asking for sponsors in March, and we definitely got some big sponsors.” The two major sponsors this year are Alpha Natural Resources, which has local offices in Waynesburg; and Ron Lewis Automotive Group, Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram, in Waynesburg. Community support is a primary reason that Ron Lewis Automotive is involved with the race, according to Waynesburg General Manager, Scott Spehar. “Everybody at the dealership lives in this general area,” he says, “and we want to be part of the community. We want to give back and participate. Any way we can help is what we’re looking to do.” Karen Benson, Human Resources Manager for Alpha Natural Resources’ Pennsylvania Services Unit, shares this idea, adding, “Alpha has been a supporter of the Rain Day race for several years. We’ve also done some volunteer projects for Habitat for Humanity, and we continue to support the organization. Alpha also supports Habitat in the other states where we do business. We just want to be a good community partner.” Contributions supporting the race have also been received from Community Bank, Consol Energy and PNC Investments and several other local businesses and organizations, helping to make sure that race participants and spectators enjoy an event to remember; and Greene County residents will benefit generously from these sponsors’ participation to help Habitat for Humanity fulfill its mission in our local area. “We appreciate all our sponsors and supporters for the Rain Day Race. The event is not only a great tradition in cooperation with Waynesburg’s legendary Rain Day festivities, it’s an important fund raiser for our organization and our efforts to help make affordable and safe housing available to local families,” says Keith Davin, Executive Director for Greene County Habitat for Humanity. Everyone can get in on the fun on Saturday, July 26. Same-day registration for the 5k Run/Walk and Kids’ Fun Run takes place at 8:15am; The “Fun Run” starts at 9am, and the 5k Run/Walk begins at 9:30am. To learn more, call Greene County Habitat for Humanity at 724-852-2598, or visit www.greenecounThis newspaper clipping marked as being from 1982 shows John Curtis of Greene Co. Parks and Recreation preparing tyhabitat.net. to start that year’s Rain Day Race. Wonder where all of these runners are now..? If you recognize yourself or a friend or

GreeneScene by Melinda Larkin

family member, let us know!

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GreeneScene by Carol Andrews

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GreeneScene by Rosemary Bird

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GreeneScene by Melissa Henry

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Going to the Dogs + and the Cats! The Greene County Commissioners recently presented the Humane Society of Greene County with the county’s annual $25,000 donation to cover general operating costs. The Humane Society, which runs solely on donations, is finalizing plans for its largest fundraising event, a Cash Bash on Oct. 19 at the Greene County Fairgrounds. Tickets are available at the shelter and cost $20. The shelter is currently inundated with cats and kittens, and also has a few dogs for adoption. For more information, call 724-627-9988, visit www.greenepet. org or “Like” the Humane Society’s page on Facebook. Pictured with shelter mascot Springer and one of the dogs for adoption are, from l. to r., Commissioner Blair Zimmerman, Humane Society board members Connie McNeely and Craig Wise, and Commissioner Chuck Morris.

It’s Good to Have Friends…

Finalizing their 2014 fundraiser, Fran Hardy, President of The Friends of Bowlby Public Library, presented an Exxon gas card to D. A. Neubauer, one of the 80+ folks who contributed to this year’s Friends Fundraiser. Fran pointed out that the 2014 effort had a great response with more than expected help from Jacobs Petroleum. The Friends organization does an annual letter writing campaign to request funds to help with projects carried out by Eva K. Bowlby Public Library. As an incentive to contributors, Steve Stuck of Jacobs Petroleum donated an Exxon gas card and ten car wash vouchers to be awarded by random drawing to people who had made contributions to this year’s fundraiser. Mrs. Neubauer was the winner of the gas card, and ten other winners will drive a clean car thanks to Stuck’s Laser Wash.

Fore!

The Friends of the Flenniken Library announce their fourth annual golf outing fundraiser on Saturday, August 2, 2014 at the Carmichaels Golf Club. Registration is $240 for a team of four. The fee includes 18 holes of golf, golf cart, coffee and doughnuts, hot dogs after 9 holes, lunch following play, and chances to win various prizes. This year, the Friends Visitors from as far away as Idaho, Utah, North Carolina, Maryland and Ohio, as well as those are delighted to have two corporate sponsors, Community Bank and UMWA Local 2258, from West Virginia, Pittsburgh and the surrounding areas journeyed to the village of in addition to the gold and silver sponsorships that help to cover the outing expenses and prize money. Garards Fort, PA to attend the 83rd annual Teams and sponsors may register in person at the library (102 E. George St., Carmichaels, PA), by callreunion of the John Corbly Descendants As- ing 724-966-5263. Checks should be made out to Friends of the Flenniken Library. sociation on June 29, 2014. Pictured are some of John’s descendents by his first wife, Abigail (left), and by his third wife, Nancy (right).

WE ARE FAMILY!

Museum Welcomes New Board Members

A new season at the Greene County Historical Society means elections for new board members and new board officers. Over the past few months, the Society as welcomed three new board members to their ranks: Carol Teegarden, Marshall Simmons, and Joyce Winters. Along with these newest additions, new board officers were also elected. The Society is pleased to announce Mark Fischer, new board president; Candace Tustin, board vice-president; Pat Fitch, secretary; and Cheryl Clark as treasurer, alongside Debbie Wilson in her new position of assistant treasurer. With the help of the public, staff and volunteers, the Greene County Historical Society Board of Directors is determined to substantiate and to proliferate the Greene County Historical Society and Museum. Pictured is the Greene County Historical Society Board of Directors L-R, Front Row:  Candace Tustin  (Vice President), Audrey Duke, Marshall Simmons,  Steve Blystone. Row: Cheryl Police officers; firefighters; paramedics. Often, these are the first responders to acts of domestic Middle Clark (Treasurer), Linda violence. If you work as or with first responders, and would like to request literature for your office or training for your staff, please contact the Education and Training Department of Domestic Vio- Rush, Joseph Kinney, Mark lence Services of Southwestern PA at 724-852-2373 in Greene County, 724-223-5477 in Washington Fischer (President). Back Row: Carol Teegarden, County, or 724-437-2530 in Fayette. Joyce Winters,  George Bly Blystone. Not pictured Patrick Fitch (Secretary).

83rd John Corbly REUNION

Special Information for First Responders

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JEFFERSON BAPTIST CHURCH

efferson Baptist was founded back in 1844, which is a little bit before both you and me. I’ve actually been there as the pastor for 32 years. One of the things we’ve tried to do the entire time is to build a sense of community—not just with the church family, but with the broader community of Jefferson and the surrounding area.” So says the leader of Jefferson Baptist Church, Rev. John Rich Dorean. His life of service began long before he came to Jefferson Baptist, however. He remembers, “I was at a place called Koinonia Farm,” which is located in Georgia. The name may not be familiar to some, but will bring a spark of recognition to others as the “birthplace” of Habitat for Humanity. John and his wife, Merry, spent 6 ½ years involved with Koinonia projects, but building affordable houses was only part of the equation. “Koinonia had this national reputation for its work in racial integration,” he notes. “We were invited to travel around the country doing seminars on Christian communities. I did some of that, and started to feel like I had a call to ministry. My folks were in Waynesburg,” he recalls, “and we came back here.” At the time, the young family had two little girls, with a third on the way. Their intention was to stay in Waynesburg for only a few months, but other plans were in motion for the Dorean clan, which now consists of four daughters, and, as John puts it, “7 and 2/3 grandchildren.” John did some guest-ministry at Jefferson Baptist, and soon discovered that, “This little church was interested in my becoming a pastor, and I was interested in becoming a pastor, and the rest is history.” Jefferson Baptist, which now averages around 135 participants every Sunday, has a unique heritage. John says, “The congregation met for more than 60 years in a white frame church that was on the site now occupied by the church cemetery. The present church building was built in 1908,” and the old church “mysteriously burned to the ground” a few months later, he notes. Tragedy struck in the later part of the 19th century when, “The church lost all of its minutes and important papers. A smallpox epidemic broke out in the community, and the church’s clerk died from it. His house—and all the church records, which he kept in it—were burned to prevent the spread of the epidemic.” John is the longest-serving pastor on record, and has guided the church through extensive ministry and missions work, at home and abroad. “We have sponsored 6 overseas mission trips in the last 10 years to Nicaragua and Haiti,” he points out, “and have participated in numerous projects here in the U.S.” The church sponsored the building of affordable houses in Haiti and Uganda in the early 1980s, and was inspired to do the same, locally, when a congregant pointed out how many people in Greene County could benefit from this work. “A few months later,” John says, “we hosted Millard Fuller, Founder and Executive Director of Habitat for Humanity, who encouraged us to pursue the dream of starting a local affiliate. In November of 1984, we completed our first home, and received official status as an affiliate a year later.” He concludes, “Jefferson Baptist members have continued ever since to play a significant part in the work and financial responsibilities of Greene County Habitat.” There is big excitement throughout the congregation now, as preparations are well underway for the 12th Annual Jefferson Summer Classic, taking place on Friday and Saturday, August 1st and 2nd, at Jefferson-Morgan Senior High School. “We just focus on building a sense of community,” John says of the event, “trying to make contact and friends with other people.” The strategy must be working, as the Classic, which was previously held on only one day, has expanded to two. The event kicks off with a “Pairs Corn Hole Tournament” at 7pm on Friday. On Saturday, the fun starts at 8:45am with a “one-mile fun run” for kids 10 and under. Other events include a 5k walk and run, a “3-on-3” basketball tournament, a cake walk, 3-legged race, and many other activities for children and adults. Volunteers will provide food to help keep everyone’s energy up at this fundraising extravaganza, which benefits the (soon to exist) Greene County Hospital Foundation Recreation Center. Pre registration is only $15, and must be completed before July 29th to save $5, and guarantee a Tshirt. Same-day registration is $20, and T-shirts can’t be guaranteed for day-of registrants. A “Family Package” registration is $45 advance, $55 same-day. To learn more, call 724-883-4088, or visit www.jeffersonbaptist.com.

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S

ummer is a time for special events, and, around these parts, the Rain Day festivities sure fit the bill! This month’s GreeneScene of the Past comes to us from Mary Thompson, whose daughter, Jessica, often took part in the “Kids’ Fun Run” mentioned elsewhere in this edition in the feature about the race. “We’ve been involved with the Rain Day Race for years and years,” she reports. Carrying that tradition forward, Mary notes that Jessica is going to be on hand for this year’s race, helping register runners. This picture actually arrived on Jessica’s desk at the county courthouse, where she works as the First Deputy Register of Wills, with no note as to who left it there! In the end, it turns out that it was a joint effort by Blair Zimmerman, who’d had the picture in his collection, and Chuck Morris (two of our Greene County Commissioners), who placed the photo for Jessica to find. Of course, the picture has a story to tell: for a period of time, Dairy Queen provided Dilly Bar frozen treats to give to the race participants, but, according to Mary, not all of the runners actually ended up eating theirs! Mary says, “My daughter is number 63. She would only run that race because she would get a Dilly Bar or two, or more! Runners would think she was cute and give her theirs. I was busy working the race, so she was in heaven!” In fact, says Mary, Jessica’s primary motivation for entering the Fun Run was the anticipation of the goodies from Dairy Queen! And how does she know this? “She called it the ‘Dilly Bar Race’!” Mary says, laughing at the memory. In a turn of fun coincidence, also in this picture is a young Asa Winters (number 6), from long before he became Officer Asa Winters of the Waynesburg Borough Police, as seen elsewhere in this month’s GreeneSaver. Pictured (L-R) are Mary’s daughter, Jessica Harrison, Sam Gardone, Asa Winters, and Asa’s sister, Meredith Winters (front row); and Sam Gardone’s sisters, Jessica and Tiffany Gardone (L-R, back row). Thanks to Mary and Jessica for sharing such a fun memory with our readers!

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T

Ready… Aim… WIN!

wenty-seven members of the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County’s Scholastic Clay Target Program team, received a total of 39 medals during the Pennsylvania Scholastic Clay Target Program Sporting Clays Championship, held Saturday, June 14, at Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club in Factoryville, Pa. The event involved 220 youth shooters from across the state competing in a 100-target shoot to determine state winners in six skill divisions: rookie, intermediate entry, intermediate advanced, junior varsity, varsity and collegiate. Awards were given to the top three teams in each division, as well as the highest overall and first- through third-place scorers in each division. The highest overall male and female individual shooters of the entire competition also win awards. A total of 68 Hunting Hills Hawkeyes members participated in the shoot. Hawkeyes squads took first place in four divisions. Squads also took two second-place trophies, three third-place trophies, 11 individual class trophies and two collegiate trophies. One Hawkeye also won an award for his individual score among all shooters. The Hawkeyes formed in February 2009 as part of a pilot Scholastic Clay Target Program in the county. More than 40 students in grades five through 12 have participated in the program each year. The team’s home base of Hunting Hills is owned and operated by Sally and Roy Sisler, who first approached the Greene County Commissioners in 2008 about starting a Scholastic Clay Target Program. Overseeing this year’s program were head coach Chuck Mallory and assistant head coach Randy Coss, along with several assistant coaches. Nationally, the programs are sponsored by the Scholastic Shooting Sports Foundation. Locally, the Greene County ComPictured with the Greene County Commissioners are the members, coaches and sponsors of the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County’s Scholastic Clay Target Program team. Twenty-seven missioners and the Department of members recently received 39 medals for their performances during the Pennsylvania Scholastic Clay Target Program Sporting Clays Championship, held June 14 at Factoryville Sportsmen’s Club Recreation sponsor the program. in Factoryville, Pa. Additional program support was provided by Alpha Natural Resources Services LLC, Always Truck N LLC, Cabela’s, CONSOL Energy, Cumberland Mine Sporting Clay Shooters, Energy Corp. of America, Friends of the National Rifle Association, Hinerman’s NAPA, Hunting Hills, ISM Weapon Systems, National Wild Turkey Federation-Warrior Trail Gobblers Chapter, Ozie’s Sport Shop and Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. The program’s mission is to promote and teach young people the fundamentals of gun safety, team work and outdoor sports. Hawkeyes squads took two places in the rookie division, with the squad consisting of Robert Dillon III of Adah, Tucker Hughes of Rogersville and Thaine Miller of Waynesburg winning first place with a squad score of 169. Finishing in second place with a score of 153 was the squad of Owen Hughes of Rogersville, Kyleigh Kozel of Carmichaels and Zach Wilson of Waynesburg. Tucker Hughes and Miller were the first- and second-place scorers in the division with individual scores of 62 and 59, respectively. In the intermediate entry division, two Hawkeyes squads placed. Jon Firchow of Morgantown, W.Va., Hunter Guthrie of Graysville and Arran Hinerman of Waynesburg won first place with a combined score of 209, and Tristan Cole of Waynesburg, Hunter Orrahood of Waynesburg and Garret Ross of Aleppo finished third with a score of 200. Cole and Firchow had the highest overall and first-place individual scores in the division with 76 and 75 points, respectively, and Hinerman won third place with his score of 73. Two squads placed in the intermediate advanced division, with the squad consisting of Zach Abbott of Rogersville, Cameron Cernuska of Jefferson and Louis Dobish of Carmichaels taking first place with a squad score of 223. Chase Faddis of Carmichaels, Dylan Henkins of Waynesburg and Dylan Miller of Waynesburg finished in second place with a score of 205. Cernuska and Abbott were the top two scorers in the division with individual scores of 80 and 78, respectively. In the junior varsity division, Will Luckey of Mt. Morris, Luke Pecjak of Dilliner and Hunter Scott of Carmichaels won first place with a combined score of 233. Pecjak and Scott were the top two scorers in the division with individual scores of 85 and 81, respectively, and Pecjak was the highest overall male of the entire competition. With a total score of 235, the Hawkeyes squad made up of Andy Buchtan of Greensboro, Camryn Dugan of Waynesburg and Tristan Kozel of Carmichaels finished third in the varsity division. After a four-way tie for the highest score of 83, a tiebreaker based on longest run determined the individual winners. Will Abbott of Carmichaels, from another Hawkeyes squad, won highest overall, and Buchtan won third place. Dugan was also the runner-up for highest overall female with her individual score of 74. In the collegiate division, Alex Rush of Jefferson won third place with a score of 90. Rush had the second-highest score, while Nick Clarke of Carmichaels had the third-highest score at 87. For more information on the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, call the Department of Recreation at 724852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us.

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JULY / AUGUST 2014

• GreeneSaver

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JULY / AUGUST 2014

July/August 2014 - GreeneSaver  

This is it! Rain Day and the King Coal Festival are upon us, and this month's GreeneSaver features all the info you need to plan and enjoy y...

July/August 2014 - GreeneSaver  

This is it! Rain Day and the King Coal Festival are upon us, and this month's GreeneSaver features all the info you need to plan and enjoy y...

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