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Color Them Happy!

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he GreeneSaver joins First Federal Savings & Loan Association of Greene County in congratulating the winners of its recent coloring contest! Three winners were chosen in each of three age groups, with first place winners receiving $50, second place winners receiving $40, and third place winners receiving $30. In the 4 and 5 year old group, the winners were: 1st place, Valetta Wilson; 2nd place, Lana Kelley; 3rd place, Chatham Knight In the 6 and 7 year old group, the winners were: 1st place, Gavin Gossett; 2nd place, Starr Grennell; 3rd place, Claire McCabe. In the 8 and 9 year old group, the winners were: 1st place, Roger Gradek; 2nd place, Karissa Rohrer; 3rd place, Ricky Eller. Pictured with Chuck Trump, Vice President, First Federal Savings & Loan Association of Greene County, are: front row, L—R: Chatham Knight, Claire McCabe, Starr Grennell and Valetta Wilson. Back row, L—R: Gavin Gossett, Lana Kelley, Karissa Rohrer, Ricky Eller and Roger Gradek.

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Jollytown, Gilmore Township By Regis Whetzel

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hen a local talks with visitors about nearly any small town in America, it’s become commonplace to chuckle and say, “Don’t blink, or you’ll miss it!” In most cases, this is just a figure of speech, but in the case of Jollytown, a small town that makes many other small towns look positively huge by comparison, it’s essentially the truth. Located in Gilmore Township, on the banks of Dunkard Creek, some 20 miles southwest of Waynesburg, and nearly 30 miles west of Morgantown, West Virginia, and once described in a newspaper article as being, “only a small dot on even the Greene County maps,” Jollytown was founded in 1835 by Titus Jolly. Some early notations spelled the name “Jolleytown,” but the spare “e” didn’t last for long. Titus had purchased the land from a man identified as “P. McCullough,” and had originally named the settlement “Centerville.” Upon learning that there was already a town in Washington County with that name, Titus chose instead to name it after himself. Although it was small, in its heyday Jollytown offered residents a school, blacksmith shop, two churches, a saddle shop, flour mill, two general stores, a doctor’s office and a funeral home. That heyday, however, did not last as long as the town’s founder or its early residents may have hoped. Never large enough to support a growing population, surrounded by towering hills, and close to no substantial towns or cities, the number of people living there by the mid-20th century was reported as less than 50; by 1983, only 10 people lived within the “town limits.” An article from the Washington Observer, dated March 25, 1954, features the poignant headline, “Isolation Of Jollytown To Be More Complete,” and tells the story of how Jollytown’s post office was to be closed at the end of April of that year. Said to have been “one of the oldest in the county,” the story goes on to note, “The Jollytown Post Office has, with only one brief exception, been associated with the Dye family since the 1890s.” When the story was written, Elizabeth Dye Rice, “attractive mother of a one-year old child and wife of J. Robert Rice, had been postmaster for the last six years.” J. Robert Rice, a devoted scholar of local history and lifelong Jollytown resident, contributed many photographs for this story. The article goes on to say, “She succeeded her father, the late Frank Dye, who was postmaster at Jollytown since 1914. For a number of years before the turn of the century, the postmaster was Mrs. Rice’s grandfather, Jefferson Dye, who enjoyed wide prominence during the days when Jollytown was a beehive for the area’s farming, lumbering, and gas and oil drilling activities.” It was Jefferson Dye, in fact, who established “Dye’s Store,” a Jollytown fixture for longer than anyone currently alive could recall, and home to Postcard photo of the Hero & Jollytown Band, which was organized the Jollytown post office. Sadly, the by George Hennen and Charles Dye around 1913 store closed in 1989. When the contents were auctioned not that many years ago, the large “Merry Christmas from Jollytown” banner featured in last month’s GreeneScene of the Past was found, therein. Jefferson, a Civil War veteran, was one of the townspeople responsible for erecting one of Jollytown’s most prominent features, the Jesse Taylor memorial, which honors the first soldier from Greene County to have been killed during the Civil War. A member of the 7th Regiment West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, Jesse died at the battle of Romney, WV, on October 26, 1861. Jefferson Dye fought alongside him in that same battle. The monument features a pedestaled statue of Jesse Taylor, along with In last month’s GreeneScene of the Past, you saw the great photo two mortars, and a cannon from his of WTAE-TV’s Paul Long visiting Jollytown from many years ago; era. The cannon had originally been what you didn’t see—and what we didn’t know until Jollytown’s own Alberta Jones provided us with this picture—is that Paul got located at the United States Military a unique Christmas gift while there—a skunk! Alberta assures us Academy at West Point, NY, and was it was de-scented; we can only hope…

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known as “Hoover’s Battery,” according to the book, Greene County History, by Lillian Potisek, Hilda Stull, and Thomas Vencek. The book goes on to detail, “It was moved to New York Harbor to defend the Harbor during the Civil War. After the Civil War, a political group obtained the cannon from the government to use at political rallies. It somehow ended up in Greene County and was abandoned. Local veterans found the cannon in a junkyard and restored it. The cannon was again abandoned, and was picked up by a local medicine show as a curiosity. After several years, veterans’ organizations, headed by Colonel Charles I. Faddis were instrumental in placing the cannon at the Jesse Taylor Memorial.” And what of Jollytown in modern times? “All the covered bridges are gone; I did a lot of family research on the Hinnans, and the Woodruffs, the Hagens, Morefords, people who were here years ago— they’re not around anymore,” says Gary Wise, a retired coal miner and history researcher who lives just on the outskirts of Jollytown. Having lived there for 62 years gives Gary a solid foundation in tracking those changes, and though many people and businesses have disappeared, Jollytown and surrounding Gilmore Township still have much to offer. “It all depends on what you mean by ‘progress,’” Gary notes as he considers the area’s transformation over time. An abundance of natural resources and woodlands make it a virtual paradise for hunters and nature lovers who either live nearby, or hold land around Jollytown; and the isolation that served to effectively cut it off from the outside world for so long is one of the very things that contributes to the peace and quiet one finds there. Of course, the option of relocating to a more vibrant locale is always available, but is kindly turned down by Gary and others who hold the Jollytown area near to their hearts. “I don’t even want to go anywhere else,” Gary smiles; “I’m happy where I’m at.” Next month “I Love This Place!” features Mather! Please share your memories, pictures, and other information about Mather by calling 724-627-2040, emailing regis@directresults.us, or visiting our offices at 185 Wade Street in Waynesburg! GreeneSaver •

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Rep. Snyder Begins Second Term

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tate Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Greene/Fayette/Washington, recently began her second term representing the 50th Legislative District after taking the oath of office. The ceremonies at the state Capitol kicked off the 199th legislative session of the state House, which consists of 83 Democrats and 119 Republicans. “It is an honor to represent the residents of the 50th District in 2015,” Snyder said. “I’m eager to get to work on their behalf because Pennsylvania needs new ideas on energy, public education, family incomes and the state budget.” Snyder said she plans to build on her efforts as a freshman lawmaker that won bipartisan support, including her legislation that ensures a state role in meeting federal mandates affecting energy supplies. “I am committed to being a responsible advocate for southwestern Pennsylvania and working effectively for citizens and communities in the district, as well as the commonwealth as a whole,” Snyder said. “We found common ground on critical energy legislation, and the same foRep. Snyder with Rep. Brandon Neuman cus will produce dividends on fixing the $2 bil(D—Washington Co.) at the recent swearing-in lion shortfall in the state budget and addressing ceremony in Harrisburg. unfair education funding and school property taxes.” Her legislative website, www.pahouse.com/Snyder, features legislative and local information, including her district and Harrisburg offices, and enables constituents to sign up for email updates on state government and regional issues. Constituents also may follow Snyder via her legislative Facebook page, www.facebook.com/RepSnyder, and legislative Twitter account, twitter.com/RepSnyder. The phone number for Snyder’s main district office in Carmichaels is 724-966-8953.

GreeneScene by Janice Koss

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Water Quality Grant Program

he Greene County Conservation District is now accepting applications for the first funding round of the 2015 Water Quality Mini-Grant Program. As many as five awards of up to $5,000 each will be awarded this year to fund projects that address water quality improvements through implementation or installation of Best Management Practices. The first round of applications is open from the third week of January until the second week of July, although applicants are encouraged to apply early enough to allow time for Conservation District staff to review applications and make site visits as needed. Grant recipients will be determined at the Conservation District’s July 21 board meeting, and priority status will be given to applicants who have not previously received a grant through this program. To be eligible for funding under the grant program, projects must specifically address water quality improvement and include implementation or installation of authorized BMP. Authorized BMP include all BMP approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Natural Resource Conservation Service. Examples of water quality improvement include erosion prevention, mitigation of non-point source nutrient and sediment runoff and the general improvement of downstream water quality. Examples of BMP include streambank stabilization projects, riparian buffer plantings, aquatic habitat enhancement structures and farming conservation practice installations, among many others. All Greene County landowners are eligible to apply for the program, as well as homeowner associations, locally based environmental organizations, school-based or scouting organizations, sportsman associations or other civic associations. Applicants will be given one year to complete their projects and will be reimbursed only upon a final site visit and receipt of necessary documentation. For more information about the Water Quality Mini-Grant Program, call the Conservation District at 724-852-5278, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us/gccd to download the complete guidelines and application form.

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ast month’s installment of Driving the Future dealt with the emerging demand for more women to enter the industry, as expansion drives the need for increased numbers of competent, trained workers. Addressing the harsh nature of many of the on-site positions, Irene Motts of the Stark State Oil and Gas School in Ohio, stated, “They’re difficult jobs. Not that women can’t do it,” she clarified, “but there are certainly a lot of men that can’t do it, too.” It isn’t a “problem,” just a simple fact: not everyone is well suited to the 12-plus hour days, total disregard for bad weather conditions, and hard physical labor associated with many of the “in the field” industry jobs. This doesn’t mean, however, that there are no opportunities available. Even a cursory glance at the Rigzone Career Center, which bills itself as a “leading web site for oil and gas industry jobs” (www.rigzone.com), reveals an astounding number and variety of careers that would likely never involve setting foot near a rig or drill site. 76 job postings for a “Planner/Scheduler”; 118 listings for “Instrument and Controls Engineers”; 240 “Sales and Marketing” jobs available—and this only scratches the surface. Jobs are available in a range from companies seeking individuals with multiple years of experience in their field and advanced degrees, to entry-level positions for those with little or no experience. In addition, the sheer scope of the industry means that, while it’s quite possible for someone to stay close to home, a more adventurous soul with a case of wanderlust could apply for positions in places like Aberdeen, Scotland; Tokyo, Japan; Abu Dhabi, in the United Arab Emirates; or a seemingly endless variety of other unique and exotic locations. The rapid and ongoing expansion of the industry all over the state, country and world has opened the door for a steadily increasing number of administrative professionals. According to an article by Horacio Garcia, published on the “eHow” Internet site (www.ehow.com), “The oil and gas field requires all types of administrative jobs, from the human resources department to the clerks on location at the oil and gas fields. Paperwork is a major part of the oil and gas industry. Administrative assistants, secretaries, human resources managers and other administrative jobs all have a place in the oil and gas field.” Another employment avenue exists for sales professionals. Manufacturers, distributors and rental companies that provide goods and services to the industry all require people who are willing and eager to present themselves and their company’s products to the appropriate industry personnel. One listing example seeks “…a highly self-motivated, energetic sales representative. This person will tenaciously hunt new business, and manage all aspects of customer accounts related to manufactured components for the oil and gas industry…” and so on. The point is that, for an outgoing, driven person, this type of career could be a perfect fit. The playing field is also expanding for engineers of all types, including applications engineers, service engineers, and transportation and installation engineers, as well as those specializing in design, electrical, and structural engineering. In a 2008 study, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated a 15% growth in engineering jobs, specifically in the oil and gas industry. With an average salary (nationwide) of over $96,000 per year, and job availability in virtually every oil and gas producing state and country, this career offers a “best of both worlds” package of being active within a growing industry, while at the same time being able to have a (mostly) “regular day job”. One other field that may slip under the “mental radar,” given the overall emphasis on the need for either heavy labor or heavy mathematics and science, is the increasing call for accountants. With so many specifics that require careful, consistent tracking, it can hardly come as a surprise that there is a growing demand in this field. Education Portal (www.education-portal.com), a provider of supplemental online learning materials for college students, provides this summary: “Accountants review financial records, analyze spending habits, and suggest ways to increase revenue,” adding, “The majority of accountants work in office settings, and a few work from their homes. Accounting work can be stressful, and, depending on the time of year, it can be very fast paced. Almost all accountants work on a full-time basis, with overtime common during tax season.” Even if your field of interest or study is not one traditionally associated with the oil and gas industry, it may well be worth a look at the variety of job postings available—there are good odds that your skills may be a perfect fit for the right company.

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Books & Beyond… Far Beyond. F

Find it at Flenniken by Regis Whetzel.

or some, the thought of a library may conjure mental images of a static, sedate place, where “Shhh!” is the order of the day. It may, in fact, be a challenge to think of a library as a fun, dynamic, vibrant place. However, after spending some time talking with Katy Pretz, director of the Flenniken Public Library in Carmichaels, it’s hard to think of a library in any other way. Look up the word “enthusiastic” in the dictionary, and you’re sure to see her picture there. By the way—looking up the word “enthusiastic” in the dictionary? Also something you can do at the library. But that’s only the beginning… “Libraries are no longer ‘book warehouses’,” Katy notes. “If we don’t have it, we can get it for you in two days’ time. With the ‘WAGGIN’ network, we’re partnered with 16 other libraries, for access to over 800,000 items.” As if that weren’t impressive enough, she adds, “We also have borrowing through inter-library loan with any other public, academic or school library in the state.” This buzzing network of activity began humbly almost 70 years ago. The Carmichaels-Cumberland Women’s Civic Club began their community’s library in 1946, housed in the basement of the First National Bank in Carmichaels (now Community Bank). In 1959, Earl T. Flenniken provided a sum of money in his will to be used for a library in memory of his parents, William F. and Mary A. Flenniken. The library purchased the Werner Lund property, near the Carmichaels town square, and began renovation and remodeling on the large brick mansion. Work was completed, and the new Flenniken Public Library opened its doors on May 1st, 1961. Katy is quick to point out, “We call ourselves the Flenniken Public Library so that everyone in the community understands that it’s not a ‘pay-for’ library subscription. We don’t charge for a library card; all you have to do is prove residence in Greene, Fayette or Washington County.” This was initially made possible because of funding from the Flenniken Trust; even now, the library still receives some funding from the family trust, as well as state and local funding, and also benefits through the generosity of donors and board members. The library has seen many changes over the years. In 1972, the first floor of the building was expanded, and in 1976, Flenniken joined forces with Waynesburg’s Bowlby Public Library to form the Greene County Library System. In 1982, an addition was built to pro-

vide space for a conference room and children’s library; new lighting and flooring, roof repairs and a handicapped-accessible entrance are among other recent additions and renovations. Six public computers, as well as laptops, all filled with office and design software, are available for use; printing, faxing, and scanning services are also offered. The library’s 3-D printer is on the cutting edge of technology, and library staff members are eager to train the public to use this exciting new technology. “We have a 15year old girl who knows how to use this equipment now,” Katy notes, adding, “when you think about what they’re going to do after high school, getting into engineering, and things like that…” A bank of computers, with shelves full of books to the side, and in the room behind. she trails off, imagining the possibilities. Some things, however, are destined to remain as they always were. “Do you see those floors?” Katy asks, look- adds passionately. “When most people think libraries, they still think ing into the building from what was once the front porch, but is now ‘books’—they don’t necessarily think of all the other things that we a brilliantly sunlit, enclosed space. “Those are the original hardwood do!” “Other things” is a vast understatement. floors, with that beautiful inlay,” she states in what could only be “Rocket Languages” is a program of interactive language learncalled a reverent tone. “I’m in love with those floors, in spite of the ing software, available for free to library members. “Why spend 4 or fact that I wear high heels and make noise everywhere I walk,” she 5 hundred dollars on language software,” Katy notes, “when you can says, laughing. It’s clear that Flenniken proudly maintains a sense of its own his- learn German, Spanish, French, Italian… we even have sign language tory, balanced with the eagerness with which it embraces current and classes, all free with a library card!” Many car enthusiasts have fond memories of the “Chilton Manfuture technologies. “Our mission really is to promote growth—Souals” of the past; a vast array of modern automobile makes and modcial, intellectual, and economic, with a focus on literacy,” Katy points out. This means approaching literacy on a multitude of fronts. Basic els, as well as changes from year to year within the same model, make Literacy, the fundamental ability to read, is still at the heart of the such a collection nearly impossible to keep updated. The problem is non-existent for a library card-holder, who can take advantage of effort. Addressing the new frontiers, Katy says, “There’s also Informa- the Auto Repair Reference Center. “You type in the make, model and tion Literacy, which is being able to understand and use computers year, and it actually pulls up not just the entire manual for your car, and digital information technology; Civic and Social Literacy, which but you can also click on the part you need to repair, and it walks you, involves things like tax information, Social Security information, step by step, through how to repair that part on your car.” For those interested in genealogy, the online Heritage Quest rebeing able to vote—teaching people to be citizens.” Health Literacy source is a perfect complement to Flenniken’s in-print selection covand Financial Literacy complete the picture, and Flenniken offers resources to teach the public about those, also. “Libraries do that,” she ering local history; while the “Power Library” allows users to link with libraries all over the state, covering subjects like an Associated Press photo library, the GreenFile environmental resource library, Newspaper Source searching, a Teacher Reference Center, and much more. The Testing & Education Reference Center has numerous resources to help people study and prepare for GED and SAT testing, as well as a wide array of other study-helps; and the WAGGIN network also offers online Gale Courses, free six-week, instructor-led courses on a variety of topics. Flenniken also now offers the Freegal Music service, which offers library members three hours of advertisement-free streaming music per day, and three free music downloads per week. With access to nearly 8 million songs from over 28,000 record labels, in addition to 15,000 music videos and streaming movies, Freegal is a complete entertainment service offered at no cost to library users. Perhaps the most remarkable thing is that, for the seemingly endless number of avenues for learning and fun available there, Flenniken is, at its heart, still a rather small, rural library—which is just how Katy Pretz likes it. “Because it’s a small library, I’m not tucked away in an office. I know the people who come in our door, and I love it. They can tell me what they want, then it’s up to me to figure out a way to make it happen with the budget. When I see a teenager ask for this new Young Adult book that I haven’t even heard of yet, I put it on the next book order, she sees it sitting on that desk as soon as it comes, and says, ‘You ordered it for me! You asked for it!’ That makes me love my job, because I see it directly affect the people that come in my door.” To learn more about all that Flenniken Public Library has to offer, call 724-966-5263, email fpl@windstream, or visit www.flenniken. org.

Katy Pretz shows off Flenniken’s 3-D Printer station.

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Community Foundation Receives National Recognition

Stocking Stuffers Helping to spread the holiday spirit, the Greene County 4-H Horse and Pony Club stuffed stockings for the Rogersville nursing home residents recently. Front Row: Vince Maley, AJ Cumer, Morgan Mooney, Samantha Lambeth, Kiley Meek, Carly Whyte. Back Row: Renae Vrabel, Meghan Eddy, Lindsay Vrabel, Haley Pierson, Nathan Cumer, Luke Maley.

The Community Foundation of Greene County recently received accreditation with the nation’s highest standard for philanthropic excellence. National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations establish legal, ethical, effective practices for community foundations everywhere. “Meeting the National Standards benchmarks is a rigorous, comprehensive process,” said Hugh Ralston, Chair of the Community Foundations National Standards Board. “This accreditation is a significant accomplishment that says the Community Foundation of Greene County has demonstrated a commitment to quality, integrity and accountability.” The National Standards for U.S. Community Foundations program requires community foundations to document their policies for donor services, investments, grant making and administration. With over 500 community foundations already accredited nationwide, the program is designed to provide quality assurance to donors, as well as to their legal and financial advisors. The Community Foundation of Greene County offers a range of charitable funds, allowing donors to advance a cause, support an individual organization, provide flexible support for community needs or recommend individual grants. In addition to affirming the organization’s philanthropic services, the accreditation validates the Community Foundation of Greene County’s grant making practices for the nonprofit community. “Grant making is a lot like investing,” said Dr. Nancy Davis, Community Foundation of Greene County board chair. “We need to assess risks, weigh potential gains, diversify assets, monitor performance and operate fairly. With our National Standards accreditation, you can be assured that we’re doing just that.”

Miss Rain Day Speaks Miss Rain Day, Morgan Voithofer, was recently the guest speaker at the Rotary Club of Waynesburg. She spoke to the members about the highlights of her quest to become Miss Rain Day 2014, stating, “Being Miss Rain Day has given me so many wonderful opportunities to give back to my community. I never truly understood the meaning of being Miss Rain Day until I was crowned. I did understand that it was a very big title to uphold, a huge responsibilWaynesburg University’s Criminal Justice Club recently participated in the Pittsburgh Polar Bear ity, and that I would be a Plunge, which took place at Heinz Field. representation of Rain Approximately 20 students joined Waynesburg University instructor of criminal justice James Tanda Day and the Rain Day in taking the plunge into the Ohio River on Pittsburgh’s North Shore. The Criminal Justice Club raised Scholarship everywhere more than $1,500 leading up to the event. This was the second year that the club participated. In two years, that I would go, but I nevthe club has raised more than $2,500. er expected the opportuStudent representatives from freshmen to seniors gave up their Saturday to join more than 1,800 other nities and situations that plungers in the freezing rain for the cause. This year, the air temperature was 39 degrees and the water would arise.” temperature was 38 degrees at the time of the plunge. For more informa“Our goal was to follow the University’s mission of service to this very needy cause while also contion about the Rain Day necting our criminal justice and forensic science students to a network of law enforcement, attorneys, Scholarship, call 724-747federal agencies and others in the profession,” James said, adding, “This year’s donation will be used to 4506. L—R, Jon Stevens (President-Elect), Kelly Stepp (VP), Miss Rain Day help further the mission of Special Olympics Pennsylvania and help support the more than 20,000 athletes Morgan Voithofer, Denise Malley (Secretary), Barb Cole (Treasurer) served in the commonwealth.” According to James, half of the money raised by Waynesburg’s Criminal Justice Club will go directly to Greene County’s Special Olympics program, which Waynesburg’s Criminal Justice Club resurrected last year. Photo by Jeanine Henry

Taking the Plunge!

Doing Good for Veterans

In late-December, the employees of Wade’s Auto Body & Frame Shop in Waynesburg, along with owner, Jim Mason, gave an undisclosed donation of money gathered during the holiday season to the American Legion Post #330, in Waynesburg. Michele Deems, U.S. Navy veteran and Post #330’s historian, offered thanks on behalf of the post, saying, “We’re grateful to Wade’s Auto Body & Frame Shop for their generosity, and for their many years serving their customers and the community.” L—R: Michele Deems, Historian; Tony Staggers, Wade’s Auto Body & Frame Shop representative; George Barnhart, Commander; Tom Boyd, Scholarship Committee; Roy Arbogast, Adjutant.

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ecently, students from Carmichaels Area participated in a “Three Tree Farm Tour” of Southwest PA Woodlot Owners Association (SWPWO) woodlots guided by current service forester, Russ Gibbs, and retired service foresters, Bill Wentzel and Arlyn Perkey. The whole idea of the tour began this past summer when Kevin Willis, Carmichaels Area Science teacher, was asked to present one of the stations of the National Tree Farm National Convention Field Day hosted at the John and Maureen Burnham woodlot.  “The Burnham Tree Farm was the perfect fit for our students,” Kevin Willis explained.  “We have American Chestnut trees growing in our Native Plant Greenhouse and the Burnham Tree Farm has an American Chestnut restoration project on their Tree Farm.” Russ Gibbs actually used some of the Oak trees that were grown in the greenhouse for his station during the Field Day this summer.  In return for the oak trees, Gibbs gave Willis some Kentucky Coffeetree seeds to grow in the greenhouse along with about 3000 white oak acorns. The tour began at the John and Maureen Burnham woodlot. John and Maureen Burnham took the students out to their Purdue Walnut plantation and discussed the Purdue Walnut genetically superior stock.  Students made their own forest management decisions by selecting the best trees of the plantation to maintain along with choosing the trees that should be removed to provide additional resources to the selected trees.  The students then walked to an American Chestnut restoration location on the Tree Farm learning about the history of this tree and the research that is being done to restore it to Pennsylvania’s forests.  The students also had the opportunity to sample walnuts and chestnuts.  At the last station, Bill Wentzel discussed tree identification and physiology.  He used an increment borer to show the students the tree growth over the last ten years to determine if that tree should remain growing or if it was overmature and should be harvested. At the Perkey woodlot, Arlyn Perkey discussed how his tree farm was originally a working dairy farm that reverted back to a forest through the process of succession.  The students hiked to various areas of the woodlot where they saw how to properly manage a crop tree, discussed stand structure and composition, along with wildlife habitat.  Mr. Perkey took the students to one area and gave the students the opportunity to choose which trees to manage and which to cut using various silvicultural techniques for regeneration. The tour ended at the Harold and Gay Thistle woodlot.  The students visited a walnut plantation where they got to see the effects of microclimate on tree growth and development.  The students visited an established red oak plantation, identified invasive species that are affecting PA forests, including mile-aminute weed, and engaged in various aspects of forest ecology.  Russ Gibbs talked about his involvement

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with TreeVitalize, a DCNR partnership to restore tree cover in Pennsylvania communities. “My students weren’t sure what to think when I told them we would be participating in the Tree Farm tour,” said Shane King, gifted education instructor, “but they were amazed at how interesting this trip really was!” “My classmates and I really enjoyed the field trip to three different tree farms to get to know trees better. All of us really learned a lot!” enthused first grader, Chloe Mitchell. “All of us woodlot owners were amazed how engaged the students were throughout the day,” said Gay Thistle, SWPWO president. “We all felt that this was a worthwhile experience- exposing thirty or so young people to our local forest ecology and the work it takes to manage it.” “Every one of these students is potentially going to own a woodlot someday,” said science teacher, Kevin Willis.  “It is very important that they know how to manage that valuable resource.  This tour gave these students real-life examples of three groups of people who have done different things to manage their woodlots successfully.”

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Area Agency on Aging Domiciliary Care (Dom Care)

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t may well be one of the best public service programs that you’ve never heard of, which is why Cindy Kopanic and Dora Johnson take the mission of spreading the word about Dom Care to an evangelistic level. “One of the unique factors about our Dom Care program is that nobody knows about it,” Cindy laments. “It’s just not something that is common knowledge unless you have somebody in your family that needed these types of services, or someone in your family or community has provided services.” Established in 1978, and operating in Washington, Fayette and Greene Counties, the program provides a quality housing alternative for individuals age 18 and over who are unable to live independently because of frailties of age, or due to physical, visual or mental impairment, yet do not require 24-hour institutional or nursing care. What sets Dom Care apart from other types of residential arrangements is that care is provided in private homes by rigorously screened individuals and families, with the aim of creating a warmer and more sociable living situation. “Where they’re at is really, truly their home,” says Cindy, whose work with Dom Care began in 2008, though she’s been affiliated with the Area Agency on Aging for over 15 years. In 2010, she became the Dom Care supervisor. Dora Johnson has been involved with Dom Care for 26 years, smiling as she notes, “I’ve been there a long, long time!” Beginning as a case manager in 1988, Dora is now Dom Care’s Provider Specialist, a key figure in terms of screening and certifying homes and individuals. “We send out packets for the provider to get the process started,” Dora says, “and then, once the paperwork is completed, we do a certification visit. We certify the homes, then my role is to inspect them every six months to make sure everything is up to code.” For those interested in becoming Dom Care providers, Cindy and Dora strive to make the application and certification process as simple as possible. Among the requirements for providers, “You must be at least 21 years of age, and a resident of Pennsylvania.” Cindy points out. “You have to show us that you’re capable of taking residents into your home, and you must also live in the Dom Care facility.” As for requirements for the actual living space, she adds, “It’s not about the size of the home; residents have to have their own space. It can be a single or double occupancy room.” Cindy notes that there are some code requirements that must be met, but adds, “Really, our Dom Care homes are individual’s homes in the community; it could be on ‘Main Street,’ it could be out in rural areas; they’re all over.” What are the expectations for a Dom Care provider? “The provider has to fix their meals, do their laundry, make sure they get to and from doctor appointments, set up medications as prescribed by the doctor,” Dora says, adding, “we have some consumers that attend a day program, so they have to be ready to catch the van or taxi to get to their program.” Dom Care is not meant to be a short-term “respite care” solution. “A lot of our consumers have been in our program for over 20 years,” Cindy says, emphasizing the familial and social aspects of the program. “We certainly encourage them to participate in community events and services, to be integrated at home and in the community.” At this time, there is an urgent need for care providers in Greene, as there are no current Dom Care providers here. This was not always the case, Dora recalls: “I was the case manager for Greene County, but over the years we lost people. They retired, or passed away, but it’s been a strong program, and it helps a lot of people.” Dom Care providers receive $978 per month per resident living with them, up to a maximum of three residents. However, Cindy notes, “Most people who enter our program don’t have $978 a month, so we’re able to apply for a ‘Dom Care Supplement’ through the Department of Social Security.” This supplement provides payment for the caregiver, as well as a $189 per month “Personal Needs Allowance” for such things as medications, toiletries, etc. If you’re willing to open your home and heart and become a Dom Care provider, or if you or a loved one might benefit from the unique services that Dom Care offers, please call the program at 800-411-5655, or 724-489-8083. Cindy Kopanic can be reached at extension 4617; Dora Johnson at extension 4614.

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GreeneScene of the Past

ur quest for this story began simply—with a photograph. Provided by GreeneSaver reader, J. Robert (Bob) Rice, the old black and white picture has turned slightly sepia-toned from age. It shows the jury box of a courtroom, railings reflected in the gleaming, polished floor, with 15 stern-faced, suited gentlemen facing the camera. On the back was pasted a single column of a newspaper story, “continued from page one,” no more than 6 inches long, with a headline reading, “First Degree Murder Asked in Trial of Mrs. Hartman.” Beneath the headline are listed the names of the men in the photograph—jurors for the trial—and a handwritten date, “Sept 20 1938.” One of the jurors, John L. Rice, is Bob’s father. Below the names is a tantalizing portion of the news story: “The first witness was Coroner Raymond Adamson, who told of going to the Hartman home on the morning of June 19. He found a blanket soaked with blood. The state then introduced a skirt, slip and red blouse given to Coroner Adamson by Mrs. Hartman’s mother, Mrs. Rosa Marshall, on Sunday morning, the 19th. They were the articles of clothing worn by Mrs.” …and that’s where the newspaper column ends. The desire to learn more, however, had just begun, and when the research was over and the facts revealed, what was left could easily compete with an old Raymond Chandler detective novel. It was a story of intrigue and murder, full of twists that would hardly be believed without proof from newspapers of the day, and it all began and ended in Dunkard, Greene County. The lead player in the drama was Mrs. Florence “Flossie” Hartman. On January 18th of 1937, Flossie was not, as we might say today, “in a happy place.”

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Estranged from her husband, Joseph, for the past six months, the 32-year old mother of three young children—Roy, age 9; Joseph Jr., 3; and 1-year old Wayne— was on a circuitous route through Cleveland, Ohio, her youngest child in her arms. Joseph Sr. had been living with a nephew in Cleveland since their separation, and had other family there, as well. Flossie had taken a bus into the city from her home in Dunkard. Through a series of phone calls and visits to Jospeh’s brothers, she eventually tracked him down, sitting in a parked car in front of a house on East 65th Street in Cleveland with Mary King, a self-described “friend of the family” who had once dated Joseph’s brother. Another man, Neil McKay, was also in the car; Mary later stated that the three had been out completing details on the sale of a car she’d purchased, the one in which she was sitting with Joseph, in fact. McKay and Mary King exited the scene quickly, going inside the McKay house, where Mary later reported hearing Flossie and Joseph having heated conversation. According to an article from the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Flossie was heard telling Joseph that, “He had done nothing to contribute to the support of her and the children. ‘You didn’t even send them a stick of candy for Christmas,’ Miss King said Mrs. Hartman told him.” In spite of this, Flossie was apparently pleading for Joseph to return home with her, but, “He told her she had left him on several occasions, and he would not agree to reconciliation.” The report of Flossie leaving Joseph repeatedly appears to be true; the young Hartman family had moved from Dunkard to Twinsburg, Ohio, the preceding July, where Joseph worked for a farmer to provide a living. It was later learned, however, that, “Every few weeks, Mrs. Hartman would get homesick and return to Pennsylvania,” according to the newspaper. Joseph sat in the driver’s seat of the car; Flossie stood in the January night, holding their baby. According to Mary King, “Hartman then asked his wife to get him some insurance papers and other papers out of the trunk. Mrs. Hartman handed the infant, Wayne, to her husband, and went to the car of Harry Hartman,” Joseph’s brother,

who had driven Flossie and Wayne to their destination. Whether or not Flossie retrieved the papers is unknown; what she definitely brought back was a gun. “She returned to the car in which her husband was sitting, and got into the back seat. A few moments later, five shots were fired. Hartman fell dead at the wheel,” says the Plain Dealer’s story. Mary King was quoted as saying, “I don’t know how she missed the baby.” When Cleveland Police Detective Frank Kosicki arrived on the scene, he found Flossie sitting in Harry Hartman’s car, admitting immediately, “I shot him.” The detective asked for the gun, which Flossie handed to him, saying, “Here it is. Please get me out of here. Will they kill me for this?” Flossie was arrested and charged with first degree murder, staying in the hospital ward of the Cleveland city jail so that she could continue to care for the baby, Wayne, until he could be returned to Flossie’s parents for care. Roy and Joseph Jr. were kept at the Greene County Home pending trial, which came near the end of March. It is open to debate whether what happened next was a just and appropriate work of jurisprudence, but the headline in the Plain Dealer from March 20th reads as sharp as the head of a pin: “HUSBAND SLAYER IS FREED BY JURY” “Mrs. Flossie Hartman, 32, frail mother of three children, was acquitted of the murder of her estranged husband, Joseph, last night by a jury of seven men and five women,” the article goes on to say. The verdict was returned after only two hours of deliberation, and Common Pleas Judge Samuel H. Silbert was said to have disagreed with their findings. The judge having ruled out a defense of temporary insanity, Flossie’s attorneys, Donald Hornbeck and Ellis Diehm, contended that she shot in self-defense, saying that, “Hartman had threatened to kill her if she did not leave the automobile.” On the witness stand, Flossie had claimed having no memory of the incident, saying that she “arrived penniless in Cleveland on the day of the shooting, seeking a reconciliation with the husband she had not seen or heard from since September,” adding that Joseph threatened to obtain a divorce, and take custody of their children. The newspaper article notes that, when court bailiff, John Sweeney read the verdict, Flossie hugged and kissed Attorney Hornbeck, and soon returned home to Dunkard to reclaim her children. If this were the conclusion to the entire tale, it would be enough to raise some eyebrows and cause many to say, “Wow, I can’t believe all of that happened to someone from around here…” But it’s only half the story. On June 20th, 1938, exactly one year and three months after her acquittal, another headline blazed across the page: “FLOSSIE HARTMAN COMPANION SLAIN— Miner Shot in Home of Acquitted Husband Killer.” The story begins, “Shot while in the one-room home GreeneSaver •

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of Mrs. Flossie Hartman, 34, of Taylortown, PA, who was acquitted in March 1937 of murdering her husband in Cleveland, John Andrenok, 21, a miner, died in a Waynesburg, PA hospital last night.” Flossie initially told Raymond Adamson, Greene County Coroner, that she and John had been asleep on the floor at the foot of a bed where her three children were sleeping, and that she was awakened by the sound of a rifle shot. She saw that John had been wounded above his right eye, with a .22 caliber rifle having fallen by his side. John Andrenok died in the hospital five hours later, having never awakened. Flossie reportedly told the coroner that, “She and Andrenok had been dating since her return from Cleveland after her acquittal in the fatal shooting of her husband” the year before. On July 6th, Sgt. V.F. Bunch of the Pennsylvania Motor Police filed formal murder charges against Flossie Hartman, and news of the case began spreading far and wide. A clipping from the September 2nd edition of the Canonsburg Daily Notes newspaper indicates that the case was to be “among 14 to be presented to the Greene County Grand Jury when it meets for the September term next Monday. The Hartman case will be the first murder charge presented to a Greene County Grand Jury in several years.” Battle lines were drawn as the state and the defense prepared their cases. A story from the Pittsburgh Press on September 17th, three days before the trial was set to begin, lays the groundwork: “Dist. Atty. Frank Throckmorton said today he would ask for a firstdegree murder verdict. The prosecutor said he would try to prove that Mrs. Hartman purchased the rifle that caused Andrenok’s death in Morgantown, W. Va., two weeks prior to the shooting.” While Flossie’s original statement regarding the shooting indicated that the sound of the rifle shot that took John Andrenok’s life awoke her, the newspaper states that, “Later, she was said to have changed her story, claiming that the gun had accidentally discharged while she and Andrenok were scuffling for its possession.” The trial began, and drama was soon to follow. D.A. Throckmorton characterized Flossie’s relationship with John as a “jealous, consuming love,” which transformed to murderous rage when he allegedly spurned her desire for marriage. John’s mother, Julia, testified hearing a discussion in which her son told Flossie, “I don’t think I’ll get married—I’ll help you for a couple of years before I do.” Another witness for the prosecution, Richard Herrod, was the ambulance driver who took John to the hospital following the shooting. He reported that Flossie had told him, “There’ll be a lot of gossip about me now. People have been saying that I carry a gun—I haven’t carried a gun since I killed my husband!” Every day of the trial brought shocking testimony and banner headlines, but none more so than the one appearing in the Waynesburg Democrat Messenger on September 24th: “MRS. HARTMAN PLEADS GUILTY IN DRAMATIC CLIMAX TO TRIAL” “Coming with sudden and dramatic swiftness,” the article begins, “stunning the large crowd of spectators, the case of the commonwealth against Mrs. Flossie Hartman of Taylortown, charged with the murder of John Andrenok, her lover, ended early yesterday afternoon when the red-haired widow withdrew her previous plea of not guilty and entered a plea of guilty of murder in the second degree.” The story continues, “Eyes red-rimmed from crying, her face pale and lips drawn, Mrs. Hartman faced the court for sentence. Asked if she had anything to say before sentence was pronounced, Mrs. Hartman said, ‘I ask the court to have mercy on me. That is all I have to say.’” Judge Challen W. Waychoff immediately sentenced Flossie to the State Industrial Home for Women at Muncy, Pennsylvania, “for a period of not less than ten years, nor more than 20 years.” Flossie began serving her sentence immediately; over the years from 1938 to 1960, court records show that her time was divided between the Muncy facility, and the Torrance State Hospital in Derry, PA. A letter written by Dr. William Schilling, Superintendent at Torrance, which was attached to a court order issued by Judge J.I. Hook in July of 1960, summarizes Flossie’s experiences: “While at Muncy, she at first did not make a good adjustment, and was thus sent to the Torrance State Hospital the first time in April

of 1939. While she was here, she was found to be not psychotic, but mentally defective, and was returned to Muncy on July 17, 1939. Subsequently she got along more or less satisfactorily, but later began to have various complaints, became impulsive and attempted to choke two other girls at Muncy, was restless, and was re-admitted here for the second time in November of 1946.” The letter goes on to characterize Flossie as alternating between being either depressed or “irritable,” claiming at times to hear voices talking to her. She was eventually diagnosed as showing a, “Schizophrenic Reaction, chronic, undifferentiated type.” As her sentence had officially expired in 1958, and since her children had requested, Judge Hook signed an order in July, 1960, allowing “leave from the hospital for short visits from time to time, and during these visits to be with her son, Joseph Hartman,” who was living in Beaver at the time. In November of that same year, another order was signed that released Flossie into Joseph’s care “for an indefinite time.” Although it feels painfully anti-climactic, this is where the story fades away. No amount of searching for any later record of Flossie’s life produced results, and no obituary for her was to be found. The final, unsatisfying snippet of information came in the form of a death notice dated January 13, 2013, for Flossie and Joseph’s youngest child— the one she brought with her to Cleveland—Wayne, who passed away at a veterans home in Marquette, Michigan. It states that he served in the Navy for 23 years before his honorable discharge, worked as a manager at the National Pen Company, and enjoyed repairing cars, woodworking and fishing. It says, also, that he was preceded in death by Flossie and Joseph, and brother, Roy. At that time, Joseph Jr. was still alive, and still living in Beaver, PA. The trail evaporates, here. Debate could go on endlessly about whether justice that had been eluded for one murder had been duly served for another; or if Florence “Flossie” Hartman was a victimized, tortured soul whose troubled mind drove her to desperate acts, or a calculating “black widow” who coldly ended the lives of two men who failed to live up to her expectations of them.

From this distant vantage point nearly eight decades after the fact, perhaps the kindest (or most pragmatic) thing for which we could hope is that everyone involved eventually found a sense of closure and peace, and maybe even forgiveness.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1990, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Clipper

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“Keep On Clipping!”

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We are pleased to share pictures of a few of our Greene County area hunters who have earned the right to

BRAG!

Dalton Woods

9 Point Buck

Dalton Woods, age 12, of Woodside Road shot this 9-point buck on December 1st. Brody, Dalton’s 6-year old cousin, spotted the buck. Dalton and his Uncle Bob went down the hill and got into position. Dalton killed this buck with one shot. This is Dalton’s third buck, and his biggest to date.

Bob Puthuff

Caleb Delansky

8 Point Buck 10 Point Buck

Submitted by his Dad, Bobby Delansky, 11 year old Caleb Delansky of Dilliner, PA is pictured with his 10 point buck, captured near Farmington, PA on December 6th.

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Bob Puthuff from Waynesburg, shown here with the 8 point, 175 pound buck, shot in Center Township on December 13th.

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Denise Lenhart

11 Point Buck

Sherri Virgili sent in this picture of her husband, Ryan, who captured this 11-point with a crossbow during the second week of archery season at the Meadows Hunt Club, scoring 160 on his catch.

First Buck Success!

Denise Lenhart let us know about her deer season success, saying, “I harvested my first buck on opening day of Pennsylvania gun season after 3 years of hunting. I harvested my 8-point buck in Mt. Morris, Greene County, PA.

Ryan Virgili

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First Buck & Elk!

13-year old Joey Kurincak of Carmichaels had a great experience hunting this year! Joey got his first buck, an 8-point, while bow-hunting on Kurincak Mountain in Carmichaels, PA. He also got his first elk this year while rifle hunting near Craig, Colorado. Appearing with him in the elk photo is Joey’s dad, Bernie Kurincak, and Joey’s grandfather, Bernie Kurincak, Sr., both of Carmichaels.

Joey Kurincak

8 Point Buck

Donald K. Davey (Donny), of Fredericktown, shot this buck on the last day of Archery Season. Field dressed weight is 122lbs.

Donny Davy

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GreeneScene by Kathy Evans

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New and exciting career opportunities await you as a Professional Truck Driver! This is your life. This is your dream. OWN IT.

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St. George Serbian Orthodox Church

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Carmichaels, PA

ivers mean many things, both in symbol and in literal fact. Their nature of flowing in one direction reminds us of the passage of time, yet they seem to go on forever, timelessly. Throughout history, the lives of countless cities and towns have depended on their proximity to a river, as a source of water and power, and as a way to participate in the trade of goods across long distances. Rivers provide blessings in a multitude of ways; it’s only fitting that humanity returns the gesture. Throughout the world, Orthodox churches of many denominations conduct “Blessing of the River” services every year; St. George Serbian Orthodox Church in Carmichaels, located right alongside the Mon, has held river blessing services since 1999, a joyful tradition that has grown over time. “The first year I came, I thought, ‘We’re right next to the river, so let’s do it!’” says Father Rodney Torbic, who has led St. George for 16 years. “That first year,” he recalls, “it was just one other man and myself; now, our choir comes and sings, and we place an ice cross in the river.” On January 18th, Holy Cross Day, following the Divine Liturgy to celebrate the baptism of Jesus, Fr. Torbic, parishioners and choir gathered to bless the river once more. St. George has been serving the community for 60 years, celebrating their diamond anniversary with a special banquet held on the first Sunday in November of last year. “Most of the people who founded the church were coal miners,” Fr. Torbic notes, “Serbian immigrants, or the sons and daughters of Serbian immigrants.” While many St. George parishioners are from Carmichaels and other parts of Greene County, some come from Washington County, and others live as far away as French Creek, West Virginia, near Buckhannon. In addition, Fr. Torbic says, “I have a small mission parish that grew out of this parish, in Fairmont, West Virginia. I’ve gone there every week for 16 years, and it’s been officially a part of our parish for 15 years.” Fr. Torbic’s history with the church goes back nearly three decades. “This is my first parish,” he says, “and I was a deacon for 12 years before that.” Originally from Aliquippa, he worked with the State Board of Parole for 30 years before retiring and entering school to become ordained, first, as a deacon, then as a priest. The church, itself, is part of a rich and ancient history whose most distant origins extend back to the 6th century, A.D. “All Orthodox are part of what’s called the ‘Canonical Orthodox Church,’” Fr. Torbic explains. “We have different jurisdictions, like the Greeks, the Russians, and the Orthodox Church in America, but we’re considered one church. We serve together on the Sunday of Orthodoxy, which is the first Sunday of Great Lent, and we have joint communion. We consider ourselves the church of Christ from the time of the apostles.” Reaching out to the community is of great importance to Fr. Torbic, and the church, as a whole. The ministry of St. George extends to radio and Internet broadcasts of services, regular mailing and emailing of bulletins and other materials, adult classes, health care seminars, and many other activities that have made this historical church such a vital part of the community. Fr. Torbic summarizes the work of St. George simply and eloquently. “We preach the gospel here,” he states, concluding, “We want to draw people to Christ, and educate them that they’ll grow in Christ if that’s their main intent.” To learn more about St. George Serbian Orthodox Church, located at 296 Old Rt. 21 in Carmichaels, visit their website at www.stgeorgeserbian.us, or call 724-966-7428.

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Wealth of Hidden Talent E

By Regis Whetzel

John Hicks

ven regular readers of the GreeneSaver may not be aware that there’s far When graphic designer Chuck Scholtisek needs a new piece of furniture for his more to what we do than just creating Greene County’s most popular news- home, he’s far less likely to go to the furniture store than to his workshop. Having paper month after month. Direct Results, the parent company of the GreeneSaver, is crafted an array of pieces, including a loft bed for his daughter, a curio cabinet for a full service marketing, advertising and direct mail company that provides promo- the kitchen and more, his experiences working at a sign Ryan Drish tional products, signs, banners, vehicle graphics, graphic design services, embroi- shop helped him gain the skills—and the tools—needed dered and screen printed apparel of every imaginable type, and much more. to bring his ideas into form. Direct Results is growing in leaps and bounds, and maintaining that kind of In a similar vein, Alaina Whetzel, another member upward surge requires a host of talented folks at every state of the operation. Natu- of the graphic design team, is getting quite an education rally, we enjoy having the best graphic designers, screen printers, embroiderers, sales- from her dad in doing stonework and masonry. “What a people and other professionals on board here, but the funny thing about talent is that lot of people would never guess,” she says, “is that when it often refuses to be confined to just one area of a person’s life! facing a wall with stone, you start from the top and go The staff at DR covers a broad spectrum of unique abilities, featuring skilled down, so that the mortar doesn’t drop down and get all musicians, diverse artists and craftspeople, awesome chefs and bakers, and more! over the work you’ve already done!” There are enough musicians in the building to stage their own “Battle of the Not to be outdone, the DR sales staff has its own Bands.” John Hicks, screen printing, has over a decade of experience as a drummer, storehouse of creativity and talent. Stephanie Edgar is Deb but his main instrument now is guitar. He’s currently a member of two bands—Cyni- a skilled craftsperson whose bejeweled works are inGroesser cal Groove, a two-piece “raw rock” guitar-and-drums band; and In So Far, an original spiring a wealth of new ideas within the DR clothing band John describes as “Power Alternative Metal, with a Hip-Hop/Rap twist.” The department. Customer service pro, Lise Milinovich, band has one album under its belt, is preparing to go back into the studio in the describes herself as a “Personal Finance Wiz,” whose summer to record their second, and has been playing locally at venues like Tommy awesome skill-set keeps things running smoothly Boys in Waynesburg, Just One More in Blacksville, and Stoney Point Inn in Jefferson. here, as well as at home! Keith Hurka, from the DR sign shop, earned acclaim as the drummer for the Love of sports runs deep for many on the sales Chris heavy metal band, Order of Nine. He was astonished to find out that the band, which team. Ryan Transue is a world-class fisherman whose Bland recorded several albums during his tenure, has a surprisingly global reach, to the trophies include a 40 lb. king salmon, a 400 lb. tuna, point of finding a picture of himself in a book, published in Europe, that spotlighted and, remarkably, an 850 lb. marlin. In addition to Regis Whetzel numerous metal bands. being able to change most any light bulb without a Graphic designer, Ryan Drish, is a guitarist for Pittsburgh area band, There You ladder, Paul Stanley was a star basketball player at Are (www.thereyouareband.com), a dynamic, emerging rock band with increasingly Waynesburg University who went on to be an interhigh-profile gigs at places like Club Café and the Strip District Music Festival. He’s national pro, playing for the Melbourne Tigers in been honing his skills for 11 years, and has no question as to what inspired him to Australia, the Hobart Devils in Tasmania, and back in pick up the instrument: “Jimmy Page. I heard Led Zeppelin, and that was it for me—I the states with the Youngstown Pride, part of the Molly Usher knew I wanted to play guitar,” he affirms. World Basketball League. Chuck Scholtisek GreeneSaver staff writer, Regis Whetzel, is an accomplished bassist, multi-inAsk Carol Howard about her sports passtrumentalist, producer and songwriter with numerous independent-label perform- sion, and she’ll smile and say, “It’s life in the fast ing and production credits to his name. His nearly three decades of experience on lane…” and she’s not joking. When not being a the stage and behind the mixing board have provided a wide palette of abilities, and, DR sales pro, you’re likely to find her at Charlotte when not working on stories for the paper, he can be found working in his custom Motor Speedway, in Concord, NC, coordinataudio facility or teaching private music lessons. ing volunteers, making sure that drivers have all Ken Hall, from DR’s screen printing division, has been pounding the drums for needed clearances and paperwork, making sure 4 years, but the “hidden talent” of which he’s most proud is when he earned honors that guests and celebrities are being cared for, and in All-State Cross Country in high school, in Boliver, MO. acting as “NASCAR Pet Mom” for many of the Rounding out the DR rhythm section, sign shop pro Tim Levdansky is a drum- drivers! Stephanie mer with a serious groove, but, these days, he’s really marching to the beat of designThere are many awesome things that come Edgar ing his own line of clothing under the “Extract Apparel” label (www.extractapparel. from Direct Results, but the greatest is our people, com), a company he founded last year with two partners, Dylan Rosgone, and Direct and the talents that fill their lives on and off the job! Results’ own Ryan Drish! If you’d like to see your business spotlighted in a Carly Richter, part of our embroidery team, is a formally-trained dancer with 10 way similar to what you’ve just read about the fantastic years of experience in tap, jazz, and gymnastic dancing. Not content to simply enjoy folks at Direct Results, why not become a part of our her talents, herself, she was a professional dance teacher in Rochester, NY, before special “Growing In Greene” progress editions of the becoming one of DR’s professionals. GreeneSaver in the February and March issues? Just Cooking and baking are passions for many of Direct Results’ finest. Co-owner, contact a member Pam Blaker, has won awards for her angel food cake; embroiderer, Deb Groesser, is a of our sales staff at renowned designer of wedding cakes; and production and facilities manager, Chris 724-627-2040, or Alaina Whetzel Bland, is a talented “food creator” whose projects often look too good to eat, but taste visit www.GreenePaul Stanley too good to be left as artworks! Adding an international flair, graphic designer Pete Saver.com to learn Brunetto specializes in French cooking, famous for its complexity, rich tastes and more! subtle nuances. In addition to being an experienced candle maker and equestrian, Ryan Transue Carol Howard co-owner Shelly Brown’s southern California roots helped shape her expert skills in Mexican cuisine. Ricky Powell, a DR business development specialist, is a professionally trained chef sought by several upscale restaurants accross the country practicing his art before joining the DR team. He graduated from Johnson and Wales college in 2008, a respected school for all manner of culinary arts whose degree holders include such famous chefs as Tyler Florence and Emeril Lagasse. Graphic designer, Molly Usher, is an award-winning painter whose 2009 work, “Conscious,” most recently took first prize at the “Art Blast on Lise Milinovich the Mon” competition in 2014. GreeneSaver readers may also remember seeing her prize-winning work from last summer’s Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful Summer Open House chalk drawing competition.

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GreeneScene by Beverly Yoskovich

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Spaghetti Dinner Greene County Boy Scout Troop 1280 will be holding their annual Spaghetti Dinner on February 6th 2015 from 5-7 PM. The event will be held at St. Anne’s Catholic Church in Waynesburg.  Tickets can be purchased in advance from local Scouts or on the night of the dinner.  The cost is $7 for adults; $3 for children 4-10, and children under 3 eat free.  Meal will include salad, beverage, spaghetti meal with bread, and dessert choice.  Dine in and carry out options are available.  Troop 1280 is chartered to the V.F.W. Post 4793 in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania.   Funds raised during this event will be used by Scouts to participate in scouting activities throughout the year. For additional information please contact Dawn Phillips, Secretary, Troop 1280 at 724-986-1550 or dawnjo13@yahoo.com.

It Was a Great Skate With More to Come!

More than 200 individuals rolled in the New Year at the seventh annual “All Night Skate,” held New Year’s Eve at Mon View Roller Rink in Greensboro, and sponsored by the Greene County Commissioners, McCracken Pharmacy, Waynesburg Milling Co. and Waynesburg Rent-A-Center. Waynesburg Rent-A-Center donated a large-screen TV for the “Just Dance” competition, which featured two winners based on skill level. Mollie Ehrlichman, 15, of Carmichaels and Kevin Kelly, 13, of Crucible each received a $10 Wal-Mart gift card. This season at Mon View, every Friday will feature a “Skate & Dance” from 7 to 11 pm, starting on January 30th, and open skating will be held from 7 to 10 pm on Saturdays. Admission for all attendees will be $8 on Friday nights and $5 on Saturday nights. Times and prices may change for special events. The special “Valentine’s Day Skate & Dance” is scheduled for 7 to 11 pm Friday, Feb. 13, and the annual “Easter Egg Hunt & Skate” is planned for 1 to 4 pm Saturday, March 28, at Mon View Park. Admission is $7 per child, and adult admission is free when accompanying a child. For more information, call Mon View Roller Rink at 724-943-3440, or the Department of RecThe Corner Cupboard food bank announces the following distribution dates and sites throughreation at 724-852-5323. out Greene County for February:

Corner Cupboard February Distribution

Feb. 10: Shannopin Civic Building, Bobtown, 11am; Jackson Township Building, Holbrook, 6pm Feb 12: Springhill Township Building, 9am—11am Feb 13: Produce to People, Harvey’s Grange, Graysvilla, 10am—12pm Feb 17: Mapletown United Methodist Church, 10am—12pm; Rogersville Fire Hall, 10am—11am Feb 18: Baptist Church, Jefferson, 12pm—2pm; Graysville Fire Hall, 1pm—3pm; Whiteley-Perry Twp pantry, “old video store” in Mt. Morris, 1pm—3pm Feb 19: Carmichaels UMC Fellowship Hall, 9am—11am Feb 20: Wayne Township Building, 10am—12pm Feb 26: Produce to People, Greene Co. Fairgrounds, 10am—11am; regular food distribution at fairground from 10am—12pm.

Wine and Chocolate Fundraiser The Friends of Bowlby Public Library are hosting a wine and chocolate tasting fundraiser at The Lodge at Rohanna’s, 1005 Rolling Meadows Rd. in Waynesburg, on Saturday, Feb. 7th at 4pm. The event will feature offerings from Shields Demesne Winery, Thistlewaite Winery, 5 Kidz Kandy and Chocolate by Michelle, with music by Bob Podish. Tickets are $20; proceeds benefit Eva K. Bowlby Public Library. For more information about the event or to purchase tickets, visit our website at www.showclix.com/event/bowlbywinetasting2015. L—R: Mollie Erlichman, Kevin Kelly

Exercise Classes Starting Soon! Beginning next month, the Greene County Department of Recreation will start its winter schedule of exercise programs with morning and evening sessions of four fitness classes. All classes begin the week of Feb. 2 and include sessions of “Body Blast!” aerobics, “Dance Fit,” hatha yoga and Zumba. Individual classes can be attended at a cost of $8 per class, but preregistration discounts are available. The pre-registration deadline for all classes is Friday, Jan. 30, and payment must be made in full. Class sizes are limited. Four sessions of fitness classes will be held in the 4-H Building at the Greene County Fairgrounds in Waynesburg, with one session of yoga planned for Mon View Roller Rink and Community Center in Greensboro. Attendees should wear sweat-absorbing clothes and good support shoes and bring water and towels. Both Zumba and “Body Blast!” aerobics will be offered in morning sessions at the fairgrounds. Zumba will be held from 9 to 10 a.m. every Tuesday and Thursday from Feb. 3 through March 12, and “Body Blast!” aerobics will be held from 9 to 10 a.m. every Wednesday from Feb. 4 through March 11. The pre-registration discount for the 18-class combination package is $5 per class, for a total of $90. The classes will combine fun cardio routines with specific and tailored mus-

JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2015

• GreeneSaver

cle conditioning. Instructor Melissa Frameli will lead the Zumba classes, and Shastina Humble will lead the “Body Blast!” classes. In the evenings, sessions of hatha yoga and “Dance Fit” will be offered. Certified yoga instructor Virginia Wainwright will lead hatha yoga in two different sessions. Wainwright will instruct yoga from 6 to 7:30 p.m. every Tuesday from Feb. 3 through March 24 at the fairgrounds, and from 6 to 7:30 p.m. every Thursday from Feb. 5 through March 26 at Mon View Roller Rink. The preregistration discount for either eight-class session is $5 per class, for a total of $40 per session. Hatha yoga is a more gentle style of yoga exercise that is great for beginners and senior citizens. It improves balance and overall health, while increasing flexibility and circulation. Attendees should also bring yoga mats, and shoes will not be worn during the class. The brand-new “Dance Fit” classes will begin Thursday, Feb. 5, with instructor Humble. Classes will run from 6 to 7 p.m. every Thursday through March 12 at the fairgrounds. The pre-registration discount for the six-class session is $5 per class, for a total of $30. The classes will focus on dancing and working out to music mixes from the 1950s to today. For more information, or to pre-register for any of the classes, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us.

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JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2015

Jan-Feb Greenesaver 2015  

Let's start this year off right! Check out local hunters in the annual Brag Mag. Incredible stories, hidden talent and much, much more! Don'...

Jan-Feb Greenesaver 2015  

Let's start this year off right! Check out local hunters in the annual Brag Mag. Incredible stories, hidden talent and much, much more! Don'...

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