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Leadership Program Graduates Honored

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raduates of the tenth Community Builders of Greene County leadership program were honored at Governance was led by Darlene Bigler, President and CEO of Community Action Southwest. Financial a ceremony held at the Greene County Career and Technology Center. The achievement ceremony Management for Boards was led by Thomas G. Milinovich, CPA, CFP, Milinovich & Company and Cywas sponsored by Community Bank. pher & Cypher. Effective Communication was led by Jon Laughner, Penn State Cooperative Extension. Ten individuals received the Community Builders Nonprofit Leadership certification for complet- Developing Nonprofit Resources was led by Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director of the Community ing the course on management and leadership of nonprofit organizations. Each 2013 graduate received a Foundation of Greene County. Engaging Volunteers was led by Suzanne Smith, PDO Coordinator, Greatframed certificate, a pin, and a special chocolate bar. Earning the Nonprofit Leadership certification were: er Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Cynthia Andrews, Roberta Boyd, Connie Hart, Jennifer Mercer, Mary Jean Pratt, Pamela Pulkownik, The 2013 Community Builders of Greene County program was sponsored by the following organiEmma Jean Rutan, Earlene Schifko, Jacqueline Shriver, and Heather Yeager. zations and businesses: Community Bank, (Achievement Ceremony Sponsor), Alpha Natural Resources The Community Builder of the Year Award was presented to Connie Hart. The award, based on (Engaging Volunteers Session Sponsor), CONSOL Energy (Developing Nonprofit Resources session), nominations by class members, recognizes the participant who displays the characteristics of a communi- McCracken Pharmacy (Introduction to Leadership Sponsor), and Community Foundation of Greene ty builder throughout the program. Ms. Hart is currently employed by the Waynesburg Chamber of Com- County (Fiscal Sponsor). merce and serves on several nonprofit boards, including Second Sam Nine, and the Humane Society of Several organizations sponsored employees or board members to participate in the Community Greene County. Additionally, Jennifer Mercer, of Community Action Southwest, and Heather Yeager, of Builders series, including: Greene County United Way, Community Action Southwest, Greene County Greene County Human Services, were recognized for Perfect Attendance during the ten-session program. Human Services, the American Legion Auxiliary #330, and Southwest Regional Medical Center. Space for Community Builders provides training for persons interested in volunteering their time and talents the program was provided by the Greene County Career & Technology Center. to support Greene County nonprofit organizations. Local leaders serving on the Community Builders steerThe nonprofit leadership program explores leadership, ing committee in 2013 were Karen Bennett, Director, Greene nonprofit governance and boards of directors, financial manCounty Department of Human Services; Darlene Bigler, Exagement, communication and team work, strategic planning, ecutive Director, Community Action Southwest; Dr. Nancy public relations, grant writing, fundraising and volunteer enDavis, Energy Industry Liaison, Greene County Education gagement. This series is geared to helping citizens become Center of WCCC; Haley Finley, Community Builder gradubetter volunteers with non-profit organizations in the comate and Community Builder of the Year 2012/2013; Bettie munity, whether it be through activities such as serving on Stammerjohn, Executive Director, Community Foundation non-profit boards, volunteering on fundraising committees, of Greene County, Thelma Szarell, Superintendent, West or providing volunteer services. Greene School District; and Barbara Wise, Executive DirecInstructors for the program are local and regional extor, Greene County United Way and Community Builder of perts in each of the topics: Introduction to Leadership was the Year 2004. led by Dr. Nancy Davis, Energy Industry Liaison, Greene The eleventh series of Community Builders of Greene County Education Center WCCC. Strategic Planning was led County will begin August 25, 2014. The program will meet by Bruce Decker, Founder and Principal Partner of Collective every other Monday through December 8, 2014 from 5:30Impact. Marketing Your Success was led by Lynn Manning, 8:30 each evening. For more information on Community (left to right) Cindy Andrews, Connie Hart, Heather Yeager, Jennifer Mercer, Pamela Principal Partner Alpha Omega Communications, and John Builders of Greene County call 724-627-2010, or email cfPulkownik, Mary Jean Pratt, Roberta Boyd, and Earlene Schifko. Not included in the picture Turner of Total Merchant Marketing. Introduction to Board gcpa@gmail.com. are Emma Jean Rutan and Jacqueline Shriver

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Film Features Greene County Talent T

he cast and community involved in the creation of the new children’s film, “For His Own Glory,” gathered on Tuesday, December 17, 2013, at Greene Community Church to enjoy a first look at the newly produced project. The film, which teaches ASL sign language to describe 12 barnyard animals (cow, horse, dog, cat, sheep, pig, goat, rabbit, duck, chicken, rooster, donkey), features children and farm animals of Greene County, PA. “We’re especially happy to be able to showcase the faces, farms and talent of those right here in our region,” says David Crowe of Crowe’s Nest Media. “More than 95% of the DVD was completed with Greene County talent, from the children used to demonstrate the signing to the music and even the farm-themed finger puppets.” This talent includes local musicians Frank & Lisa Pazzynski; Hannah Morris, an accomplished pianist and communication major at Waynesburg University; and Sandy Seybold, a “crafter-extraordinaire.” The 40-minute educational film teaches everything from sign language to number, letter, and animal sound recognition—all the while teaching children of the “glory of God,” and “pointing to God as the Creator,” according to David. A family affair, the new project is the third film for the Crowe family of Crowe’s Nest Media, who also reside in Greene County. Hosted by Grace Crowe, 9, animated by Samuel Crowe, 14, and edited by Taylor Crowe, 16, the project was produced and directed by parents, David & Kellie Crowe.

The Crowe’s say they created this film as a result of not finding what they were looking for when searching for a DVD to teach early signlanguage to their youngest son, Andrew. “We wanted a video that would teach signlanguage, but that would also be God-honoring,” says Crowe. According to the website description, “For His Own Glory” is “fun, gentle, playful” and provides a great opportunity to “snuggle with your little ones, all the while teaching them about the wonderful Creator God.” In addition to including six hymn classics, the project also features the music of Judy Rogers, a national Christian recording artist. The film, currently available at www.crowesnestmedia.com for $16.95, is also available at national online retailers, including Christian Book Distributors and Amazon. By Regis Whetzel

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GreeneScene by Pansy McConnell

By Regis Whetzel

Native Plant Greenhouse Project B

y the time this school year began, students from Carmichaels Area High School grew over 750 oak seedlings in their native plant greenhouse. “We are good at growing oak trees,” says their teacher, Kevin Willis. “We needed to find a resource to help us grow other native plants.” That’s where Audubon at Beechwood comes in. Students from Carmichaels Area recently visited Audubon Center for Native Plants (ACNP) at Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve in Joey Kurincak, Jacob Hair, and Ethan Greene plant native plants with the Fox Chapel, PA. Students were given help of volunteer Peg Campbell at Audubon Center for Native Plants at a tour of the Plant Center by Roxanne Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve. The seeds were brought back to the Swann, ACNP Coordinator. Groups of Carmichaels Area students then rotated Native Plant Greenhouse at Carmichaels Area to track their growth. through different stations staffed by ten Audubon at Beechwood volunteers who demonstrated how to plant native plant seeds. “We were actually able to plant our own seeds!” says Carmichaels senior, Tyler Crago. “Now we will be able to track their growth in our greenhouse.” Carmichaels Area students also had the opportunity to visit the Spruce Flats Bog, a rare high-elevation bog at Linn Run State Park and Forbes State Forest. Students were guided by Greene County native, Mary Joy Haywood, RSM, Ph.D., Faculty Emerita and former Chair of the Division of the Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Carlow University. Mary Joy, author of “Wildflowers of Pennsylvania,” has been another invaluable resource in growing native plants. Students sent Mary Joy the list of native plant seeds that they were attempting to grow, and she sent them a detailed description of how to grow each one. “We were getting our Dense Blazing Star seeds to sprout, but we couldn’t keep them alive,” says student Ashley Dotson. “Mary Joy Haywood told us that these were desert plants and we were watering them to death!”

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While at Forbes State Forest, students were able to collect native plant seeds under the supervision of Russ Gibbs, DCNR Bureau of Forestry service forester and Rachael Christie, Forbes State Forest Environmental Educator. Mixed oak acorns, hickory nuts, and butternuts were taken back to the greenhouse and planted for propagation and future habitat restoration. Carmichaels Area received funding to continue their Native Plant Propagation Project through an EITC grant from Community Foundation of Greene County. With the additional funding, an automatic watering system, seedling propagation heating mats, and additional plant benches, pots, and soil were able to be added to the existing Native Plant Greenhouse. “What makes this greenhouse project unique is that these students are growing native plants that they will use to restore local habitats,” says Bettie Stammerjohn, director of Community Foundation of Greene County.

Carmichaels students with Kevin Willis, teacher; Mary Joy Haywood RSM, Ph.D., Faculty Emerita of Carlow University and author of Wildflowers of Pennsylvania; Russ Gibbs, DCNR Bureau of Forestry, and Rachael Christie, Forbes State Forest Environmental Educator, at the raised walkway leading into the rare, high-elevation Spruce Flats Bog at Linn Run State Park and Forbes State Forest.

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GreeneScene by Heather Guthrie

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his GreeneScene of the Past comes to us courtesy of Albie Reinhart, a frequent contributor of photographic nostalgia. The picture was among many being stored ot the Waynesburg Boro Police Station. Our thanks go to Albie, as always! We’re hoping to recruit some help from our readers to determine exactly what event is taking place in this classic photo. It was taken at the corner of High Street and Washington Street in Waynesburg, and appears as though it could be from the 1940s. Based on its proximity to the courthouse, it may be that everyone is waiting for a verdict in a high-profile trial, or for a news announcement. Whatever the event was, it certainly brought out a remarkable number of people. There was writing on the back of the original photograph, but it only identified the location where the picture was taken, saying nothing about the date, or the reason why the streets were, literally, overflowing with humanity! Although it does bear the name of well-known columnist John O’Hara, who wrote about many fascinating events in Waynesburg history. If any of our readers have insight as to the nature of this Greene Scene of the Past, we would like to hear from you! Call us at 724-627-2040, or e-mail info@directresults.us.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too. 6

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Follow Up to Last Month’s

Last Month’s GreeneScene of the Past

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fter seeing last issue’s GreeneScene of the Past, Ms. Susan Haines of Spraggs called the GreeneSaver to report that the gentleman driving the sleigh in the picture was her step-grandfather, Dr. William A. (W.A.) Titus, a dentist who practiced in Waynesburg for many years. According to our research, Dr. Titus was born in 1869, and died in 1949 in an accident involving a horse. As can be seen from last month’s Greene Scene photograph, and from the striking new picture accompanying this follow-up, Dr. Titus was obviously a man who loved horses. This picture comes to us from the archives of the Greene County Historical Society, researched and digitized for the Greene Connections: Greene County, Pennsylvania Photo Archives Project, thanks to the hard work of Ms. Candice Buchanan. The “Greene Connections” Internet site, at http://greeneconnections.blogspot.com/, features extensive and exhaustive research, information, and photo archives stretching far back into Greene County’s past.

New Photo of Dr. Titus

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Domestic Violence Services Receives Grant

Cornerstone Care Announces UTV Winner Ricci Caringola of Fairchance, PA is the lucky winner of a Coleman 700 Utility Vehicle, or UTV, raffled by Cornerstone Care. Caringola held the winning ticket for the Thanksgiving Day drawing. Funds raised by the raffle benefit Cornerstone Care’s outreach programs including mobile medical and dental programs, school based health programs, Dancing with a Pink Ribbon Breast Health Project, and Smile for Life oral health outreach and enrollment. “Our outreach staff does a remarkable job getting information to the community about a number of critical health issues, including getting health insurance. Like most service organizations these days, Cornerstone Care relies on a number of fundraising strategies to support our mission,” explained Rich Rinehart, Chief of Operations.

Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA (DVSSP) has received a grant from the Verizon Foundation for $15,000 to help with its teen dating violence education and awareness programs. This funding will help educate teens in local communities in an effort to promote healthy relationships for youth, and ultimately end domestic violence in adult relationships. Said William B. Carnahan of Verizon’s State Government Affairs in Western Pennsylvania, “For more than a decade, Verizon has been a champion of ending domestic violence and supports a broad range of programs that include training healthcare practitioners and first responders about screening for signs of abuse, engaging men as role models and advocates for prevention, educating teens about preventing dating violence, and collecting no-longer-used wireless phones and accessories, with proceeds supporting and furthering domestic violence prevention programs,” adding, “We are pleased to help expand the critical programs and services of DVSSP to help those in need in the community.” In a recent press release, a representative of DVSSP stated, “DVSSP appreciates the support of the Verizon Foundation, and also of Verizon Wireless for the HopeLine Program, which provides wireless phones, services, tools and financial grants to benefit domestic violence and non-profit advocacy agencies. Thanks to the Verizon Foundation, there will be greater awareness of domestic violence throughout Washington, Greene, and Fayette counties. With grants such as these we hope to ensure that peace does begin at home.”

Operation Christmas Child

Members of The Greater Purpose Team Ministry a group of six United Methodist Churches located in Denbo, Howe, Fredericktown, Jefferson, Rices Landing and Roscoe worked together to support Samaritan Purse’s Operation Christmas Child. “Working together, as one of our yearly missions projects, we were able to complete 170 Christmas shoeboxes,” said Susan Christopher, who was intimately involved in the project. “These boxes, over the next few months, will travel to other counties to be presented to children along with the opportunity to learn about God and his precious word.” Pictured working on the project are: Back row, L-R, Jim Howard, Kathy Howard, Renee Sahady, Deb BowsThe performance of Westmoreland County Community College’s 2013 associate degree nursing grad- er, Pastor Rick Bowser. Front row, L-R: Frank Huffuates on the national licensure examination exceeded the national and state averages. WCCC nursing man, Shirley Huffman, Jane Snyder, Betty Sowden, graduates achieved an 87.16 percent pass rate on National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Sara Christopher, Tammy Analong, Janie Shrum, Joyce Snyder. Nurses (NCLEX-RN), surpassing the national pass rate of 84.29 percent and the state’s pass rate of 86.22 percent. The pass rate is determined by the number of graduates who passed the exam on their initial attempt from October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2013. “I’m very proud of our graduates and our faculty,” said Dr. Ruth Irwin, director of nursing. “The difficulty level of the exam was increased in April. Historically, program performance in first-time test results decreases when a change occurs; however, the performance level of WCCC graduates was higher overall than the previous year.” The NCLEX-RN pass rate qualified WCCC’s associate degree nursing program for full-approval staOn November 20, The Commonwealth Financing Authority approved more than $2.5 million in tus by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing. WCCC offers a two-year associate degree nursing program grants for Greene County projects, state Sen. Tim Solobay and state Rep. Pam Snyder announced. The requiring 72 credits of coursework. Advanced standing is available for licensed practical nurses who wish largest award will go to the Southwestern Pennsylvania Water Authority for the expansion of water lines through Waynesburg. to earn an associate degree. “Greene County is seeing steady economic growth and this grant will help make sure the infrastrucWCCC conducts daytime associate degree nursing programs at the Youngwood campus and Indiana County Center, Indiana. Evening/weekend programs are offered at Youngwood and the Greene County ture is in place to keep the momentum going,” Solobay said. “Water and sewer projects are investments that Center, Waynesburg. For more information about the WCCC nursing program, visit wccc.edu/nursing or will pay economic benefits for generations to come.” The money is being awarded through the state’s Water Supply and Wastewater Infrastructure Program call 1-800-262-2103, extension 4062. (PennWorks), put in place by the legislature to improve Pennsylvania’s water and sewer systems, protect the environment, and create jobs. The Greene County Airport’s Business Park Project will receive a grant of $31,068 through the Department of Community and Economic Development. Greene County officials were also awarded a $100,214 grant to help pay for the restoration of the Mon View Park swimming pool. The county is picking up the rest of the cost, estimated to be more than a halfmillion dollars. The state money is being awarded through a Greenways, Trails and Recreation Program Fund, created through Act 13 of 2012. “Greene County is investing in future generations by restoring community assets and using the ecoMembers of the Waynesburg American Legion, nomic power of Act 13 to do it,” said state Rep. Pam Snyder, a former Greene County Commissioner. Unit 330, recently made a contribution of clothing “These grants will serve to expand our infrastructure, which strengthens our communities.” and supplies that were shipped to Veterans’ AdminisAct 13 will also be the source of a $54,000 grant awarded to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy tration facilities in the Pittsburgh area. Pictured are: for its Whitely Creek Streambank Stabilization Project. The project is expected to improve water quality in Front row, L-R: Ruth Debolt, Carol Tharp, Roberta the area and create a fish habitat that will benefit local sportsmen while attracting tourists. Boyd. Back row, L-R: Jackie Shriver, Donna Hurd, For more information about PennWorks, or any other CFA programs, visit www.newPA.com or call Emma Rutan. 1-866-466-3972.

WCCC Nursing Graduates Excel on Licensure Exam

Greene County to Receive $2.5 Million+ in Grants

American Legion Provides Supplies

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$25,000 in Health Care Products Donated By Regis Whetzel

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Greene County Postcards & Notecards

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hristmas may officially be over, but that doesn’t mean that giving gifts needs to end, even if it’s a gift you give to yourself! Postcards and notecards depicting seasonal watercolor portraits of Greene County scenes are now available from the Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency.

The cards feature four portraits of Greene County locations – the Christmas tree in front of the Greene County Courthouse; a family enjoying the springtime Enlow Fork Wildflower Walk; the festive Greene County Fair in summer; and the Greene County Museum surrounded by fall foliage. The four paintings are the original work of local artist Leslie Fehling of Prosperity and the cards are locally published. Postcards are 50 cents each, or 30 cents each when 10 or more are bought. Notecards are sold as a boxed set of 12 with envelopes and a pen for $15, or are available for $2 apiece. In addition to the new cards, the Tourism office continues to sell Christmas cards, ceram-

ic mugs, puzzles and other Greene County gift items. Introduced last winter, the Christmas cards also feature the watercolor work of Fehling, who painted snow-covered scenes of the courthouse, the Carmichaels Covered Bridge and Route 188 in Jefferson, as well as a collage of winter pictures. A boxed set of 20 cards with envelopes and a pen costs $20. The white ceramic tumbler mugs feature four separate photos of county locations – the illuminated Christmas tree in front of the courthouse; the snow-covered Carmichaels Covered Bridge; the White Covered Bridge with fall foliage; and a Rain Day banner and flowers in front of the courthouse. Each full-color photo is paired with one of Tourism’s seasonal logos. White silicone lids are included. Prices are $15 for one mug, $25 for any two or $50 for the set of four. The series of county covered bridge puzzles includes photos of the Carmichaels, Cox Farm, King, Neddie Woods, Scott and Shriver bridges. The White Covered Bridge puzzle is currently sold out, although a second edition is in the works for early 2014. Puzzles are $20 each, or $80 for a set of six. The Tourism office also has a select number of copies of the Greenopoly board game and the books “A Village Called Brave” by Jim Hoy, “All Quiet on the Border” by D. Kent Fonner, and “Greene from the Blue” by Jerry Hardy. All gift items are available for sale in the Tourism office, located at 19 S. Washington St. in downtown Waynesburg from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call the Tourism office at 724-627-8687, or visit www.GoGreeneCounty.org.

ornerstone Care announced recently that they will receive $25,000 in health care product donations over the next two years from Henry Schein Cares, the global social responsibility program of Henry Schein, Inc. Henry Schein Cares helps to expand access to health care for underserved and at-risk populations around the world in the areas of wellness and prevention, emergency preparedness and relief, and capacity building. Participation in the Henry Schein Cares program helps Cornerstone Care’s Smile for Life project realize its goals to provide oral health education and dental services to area school districts and Head Start programs, as well as to expand mobile dental services to more schools. Ensuring that underserved children throughout the tri-county area receive timely dental and medical care is one of Cornerstone Care’s key strategies. This strategy improves both the health of the child and that of his or her family. It also improves the child’s performance in school, and saves money in the long run. “The support from Henry Schein Cares Foundation strengthens our community partnerships with other supporters such as the Greene County United Way and the Washington County United Way, so that pre-school and elementary school children have access to resources for good oral health. Eventually we hope to reach every school in Greene, Washington and Fayette County that wishes to address health disparities for children,” explained Donna Simpson, Manager of Outreach and Mobile Services for Cornerstone Care. Since 1977, Cornerstone Care, a non-profit community health center, has worked to increase access to primary health care in the region. “What many people may not realize,” according to Robert Mt. Joy, CEO, “is that Cornerstone Care is always working to focus attention and resources on the communities’ health care needs by collaborating with groups and individuals to create new strategies for health improvement.” Mt. Joy added, “We also want people to know that although we depend on fees for service just like all health care providers, we will not turn anyone away for the inability to pay. We make healthcare affordable for eligible uninsured patients by reducing fees on a sliding scale based on family income.” School Districts in Fayette and Washington Counties who are interested in receiving mobile dental services provided by Cornerstone Care should contact Donna Simpson at (724) 852-1001 ext. 306 or by email to dsimpson@cornerstonecare.com.

Postcards and notecards depicting seasonal watercolor portraits of Greene County scenes are now available from the Greene County Tourist Promotion Agency.

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Grant Helps Airport Project Take Off

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n $800,000 infrastructure grant from the Appalachian Regional Commission and the Federal Highway Administration was recently presented to the Greene County Commissioners by U.S. Representative, Tim Murphy. These funds will be used to finance needed roadway improvements to help further the development of the county’s new Airport Business Park by creating greatly-improved access to the airport. The current three-way intersection between Route 21 and Murtha Drive (near Wal Mart) will be transformed into a fourway intersection, allowing vehicles to enter the airport area, directly. Currently, a smaller service road must be used to access the airport. Phase One of the airport project is the construction of new T-Hangars (currently underway), and demolition of the existing hangars (spring

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2014) so that parcels can be leased for commercial use at that location. Phase Two of the airport project is the construction of the proposed new entrance and relocation of the existing access road and parking lot. The $800,000 funds will be used for this phase of the project. Phase Three of the airport project will include the construction of proposed new restaurant development sites on the six acres which are meant to benefit the county, users of the airport and travelers along the interstate and SR 21. State Representative Pam Snyder echoed the sense of anticipation and excitement surrounding the project, saying, “This is another piece of the puzzle that is bringing our dream closer to reality. Hats off to everybody.”

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United Way Receives

“Unclaimed Funds” Donation

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ocal United Way offices throughout Pennsylvania were highlighted by Treasurer Rob McCord’s unclaimed property program with the presentation of a check for more than $14,000 to United Way of Pennsylvania’s President, Tony Ross. Each year, the state treasury receives millions of dollars in unclaimed property – money from items such as abandoned bank accounts, forgotten stocks, uncashed checks, and contents of safe deposit boxes. “These unclaimed funds are very much needed in the budgets of human services organizations, such as the United Way, across the Commonwealth,” said President Ross. People and organizations owed unclaimed property often do not realize the property has become dormant because holders are not required under state law to contact the owner before remitting it to Treasury. The more than $14,000 the United Way system received is only a fraction of the $2.2 billion in unclaimed property Treasury currently seeks to reunite with businesses, organizations, and citizens across the state. “The United Way of Pennsylvania and its members work to improve lives and strengthen communities throughout our state, and I am so pleased that these funds will contribute to that important mission,” Treasurer McCord said. “I encourage nonprofit organizations and community groups – and the people who support them – to search www.patreasury.gov or call 1-800-222-2046, Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., to find out if any of the $2.2 billion in unclaimed property Treasury currently holds belongs to them.” The Greene County United Way received $361.44 as a result of the unclaimed property program. “I was excited to receive this information. Mostly because people don’t realize they can search for unclaimed property. This proves the program works.” says Barbara Wise, Executive Director.

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he start of a new year is always a time to look forward, anticipating what the next twelve months may bring; but it’s also a time of reflection, tracing back through time to see where you’ve been. While this column typically focuses on new innovations in the industry and its impact on our lives, it’s worth taking a moment to note that the “Oil and Gas Industry” as we know it, today, actually began right here in Pennsylvania. Naturally occurring deposits of natural gas were discovered and identified as such in America as early as 1626, when French explorers discovered Native Americans lighting gases that were seeping into and around Lake Erie. It wasn’t until 1858, however, when a man named Colonel Edwin Drake (he was actually a former railroad conductor, who took on the title, “Colonel,” to impress the townsfolk) dug the first well near Titusville, Pennsylvania. Having purchased a steam engine in Erie to power the drilling equipment, he began on an island in Oil Creek. When the depth reached 16 feet, the sides of the well began to collapse, which inspired Drake to devise the idea of a “drive pipe”. This was a cast iron pipe, in 10-foot lengths, which was driven into the ground to keep the drilled hole stable. The slow progress made for many challenges; difficulty finding necessary parts to build the well, along with the three-foot-per-day progress led his well to be nicknamed “Drake’s Folly”. When funding ran out, Drake had to rely on friends to help finance the operation. On August 27, 1858, the drill had reached a depth of 69.5 feet, at which point the bit hit a crevice in the bedrock, and the workmen stopped for the day. The following morning, Drake’s chief driller, Billy Smith, gazed into the hole, and saw crude oil rising up. A hand pump was used to start bringing oil to the surface; the first “storage facility” was a bathtub brought near the well. His original 1858 well produced 25 barrels of crude oil per day. By 1872—after many began imitating his methods, and established several “oil boom” towns near Oil Creek—the area was bringing forth 15,900 barrels per day. Drake established stock in his new venture, to extract and market the oil; his work led to the expansion of an industry that brought wealth to many, but, sadly, Drake was not to be among them. Despite his intelligence and innovative spirit, he was not a smart businessman. He neglected to obtain a patent for his drilling invention, and lost his life’s savings in an oil speculation venture in 1863. Colonel Edwin Drake died on November 9, 1880, in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. There is now an impressive memorial built near his grave in Titusville, where he is buried with his wife, Laura Dowd Drake. So, as the new year begins, with all of its possibilities and hopes, perhaps you might pause for just a moment to remember Edwin Drake, who proved that natural gas could be brought from its underground source to be used for practical purposes with relative ease, and created technology that is, although advanced and updated, still in use, today.

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Direct Results Owner Honored

iting how helpful she has been in helping publicize their activities and events, Greene County Association of School Retirees (GCASR) nominated Shelly Brown, co-owner of Direct Results, for a Pennsylvania Association of School Retirees (PASR) citation. Patty Jones, President of GCASR, was prompt to point out “Our local media have been so cooperative when we plan an event, whether it is a community food drive or our recent trip to Lancaster. Other chapters of PASR envy GCASR because we have such help, and we get that help because of folks like Shelly.” Ms. Brown was presented her plaque by GCASR’s Public Relations Chairman, Jerry Hardy.

L-R: Jerry Hardy, Shelly Brown, Patty Jones.

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Clipper

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“Keep On Clipping!”

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Scholarship Applications Due March 27

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pplications are now available for the 2014 County of Greene/West Penn Power Scholarship, which will be awarded to two graduating seniors from each of the county’s five school districts. Completed applications must be submitted to each high school’s guidance office no later than Thursday, March 27. Applications were sent to high schools in the county’s five school districts – Carmichaels Area, Central Greene, Jefferson-Morgan, Southeastern Greene and West Greene. Each school should forward completed applications to Waynesburg University’s admissions office no later than Monday, April 7. A committee of Waynesburg University and County of Greene representatives will then review and blind-judge all applications from the five school districts. Two students from each school district will be selected by the committee to receive a $1,000 award for their first year of enrollment at Waynesburg University. In order to be eligible to receive the scholarship, applicants must have a cumulative high school GPA of at least 3.0 and be accepted to Waynesburg University entering as a new, non-transfer student for the Fall 2014 semester. Funding for the scholarship was made available through Allegheny Energy, Inc., as part of an agreement reached with Greene County in 2008 related to the Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line (TrAIL) project. In the agreement, Allegheny Energy subsidiary Trans-Allegheny Interstate Line

Company (TrAILCo) agreed to contribute $750,000 to the county for educational, environmental, public health and community infrastructure projects. In June 2009, the Greene County Commissioners and officials from Allegheny Energy, Inc. – which subsequently merged with FirstEnergy Corp. – presented Waynesburg University with $100,000 to start the scholarship, and a second $100,000 gift was presented in 2010. In 2011, the commissioners and officials from FirstEnergy made a final donation of $50,000 to the scholarship fund, bringing the total to $250,000 and ensuring the scholarship’s permanent endowment at Waynesburg University. Formerly known as the County of Greene/Allegheny Energy Scholarship, the merger necessitated a slight change in the scholarship’s name to include West Penn Power, FirstEnergy’s Pennsylvania subsidiary. During the scholarship’s inaugural year, five 2010 Greene County high school graduates each received $1,000 awards. The number of recipients increased in 2011, allowing multiple students from each high school to receive $1,000 scholarships. Nine students received scholarships in 2011, and 10 students were awarded in 2012 and 2013. For more information on the County of Greene/West Penn Power Scholarship, contact the Greene County Commissioners’ office at 724-8525210, or Bob Barnhart in the Waynesburg University Admissions office at 724-852-3346, or e-mail rdbarnha@waynesburg.edu.

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Red Cross Ready

“Get a kit. Make a plan. Be informed.” This terse declaration is the introduction to the American Red Cross’s “Be Red Cross Ready” program. Designed to benefit individuals, communities, businesses, schools, and other organizations, the prime focus of the program, as stated on the American Red Cross Internet site, is to, “…make sure you are as prepared as you possibly can be for potential disasters and other emergencies. These events can strike suddenly, at anytime and anywhere.” Not to be confused with a traditional first aid or CPR course, Red Cross Ready training helps participants prepare for unforeseen crises on a personal, family, and community level. For example (excerpted from the American Red Cross “Be Red Cross Ready” Internet site): -I know what emergencies or disasters are most likely to occur in my community -I have a family disaster plan and have practiced it. -I have an emergency preparedness kit. -At least one member of my household is trained in first aid and CPR/AED. -I have taken action to help my community prepare. Red Cross Ready training emphasizes the importance of having an emergency preparedness kit for yourself and your family, in the event of a disaster. The training advises that the kit include essentials like a 3-day supply of water and non-perishable food, a flashlight, a battery-powered or “handcrank” radio, a first aid kit, needed medications, contact information, personal hygiene items, and other necessities. The next element of the training—“Make a Plan”—is designed to make sure that families remain prepared and informed in the event of an emergency. It’s recommended that families discuss how to prepare and response to emergencies that are likely to happen in their area, including having designated meeting places—one right outside the home, in case of a sudden emergency, such as a fire; and one outside the immediate neighborhood, in case returning home is not possible, or an area evacuation has taken place. Equally important is to “Be Informed.” This includes knowing how local authorities will notify the community in case of a disaster, and how to obtain information, whether through local radio, television, or other methods. Knowing the difference between various types of weather alerts, such as “watches” and “warnings,” and what actions to take in each can also mean the difference between life and death. Another part that many may not have considered is being aware of how to protect yourself in the event of an emergency or disaster while traveling. Now, the American Red Cross in Greene County is ready to share an opportunity to educate the community on disaster preparedness, with an in-person “Be Red Cross Ready” training program. The educational program, which focuses on how to prepare for house fires, floods, and winter weather, is being offered locally by Becky Fry, a Red Cross Preparedness Training Specialist. Becky will be presenting the materials, and is happy to travel to the agencies, offices, and community groups that would like to receive this education. The program takes no more than an hour, and, best of all, is being offered free of charge. Any organization interested in this program can reach out directly to Becky through e-mail at becky.fry@redcross.org, or by phone at 412-263-3117.

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Picnic Committee

Christmas Parade Winners

A committee is being formed for the Southwestern Pennsylvania Retired Workers Picnic, schedNinety-One entries appeared in the 2013 Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce Christmas uled for May 18, 2014 in Washington County. Organizers are seeking people to serve on the new Parade. Winners of the Float Entry planning committee. If interested, please email VREvents9752@yahoo.com. Competition were: 1st - Seldom Seen Farms (pictured here; photo by Jeanine Henry); 2nd - Greene Arc; 3rd - Greene County Relay for Life; Best Design – Seldom Seen Farms; Most Spirit – Oakview United Methodist Church Singing Angels; Most Original – WWJD Christian Center. Waynesburg University’s coverage of the 2013 and previous parades can be viewed online Here’s a picture of our Greene County 4-H at http://wctv.waynesburg.edu. “The members participating in Showmanship at the Penn- production is our Communication sylvania State Farm Show. Front row L-R Chelsey Department’s Christmas gift to Greene Wilson and Cara Longstreth, who took 9th out of 25 County,” said Waynesburg University’s Intermediate level competitors. Back row L-R Chaz director of TV operations, Bill Molzon.

Showmanship at StatE

Conners and Emily Shultz who placed 8th in a field of 29 in the Senior level competition.

Rolling in the New Year More than 200 individuals rolled in the New Year at the 6th Annual “All Night Skate,” held New Year’s Eve at Mon View Roller Rink in Greensboro. Activities included continuous skating, games and prizes, and hot dogs & sauerkraut at midnight. Waynesburg Rent-A-Center donated a large-screen TV for the “Just Dance” competition, which was won by Mollie Ehrlichman, 14, of Carmichaels and Ryan Demchak, 15, of Taylorstown (pictured). Each received a $15 iTunes gift card. The event was sponsored by the Greene County Commissioners, Holly Shipley of Greensboro, Waynesburg Milling Co. and Waynesburg Rent-A-Center.

Lunch with Santa Shannopin Civic Club, Bobtown, PA, posts this picture of “Lunch with Santa” taken last month as community kids enjoyed a visit with Santa, crafts, games and lunch.

Christmas Tree Extravaganza “Flower Power” was the theme of the Christmas tree decorated by the Town and Garden Club of Rices Landing, participants in the 11th Annual Christmas Tree Extravaganza at the Carmichaels First United Methodist Fellowship Hall last month. Local merchants, churches, organizations, and individuals participated in the event by donating a live or artificial tree decorated in the theme of their choice. All trees were auctioned to benefit the Extravaganza sponsor, A.C.T.S. (Arts, Crafts, Talents, Services), a ministerial association of Greene County. Seated in front of the tree in this picture are Marion Walker and Kay Bair. Standing, L-R: Terri Laird, Jean Scott, Johnsie Rizzo, Renee Sahady, Suzanne Swinchock, Linda Shefcheck, Carol Harrison, Gert Sagosky and Helen Barbor.

Bowlby Bits • The Adult Literacy program at the Bowlby Public Library offers free test preparation for the GED, Civil Service exams, and Drivers Licensing and Life skills. Also, any adult wishing to brush up on their basic reading and math skills can do so at no charge. The Family Literacy Department also offers free tutoring for school-age children. • The Bowlby Public Library is looking for local artists to display their artwork at the library during 2014. Collectors may also display collections in the Display case. FMI 724-627-9776. For more info on tutoring or displaying, call Bowlby at 724-627-9776. Also, the library will be closed on Monday, Feb. 17, in observance of Presidents’ Day.

OOPS! In an earlier article about the Southside Deli, we incorrectly spelled the name of long-time previous owners Jim & Cindy Sebek. Sorry!

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January/February 2014 - GreeneSaver  

It's here! The new GreeneSaver is ready, with new contests, new stories, and our annual "Brag Mag," highlighting area hunters!

January/February 2014 - GreeneSaver  

It's here! The new GreeneSaver is ready, with new contests, new stories, and our annual "Brag Mag," highlighting area hunters!

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