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GreeneScene Magazine •

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2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Celebrate Good Times With Dancing Queen

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t 7:30 pm this July 29, plan to put on your platform shoes and prepare to do the Hustle as Rain Day headliners, Dancing Queen, take you back to the days of Saturday Night Fever. Here’s an opportunity for the over 40 crowd to embarrass their kids as they show off what they learned from another fever-related phenomenon of the day, Denny Terrio’s Dance Fever. Heaven Knows you will want to Get Up and Boogie and Shake Your Groove Thing as the band leads you in a round of Kung Fu Fighting. All the way up to the Last Dance, Oh What a Night it will be as vocalists, Shelley Duff, Ronnie Slam and Jim Schultz offer up a Celebration until they have you Upside Down. Waynesburg will be a Funky Town on Rain Day evening as Disco Inferno makes you beg for More, More, More before you take off those Boogie Shoes. Knock on Wood, we hope the rain will Let it Whip early so it won’t be Hot, Hot, Hot, because You Should Be Dancing as they Play That Funky Music. John Replogle, keyboards and vocals; Jim Schultz, drums and So, come on out and help them to Turn the vocals; Shelley Duff, vocals; Ronnie Slam, vocals and guitar; and George Marcinko, guitar. Beat Around before it is time to say Another (Rain Day) Bites the Dust.

RAIN DAY S ce ne of the Pa st

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rett Moore brought this gem to our office the other day saying he thought it would be fun to run in this special issue of the GreeneScene Community Magazine, as we reflect on Waynesburg’s celebrated Rain Day Festival. “I found it in my dad’s collection of pictures, it’s of the committee (AKA Special Events Commission), that organizes Rain Day, right before I joined it” he explains. Brett’s dad was the

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well-known local newspaper man Jim Moore, who certainly would have built a great collection of local stories and pictures. This publicity shot for the 1984 Rain Day Festivities features several energetic, young Rain Day Makers, and just in case you’re not able to recognize all of them, Brett supplied their names as well (L-R): Barb Loeper, Carolyn Augustine, Lou Dayich, Greg Leathers, Chris Phillips, and Olga Harding. GreeneScene Magazine •

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A Groundhog and Championship Softball Team Take on Waynesburg Mayor

The Coleman Lee Band

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From left, Randi Blackmon, Coleman Lee, Daniel Downie, and Lucien Schroyer.

he Coleman Lee Band is a Waynesburg country/rock band with gritty country vocals, power guitars, thumping bass and pounding drums. Led by Brian Bennett on lead vocals and rhythm guitar, the band also features the vocals and lead guitar playing of guitar instructor Lucien Schroyer. Rounding out the group is Randi Blackmon on rhythm guitar and Daniel Downie on drums. Look for them on the upper stage at 12:30 pm.

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ome years the Rain Day hat bet made with those who bank on sunshine in downtown Waynesburg just has a certain uniqueness to it. Of course all of those who bet with the current mayor become part of Rain Day history, win or lose, and the bets are much appreciated. We’ve had everyone from Muhammed Ali to Bob Hope taking a shot on rain, or a lack thereof. This year just seems especially fitting as Mayor Duncan Berryman takes on the prognosticator of all prognosticators, Pennsylvania’s own Punxsutawney Phil. The bet is a double one for 2016 as the West Greene ladies softball team, runners-up to the PIAA State Championship, also bet against precipitation. There is a sketchy possibility that Phil himself may make an appearance. Either way, we understand there will be a member of his entourage coming to town, A.J. Dereume. A.J., hails from a long line of those who have been close to the famous groundhog. His great-grandfather, Raymond Dereume was involved even before the famed Inner Circle formed. Next up was his grandfather, August Dereume and father, August Dereume, Jr., both came in as Inner Circle members. For those who are unfamiliar with the Inner Circle we shall explain. If you have ever watched the Groundhog Day festivities, in person, on television or even via the movie of the same name, you

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have seen the men in the top hats and tails. This is the famous Inner Circle. It is their responsibility to take care of Punxsutawney Phil, Seer of Seers, Sage of Sages, Prognosticator of Prognosticators and Weather Prophet Extraordinary, as his official title reads. In a bit of irony, A. J. also happens to be known as Rainmaker by the Inner Circle. Each member has a weather related nickname. The hope is that he lives up to that nickname on July 29 in Waynesburg Borough.

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016 Pittsburgh Battle of the Bands winners, Blended Reality will be one of the acts that grace the stage during the Rain Day celebration this year. Hailing from Brownsville, siblings Riley Higenbotham, Mack Paige and Ty Higenbotham offer a mix of country-pop and rock covers along with their own original music, like the band’s newest single, “Blue Eyes.” Riley provides the lead male vocals and guitar for the band. Brother, Ty, serves as the band’s drummer, as well as contributing harmonies. The boys’ step-sister, Mack, shares in the lead vocals along with playing bass guitar and piano in the group. With selections ranging from Van Morrison’s Brown Eyed Girl to Mark Ronson’s Uptown Funk

on the playlist, Blended Reality appeals to a wide range of audience members. Watch the show on the upper stage at 4:30 pm.

Rain Day Pageant Time! It wouldn’t be Rain Day without the Rain Day Pageant!

MICAELA

Brittany Rhodes, the 16 year old daughter of Robert and Angela Rhodes of Waynesburg; she will be a junior at Waynesburg Central High School.

Those competing for the title of Miss Rain Day 2016 and the schools they attend are (portraits by Bruno & Bruno):

ALISON

BRITTANY

The 38th Annual Miss Rain Day Scholarship Pageant is July 24, beginning at 4pm at the auditorium at Waynesburg Central High School.

Alison Blair, the 14 year old daughter of Laurie and Michael Blaire of Waynesburg; she will be a freshman at Waynesburg Central High School.

Micaela Ricco, the 15 year old daughter of Tom and Carrie Ricco of Carmichaels; she will be a sophomore at Carmichaels Area Junior Senior High School.

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MCKENNA

Bryn Patton, the 14 year old daughter of Michelle and Randy Patton of Waynesburg; she will be a freshman at Waynesburg Central High School.

McKenna Benke, the 17 year old daughter of Traci and Scott Benke of Waynesburg; she will be a senior at Waynesburg Central High School.

2015 Miss Rain Day

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laire Kreider, 17-year-old daughter of Lowell & Dani Kreider of Waynesburg has spent a very active past 12 months as Miss Rain Day 2015. She will be a senior this fall at Waynesburg Central High School. Claire is a member of National Honor Society, the Monitor Newspaper,

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Pens and Lens Magazine, leadership and Global awareness, Debate, Theater and Broadcast Arts, and the Reading team. Claire is also a member of T.A.G. or “Teen Advisory Group” at Bowlby Library, and this past April they made a video on teen dating violence awareness and it received first place overall! GreeneScene Magazine •

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I Love this P l ace

DRY TAVERN, PA

NOT DRY ANYMORE

A tavern, by its very definition, is a place where one goes to consume alcohol. So, we wondered, how is it that one Greene County village came to be known as ‘Dry’ Tavern? We sought the help of the sole tavern proprietors in the town today, the Caputo family. Popping into the establishment I spoke with family matriarch, Alice Caputo, who retold a story that was once on the menus for the restaurant side of the business. Alice said she found the story at the library. It took a while to locate the book she referred to but, low and behold, there was the history, albeit brief, written by Professor Andrew J. Waychoff. As his book reads, Dry Tavern was so named

because in the early times there was a prominent tavern there and no liquor was sold, and no bar. This was prominent because it was located on the principal road leading south from Pittsburgh to Virginia, and is said to have had for years the most travel of any north and south road west of the mountains.” In the days when the town was being named, taverns were among the most important businesses located along the National Road. There was one tavern for each mile of road, on average. For the wealthier traveler there were the stagecoach taverns and for the working class stiff, there was the wagon stand. Both offered food, drink and lodging, just at different levels of comfort and affluence. We asked Alice if the original ‘Dry Tavern’

was located where her establishment is today. She said this was not the case. The original tavern was located at the intersection of Routes 88 and 188. It burned down and then was rebuilt where Caputo’s is located currently. It was called Mailo’s Dry Tavern Inn in 1981 when Alice and her late huband, Jim, purchased it. As far as we could tell, the Mailo’s ran it for at least 40 years. For a town that was called ‘dry,’ there seemed to be an awful lot of alcohol available there in the last 50 years or so. At one time, next door to where Caputos is, was the Twin Gables, quite the popular establishment in its day. An old advertisement for the business said, ‘Dial 711 now for the best gala, most

R.A. Matteucci’s with its large bottle was a well-known business in Dry Tavern for 40 years. It closed in 1987. The bottle can be seen today outside of Rinky Dinks Bar in Amity.

R.A. Matteucci’s, circa 1950s.

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wonderful New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Night in history at Lund’s Twin Gables on Route 88 in Dry Tavern, Greene County’s finest night spot.’ Yep, in those days you simply asked the operator for the town you were calling and gave a three digit number. “People have stopped in here over the years and said, ‘I used to come here to dances,’ and I’d tell them, ‘No, you didn’t. That was next door,’” Alice said. Renee Mattuecci, who grew up in Dry Tavern, also found the name of her hometown amusing, especially since her family once helped to make it a little less dry. It began with her grandfather, who operated a dance hall/bar that coupled as a roller rink on nondancing nights. Sadly, a tornado would sweep through the county in 1944, taking her grandfather’s business and home with it. Three years later in a shanty on

by Tara Kinsell

the same property, Renee’s father, R.A. Matteucci set up shop. With just a few dollars worth of beer, he turned it for a profit. From there he bought a little more and sold it, repeating until he was a fullfledged distributor. Renee and her sisters grew up around the business which operated for the next 40 years. It may have started small but at one time R.A. Matteucci’s distributorship was known far and wide. His ingenuity didn’t stop with beer. Unlike today when one can buy a bag of ice at every gas station or grocery store, there was a time when it wasn’t so readily available. R.A. capitalized by installing one of the first self-serve ice machines in the area. One would simply drive up to the machine, insert some coins, and then it would spring to life. You’d hear the ice shifting around as it prepared to drop out like a can of pop. After some clanging and banging, a bag of ice would fall to the bottom. “That ice machine paid for our college educations, for all four of us kids. We would have to bag the ice every day, staple it shut and put it on the conveyor,” Renee said. “In the summertime we had to sometimes do it twice a day.” She said as kids they had a lot of fun pushing each other around on dollies and pretending to drive the distributor’s truck; but it is the good times playing in the Dry Tavern School yard she remembers most. That was where all the kids would gather for sled riding, playing ball, and building club houses in the grove of pine trees that used to be in the field adjacent to it. “There were always other kids around and we’d play in the school yard all the time. Route 88 was busy then but it was nothing like it is now,” she said, noting the Matteucci kids had to cross it to get there. In addition to her family’s business, Renee recalled several others found in Dry Tavern through the years, among them; Goslin’s Dairy (where they purchased milk in glass bottles), Carney’s Dari Delite and the Tastee Freeze, Johnson’s Television Repair, Lee’s Greenhouse, a jewelry store, and even a children’s clothing store operated by Bill and Leila Paller. “Leila was like a grandmother to me. Mom bought all of our clothing there,” Renee said. “Dry Tavern was just a great place to grow up as kids. Everyone knew everyone.” Carney’s Dari Delite was where Italian Boys is now, though the Tastee Freeze is sadly, long gone; yet many, this writer included, remember it well as the “Home of the Granny Burger”. Some of the village’s long-time business establishments are still in operation today, like Ozie’s Sports Shop, the Dry Tavern Service Center, and the True Value Hardware, joined by a few other eateries, salons, car lots and various shops. The one time Davis Market (see related story on page 10), now a Giant Eagle, even has a beer distributor next door. So, with its fascinating history and enduring hospitality, Dry Tavern remains a misnomer, and a place that many still love.

GreeneScene Magazine •

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John Corbly Baptist Church The John Corbly Baptist Church may not be the biggest church in Greene County but it is certainly one of the oldest. During the 85th reunion of The John Corbly Descendants Association, held last month, Dr. Jeffrey Johnson, head of the American Baptist Churches of Pennsylvania and Delaware, presented a plaque designating the church, located in Garards Fort, as the second oldest continually operating Baptist church in the United States. Jeff presented the plaque in recognition from the region and denomination “for the extraordinary life and exceptional pastoral ministry” of the Rev. John Corbly. As it so happens, 2016 marks the 245th anniversary of the church, originally pastored by the Reverend John Corbly. Descendents of the reverend visit the church each year from all over the country to pay homage and share family connections. The life and times of Rev. Corbly are very well documented. This comes in part from the tragic story of the reverend’s wife, Elizabeth, and three of his children being killed by Indians as they walked to church in 1782. Two of his other daughters were scalped but survived the attack. Jeff brought the most recent book on the life of Rev. Corbly, “Frontier Preacher” by Sam Hossler, to the reunion. There he had all the direct descendants in attendance sign the inside cover before sending the book to the American Baptist Historical Society to be placed into their archives with the other John Corbly records and items they have among their collections. Among those who attended the reunion this year was Robert Rice, the oldest living member of the Corbly family at 93-years old. Reverend Corbly established what was then known as the Goshen church, now renamed the John Corbly Baptist Church, after coming to America from Ireland as an indentured servant. Living in the 1750-60’s first in eastern Pennsylvania, then Virginia, and finally settling in Garards Fort, Corbly established over 30 churches west of the Appalachians, spanning a region from Bridgeport, WV to Peters Creek near Pittsburgh, PA. In addition to this accomplishment, Reverend Corbly served as a Revolutionary War soldier, chaplain and militiaman, a delegate to the General Assembly in Williamsburg and a trustee of Washington Academy (now W&J College). He was also responsible for surveying and platting the city of Louisville, Kentucky and was arrested for his outspoken views against the whiskey

tax during the Whiskey Rebellion. Later he was exonerated of all charges. Elizabeth was one of three wives that the reverend would have. In all, he fathered seventeen children. Descendants from eleven of these children have met at his home church in Garards Fort the last Sunday in June since 1932. This year began with a worship service led by the Corbly Baptist Church minister, Pastor Gary Whipkey. The family association’s president, Bill Miller, called the meeting to order. Attendees introduced themselves and related their Corbly lineage. Several were recognized for the distances traveled, and their ages. Three were acknowledged as being in their 90s: Jim Hawkins, Pansy Six and Eugene Everly. There were over 80 attendees, representing 15 states, ranging from Florida to the state of Washington, in attendance this year. Historical preservationist Mary Beth Pastorius served as the featured speaker for the reunion. Mary Beth spoke to the family members in attendance about preservation options for the Corbly house. The house, listed on the National Historic Register since 1984, is on Carmichaels Road, roughly one mile from the church. Built in 1796, it is a two-story, brick house with ten rooms and a large parlor that doubled as a location for worship services.The house is in need of very significant repairs both inside and out, said association president Bill Miller. With its historical significance and the fact that a cabin portion may render it as the oldest structure in Greene County, the Corbly house should be preserved for future generations. The reunion concluded with a brief memorial service for descendants who have passed away since the last reunion and a viewing of the photos of descendants from each of the three Corbly wives. Following a luncheon in the church social hall, tours of the Garards Fort cemetery were given. The graves of Rev. Corbly, two of his wives and eleven children as well as memorials for the Corbly massacre and highlights of Corbly’s life are on the cemetery grounds. The next reunion will be held June 25, 2017. The event is open not only to Corbly descendants but also to anyone interested in local history. For more information, contact William Miller at billkathymiller@yahoo.com or 724-627-7129 or visit the family association website www.johncorblydescendants.org. Services at the Corbly Baptist Church are held each Sunday at 9:30 am.

Corbly Church 1910

Corbly Church today

Corbly Reunion

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A Blast from the Past, Davis’ Giant Market

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e all have them, places that feel like we were there only yesterday, even decades later. Such is the case, for many who shopped at the Davis’ Giant Market in Dry Tavern. As someone recently said to me, “What kid is going to grow up and say, ‘You remember that Walmart or Target we used to go to?” There was a uniqueness to Davis’ that transcends time. Some might say it was the give and creak of the wooden floors, others may equate it to the wide staircase leading to the downstairs where shoppers could find everything from craft supplies to toys and even cloth diapers. Maybe it was Mike, the butcher, in his long white coat and cap or the cage where you could pay your bills. Perhaps for some it was the employees, like Ida Mary, who was there for

by Tara Kinsell

The old Davis’ Giant Market, circa 1970s.

as long as anyone could remember. Today we have fuel perks programs at grocery stores. Buy so much merchandise and you earn an amount that can be applied to your gasoline at specific stations. Davis’ was ahead of its time. One could collect receipts and once it reached a certain level turn them in for cash back. Brice Rush of Carmichaels was instantly a ten year old boy again when he talked about it. Little Brice would scan the parking lot for any dropped receipts and collect them. He’d flash a smile to ladies exiting the market and they would often add to his stash. By the time his mom was done shopping, Brice had enough money to buy a box of candy. Back then it was under a dollar. Other youngsters who spent time at the store during its run may remember the rides, a horse and

a rocket ship where you could place a coin into a slot and be jostled around for a few minutes. This was a much slower paced time. There were no computers or self-checkouts. Everything was done by hand. Groceries were placed into large paper bags, no plastic there. The market got its start in 1954 when Albert and Evelyn Davis, along with relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Davis purchased the property for a store. In 1976, John and Edna Tiberi bought it and kept the name, Davis’ Giant Market. The logo used a giant, very similar to the Jolly Green Giant used by General Mills Corporation. The Tiberi’s had already been operating the store for several years at the time of the purchase and continued to do so until John’s death in 1984. It was then that Edna sold the business, which

The Giant from an old Davis’

operated as an IGA Giant Market advertisement. Foodliner franchise, to the Throckmorton family. The Throckmortons continued to run the business as it was until January 26, 1995 before tearing down the former market and building a new store in its place. Today, the Dry Tavern store is a Giant Eagle franchise. You’ll find if you ask around, there are still those die-hards who call it Davis’. Like those who will tell you to turn at the old Swap Shop at Khedive (it hasn’t been there in years), or those who say to look for the old Ganocy’s Service Station in Cabbage Flats on yard sale day, some things will never change, even when they have.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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Opportunities for a New Career Offered in Waynesburg

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ould you like an opportunity to change careers? Have you been downsized by your employer? Do you make less than a living wage? Are you ready for a change but don’t know where to start? Perhaps you worked in the coal industry or found yourself out of high school with no specific direction. Mined Minds, located in Waynesburg, may be the answer in the form of a software development career. The seeds for Mined Minds were planted early last summer when Amanda Laucher, a native of Greene County, and her partner, Dr. Jonathan Graham, were visiting the area for a family picnic. “Amanda’s younger brother is a coal miner and he was worried about how to support his family and the lack of opportunities here,” Jonathan said. “On our drive back to Chicago we began to talk about it and thought, ‘Why can’t we do this here?’” They threw the idea out onto Facebook and had immediate reaction from people who were interested in learning more. Thus began classes, offered at the Nemacolin Volunteer Fire Department Social Hall and alternating at the Flenniken Library and the union hall in Nemacolin when the fire hall space was unavailable. “It’s powerful; we needed to build the desire for the skills in this area,” Jonathan said. It was all about changing mindsets, he said. “We wanted people to know they can work from the shoulders up, not just the shoulders down (in fields like mining or gas and oil).” Things took off so well that they began looking for a permanent location in Greene County. After considering multiple locations, they were led to the vacant Denny House in Waynesburg Borough. Its history and esthetics spoke to the couple that have traveled around the world teaching others about software development. “We are the first people to do this. But, we were wanting to make it be free and selffunded. We wanted to help those who were unemployed or underemployed. We realized

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to do this we can’t be 500 miles away,” he said. “We now employ four full-time people.” There are a few others who are working part-time for Mined Minds and Jonathan anticipates others as the company becomes more well-known in the industry. It will offer, not only training, but consulting at competitive rates for businesses both locally and around the world. If someone is nervous about stepping back into a classroom after being out of it for many years they shouldn’t be, he said. The teaching style at Mined Minds is one where you don’t have to worry about copying off of another’s paper or using someone else’s ideas. It is collaborative. If someone has already figured something out there is no need to reinvent the wheel, so to speak, according to Jonathan. In addition to shorter courses that are offered at no cost, Mined Minds has recently entered into a partnership with Community College of Allegheny College to offer an intensive “coding boot camp,” that focuses on the fundamentals of software development. The goal is for participants to go from no coding experience to starting a sustainable career within the technology industry, Jonathan said. The full-time course, includes on-site training in Waynesburg, as well as remote study, and will run for four months. The training is offered at no cost to qualifying students. There is tuition involved for those who don’t qualify for the scholarship monies. Participants receive student support from CCAC and a co-branded certificate of completion, along with continuing education credits upon successfully completing the program. “We want to help transform the coal towns of Southwestern Pennsylvania into technology hubs,” Jonathan said. “There is no good reason why all the jobs and money should flow to Silicon Valley. We can put Greene County on the map for other things.” For more information, including details on how to apply and how to access funding, go to www.ccac.edu/Computer_Coding_Boot_ Camp or www.minedminds.org.

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Billy Heh Strolling Magician

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illy Heh, aka Magic Billy, has been honing his skills since he was just a wee lad. A life threatening accident when Bill was just 9 years old led to therapy to walk and talk again. During that time he developed a love for magic and comedy that has stayed with him ever since. Paying it forward, he has done countless performances for others who are in need of laughter and excitement as they deal with various ailments and injuries. Children are among those for whom

Billy has a special affinity. Magic Bill strives to create a show unlike any spectacle anyone has ever experienced in the theater, or on television. A performance graduate from Ithaca College, Magic Bill combines his theater training with the art of magic creating a performance that embraces the heart, electrifies the senses, and tickles the funny bone. On Rain Day, July 29 in downtown Waynesburg, catch Billy as he shares illusions, magic and balloon art at 3 pm on the upper stage.

More Than Just a Home By Tara Kinsell

This is Carol Lynn’s favorite photo of herself, Mo, and Afreen together at Christmas.

York, from where a group of Fordham University students that worked on the home hail. It took 13 ½ months to build, so it gave them plenty of time to get to know each other and to bond. “We had applied to Habitat before but there was another family ahead of us. The second time we applied, we were selected. We came to look at this property and we knew as soon as we saw it,” Carol said. “We wanted to be here. We are very happy here.” The 5 bedroom house is quite lovely. Carol Lynn has put her own touches on it, including hanging large photographic images given to her by Afreen Juli and Wasif Rahman Alvi. This couple, originally from Bangladesh, holds a very special place in Carol Lynn’s heart. She met them when they came as part of the Fordham University team of volunteers to work on the house, and the bond forged at that time continues today. Wasif, called Mo by his friends, is an amazing photographer. He and Afreen, who are engaged to be married, travel all over the world, and his photos chronicle their journeys.

The Lippencott family, (Carol Lynn at far left, Carol front right) surrounded by student volunteers from Fordham University and friends and family.

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hen the Lippencott Family was approved for a Habitat for Humanity House being built in Greensboro, Carol Lynn Lippencott was thrilled to have a place large enough for her extended family to move into. This included her parents, Carol and Robert, her brother Bob and his children. “We now have the security of a home. And, it has a story behind it. It has a good story,” Carol Lynn said. What she did not know was that her family was going to grow exponentially with the new home as the strangers who came to help build it became more like brothers and sisters to her. “It has really changed my life in so many ways. It isn’t just a house. It is a home and a place for my family and these special people who helped to build it to come together,” Carol said. And, come together they do, not only in Greene County, but also in New

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During the years since the construction was completed, Carol has been to New York numerous times, visiting Afreen and Mo. “They, along with the rest of the Fordham group, have made me feel as if New York is my home-away-from-home,” she said. And the New Yorkers continue to come here to visit Carol Lynn. Afreen and Mo have even participated in the Greensboro Art Blast in the past. At a time when cultural differences may often cause distrust in our world, Carol Lynn conveys how truly special, kind, loving and giving this pair is as she make note of their Muslim faith. “They do celebrate Christmas with us. They are still open and receptive to our faith and accepting of us as we are of them,” Carol Lynn said. “These are the kindest people you’d ever want to meet. I am so happy to be there (in New York) with them. When I visit they always try to give me a cultural experience by taking me to places that tourists don’t typically get to go.” Carol Lynn said they are from a different culture, religion, and are far apart in age, but they have become “just three friends who love each other and love spending time together and accept each other” for who they are. When they call, they always inquire about Carol and ask, “How is Nana doing?” Carol Lynn said, referring to her mom. “We’ve kind of adopted all of them as our family,” Carol Lynn said. “Next year will be five years since the house was built. Those 12 kids (from Fordham) want to come back and have a Fordham reunion at our house. It’s been a whole new experience since we built it.” Carol said it has truly made them proud to be a part of Habitat for Humanity. “A lot of the members from our church also

helped build this. Reverend John and Merry Dorean have been so supportive,” Carol added. “We are so grateful and thankful for the Jefferson Baptist Church (where John is the pastor).” Carol Lynn said she wants people to know that Habitat Homes are not a handout; instead, they are a hand up. The homeowners pay a mortgage just as one would with a traditional home loan, whether purchasing or constructing. The difference is in the sweat equity, the hours of work the homeowners are required to give back on their own homes as well as other projects and homes. This effort, along with the volunteer work from students and community members, helps reduce the costs associated with home construction or remodeling, making it affordable for those in need who would not have been qualified or able to finance a conventional house. This was not an easy process by any stretch. Carol Lynn became quite ill during the building construction and even fell in the snow at one point, breaking her knee cap. She worried how she’d complete the sweat equity but she helped in the ways that she could. When she couldn’t get around with an ankle to thigh brace, a second group of college students, a group of girls from Simmons College in Boston, helped her get around and checked on her regularly. She said they, like the Fordham kids, are always welcome at her home. “They really care (these college student volunteers). What they do today makes a difference in somebody’s tomorrow. That’s what came out of this. Our lives have been forever changed by this experience,” Carol Lynn said. “My life is so much richer because of Habitat for Humanity, and my relationship with that group of 12 students from New York.” GreeneScene Magazine •

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Coo l at S c h ool by Tara Kinsell

Internships for Students with Disabilities

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s students in our local school districts enjoy the summer break, we looked into a certainly “cool at school” program that will be available when they return this fall. Community Action Southwest, in partnership with the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, will be offering work-based learning for high school students with disabilities in Greene, Washington and Fayette counties. Participating students will take part in onsite internships at local businesses where they will gain 90-hours of work experience. With parental permission, case workers will meet with interested students to determine eligibility, specific interests, skills and abilities that would apply to the work. Case workers will then help these students prepare a resume and establish contact with potential employers. An hourly stipend for the internships will be paid to the students through Community Action Southwest. CASW will also cover the cost of liability insurance for these student interns.

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Students will be referred through the staff of local high schools, career and technology centers, and by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation in their county of residence. Students, parents and guardians may also contact CASW directly for more information. Eligibility is based upon the following: Students must be currently enrolled in high school. They must be ages 14 through 21. Parental or guardian consent is required. They must be OVR eligible or potentially OVR eligible. Students must have a physical, cognitive, emotional, or social disability. They must be able to maintain appropriate workplace behaviors. Students must have a willingness to work on-site with a local employer for 90 hours. The internships are funded through an Innovation and Expansion grant from the Pennsylvania Office of Vocational Rehabilitiation. For more information, contact 1-877-814-0788, ext. 526, or email ebraun@caswg.org.

Rain Barrels Distributed by Conservation District

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he Greene County Conservation District, in cooperation with Waynesburg Borough, recently held three workshops that focused on the importance of reducing storm water and best practices for home owners. Thirty rain barrels were constructed during the workshops and taken home at no cost to the attendees. The $50 supply fee for each rain barrel was provided through a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Rain barrels mimic the effects of natural landscapes by reducing and slowing storm water runoff from roofs. An average sized roof may shed more than Conservation District Watershed Specialist, Jared Zinn, five-hundred gallons of water during a assists workshop participants determine an ideal location for moderate rain storm. A rain barrel colthe overflow of their rain barrel. lects a portion of this water and stores it for later use by the property owner. This and reducing roof runoff with a rain barrel is a great results in a savings in the property owner’s water place to start. For information about storm water, bill and stores a supply of water suitable for wa- rain barrels or future workshops, contact the Contering gardens, washing vehicles and equipment, servation District at 724-852-5278. cleaning decks and windows and a host of other Financial and other support for this project household tasks. This water should not be used for was provided by the Pennsylvania Association of drinking, food preparation or bathing. Conservation Districts, Inc. through a grant from Storm water management practices like rain the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental barrels help communities and the environment by Protection under Section 319 of the Clean Wareducing flood risk, lessening stream erosion and ter Act, administered by the U.S. Environmental improving water quality. Reducing storm water is a Protection Agency. For more information about critical need in communities across Greene County PACD, visit www.pacd.org.

reene County Habitat for Humanity was founded in 1985 by local citizens concerned about poverty housing in Greene County, PA. They became the second chapter of Habitat for Humanity International to be organized in the state of Pennsylvania. The first Executive Director worked for the whopping salary of $50 a month. Since that time Greene County Habitat has established a solid relationship with local businesses, educational institutions, government agencies, other non-profit organizations, churches and individuals who financially support its efforts today. Each year Greene County Habitat hosts volunteer work groups of college students from outside the state, who participate in their campuses’ alternative spring break programs, and numerous youth and adult groups from churches throughout the country. Weekly, during the school year, students from Waynesburg University assist with construction and administrative projects. Over the course of 31 years, Greene County Habitat has: Built 33 new houses Rehabilitated 26 houses for new homeowners Housed 59 families totaling 216 individuals, including 119 children, 23 single mothers, and 7 elderly homeowners Partnering with Affordable Comfort, Inc., in a grant from the PA DEP, Greene County Habitat  built the first ENERGY STAR® rated home in Southwestern PA.  The energy efficient standards used in that house are now included in all Greene County Habitat homes.  To support the positive life changing efforts of Greene County Habitat for Humanity, call 724852-2598 or visit www.greenecountyhabitat.net

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Coloring Contest Winners Category A: 6 years & under

WINNER

Kylie Titchenell

Category B: 7 years - 12 years

WINNER Lauren Martin

PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER Answer: SUN

Category C: 13 years and up

WINNER Tara Stump

Oleta Kiger of Spraggs, PA

IS THE WINNER OF A DOMINO’S PARTY PACK Compliments of Domino’s Pizza in Waynesburg

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Coal Show Swap Meet

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new old event will be part of the annual King Coal Show this year. Back in 1983 a decal and belt buckle swap was incorporated with an auction component to it. The swap continued for a few years then, like the water battle contests that once were part of the event, was dropped from the schedule. Due to many requests by those involved in the collecting, trading and selling of mine memorabilia, Brice Rush, who Just some of the items that will be part of a collection of coal mining memoraholds one of the largest local bilia to be raffled to one lucky person at the King Coal Show this year. collections known, is bringing it back. This time it is part of the Eastern Miners Collectors Show (EMCS) cir- that will be set up at the back of the fire hall with its cuit. What started in the 80s as a decal and buckle own entrance. swap will be a much larger event held at the Car“Each of these individuals coming to it has michaels Fire Hall from 11 am to 7 pm on Aug. 27. private collections. Never will we (referring to he “There will be people from several of the coal and his wife, Linda) have everything there is- never, mining states. We have heard back from some in never, never,” he said. Brice is dedicating the show Maryland, West Virginia and Ohio,” Brice said. to a fellow collector and long-time friend, Larry “We’ll probably get some from Illinois, Indiana and Elmer Click, who passed away in October. “I’m maybe Kentucky.” bringing it back partially in his memory. His wife, People will be able to buy, sell, trade and “Dottie,” has contributed some of the stuff from his swap their items. Anyone who wants to know what collection for the raffle.” something is worth is encouraged to bring it for an Also new to the Coal Show this year will be Antique Road Show type evaluation, he added. a display of a model handcrafted by Joe Glad, 89, Each of the confirmed participants who will of Marianna. A mine foreman at the old Marianna be displaying at the EMCS has donated a piece of Mine, Joe, has painstakingly created the town in a coal mining memorabilia for a raffle drawing that large display that he has entrusted to Brice for the will coordinate with the 7 pm Pennsylvania Lot- show. It is something that one has to see to truly tery’s daily number. That way the winner will be appreciate. able to take their winning merchandise home with Live music on the grounds will take place them at the end of the evening. Thursday with Rustic Memories and then the One-hundred percent profit from the sale of Timm Reeves Band will perform on Friday and Sattickets for the drawing will go to the King Coal As- urday nights. Timm is a Dry Tavern boy, ironically, sociation. The cost is $5 each for a ticket with two who currently lives in Carmichaels. numbers on it for two chances to match the nightOf course there will be all of the traditional time daily number drawing. It will all come inside a events from the pet parade to the car show and large wooden box. A smaller wooden box contains King Coal Salutes Our Miners Parade (the theme a keychain safety lamp, racing memorabilia from this year). Massey Coal’s Race to Safety, a 1996 Eastern Coal The Coal Show will conclude on Aug. 27 with Association Silver Dollar, mining pins, stickers, a fireworks display at 9:45 pm, sponsored by state books, and various artifacts. “Just all sorts of items Representative Pam Snyder. have been donated,” Brice said. For more information, visit www.kingThere will be a $1 charge to get into the swap coalshow.org.

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Spo r t Sh o rt s

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GREENE COUNTY UNITED SOCCER CLUB

t may have been among the most underappreciated sports being played in Greene County; but that has changed as youth soccer continues to draw players in a slow and steady pace ever since 1995, when the Greene County Youth Soccer League formed. Today, roughly 250 children are registered to play as part of the reincorporated Greene County United Soccer Club. The club offers opportunities for young footballers to play for an in-house league that takes into consideration the skill levels at various ages. Teams for 4 and 5 years olds, 6 and 7 year olds and 8 and 9 year olds play in the non-competitive, instructional league. Youngsters ages 10, 11 and 12 may play as part of travel teams that primarily play within an hour’s radius of Greene County. “Occasionally we play teams in Wheeling, W.Va. and Steubenville,

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by Tara Kinsell

Ohio,” said league president Steve Hogue, who has been coaching in the league for 11-years. “We have 23 teams and 7 of those teams are from Carmichaels. The cost to play on an in-house team is $60 and it is $75 for the travel teams. That covers insurance, uniforms and referee fees.” The fall season of soccer will begin around Labor Day. Steve said the league tries to ensure that any child who wants to sign up, even after the traditional sign ups have been held, may do so. “Unless we are very close to the season starting and have already ordered uniforms they can still contact us. We will look at the numbers and make sure there is a spot on the team,” he said, noting that a lack of space could potentially block someone from signing up, but they always try to do whatever they can for prospective players when they can. Without competitive soccer at the high school level in four of the five districts (Waynesburg is the only school with a dedicated soccer program), there isn’t much for these players to move on to after Greene County United Soccer Club. “Some of the kids go on to play in Morgantown or Washington in higher competitive levels. A lot of our kids do that and do well. We’re kind of proud of that,” Steve said. “We don’t get too involved in competitive soccer. We are more of a developmental program to let the kids really learn the game.”

In addition to Steve coaching, his wife Erika is also a coach for their youngest son, Landon’s team. It all started for the Hogues with their oldest son, Brody, who came to them when he was 7 years old and said he wanted to play. The couple’s middle son plays at the middle school level. A daughter has chosen not to play, leaving Landon, 5, as the last member of the family to play for the Greene County United Soccer Club. Games are played in Greene County at the Route 188 fields, east of Waynesburg and at Wana B Park on Ceylon Road in Carmichaels. Steve said a main component of what they teach is sportsmanship. “We try to push our sportsmanship really hard. Coaches are not focused on winning or on making star players. Game scores and standings are not kept in the in-house league. There are no trophies so there is none of that, who

is the champion,” he said, noting there is still some competitiveness to the games, just not what one would experience playing other sports. “There are no official rankings. Our referees are high school age soccer players. They teach what they did wrong and they are learning to play the game the correct way.” For more information on the Greene County United Soccer Club, visit www.greenesoccer.org.

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First Federal Awards Scholarships

Little Miss Firecracker Named Alaina Jonelle Moore, age 5, daughter of John Moore and Shannon Fuller of Clarksville, was crowned the 2016 “Little Miss Firecracker” at the Waynesburg Lions Club Fourth of July celebration at the Greene County Fairgrounds. The pageant is sponsored by the Waynesburg Sewing Center in conjunction with the Waynesburg Lions Club.

Recognizing Doris Dunn

Pictured from left, Barbara L. Galica, First Federal of Greene County Vice President; Noah Gatten, Bentworth High School; Mackenzie Wagner, Canon-McMillan High School; Abigail Abraham and Joshua Miller, both of Laurel Highlands High School; and Tomi Guinn, First Federal of Greene County Education Coordinator, Uniontown office.

Four area 2016 high school graduates were recently selected by the Uniontown office of First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Greene County to receive four-year college scholarships. The scholarship recipients are: • Abigail Abraham, Laurel Highlands High School, Uniontown. Abraham, the daughter of Joe and Andrea Abraham, will attend Washington & Jefferson College and major in political science. • Noah Gatten, Bentworth High School, Bentleyville. Gatten, the son of Ralph and Rhonda Gatten, will attend Geneva College and major in engineering. •   Joshua Miller, Laurel Highlands High School, Uniontown. Miller, the son of Floyd and Andria Miller, will attend the University of Pittsburgh and major in chemical engineering. •  Mackenzie Wagner, Canon-McMillan High School, Canonsburg. Wagner, the daughter of James and Lori Wagner, will attend Slippery Rock

University and major in elementary education and special education. Each winner will receive a $1,000 scholarship renewable for a maximum of four years, or $4,000 total. Funding is made possible through the First Federal Scholarship Fund, which awards up to eight randomly selected eligible students. Eligible students must reside in Greene, Fayette or Washington counties; have been accepted full-time to an accredited educational facility; and maintain an Education Club savings account with minimum regular deposits. The Uniontown office randomly selects four winners each year from Fayette and Washington counties, while the Waynesburg office randomly draws four Greene County students. The Waynesburg office winners will be announced later this summer.

BOWLBY BITS Greene County Commissioners presented a certificate of achievement to Doris Dunn on her commitment and dedication to the Greene County Fair and other County events at their July 14 regular meeting. For nearly 60 years, Doris Dunn has been a valued and leading vendor at the Greene County Fair and is stepping down this year. Commissioner Blair Zimmerman recalls Dunn at various events in the county from his childhood to the present. “Dunn has been a fixture in Greene County and we admire her hard work,”

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he stated. Commissioner Dave Coder commented on knowing Dunn ever since he started attending the fair. He stated that he will “miss her down there this year and appreciates all her years of service at the Greene County Fair.” Pictured, from l. to r., are Larry Marshall, Greene County Fair Manager, Commissioner Dave Coder, Doris Dunn, Loretta DiBiase, Commissioner Blair Zimmerman and Commissioner Archie Trader.

Creative Crafting Class for Adults – Aug. 4, 5-7pm. Project is a string art summer sign on bead board. Cost for materials is $20; pre-registration required. After-After Hours for Teens – Aug. 5, 8-10pm. Suggested donation is $2. Pittsburgh ZOO & AQUARIUM Trip – Aug. 13. Tickets include bus transportation and are $14 for ages 2 & older [younger are free]. Call library to order tickets,(deadline is Aug. 8) The Bowlby Book Club – Aug. 8, 6pm. Discussion will be “The Kitchen House,” by Kathleen Grissom. New members welcome! Library Night with the Washington Wild Things - Aug. 10, game time is 7:05pm. Sum-

mer Reading participants get FREE admission; all others $8 (no transportation provided). FREE S.A.T. Preparation Classes - Three Saturday sessions: Sep. 10, 17 & 24, 10am – 2pm. Bring scientific calculator & bagged lunch. PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED. FREE Summer Tutoring for children/ youth, subjects include math, reading and writing. Register your child/youth today. T.O.P.S. ~ Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a weight management support group that meets every Saturday at the Library, 9:30-11:30am. New members welcome! For more info or to register for any of the above activities call The Eva K. Bowlby Public Library at 724-627-9776. GreeneScene Magazine •

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2016 Community Builders Sessions Begin in August

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he thirteenth series of Community Builders of Greene County will begin August 29, 2016. The program will meet every other Monday through December 12, 2016. Classes will be held from 5:30-8:30 each evening in the new Community Foundation meeting room at 106 E. High Street, Waynesburg. Applications are being accepted through August 19th. Community Builders provides training for persons interested in volunteering their time and talents to support Greene County nonprofit organizations. The nonprofit leadership program explores leadership, nonprofit board governance, financial management, communication and team work, strategic planning, public relations, resource development and volunteer engagement. The series is geared to helping citizens become better volunteers and employees with nonprofit organizations in the community, whether it be through activities such as serving on non-profit boards, volunteering on fundraising committees, or serving as a program staff. Eight learning sessions are conducted by one or more local experts in the field of that week’s topic. A graduation/achievement ceremony is held at the end of the program when participants com-

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pleting the course receive a Community Builder Certificate. Each participant is asked to pay a $150 tuition fee which covers some of the cost of their materials and a light meal during each session. In some instances, the participant’s employer or organization may cover all or part of the fee for their employees or board members. A limited number of scholarships are available on a need basis for one-half of the tuition. More than 150 individuals have completed the course since 2004. Many have become active members of local nonprofit boards. while others have expanded their roles as employees of nonprofit organizations. One Community Builder graduate recently said, “As a board member of one nonprofit and employee of another, I can’t tell you how much I have used what I learned in Community Builders to help make these programs stronger.” Several graduates also shared how the series helped them to build self-confidence and become more involved in their work and community. Applications and schedule are available online at http://www.cfgcpa.org/commbuilders.html. For more information on Community Builders of Greene County call 724-627-2010, or email cfgcpa@gmail.com.

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Twenty-seven Win Awards at State Championship

Pictured with the Greene County Commissioners are the members, coaches and sponsors of the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County’s Scholastic Clay Target Program team.

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wenty-seven members of the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, Greene County’s Scholastic Clay Target Program team, received a total of 32 awards during the Pennsylvania Scholastic Clay Target Program Sporting Clays Championship, held Saturday, June 18, at Buffer Creek in Somerset, Pa. The event involved 213 youth shooters from across the state competing in a 100-target shoot to determine state winners in six skill divisions: rookie, intermediate entry, intermediate advanced, junior varsity, varsity and collegiate. Awards were given to the top three teams in each division, as well as the highest overall and first- through thirdplace scorers in each division. The highest overall male and female individual shooters of the entire competition also win awards. A total of 51 Hunting Hills Hawkeyes members participated in the shoot. Hawkeyes squads took first-place in four divisions, second-place in one division, and third-place in three divisions, along with seven individual and two collegiate awards. Two squads placed in the rookie division. The squad consisting of Robert Dillon III of Adah, Graham Hill of Morgantown, and Cole Jones of Jefferson took first place with a combined score of

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182. Ivan Pavick of Jefferson and Johnathan Riley of Waynesburg took third place with a score of 65. Dillon and Jones placed first and second in the division with individual scores of 73 and 62 points, respectively. In the intermediate entry division, Ethan Wise of Morgantown, Owen Hughes of Rogersville and Landen Friend of Point Marion won first place with a combined score of 169. Hughes placed third with an individual score of 60 points. Hawkeyes squads placed first and second in the intermediate advanced division. The firstplace squad consisting of Tristan Cole of Waynesburg, Hunter Orrahood of Waynesburg and Aaran Hinerman of Waynesburg had a squad score of 211. Finishing in second-place with a score of 197 was the squad of Tucker Hughes of Rogersville, Kolby Smith of Waynesburg and Thaine Miller of Waynesburg. Cole placed second with an individual score of 79. Kyleigh Kozel of Carmichaels and Abby Ozohonish of Clarksville were top scorers in the division placing first and third for highest overall female with individual scores of 61 and 34, respectively. In the junior varsity division, Cameron Cernuska of Jefferson, Corey John of Holbrook and

Noah Haines of Greensboro won third-place with a combined score of 183. With a total score of 237, the Hawkeyes squad with Zach Abbott of Rogersville, Randy Durr of Greensboro, and Hunter Scott of Carmichaels finished first in the varsity division. Placing third in the division with a combined score of 223 were Chase Faddis of Carmichaels, Branden Sanders of Waynesburg and Walker Smith of Waynesburg. Durr placed first in the division with an individual score of 84 and placed second overall among all shooters. In the collegiate division, Andrew Buchtan, Jr. of Greensboro won third-place with an individual score of 81. Montana Bellis of Dilliner also placed third with her individual score of 64 in the ladies’ category. Last year, 58 members of the Hawkeyes competed in the state shoot in Harrisburg, with 23 members receiving 18 medals and trophies for their performances. Hawkeyes squads took firstplace in four divisions, second-place in one division, and third-place in two divisions, along with 10 individual and one collegiate awards. The Hawkeyes formed in February 2009 as part of a pilot Scholastic Clay Target Program in

the county. More than 60 students in grades five through 12 have participated in the program each year. The team’s home base of Hunting Hills is owned and operated by Sally and Roy Sisler, who first approached the Greene County Commissioners in 2008 about starting a Scholastic Clay Target Program. Overseeing this year’s program were head coach Chuck Mallory and assistant head coach Randy Coss, along with several assistant coaches. Nationally, the programs are sponsored by the Scholastic Shooting Sports Foundation. Locally, the Greene County Commissioners, Hunting Hills and the Department of Recreation sponsor the program, with support this year from Big Covey Quail, Chapman Corporation, East Coast Risk Management, First Federal Savings and Loan of Greene County, Friends of the National Rifle Association, I-79 Honda, Midway Foundation and Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. The program’s mission is to promote and teach young people the fundamentals of gun safety, team work and outdoor sports. For more information on the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Muddy Creek Gang Reunion The 22nd Annual Muddy Creek Gang Reunion begins at 4 pm on July 30 at the Greene County Historical Society Museum, Rolling Meadows Road in Waynesburg. The reunion is for any former or current residents of the Muddy Creek area of Greene County. Those who plan to attend are asked to bring a covered dish to share. Starting in 2010, a donation was made each year to the museum for a total of nearly $1,500 in the past six years. This year, the donation will instead go to the family of Hank Workman, Jr., of Khe-

dive to help with medical expenses. Hank was severely injured from a fall while trimming a tree. He was recently transferred from Allegheny General Hospital to the Shepherd Center in Atlanta, Georgia, a hospital that specializes in spinal cord and acquired brain injuries. It is estimated that Hank will be there for several months. Donations will help the family with costs incurred in Atlanta and at home while they are away. To RSVP, contact Sherri Kuran via text message at 724-8332712, or leave a message at 724-802-7149.

Cheerleading Clinic A cheerleading clinic for students who will be in the first through sixth grades this fall is being offered by the Carmichaels Area Cheer Boosters. Students are welcome from all school districts. The clinic will be held from 9 am to noon on Aug. 13 at the Carmichaels High School gymnasium. Registration will begin at 8:45 am. The cost is $20 per participant and includes a Pink-Out t-shirt. Checks may be made payable to the Carmichaels Cheer Boosters. Participants will be instructed

Lucky Pete Meets Mr. Stanley Pete Polando of Carmichaels, who is a network administrator for Trib Total Media, publisher of the Tribune Review, happened to walk in the Clark Building on the north shore one day recently for a meeting and ran right into the one and only, real life, Stanley Cup! Which now belongs, of course to our beloved Pittsburgh Penguins, and just happened to be on display at that corporate sponsor’s location the day Pete was there. Lucky Mr. Pete and Mr. Stanley got up close and personal – thanks for sharing pic, Pete.

Garden Club District Ten Convention Plans

The next planning meeting for the 2018 District X Garden Clubs of Pennsylvania Conin cheerleading fundamentals such as motions, vention will be held at 10 am on Aug. 22 at the jumps, cheers, chants and a dance. For more in- Doubletree Hilton Meadow Lands. A represenformation, contact cheerleading coaches, Erin tative from all District X clubs should plan to Fitzsimmons or Lisa Robinson at 724-966-5045, attend. In honor of the three big races; the Kenext. 3240, or email efitzsimmons@carmarea.org or lrobins@carmarea.org. Registration by Aug. 1 will ensure receipt of a t-shirt. Forms are available at the Carmichaels Senior High Office or by visiting the Carmichaels

tucky Derby, the Belmont, and Preakness Stakes, plus the Adios in Washington, the theme of the convention will be Floral Tri-Fecta. Clubs in District X represent Allegheny, Washington, Greene and Fayette counties.

Protecting Bats Subject of Garden Club Meeting

Guest Speaker at the June meeting of the Town & Country Garden Club John Yesenosky, displayed a bat house he constructed from recycled wood, metal, and mesh. The house was placed 10-15 feet above ground facing Southand folders. Yellow containers can be supplied by re- East. According to John, conservation and manquest for those who are collecting such dona- agement of the bat population is vital as they help tions. Monetary donations for the purchase of control the insect population. Bats are nocturnal carnivores eating at night new school supplies are also always appreciated. chiefly eating insects, many of which are harmful Last year, the “Stuff the Bus” program colto plants and crops. Bats are the only mammals lected over 467 backpacks filled with back to that fly. Echolocation is how bats use sound to school supplies.   The Stuff the Bus event will once again locate objects in total darkness. Born in early by held at the JC Pavilion at the Lion’s Club spring, the young bat called a pup is blind, naked and helpless growing into adulthood within six Park from 11 am to 2 pm on Aug. 10. Lunch for the children will be provided free weeks and living up to twenty years. Bats seek out dark, hot secluded spots as of charge as part of the Summer Food Service Program through the Central Greene School hollow trees, vacant buildings, barns, and attics where they roost hanging upside down by their District.

Stuff the Bus Greene County United Way is sponsoring its 14th Annual “Stuff the Bus” program, sponsored by First Federal Saving and Loan of Greene County.  With all the recent layoffs in our county, the United Way needs your help more than ever!  When local students head back to school every year, many requests are received for back to school supplies.  The “Stuff the Bus” program is designed to supplement these supplies.  The United Way is once again asking for donations of new school supplies such as backpacks, lunchboxes, pens, pencils, crayons, markers, book covers, notebooks, binders

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feet. Man, pesticides and windmills pose the most danger to bats. Bats also fall prey to owls, house cats, and raccoons. The biggest threat now is white-nose syndrome, and emerging fungal disease which is causing massive die-off of the bats. Scientists continue their research as there is no known cure.

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Eulah Mae McGillicutty By Tara Kinsell

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ulah Mae (aka Ramona Mills) has been gracing Rain Day with her presence since 2009 when she first entered the old husband calling contest. The thing with Eulah is that she is larger than life. It wasn’t long before she was back at Rain Day and taking over the whole stage all by herself. Look out fellas cause Eulah’s hubby, Cletus, only answered her former husband calling for a short time before he took off again, for good. Eulah was none too happy! No matter, Eulah’s a resourceful woman. She seized the opportunity to take the

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lemons Cletus threw at her and make Rain Day lemonade back in 2012 when she started her own Bachelorette competition on the lower stage. Rumor has it she may still be on the prowl. Ladies, you aren’t safe either. We are here to tell you that old Eulah knows half the county’s secrets so use those umbrellas to avoid eye contact while she has that microphone in front of her. If she spots you in the audience there is no telling what might come out of her mouth. One thing is for sure, Eulah knows how to rile up a crowd. It is too early as we go to print to know what weather is being called for on July 29, although we all know Mr. Rain Day himself, the late John O’Hara, didn’t care about weather men. And, neither does Eulah Mae McGillicutty! Now, to help y’all out this year, just in case Eulah leads another Rain Day cheer, we are going to provide you with the words. That ways y’all can get in some practice. Eulah was none too happy the last time when the crowd kept screwing it up. So, here it is… and be sure you are at the lower stage at 5 pm so you can impress her with how ready you are, just don’t get too close if you are a good looking, single guy, or if you are a ahem, ‘lady’ with something to hide. “My Name is Eulah so they say. You came to see me cause it’s Rain Day. Are you ready to come and play? Let’s get this party under way! When I say Eulah, you say Mae. When I say rain, you say day.” Just repeat after her and you will be okay. See

how we managed to rhyme right there? Next, she tells everyone to scream. Do it loudly or that cranky thing will make you do it again! Second verse, “The rain is pouring from the sky. Cletus left me; I’m not sure why. I need a new man so don’t be shy. Come on and give Eulah a try.” Told you she was prowling! “When I say Eulah you say Mae. When I say Rain you say Day.” This is supposed to make it rain but back in 2012 her little chant didn’t quite do the trick. Eulah seems to think that was because the audience that year “sucked eggs,” her words not ours. That’s why we are giving you a chance to get it right this time so she has no one to blame but herself if it doesn’t work! And, look out if it does! No one will be able to live with her if she actually thinks she is responsible for it raining the 115th time in this the 143rd year. She’ll want a statue next to that little kid with the umbrella over by the county office building or something! Oh well, you can’t help but like the gal, even if she is missing a few of her marbles.

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July August GreeneScene 2016  

It's Here! The Rain Day issue has all your Rain Day info. Make sure you check out the stories and entertainment. Dry Tavern is the subject o...

July August GreeneScene 2016  

It's Here! The Rain Day issue has all your Rain Day info. Make sure you check out the stories and entertainment. Dry Tavern is the subject o...

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