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Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union

he staff of Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union would like to take the opportunity to let you know that we are happy to serve your financial needs! We are conveniently located at 222 Elm Drive, Unit #3. Stop in and ask for one of our Member Service Representatives for any information you may need.  For more than 54 years, Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union has delivered one-on-one service to our members, serving them for generation after generation.  Our credit union is a full-service, federallyinsured financial institution.  The National Federal Credit Union Insurance Fund insures all deposits at our credit union up to $250,000.  Our membership is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Fayette, Washington, and Greene Counties.  And we have four conveniently located branches – Waynesburg, Uniontown, Washington, and Charleroi. We recently relocated our Washington office to a new and improved location. The 95 West Beau Street office is now open for business! Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union employs 21 full-time staff members and currently manages nearly 80 million dollars in member de-

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• GreeneSaver

posits. Services include but are not limited to savings accounts, checking accounts, money market accounts, certificates of deposit, IRA accounts, and more.  We offer VISA credit cards and debit cards, on-line banking, E-statements, and other convenient electronic options.  Our lending services provide solutions ranging from personal loans, auto loans, home equity loans, to first mortgages. We make it possible for you to be a homeowner and avoid high bank fees. All our mortgages are underwritten and serviced locally. And we offer loans for marginal credit applicants. We look forward to continued advancements in 2016 with an updated website and enhancements to our mobile banking apps. If you have not done so, be sure to go to iTunes or Google Play and download the Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union mobile app for free! If you are looking for a financial institution that offers great personal service, lower rates, and a variety of financial options, contact us.  Stop in at one of our convenient locations, visit our website at www.fricktricountyfcu.org, or call us at 1-800SAY FRICK! 

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David Balint, CPA

aynesburg native David Balint opened his one man CPA office just four years ago, and has already expanded to a talented team of four. Dave’s CPA firm offers a variety of tax services needed by individuals and commercial business. “We provide income tax preparation and consulting, including quarterly estimated payments for royalty income, tax projections for lease bonus payments, right-of-way payments and sales of mineral interests,” says Kayla Balint, who works with Dave, especially during the peak tax season. “We also perform monthly and quarterly accounting for businesses, including payroll services,

and of course we assist with IRS audits.” With Justin Kubicar, a Rices Landing native who holds an MBA in business administration, Kelly Bates and Kayla, the firm now has a combined 30 years of experience in the tax industry. “The expansion was necessary to meet the growing needs of our clients,” explains Dave, who has personally worked in accounting for over 15 years, is also Greene County’s Controller, serving in that office since his initial election in November of 2007. New clients are welcome. To schedule an appointment, call 724-833-9326. The office is located at 1050 E. Greene St., Suite A, Waynesburg.

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From left, Justin Kubicar, MBA; Kelly Bates, Kayla Balint, and David Balint, CPA.

Behm’s Auction & Real Estate Services

fter more than 75 years in business, Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is still a leading provider of auction services in our community and beyond. Based in Greene County, PA, the company conducts various auctions throughout the tri-state area of West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Three generations strong with Jim Behm at the helm today, Behm’s Auction Service continues to offer quality service and a personal relationship with each and every client. Years ago, the average auction was nearly as much a social gathering as a business transaction, and most often consisted of household items or livestock. Today’s auctions offer up a much greater variety of goods and buying power for consumers. Today’s technology enables internet bidding and absentee bids among other ways to access the sale, making selling by auction more lucrative than ever before. Of course, maximizing income while minimizing effort is one of the greatest advantages of selling by auction. Behm’s works directly with individual owners and also with executors, corporations, and bankruptcy attorneys, among many others. Sales may range from a local family relocating or the settlement of an estate to the sale of personal property, real estate, or business liquidations. One of the many reasons that people choose to hire Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services

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Auctioneer Jim Behm brings top dollar.

is that each auction is handled with professional courtesy and personal attention. “I’m often asked why people use our company, and the answer is very simple. We treat each auction as if it were our own. We strive to liquidate their assets, personal property, or real estate in a reasonable amount of time, resulting in the highest value that we can achieve,” explains Jim Behm. With thousands of auctions conducted throughout the tri-state area, Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Services is a familiar name. Most importantly, it is a trusted name in the auction industry. For more information call the office at 724-428-3664 or visit the website at www. behmsauction.com. GreeneSaver •

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Community Bank

ommunity Bank had its best year ever in 2015. This is saying something since Community Bank has been serving the people of Southwestern Pennsylvania since 1901. During the last year, the Bank was busy integrating the merger of Community Bank with First Federal Savings Bank. The integration went well, largely because both banks were so similar in their cultures and dedication to customer service. Because of the merger, Community Bank nearly doubled its retail branch locations to 16, while adding numerous commercial lenders, mortgage lenders, and cash management specialists. The Bank also added an insurance subsidiary, Exchange Underwriters, one of the largest insurance agencies in the area. Exchange employs over 20 people out of its offices in Canonsburg, where they offer a large array of property, casualty, and liability coverage’s to business and residents. With the added muscle, Community Bank was able to better serve its customers. With a determination to be the best, the Bank made and/ or disbursed about $300,000,000 in loans into the local economy. The Bank also expanded its insurance business, which recorded an all time best year. Community Bank Wealth Management also was busy and also had a record year. At Community Bank Wealth Management, our partners carefully dispense timeless advice on investing and actively

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manage the savings of people and companies. With its devotion to outstanding personal service and with this team of financial products, it’s no wonder that Community Bank had such a good year. On the community side, we are pleased to have been able to participate in an endless variety of community activities. Our employees are tireless, devoting countless hours to help others. Our “Community Bank Cares” charitable giving program reached new heights. Through this program, the Bank has offered to donate $100 on behalf of and in honor of every direct loan customer (for loans over $10,000). The donation goes to the charity or church of the customers’ choice. We have now exceeded 800 such donations, contributing over $80,000 to an astonishing collection of worthy organizations. These donations reflect the passion of our customers. We are only too proud to help out. On the financial side, the Bank had a record year. Our stock, which trades on NASDAQ as “CBFV”, had a good year, appreciating about 15%. Our dividend, paid quarterly, was increased and now returns about 4% to our shareholders. It was an interesting year, with our Bank being subjected for the first time to “national” scrutiny by the financial industry. But we held up pretty good. It seems there is always a need for a sensible, independent local bank devoted to delivering outstanding personal service to our local communities.

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I Love this P l a ce

he freezer is covered with photos, placed there as any family would to show off their loved ones. But, this isn’t inside someone’s home, at least not in the traditional sense. When you step inside the Hopkins’ General Store in Nineveh you get the sense that you are at home and those who enter are indeed part of the family. On a sunny day while out-and-about I had occasion to pop into Hopkins’ to take up some time before meeting someone. The clerk that day was unfamiliar to me but soon began sharing tidbits about the store and the townspeople. As I looked over the menu, hoping to find something my gluten intolerant stomach could handle, a few customers came and went. Each knew the other and of course knew the lady behind the counter. It got a little busy at the lone store along Route 18 in Nineveh. When I inquired if the hot dogs happened to have gluten in them my new friend was quick to check the packaging and take care of me. While I waited, I had a chance to look around at the sun-weathered news articles, old photographs, trophies, bric-a-brac and cute sayings that peppered the walls and shelves. “Cows may come and cows may go but the bull in this place goes on forever,” one post read. It seemed especially fitting with tables set up for those who want a place to sit and eat, but also for community members to congregate. If one listened closely enough, I thought, perhaps echoes of old stories might come out of the walls of fish tales and babies being born. Nineveh...how could you not Love This Place? The slower pace inside the store, bought by the Hopkins’ family in 1946, is what the town was once all about. Dotty Hopkins and her son, Greg, the town’s celebrated, though now retired, professional footballer from the Arena Football League, share some disdain for the heavy traffic that has come to town in recent years. “Years ago it was a quiet little town. It is

a lot different. My husband, Sam (his parents were the original store owners), lived right in town. He played catch when he was a little boy in the middle of the road,” Dotty said. “He said it would be a couple of hours with no cars coming at times.” There used to be three stores in town that doubled as service stations, there was also a funeral parlor and a hotel. Ninevah had its own high school and elementary school. The buildings remain in various states, most have been turned into family homes. The old high school, now an apartment building, can be seen from the front window of the store. Dotty’s mom, Louella, taught Latin there. Across the street from it is the town laundromat. Photographs under the glass top of a table were placed there for customer’s amusement while they wait for wash and dry cycles to complete. Dotty said it was Greg who put it together. Another Nineveh native, Renee Cranmer, contributes to the photo history of Nineveh through the website, NinevahPa.com. On it are old photos mixed with new that continue weaving the story of the true small town with community gatherings for annual Fourth of July Parades, picnics, and a fireworks display. Children on decorated bicycles smile as they ride through the town. Renee moved about four miles from town but said she still owns her old house. “It has a room on the side that used to be a doctor’s office - Dr. Throckmorton,” she said. At one time the tiny village had two doctor’s offices, three blacksmith shops, a feed store, and a switchboard operator. Time has marched on since the town was founded in the 1800s but, even with all of its changes, one can’t help but feel like they are in a bit of a time warp when visiting Nineveh. With its 25 mph speed limit on a street lined with trees, family homes and the little white church steeple reigning tall above it all, even this outsider from the other end of the county felt like pulling up a chair and spinning yarns. That’s why we “Love This Place.”

THEN Nineveh Road, then and now.

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NINEVEH, PA

by Tara Kinsell

The freezer at Hopkins’ General Store is a family photo album for Nineveh.

Loughman boys John, Max and Van.

Two boys playing in the street. If anyone knows who these boys are, please let us know.

NOW Greg Hopkins leads the July 4 parade. GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2016


GreeneScene by Bridget Vernon

Knights Farm Supply Mark your calendars for March 17th – 19th. You don’t want to miss the Annual Spring Open House at Knight’s Farm Supply in Glen Easton, West Virginia. One of the most popular community events, this is a weekend of fun that has become a tradition in the region. Folks from three states come to Knights for some of the best pricing of the year and excellent financing opportunities on tractors, implements, equipment and everything else a busy farmer or gardener needs to get ready for spring.  During Open House Knight’s offers 10% off all parts for your equipment and implements from New Holland & Massey Ferguson, Krone, Woods, Echo, Shindiawa and Land Pride, plus discounts on oil, baler twine, net wrap and sileage wrap, wire, fence supplies and more. While the discounts are enough reason to come to Spring Open House at Knight’s Farm Supply, the food and entertainment just make it a “must do deal”  for most people. And talk about delicious…there is always free food and refreshment on Friday & Saturday, dozens of door prizes every day, and everyone looks forward to the live entertainment on Friday night. Spring Open House is the perfect time to see the year’s new models and learn all about the

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2016

• GreeneSaver

tractors and equipment from the factory reps that will be there on Friday to answer your questions. You’ll find the reps from New Holland, Massey Ferguson, Land Pride, Wood, Krone and Kuhn. It’s also a good time to take a close look at Knight’s huge inventory of used tractors and equipment, and get sale prices on everything from fence posts to feeders. Months are spent in advance, building inventory and making preparations to kick-off the season with Spring Open House at Knight’s Farm Supply. “A lot of people take advantage of the deals and plan to purchase during open house. It’s a busy weekend.  We always encourage people to call in their parts orders early, so we can have them ready to pick-up any time during open house, that’s really important...don’t wait till you come, call us now,” advises Missy Knight. So don’t wait, go ahead and call now for parts you want to pick up during open house to get the 10% discount. Call 304-845-1525 or 304686-2525 or you can email your parts order to missy@knightsfarmsupply.com. It’s happening Mar. 17th, 18th & 19th (Thu 8am - 6pm, Fri 8am - 8pm and Sat 8am - noon). Write it on your calendar and plan to be there!

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GreeneScene by Lori Barnhart

G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

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t may be hard to believe, looking at the village of Nineveh today, that at one time it had three general stores, all of which sold gasoline, plus a fourth service station; but that was the case for many years. McKee’s General Store, our Greene Scene of the Past, was one of them. It was owned by John and Linnie Stone McKee. The second is of course the Hopkins General Store and the third was the Bedilion’s Store. Today, McKee’s is more commonly known as Sam’s Wash Tub. Sam Hopkins purchased the building in 1967 and converted it into the laundromat. He and his wife, Dotty, married in 1968 and lived for a time in the apartment above it. Sam estimates that the McKee General Store closed around 1960. When Sam opened its doors the first time after he bought it, it looked like the McKees, who lived in the house next door, had simply closed up shop one day and went home. The Greene Scene of the Past is on display inside the old store and it is also on the Nineveh, Pa.

by Tara Kinsell

website, maintained by Renee Creech Cranmer. Dotty said the young people in the photo are Sam’s sister, Renee and one of the five McKee kids: Harmon, Myra, Linnie, Margaret and Herbert. Both Herbert and Harmon served in WWI. We are not sure which of the McKees is sitting on this 1950s Plymouth with Renee but found it to be a very interesting photo. If any of you happen to know with whom she’s sitting, us a call.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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FEBRUARY / MARCH 2016


Clay-Battelle Health Services Association

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Clay-Battelle Health Services Association Expands Focus to Include Behavioral Health

ith its continued focus on patient centered health care, the ClayBattelle Health Services Association (CBHSA) has recently added behavioral health to its list of available services. “We received a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to expand our staff to include a Licensed Certified Social Worker, Charlotte Whipkey, to provide counseling for individuals and families,” said Janice Morris, CEO of the Clay-Battelle Health Services Association. “We’ve recognized the need for some time. In September, 2015, we were awarded funds for expanded services and immediately began looking for a qualified and experienced social worker to head the new department. We also added Shera Hoy, RN, to the team, to assist with the integration of behavioral health services with primary medical care.” Janice said the range of reasons that patients might choose to seek counseling vary from anger management to anxiety and depression, to substance abuse issues. “The program has taken off

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in a big way. Based on the need we are seeing, it is a good thing that we are able to provide this service for our patients,” she notes. Patients may be seen in both of the CBHSA health centers, located in Blacksville and Burton, WV. Clay-Battelle Health Services Association strives to make treatment as accessible as possible. “We see patients from West Virginia and Pennsylvania, and offer a sliding fee scale for patients with limited incomes,” Janice explains. “We also have a mileage reimbursement program to assist low income patients in getting to their appointments. Evening hours are available to make it as accessible and convenient as possible.” In the event a patient would need more specialized treatment by a psychiatrist, a referral can be made. Clay-Battelle Health Services Association has been a provider of family medical and dental care in northern West Virginia and southwestern Pennsylvania since 1973, offering residents from both states convenient, affordable, quality healthcare. A full service retail pharmacy, Clay-Battelle Pharmacy, is

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located next door to the Clay-Battelle Community Health Center in Blacksville, and CBHSA patients may qualify for significant discounts on prescription medications if they are uninsured. Both of the Clay-Battelle Health Services Association health centers are recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance as Patient Centered Medical Homes. The staff at Clay-Battelle Health Services Association has a unique and close understanding of the communities in which they work, as several of its providers are natives of Monongalia, Wetzel or Greene Counties. This enables them to achieve their patient centered healthcare goals, and offer the compassionate and appropriate care their patients deserve. “When you walk into our health centers, you’re not just a number,” Janice notes. Patients at Clay-Battelle Health Services Association are “at the center of what we do. You can expect us to use current technology and clear communication to help you make the best choices to achieve the best outcomes.”

Charlotte Whipkey, Licensed Certified Social Worker for the behavioral health program at Clay-Battelle Health Services Association.

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GreeneScene by Sandy Wilson

Co o l at Sc h o o l

by Tara Kinsell

HISTORY FAIR AT CARMICHAELS

First Place winner Britney Pollock took first place with her work on Henry Walter Bates.

Second place winner Megan O’Neal took second place for her work on Attila the Hun.

W Third place winner Nick Swaney took third place for his work on William Crawford.

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hen students in the ninth grade at Carmichaels Area High School shared their work at the annual history fair, held in the high school cafeteria on February 10, it was the result of several week’s work. “What the public sees on fair night is the final product of the students work,” said instructor Rebecca Reed. “Each year the theme changes. I always

use the theme of the National History Day competition for that year.” Students then have an opportunity to select a theme within the theme to research, analyze, document and present on at the history fair. A panel of four judges viewed the work this year; Tom McCombs, former ninth grade teacher in the district; Rea Redd, library director and history professor at Waynesburg University; Hillary Miller, 2004 Carmichaels alum and history professor at W&J College; and Michael Slaven, history professor and chair of history and political science at California University of PA. The theme for 2015-16 was “Exploration, Encounters, and Exchanges in History.” With such a broad topic students had countless options for their projects. Students were challenged by History Day judges to “consider this theme an invitation to look across time, space, and geography to find examples in history of when people took a risk and made a change.” That did not mean the subject matter would all take a positive note. For example, the tied student exhibits that were awarded Best in Show by the judges at Carmichaels were on the topics of the Salem Witch Trials and Seal Team Six. The latter focused on the elite group of Navy Seals that is credited with finding and killing Osama Bin Laden. The other on the mass hysteria in the 1600s when people became convinced that a group of young girls were witches.

Not only did these young women meet with the gallows but so did several others. The first, second and third place entries were just as varied in subject matter, covering William Crawford, Attila the Hun and Henry Walter Bates, respectively. Crawford was a lawyer and senator who twice ran for President of the United States, the only person from Georgia to do so until Jimmy Carter ran. Attila, who ruled a nomadic and barbarian group known as the Huns, was one of the most feared leaders in the history of the Roman Empire from 410 to his death in 453; a very different type of story from that of William Crawford. It was the work of student Britney Pollock on Bates that earned the first place award. Bates was a naturalist and explorer who is credited with sending more than 14,700 species back to the U.S. from a trip to the Amazon. Of those, 8,000 were previously unknown species. “The students work to develop a research based historical thesis. My main objective is to get them using more than one source for a project and teach them how to find and analyze primary sources to create an original idea about their topic,” Reed said. By doing this it engages the students in the work in a way that simply reading a textbook wouldn’t do. Seeing the work of these students was definitely worthy of the “Cool at School” title. GreeneSaver •

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Redevelopment Authority of The County of Greene

ACG was activated in 2009 to increase affordable housing and home ownership opportunities, redevelop blighted areas and, in conjunction with other County, State and Federal entities, provide for community revitalization in Greene County. RACG is committed to enhancing the quality of life for all of the County’s residents by advancing housing development and potential redevelopment sites across the County. Housing development includes senior housing, market rate housing, affordable housing, low-and moderate-income housing and special needs housing. In addition to assisting commercial and residential developers with site location, acquisition and preparation, RACG has created an Acquisition, Rehab and Resale Program to assist the County with the redevelopment of its underutilized properties and the remediation of blighted properties. This program is sourced by the County’s 26 municipalities identifying blighted properties in their communities as well as RACG identifying vacant/ abandoned/ underutilized properties through foreclosures, sheriff sales and the County tax repository. RACG has received grants from the Pennsylvania Housing Affordability and Rehabilitation Enhancement Fund (PHARE) through the Act 13 impact fees to assist with its work. RACG currently has

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projects underway in Rogersville, Waynesburg, Jefferson Township, Dunkard Township, Crucible and Clarksville. The RACG purchased the old Waynesburg Floral Shop at Judicial Sale in December and plans to begin renovations soon. Recent completed projects include two homes in Dunkard Township, one home in Pitt Gas, two Land Installment Purchase Contracts (rent to own) with first-time home owners, a modular home in Waynesburg (pictured above and currently for sale), and demolition projects throughout the County. If you are interested in purchasing a home, advancing housing, developing commercial or residential property, or own land that you are interested in selling, developing or donating to RACG, please contact Dave Calvario, Executive Director, RACG, at 724-852-5306 or at dcalvario@co.greene.pa.us. Also check the County’s website at www.co.greene. pa.us for links to available housing programs and more details on RACG.

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Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, Inc.

Open Flags are provided for “Buy Local, Buy Greene” participants

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aynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful (WP&B), a Main Street initiative, is named after an historic 1906 souvenir pictorial directory of Waynesburg touting it as the Biggest and Best Little City in Pennsylvania. It is WP&B’s mission to preserve and revitalize historic downtown Waynesburg, Pennsylvania and to cultivate a heightened public awareness of the educational, cultural and historical opportunities and conveniences in shopping associated with visiting downtown Waynesburg. Work to accomplish this mission is performed by volunteers in various focus groups, including an economic restructuring committee which examines current economic and marketing forces affecting the downtown; and works to bring the mix of retail, professional services, and housing that will prosper in the area. A recent example is WP&B’s collaboration with PIRHL Developers to establish Gateway Senior Housing in downtown Waynesburg. Currently under construction, this beautiful 52 unit apartment complex will provide attractive, safe and comfortable housing to residents over the age of 62 with limited incomes. The venture helps accomplish the dual objective of providing much needed, new and affordable housing; and introducing a new resident population to the convenience and advantages of shopping and doing business in the downtown district. The building features a fitness center, multiple laundries, community room and outdoor living space. Applications for one and two bedroom apartments are now being accepted; call 724-880-0373 for more information. The WP&B Promotions Committee, which strives to maintain a vibrant downtown with innovative retail promotions and special events, is responsible for several of Waynesburg’s most popular festivals, including the 50’s Fest & Car Cruise in September, the Sheep & Fiber Festival in May and the merchant’s “Open House” events during summer and holiday season in winter. By working closely with the newly formed Waynesburg Merchant’s Guild in downtown, and with the support of corporate sponsorship from EQT and Greene County’s Tourist Promotion Agency (GCTPA), the recent Holiday Open House again drew large crowds to downtown, including many shoppers coming from West Virginia and Washington and

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Allegheny Counties. The Summer Open House, with live entertainment and the popular “Rock the Chalk” artists’ competition is planned for June 24th this year. Another collaborative effort with like-minded organizations, the “Buy Local, Buy Greene” initiative’s purpose is to educate consumers about the impact they can have on their community by spending locally. The mission statement is “Unleashing the power of the Consumers’ Dollar in Greene County.” Both consumers and merchants support the cause through an online invitation to make a commitment to local spending and promoting local spending. All participating merchants display a large OPEN flag in front of their shops. The decorative flag stand and the initial flag are provided free of charge to merchants when they commit, with replacement flags available as needed to all merchants at wholesale cost. GCTPA recently awarded a $500 grant to help fund the Open Flag program and other aspects of the Buy Local Buy Greene Campaign. Those interested in learning more about the huge impact of local spending should visit www.waynesburgpa.org/buylocal. WP&B’s Board of Directors has also committed to support and work with Waynesburg Borough Council ’s design of a long-term comprehensive plan for the borough, an action that is strategic to developing funding opportunities and possible future grants for improvements. The plan addresses infrastructure, zoning, building code, parking and all matters under the governance of the Borough. Each calendar quarter, WP&B organizes and hosts “downtown dialogues” for business owners and stakeholders to come together to keep communication open and cooperation high in the common goal of improving downtown Waynesburg. WP&B continues its use of social media to heighten awareness of Waynesburg’s historic downtown. A Facebook page keeps friends (now numbering close to 1500) informed with frequently updated news of merchant’s happenings, pictures and comments and has become somewhat of a “Go To” page for everyone interested in Waynesburg. With Twitter and Instagram accounts as well, it’s becoming easier to follow what keeps our prosperous and beautiful Downtown Waynesburg inviting and vibrant. All photos compliments of Jeanine Henry. See more on Facebook.

15th Annual 50s Fest & Car Cruise in Downtown Waynesburg is September 10, 2016 GreeneSaver •

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Greene County Industrial Development Authority

Director Crystal Simmons of Greene County Industrial Development Authority is ready to help you cut the ribbon on your new business!

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he Greene County Industrial Development Authority (GCIDA) is actively partnering with the Greene County Board of Commissioners to foster economic growth in the county. The authority’s concentration is on economic development and strives to further expand business opportunities throughout the county. The authority provides links to financial resources for County-owned businesses for expansion or retention and administers a revolving loan fund, funded in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development program. The fund was established to provide seed money to promote job development and business growth and expansion within Greene County. In coordination with Pittsburgh Regional Alliance the authority has developed a free online commercial real estate database Greenesitesearch. com for finding the optimal business location. The authority’s focus is on the creation, attraction and retention of business. The Authority has established the Greene County Brownfield Redevelopment Advisory Committee (GC-BRAC) to create more public involvement in its effort to address brownfield sites. The committee will improve public participation and community involvement in the brownfield redevelopment initiatives. The Director of the Industrial Development Authority is Crystal Simmons and the Board of Directors is led by Joseph Simatic, who serves as Chairman. Other members include Sheila Elliott Stewart, Branch Manager and Vice President of First National Bank; Andrew Corfont, Vice-President and Marketing Administrator; Jason Neighbors, owner of Vending Solutions and Mike Belding. The Authority offices are located on the street level of the Fort Jackson Building at 49 South Washington Street in Waynesburg. For information or assistance, please call 724-627-9259.

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JANUARY/ FEBRUARY ISSUE PICTURE PUZZLE WINNER Tonya Steinmiller of Waynesburg, PA Last Month’s Picture Puzzle Answer: Box of Chocolates

Lisa is a Winner of either a COUCH & LOVE SEAT UPHOLSTERY CLEANING OR TWO ROOMS OF CARPET CLEANING compliments of

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10% OFF

PENING O D N G RA

ANY PURCHASE Ends 4/30/16

Featuring supplies for all your VAPE needs! Monday - Sunday • 11am - 9pm

175 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA • 724-802-7952

Dubtown Vapes

“I

The right place at the right time

was just pulling in to turn around when I saw the “For Rent” sign and I said to myself, ‘This is it,’” said Will Smith, owner of Dubtown Vapes, located at 175 Wade Street in Waynesburg. This is Will’s second Dubtown location. His original store is at 893 Henderson Ave., Washington. It was there that the idea of opening a Greene County store emerged. “I had a lot of customers from Greene County who would come in and they would tell me that there wasn’t a lot of options for vapes there,” Will said. The decision to open the new location in Waynesburg has been a good one, Will said, noting

he is also a resident now. “People here have really made me feel welcome and been good to us. I get lots of help that I didn’t really ask for and they don’t expect anything in return. I even had one guy who left and had a hat made and gave it to me,” he added. The grand opening of the store is ongoing through April. Will said he carries everything ECigarette related that one can think of, including tanks, RDA’s, mods, starter kits, and a wide variety of e-juice flavors. Hours of operation are seven days a week from 11 am to 9 pm. For more information, call 724-8027952 or visit the Dubtown Vapes Facebook page.

GreeneScene by Candy Hoskins FEBRUARY / MARCH 2016

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he historic Nineveh United Methodist Church has been around nearly as long as the village itself. Stained glass panels on the church have dates of 1880 and 1884. This is because the first church building, built in the summer of 1880, was destroyed by a fire just days after Christmas in 1883. The church history states that the very next day the quarterly conference reconvened and resolved to rebuild. The original building committee was reappointed and work began anew just days later. The new church, as it stands today, was dedicated on Sunday, September 21, 1884. Though it is a small village, church records indicate that the Nineveh UMC grew to 120 members in the three years proceeding its dedication, under Reverend R. S. Ross. Today, the church again has a growing congregation under its new pastor, Rev. Scott Lawrence. Actually, he isn’t all that new. He started at the church on July 1, 2014, but the position was all new to him. He came to the church right out of seminary and that is helping the 28-year old connect with younger people. “I think he is a nice guy. He shows up to

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sporting events and cheers on all the West Greene students,” said congregant Mitchell Murdock, 16. “During Church he connects with the kids very well because he is younger and he makes it easy for people to understand and learn about God and what he has done for all of us.” If one takes a look at the church’s Facebook page you see how Scott might connect with young and old members of the congregation. Clearly he has a wonderful sense of humor, as confirmed by Mitchell. It is really a refreshing read with the young pastor sharing his thoughts on everything from married life to television programs. He shares his struggles to find a hobby and what is on his reading list. And, for those who can’t make it to church, he puts his sermons on the page. It is a very nice touch for those who might be sick, out of town or have other situations that keep them away. We are happy to shine the light on this 130 plus year old church’s history and where it is today. Join Pastor Scott Lawrence at the Nineveh United Methodist Church on Sundays at 9 am for Sunday school and 10 am for services.

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Salvation Army Golf Outing

he Greene County Salvation Army’s Annual Golf Outing is May 2, at Greene County Country Club. All funds from this tournament will be “fore” others. You can assist our local neighbors in need with utilities, rent, emergency food, summer camp, holiday toy drive, winter outwear, burials, transient care and much more. It’s a 4-person scramble, entry fee is $280 per team and includes 18 holes of golf, cart, continental breakfast and sit-down lunch of beef au jus, baked chicken, parsley potatoes, rigatoni with marinara sauce, vegetables, rolls and beverages. First prize for tournament winners is $280, second-place is $140; skill prizes, too and silent auction, 50/50 drawing,

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Chinese auction and hole-inone prizes. To register, contact Sister Audrey Quinn at 724852-1479 or Audrey.Quinn@ USE.SalvationArmy.org. The Greene County Salvation Army warehouse is located at 131 W. First Street in Waynesburg. Free clothing, coupon exchange, free camps for children, disaster services and emergency utility and rent assistance are among the many services offered. The Salvation Army is committed to serving the whole person, body, mind and spirit, with integrity and respect, using creative solutions to positively transform lives.

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Suits for Soldiers

Food Bank Recognized The Greene County Commissioners declared the month of February as National Canned Food Month at their monthly meeting. A proclamation given to Candace Tustin, Corner Cupboard Food Bank executive director, recognized the work of the food bank in serving roughly 2,000 people each month. That number includes nearly 400 senior

citizens and 600 children at 11 food pantries across the county. After more than 20 years of service to the community, the Corner Cupboard Food Bank provides nearly 870,000 pounds of food annually, comprised of donated and purchased items. Its overall mission is to not only provide food security to community members in need, but also to educate the public about the nature of and solutions to the problems of hunger. For more information on how to contribute to the food bank, contact Tustin at 724-627-9784. Pictured (l-r): Commissioner Dave Coder; Jessica Cole, Corner Cupboard operations manager; Candace Tustin, Corner Cupboard executive director; Terri Cartier, Corner Cupboard board vice president; Commissioner Blair Zimmerman; and Commissioner Archie Trader.

It started with a blurb in a newsletter that led to a newspaper article, radio announcement and 300 suits later, multiple organizations coming together to give soldiers a new uniform and a new start. Ken Carlisle, owner of the Farmers Insurance Agency in Waynesburg, said he is “so humbled and thankful to see our neighbors coming together to help so many military families.” Ken said it has been a “small gesture that has inspired a lot of people.” When the agency organized a new or gently used suit drive for soldiers transitioning out of military life into civilian roles, little could they have known how quickly and overwhelmingly the public would respond. “Within the first few days of the drive we knew we needed to focus pretty heavily on the logistics of picking up, transporting, organizing and storing the suits. The outpouring of support was heartwarming and inspiring,” said Caitlin Carlisle, noting there is an ongoing need for suits for soldiers leaving military life. “We realized we need to keep these things on hand to be really helpful. Our community can do tremendous good and to everyone who has donated, 300 families were given a very thoughtful gift at a very stressful time, so thank you.” The Veterans of Foreign Wars and other military and veteran organizations are working with the Farmers Insurance Agency to keep Suits for Soldiers as an ongoing drive. Pictured here is Senior Vice Commander of VFW Post 4793 Rick Black, helping organize new donations at the Farmers office. For more information, contact Caitlin at 724-833-9520 or email at Caitlin.kcarlisle@farmersagency.com.

Ryan Mayfield Exhibit

The work of Waynesburg University senior art major, Ryan Mayfield, a Carmichaels Area School District graduate, is being exhibited through March 18 in the Benedum Fine Arts Gallery at the university. The exhibit is open from 9 am to 4 pm, or by appointment. Admission is free and the public is invited to attend. Some of the work featured will Tune in to KDKA at 11 am on March 12 for Hometown High-Q and the winning Waynesburg Central include Ryan’s drawings, paintings, sculptures, and metalwork, created over the past four years as a stuHigh School team of Jack Fudala, Jeromy Mackey and Reid Griffin. dent at the university. Various works will be availFrom left, Waynesburg cheerleader Erin McCall; instructor Bill Kelly; Jack Fudala; instructor Ramonda Lipscomb; Jeromy Mackey; Reid Griffin; and cheerleaders Lauren Tustin and Sarah Rudnik.

WCHS Wins!

able for purchase. “It means a lot to me to have my artwork featured in an exhibit,” Ryan said. “This show is a stepping stone for me as an artist and for my art career.” In addition to showing and selling his work, Ryan is encouraging donations be given at the gallery showing to benefit Autism Speaks, the world’s leading autism science and advocacy organization. Those who donate to the organization will receive a handmade ceramic puzzle piece created by Ryan.

Carmichaels Teen Wins Scholarship The $1,000 Proctor Ranch Scholarship, given in memory of fallen sheriff ’s Deputy Robert Paris, Jr., of the Stanislaus Sheriffs Department in Modesto, California, has been awarded to Joey Kurincak, 15, of Carmichaels, Pa. Joey, like Deputy Paris, is an avid sportsman who has hunted at the Proctor Ranch, located in Meeker, Colorado. In October of 2015, Joey harvested a 4X5 mule deer (pictured) and a cow elk at the ranch qualifying him for a spot in the drawing for the youth scholarship, given by the owners of the ranch. Deputy Paris was killed in the line of duty in 2012 while serving an eviction notice. Joey, currently a freshman at Carmichaels Area Jr. Sr. High School, plans to attend college and major in engineering.

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GreeneScene by Lisa Sowden

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Padgett Business Services

mi Cree has been the owner of Padgett Business Services since June 2002. To better serve the community, there are offices in Carmichaels and Waynesburg. Both are IRS approved to e-file. Padgett prepares income tax returns for individuals and business returns for sole proprietors, partnerships, corporations, farms and nonprofits. Padgett provides financial reporting and tax consulting services, payroll services, preparation and filing of payroll taxes, estimated taxes, and sales tax. Ami has experience with the issues and opportunities associated with the gas industry and is helpful in calculating estimated tax on gas leases, royalty and right of way payments. Ami Cree, a 1989 graduate of Bethlehem-Center High School, earned both her Master’s and Bachelor’s Degrees from Waynesburg College. Prior to opening Padgett, Ami worked at Ellis and Everard for eight years where she was promoted from accounts payable administrator to accounting manager to assistant controller.  She taught numerous evening classes at Westmoreland County Community College. Ami resides in Khedive with her husband Bill, a third generation dairy farmer, and their three children, Al, Beth and Ani. Ami enjoys volunteering at school activities and coaching soccer. Her business proudly sponsors numerous Greene County events. Toby Whipkey, a 1991 graduate of West Greene High School, earned her Associate’s Degree in Executive Office Administration from Penn Commercial. Toby has worked at Padgett for three years and currently manages the administrative functions from the Waynesburg office. She handles payroll, bookkeeping and bank reconciliations for some clients and is a Registered Tax Return Preparer. Previously, Toby served Washington Federal for twelve years as a Senior Loan Processor in Residential Lending and as a Senior Loan Closer. Toby resides in West Greene with her husband Jim, owner of Scotty’s Pizza, and their two children, London and Pieper. Charlotte McMillan, a 1967 graduate of Canon McMillan High School, has lived with her husband, William, in Greene County for 31 years. Together

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(L to R) Charlotte McMillan, Toby Whipkey and Owner Ami Cree of Padgett Business Services

they operated a small business, Railroad Repair, from 1999 to 2004. Charlotte was employed by Catholic Charities as a Secretary for fifteen years, and also volunteered for the Greene County Food Bank for 15 years. She has worked at Padgett for two years and is a Registered Tax Return Preparer, Charlotte raised 3 children and has eight grandchildren. To see how Padgett can help improve your business, or just to have your income taxes filed, call either office. Waynesburg 724-627-3800; Carmichaels 724-319-2274, both provide friendly and affordable services!

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Lisa Brown Agency

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hen Greene County native Lisa Syrek Brown decided to leave the banking industry, she wanted to do something that would enable her to give back to the community she loves. That goal led to the opening of Lisa Brown Allstate Insurance office last year, at 140 Bill George Drive, Waynesburg. “We want to thank the community for supporting our business and helping us to get off to a great start. At our grand opening we raised money and were able to make a great donation to the Waynesburg Volunteer Fire Department,” Lisa said. “We want people to know that you are in good hands with us. We are local, not a big call center. You can walk into the office and get personalized service.” The Lisa Brown Agency offers a full array of insurance services for its clients. “We can customize what we offer to fit your needs,” Lisa explains, noting that they make the experience as easy for clients as possible. “If you are tech savvy, we can do things electronically, but we still have the face-to-face interaction that appeals to all. We want to make it as convenient and simple as we can and not a hassle for our customers.” Lisa is licensed in both Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Lisa expects to expand and hire additional employees in 2016. The current staff includes Cortney Syrek, Madison Muilenburg, and Lisa’s husband

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Mark Brown. “We’re here to stay,” Lisa said. Visit the Lisa Brown Agency Monday-Friday 9am to 5pm, Wednesdays till 6pm, Saturdays 9am to 1pm. To schedule an appointment after hours call 724-7103101.

P.W. Auto Sales & Service

ith 33 years of successful service to our community, Pat Westich of PW Auto Sales & Service is doing something right. His customers know what it is. And so does he - honesty, integrity and the best technology has to offer in diagnostics, good equipment and skilled personnel. “Honesty leads to trust…that’s what customers want,” Pat emphasizes. The increase in Pat’s used car sales certainly attests to the trust his customers have in him. “We added used car sales several years ago, and it was a good fit. We have the tools and resources to make sure every car is in its best condition and safe on the road before we ever put the for sale sign on it,” he explains. Continually investing in the latest technology, training and equipment is another key to business Pat says. PW is very much a full service shop, offering towing, mechanical work, tune-ups, brakes, exhaust, oil changes, alignments and new equipment updates. By continually updating diagonostic programs and equipment, PW enables its technicians to detect the source of problems

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Seated, Lisa Brown, owner of the Allstate Agency in Waynesburg. Standing, from left, Mark Brown, Maddy Muilenburg and Cortney Syrek.

that affect your car’s performance and your safety, even with the latest models. One should not assume that a dealership may be more advanced. “Their mechanic shop works just like ours,” Pat explains, “it’s skilled people and the proper equipment that do the job.” PW Auto Service has both - for all makes and models. As a pastor to his church, and particularly dedicated to youth ministry, Pat Westich believes faith plays an important role in his life, both personally and professionally. “It’s the same characteristics that foster trust…no matter whether you’re selling a car or witnessing to a teenager… honesty and integrity are vital,” Pat says. Accomplishing his goals in both areas is evidence of Pat Westich’s success. “We really have to thank our loyal customers, that’s the way we know we’re accomplishing our goal of complete customer satisfaction, many of them have been with us from the start.” The GreeneSaver congratulates Pat Westich and PW Auto Sales & Service on 33 years of business and community service.

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Relay For Life

n the United States, men have a one in two lifetime risk of developing cancer; for women the risk of developing cancer is about one in three. The American Cancer Society and Relay For Life volunteers are urging local businesses and organizations to take up the fight against cancer in our community by supporting the Relay For Life of Greene County. Relay is the signature fundraising event for the American Cancer Society and is critical in raising funds for cancer research, education, prevention, and early detection to increase the chances of living a cancer free life. April 30 – May 1, 2016 have been set aside for this year’s Relay For Life of Greene County Celebration. Relay involves teams of walkers who raise money for the fight against cancer. One member of each team is encouraged to be on the track throughout the entire 24 hour event. During the Opening Ceremonies, the first lap is dedicated to Cancer Survivors. All survivors and their caregivers from the community are invited to attend and take part in this tradition. At dusk a Luminaria Ceremony is held to honor survivors and to remember those who have lost their battle with cancer. Throughout the night, while Relay is going on, team members camp out, enjoying entertainment, food, games & camaraderie creating a family and community atmosphere all to support the fight against cancer. Greene County held its first Relay For Life event in 1999 and has seen the event grow from raising $33,000 in that first year to raising over $234,000 in 2012. Over the past five years, Greene

County was ranked in the top 10 events in the nation for per capita fundraising. In 2016, the Relay For Life of Greene County is continuing to reach out to more participants, survivors, businesses, and all of the individuals living in Greene County. Relay For Life is a community based event, and their Event Leadership Team would like to have as much participation from as many members of the community as possible. There are several different ways of getting involved. Businesses can take advantage of sponsorship opportunities, or sponsor “Paint the Town Purple” banners that are hung in town prior to the event. Individuals are able to visit the Relay For Life website (www.relayforlife.org/greenecountypa) to join an existing team or start their own. Anyone wishing to offer support can also visit the website to make a donation ($10 recommendation) for a luminaria in honor of someone who is battling cancer, or in memory of someone who has passed from cancer. Luminaria are the white bags that are placed around the walking track at the Relay For Life event, and during the Luminaria Ceremony a candle (glow stick) is lighted to show support, or to remember loved ones. At the event, organizers and participants take the time to honor the cancer survivors of Greene County with a Survivors Lap and luncheon. All survivors and a caregiver are welcome to attend the luncheon following the Opening Ceremony’s Survivors lap. If you are a cancer survivor in Greene County and would like to attend the relay and the luncheon, please contact Jacki Headlee at: jacki_ h143@yahoo.com or go online and register at www. relayforlife.org/greenecountypa.

Greene County Economic Development

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Working On Job Creation

t is an extremely busy time for the Greene County Department of Economic Development (GCDED) as it addresses the decline in both the coal and gas industries, said Robbie Matesic, executive director. “Coal is in transition and it is not going to be what it has been,” Matesic said. “Our coal companies are publicly traded. They answer to shareholders. It is not like it was 50 years ago.” Matesic said the GCDED is trying to not focus on the negative side but instead, “on what we are going to do about it.” “Coal miners made good money. Some were making six figures by working a lot of over time,” she said. “I don’t know if anything is an exact substitute to help people make six figures again but we are trying to find opportunities for family sustaining wages.” Matesic said to do this, there is a consortium of 20 counties in Pennsylvania and West Virginia partnering to aggressively push diversification of the workforce. “There are options out there right now for us to take advantage of in building and construction and metals manufacturing,” she said. “We’re trying to grow businesses in manufacturing. This is not going to happen overnight.” Matesic recognizes that displaced workers

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may need to seek employment outside of the county. However, she hopes they will be able to continue to live in Greene County and eventually find family sustaining work here. “We are working hard to make those job opportunities from all over the state and region. That’s how what we are doing fits into the national and global scheme,” she said. “We all need to be working together to increase demand. Greene County is clearly the most impacted county right now.” Roughly 300 miners were laid off in the last year with a multiplier of five times that amount indirectly affected in the community from those incomes not being spent at restaurants, stores, etc., according to Matesic. “The United Mine Workers are with us 100 percent and I applaud them for that. They are trying to do everything they can to help,” Matesic said. For now, Matesic is pointing to Career Link as the point of contact for displaced miners and gas well employees. “Workers need to go to Career Link, get registered, do the skills assessment, fill out a resume and job search. We are working closely with Career Link,” she said. “Career Link is the integral component in this whole thing when a miner or gas industry employee decides they need to seek a new occupation.”

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Spo r t Sh o rt s

by Tara Kinsell

One of just three Greene County rifle team members to make it to the state tournament, West Greene’s Lexi Keller had a score of 200-15X at the WPIAL Individual Rifle Championship to place her there. The results of the state tournament were not yet available at press time.

It was a banner year for the West Greene boys and girls basketball teams who reached the playoffs together for the first time in school history. Both finished third in their section to advance. It had been more than 20 years since a Pioneer boys team got to the playoffs and more than a decade since the girls reached it.

The Waynesburg and Jefferson-Morgan combined high school rifle team took its section title with a 7-1 record this year. The team went on to the WPIAL team tournament where it finished fourth and shooting a team high score for the year of 799-50x. Two of the team members finished in the top 15 at the tournament, earning them a berth at the state tournament; Emily Ozohonish and Emilee Tuttle. We await their results. Kneeling from left to right: Andrew Guess, Cameron Dugan, Emily Ozohonish. Standing: Dylan Henkins, Travis Elliot, Cameron Cernuska, Cameron McIe, Dylan Crockard, Jake Bissett, Emilee Tuttle, Michael Pochron and Selena Phillips.

Members of the boys team (top), kneeling, from left : Zach McHenry, Kylar Amos, Joey Reed, Christian Fox, Eric Stoll, and Jeremiah Miller. In back: Assistant Coach Jordan Rode, Timmy Martisko, Garrett Ross, Lance Lindsay, Craig Weaver, Kolton Rush, Nathan Brudnock, Isaac Rizor, Head Coach Jim Romanus, and statistician Brittany Bonnema. Members of the girls team, in front, left to right: Madison Lampe, Mikhayla Post, Coach Jordan Watson, Sarah Courtwright, and McKenna Lampe. Middle: Savannah Phillips. Back row: Brianna Goodwin, Ashley Cumberledge, Marissa Rode, Emily Tedrow, Kaitlyn Rizor, Savannah Pettit, and Jessica Orndoff.

The Jefferson-Morgan Girls Basketball Team made school history when it stood alone as the Section 3A champions for the 2015-16 school year. It was the first time the lady Rockets have garnered this distinction. In front, from left: Leslie White, Jamie Lawrence, Erin Confortini, Anna Mattish, Abby Nelson. Second row: Sadie Fowler, Savannah Saesan, Katey Wolfe, Krista McCartney, Brynn Boyd. Third row: Coach Neimic, Kayla Yorko, Morgan Simkovic, Ally Bogden, Nikki Venick, Erin Sullenbarger, Coach Knisley.

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McCracken Pharmacy

riginally established in 1961 by Jack McCracken, this local drug store has progressed in all the right ways over the years, changing where change was needed while keeping personal service a tradition; very much in keeping with the slogan, “Yesterday’s Service, Today’s Technology.” Now under the ownership of long-time pharmacist, Scott Adamson, who began his relationship with McCracken when he served an internship in 1992. The pharmacy changed hands when Jeff McCracken retired in the fall of 2013; however, “He remains my mentor and consultant,”  Scott says. Scott believes the longevity of McCracken Pharmacy is a result of the quality of people who work there. “We’ve been fortunate to be able to maintain a relatively large staff, and to keep a high caliber of people who are consistent, compassionate and just valuable to our customers, I’m proud to work with the people here,” Scott emphasizes. Today that staff includes 22 people working to serve the needs of McCracken’s customers. McCracken Pharmacy has always been a popular destination for locals looking for meaningful internships, too. Like Mt. Morris native Drew Eddy, a 2008 graduate of Waynesburg Central, who earned a BS in biology and is close to graduation from Pharmacy School at WVU.  McCracken operates efficiently because they do not skimp on personnel. There are four pharmacists on staff in addition to the technicians and support staff - too many

names to mention here - but plenty of familiar faces when you walk through the door of McCracken Pharmacy. All working together to provide that “Yesterday’s Service” you don’t find everywhere.  As for “Today’s Technology,” McCracken Pharmacy has always been a leader in the latest tools and expertise to deliver accuracy and efficiency in filling prescriptions and serving all needs of customers.  That never changes. Just as McCracken was among the very first pharmacies to even use computer technology back in the 1960s, and later the most innovative dispensing systems, our local pharmacy today is helping to pioneer new methods of packaging designed to facilitate and improve accuracy in daily dosing of medications. “We offer innovative blister and strip packaging systems that clearly label and separate medicines for daily doses and help patients and caregivers stay informed and in control,” Scott explains. Particularly useful for those who take multiple doses and meds, this new system is easy to follow and much appreciated by customers. Just one more example of how our iconic “corner drug store” with all the charm of Yesterday’s Service is still a leader in Today’s Technology. Be watching for some bright & cheery differences in the look as McCracken Pharmacy undergoes some new branding this year. You may have already seen the colorful blue logoed delivery van and other renovations in the building on High Street in downtown Waynesburg.

Chili Cook-off in Downtown Waynesburg

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on’t miss The upcoming “Cabin Fever Sunday” chili cook off competition in Downtown Waynesburg on Sunday Feb. 28, 11am-3pm will give winter weary shoppers a chance to socialize while sampling chili and voting for a favorite at participating shops. Voting is done by donating a can of food (benefitting the Corner Cupboard Food Bank). More than a dozen downtown stores will be participating. Sponsored by the Waynesburg Merchant’s Guild, the $5 wristband for the event is a fundraiser for the guild. $5 Wristbands for taste testing are available at all participating merchants. Find out more on Facebook search Waynesburg Merchants Guild.

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Blessing of the Mon

Rabbit Club Attends State Breeders Convention

The Monongahela River blessing is an annual tradition for Father Rodney Torbic of the St. George Serbian Orthodox Church of Carmichaels. Father Torbic has been blessing the river near the Masontown Bridge each January since 1999. Father Torbic, at center, is joined by parishioners for the The Greene County 4-H Rabbit Club atriver blessing that took place on New Years Eve. tended the annual Pennsylvania State Rabbit Breeders Association (PASRBA) Convention, taking home awards in several categories. This year nearly 10,000 entries were exhibited over three days of competition. Pictured in front, from left, Allison Pecjak and Jenna Longstreth. Second row, Johnna Calvert, Cara Longstreth, Ryan Grecoe, Alexus Grecoe and Rachel Courtwright. Alexus won opposite breed in two Chesapeake Regional Dutch Specialty shows along with varieties and opposites in the PASRBA shows. Allison won best of breed with her New Zealand and Jenna took two best of breed titles with the Mid Atlantic Dwarf Hotot Club and a best of breed

Chamber Scholarship

Applications for the 2016 Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce Educational Fund Scholarship are available for download at www.WaynesburgChamber.com. The deadline for entries to be received in the chamber office is no later than 4 pm on April 15.

Carmichaels/Cumberland Township Photographs Needed

A book, being published by Arcadia Publishing for their ‘Images of America’ series, entitled “Around Cumberland Township and CarCould someone contact me about the upkeep of the cemetery on Route 21. I would like to vol- michaels,” is in the works. The book will contain unteer to help with snow removal, flowers, etc. I can be reached at 724-710-5471. Ask for Amy Jo. photos and info on Carmichaels, Ceylon, Little Chicago, Paisley and Stringtown among other areas in the township. Vintage photos predating 1961, along with newspaper articles, postcards,

Upkeep of Cemetery on Route 21 Correction

Incorrect information was provided to the GreeneSaver regarding the director of the Waynesburg University Kiltie Band as published in our January/February edition. The current director of the band is Jeremy Olisar, not Andrew Heisey. Andrew is however a member of the group. Our apologies to Jeremy, who we know to also be an outstanding clarinetist.

Distinguished Alums Sought Westmoreland County Community College is accepting nominations for its 2016 Distinguished Alumnus Award through March 18. This award recognizes and honors WCCC alumni who have distinguished themselves through professional accomplishments, significant community-based service, and support or service to the

college.The award will be presented at the WCCC commencement ceremony on May 13. It is a onetime honor. Self-nominations from alumni will be accepted. Nomination forms may be obtained by visiting www.wccc.edu/distinguishedalumnus or by calling Pam Mowrer, coordinator, WCCC Educational Foundation, at 724-925-4178.

Extended Hours for Gun Permits

with the PASRBA show.

etc. relating to Carmichaels and anywhere in Cumberland Township are being sought. Credit will be given in the book to those who provide photos, clippings, etc. Once completed, the book will be available for sale at Barnes and Noble, Walmart, Amazon.com and local outlets. To contribute to the book, contact Shelley McMinn Anderson at 724-319-2060.

$2000 in Prize Money offered to Local High School Students The latest PAYS survey, taken in 2013, indicated that the most significant risk factor for Greene County students is a belief that laws and norms favor drug and alcohol use;while the most significant prevention factor is a belief that there are too few activities offered that don’t involve drugs and alcohol. In response, a “Judge’s Award” has been established to address these factors by inviting teams of area high school students to submit 3-5 minute videos demonstrating healthy activities available in Greene County that don’t involve drugs or alcohol; and the unhealthy physical and negative legal consequences

of drug and alcohol use. Each high school in the five county school districts may submit a maximum of three entries. The top five submissions will be chosen by a five member panel chaired by Judge Farley Toothman, two Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation board members, and two members from the Community Recovery Committee. Prizes will be awarded for 1st5th place with $125 going to 4th & 5th, $250 to 3rd, $500 to 2nd, and $1,000 to the 1st place team. All submissions must be delivered to the second floor of the Greene County Courthouse by April 1.

The Greene County Sheriff ’s Office has extended office hours for gun permit applications. The office is now open until 6:30pm on the third Thursday of each month. Applications are available on the county’s website and at the sheriff ’s office, located inside the Greene County Courthouse. Due to recently implemented security measures in the courthouse, after-hours applicants must enter the With many layoffs from mine and power plant closures courthouse via the Church Street entrance. FMI 724-627-7207. in Greene County, 2015 Pennsylvania Bituminous Coal Queen Katlyn Allison wanted everyone to know that she has not forgotten that many coal miners are still working 24 hours a day, seven days a week, even when two feet of snow blanket the ground, to The 2nd Annual Kicking Cancer’s Butt Kickball Tournament, hosted by Colby’s Stars Founda- keep the lights on. As the daughter of a former Hatfield Ferry tion, Inc., will take place at the Rices Landing Athletic Club on May 21. Proceeds will benefit local in- Power Plant employee, Katlyn has been deeply impacted by the dividuals who are suffering from cancer. Colby’s Stars Foundation is currently looking for volunteers, cuts in coal and coal-related industries. “When there is two feet kickball teams, Chinese auction items and concession stand donations. FMI contact Carrie Simkovic of snow on the ground I am not worried about the wind or limited sunshine because I get my warmth from the coal mine. Burn at 724-998-5116 or Julie Venick at 724-322-4529. more coal,” Katlyn said. Photo of Katlyn taken by Kim Novak.

Coal Queen Shares Thoughts on Coal Closures

Save the Date for Kicking Cancer’s Butt

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Veterans Affairs Office Wants to Help

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Greene County Historical Society

o begin the museum’s 45th season, the Greene County Historical Society will be hosting the 6th annual Dinner Dance. The Dinner Dance is a banquet to showcase what the Greene County Historical Society has planned for the coming year. It is also an opportunity for the board, staff, and volunteers to meet with the public and join together in eating great food, listening to excellent music, and having an all-around wonderful time. Speaking of music, this year, as in years past, the Swingin’ Bopcats, a classic 18-piece big band, playing the best music of the 1940’s and beyond, will be performing throughout the evening. We will also be joined by Thistlethwaite Vineyards, who will be offering tastings and sales. We will also be having a few opportunities for the public to win various prizes in our Chinese Auction and 50/50 raffle. Every year, we ask the community to donate prizes to be won in our Chinese Auction. Last year, we had over 25 different baskets from various businesses in the community. There will be a display of artifacts showcasing the Gilded Age (1870-1900) in Greene County. This display will be a preview of the first main hall exhibit of this year. The 6th Annual Dinner Dance will be held on Saturday, April 2nd, from 6:00-10:00pm at the National Guard Readiness Center, behind Waynesburg Airport, at 500 EverGreene Drive, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Tickets are $40 per person, and a

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or our public service profile this month we chose the Greene County Veterans Affairs (GCVA) Office. It seems benefits for veterans are quite often called into question. It is no small wonder when veteran’s benefits are primarily based upon when one served. Military service is classified either as wartime or peacetime service. This distinction is important because there are significant advantages specifically accruing only to veterans with wartime service. For example, only veterans with wartime service are eligible for nonservice-connected disability pension benefits, according to GCVA. Fortunately, the staff of the Greene County Veterans Affairs Office is available to help veterans and their families with full access to federal and state benefits for all military, former military, retired military, widows and family members. The GCVA’s office fields hundreds of calls each week from veterans in need of assistance. The staff serves as advocates for veterans by attending veteran’s council meetings, talking with ranking military personnel and speaking at public events. The veteran’s benefits available at the county level include: burial allowance, burial plots, headstones and installation allowances, veterans license plates, flags and emblem markers and assistance with DD-214 protection, among others.

On the state level, benefits include: blind veteran’s pension, emergency assistance, educational gratuity, paralyzed veteran’s pension, real property tax exemption, state veterans home system, and widow’s real property tax exemption. Federal benefits include: disability compensation, eBenefits, education and training, GI Bill, healthcare, life insurance, mortgage delinquency assistance, pension, survivor benefits, VA guaranteed home loans and VetSuccess. One may be eligible for benefits if they are a veteran, veteran’s dependent, surviving spouse, child or parent of a deceased veteran, uniformed service member, present or former reservist or National Guard member. Call or walk in to the office at 22 West High Street, Suite 100, in Waynesburg to see if you qualify and for what benefits. As a convenience to Greene County veterans, special outreaches at senior centers are offered all year long with the dates and locations published on the county website, www.co.greene.pa.us, under the Veterans Affairs Office. The Veterans Affairs Office hours of operation are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday. For more information, call 724-8525272. Veterans in crisis may call the dedicated crisis hotline at 1-800-273-8255 and press one, or text Get Help NOW to 838255.

full table can be reserved for parties of six or more. To make a reservation, contact the museum office at 724-627-3204 or gchsalexandra@gmail.com or visit us at www.greenecountyhistory.org/events/ dinner-dance/. GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2016


Community Foundation of Greene County Gives Back in Monumental Fashion The Community Foundation of Greene County is a philanthropy organization set up “by the community, for the community,” according to executive director Bettie Stammerjohn. The Foundation serves the present needs of Greene County as well as anticipating future needs by raising community capital. The money donors provide to the Foundation is invested and grown, and a portion of the resulting income goes out to support community needs. “You set up a fund, or you give money to a fund, and you can say where you want that [donation] to go,” said Stammerjohn. “You get to choose what need in the community you want to address.” Contributions can be made through giving cash or gifts of stock among other options. For example, people who are at least 70-1/2 years or older can make a charitable distribution directly from their IRA and possibly reduce their tax impact. “We have had donors who have set up funds for their churches, the food bank, the humane society, the library, other nonprofits, as well as for student scholarships,” said Stammerjohn.

The Foundation is using its plentiful resources to address many of the critical needs in Greene County, from child hunger and food security to educational scholarships. CFGC has accumulated over $4 million total in assets – mostly endowments – since its founding in 2000. More than $2 million has gone back out into the community; and although the numbers have not been finalized, an estimated $300,000 in grants was given out in 2015. Stammerjohn hopes that the Foundation will continue to grow and be even more impactful in addressing the needs of the community. Because the funds are invested and only a portion of the income goes out as grants, those funds continue to grow and give back to the community year after year. As it turns out, $2 million can make a large impact; but it is only the beginning for the Community Foundation of Greene County. To find out how you can make a gift to make a difference forever, contact the Community Foundation of Greene County office at 724-6272010, or visit our website www.cfgcpa.org.

BOWLBY BITS Spring Story Time begins March 1 for all ages from babies on the lap to young adults. Please call the Children’s Department for schedule and to register. Essential Oils Informational Meeting for people wanting to improve their health, or the health of their loved ones using essential oils. Local doTerra Oils representative Sandi Queen will present. Thursday, March 3, 5:30pm. FREE and open to the public. Bowlby Book Club - Next meeting is Monday, March 7, 6pm. Discussion on “Testimony” by Anita Shreve. New members welcome! Saint Seuss Party on Friday, March 11, 4-8pm. A combined St. Patrick’s & Dr. Seuss shindig - wear your favorite green clothing & be prepared to eat green food! St. Patrick’s day games and a special edition of Dr. Seuss Jeopardy! Register your family now. Decade Dance - The Teen Advisory Group (TAG) invites all local teenagers (13-18 yrs) to their Decade Dance on Friday, March 11, 8-10pm. Popular dance tunes from the past six decades that will be presented by a Live DJ. $2 admission at door, please pre-register. Board of Trustees Meeting on Monday, March 21, 6:30pm. Community members are encouraged to attend. Movie Night - Wed., March 30, beginning promptly at 5:45pm. Showing Ron Howard’s “In The Heart Of The Sea,” a recounting of a New England whaling ship’s sinking by a giant whale in 1820, an experience that later inspired the great novel Moby-Dick. Seating is limited, call ahead for reservations. Poetry Competition - Greene County citizens are invited to submit original poems for National Poetry Month in April. Prizes will be awarded in the following categories: Kindergarten-2nd Grade; 3rd-5th Grade; 6th-8th Grade; 9th-12th grade; Adults. All entries due by April 1, 2016. Winners will be announced April 14 during a Reading & Awards ceremony at 5:30pm. Free Computer Classes will be offered during March, always on Thursdays from 5:30-6:45pm: How Do I Use This Device? on 3/10, to help with tablets and/or smartphones; Getting Started with a PC on 3/17 for beginners with little or no experience with a computer. Setting Up Email on 3/24 to learn how to create and save documents, work with text, format characters and paragraphs, and print a document. State and Federal Tax forms provided by the federal and state governments are available at the library, provided by the federal and state governments. The library has no control over the quantity of forms available. The IRS provides listings for tax help lines; library staff is not trained to offer tax advice. For more information or to register for any of the above events, please call the Bowlby Public Library in Waynesburg at 724-627-9776.

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More Than a Hobby, Less Than a Job

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by Tara Kinsell

nn Titus Bargerstock of Carmichaels of the shelves so the tea pots are more visible. isn’t sure exactly why teapots speak to Lest one thinks that Annie’s collection is all her so much. Maybe it is her disdain for contained to this one room, that would be incorcoffee, even the smell of it makes her rect. turn up her nose. Perhaps it was her Aunt Ethel’s “I have over 400 of them. There are seasonal tea set that she played with as a little girl, or her ones too. I probably have 50 Christmas tea pots. It mother’s Japanese set that she remembers being dis- got to the point that I couldn’t leave everything out,” played in her mother’s house when she was a child. she said. When “Annie”, as she is known to most, and her late Some will always be on display, like that of a husband, Ken, were married, her mom, Mary Jane, favorite teacher, Evelyn Hartley. When the family packed up that tea set and sent it with her daughter held an auction to close out her estate, Annie was and new son-in-law for their new life together. Or there. maybe, it is simply that Annie loves tea. “Her son, Brice, met me in the kitchen and “There is something very soothing about hot gave it to me,” she said with a clear fondness. tea in a tea pot,” Annie said, surrounded on all four Annie calls her collection, “more than a hobby walls of her living room by floor to ceiling shelves and less than a job.” A smaller collection of spoons and display cases of tea pots of varying sizes and from as far away as the former Yugoslavia takes up shapes. a portion of her kitchen walls also, but it doesn’t It was Ken’s cousin, Joyce Fortney, who may come close by any stretch, to her tea pot collection. have jump started the idea of collecting them, some Maybe the spoons are an offshoot of it, when one 42 years ago when Annie and Ken married. Even thinks of a hot cup of tea being stirred. before Mary Jane gave her daughter the delicate I wondered if there was a favorite among these Japanese tea set, Joyce presented Annie with a deco- tea pots. Although she loves them all, it seemed rative tea pot, as a wedding gift. there was one she held above the rest. It is the tea “Somehow it just took off from there. They just pot that broke her steadfast rule of never spending sort of arrived; they just came to me,” Annie said. more than $10 for one. It helped that Ken was a pack rat. Annie “We were in a hall at the Jacktown Fairgrounds laughed when she talked about Ken and his flea for a Behm’s auction and there was a teapot that bemarketing. longed to John “Goose” Smith, an insurance sales“Kenny was a flea marketer. He loved that stuff. man from Rogersville,” Annie said, tearing up a bit. He dealt in salt and pepper shakers,” she said, not- “Kenny wanted me to have it.” ing it was a sort of currency for him to trade with. The cost he paid for Annie to bring it home “Hardly a week went by that one or two or three of is inconsequential at this point because to her it is them (tea pots) didn’t come home with him. And, priceless. And so, we thank Annie for taking the he always had more tools than any man had a right time to share her stories and beloved collections to. I used to think that was why he came home with with us. We look forward to presenting more treathe tea pots, so I couldn’t say anything about all of sured collections as we continue our series. the tools he brought home.” Looking around the room, she explained how many of the tea pots, not purchased by Ken, did come to her. Each had its own special story of gift exchanges at work, or dear friends and loved ones, several of whom are no longer with us. Of course there are a few in the mix from her children, Matt Bargerstock and Stacy Bargerstock Ross. Annie’s collection includes pots as small as a thimble and others the size of a cookie jar. There were tea pots that would appeal to most anyone’s tastes from cat lovers to Coca Cola fans. There was even a tea pot that looked like a Red Hat Society member. Some served other functions, besides holding tea. There was one that held a candle and another with a clock face on it. A few came from people’s vacations, like the tea pot shaped like playing cards from Las Vegas and of course one in the shape of Mickey Mouse ears. Each are lovingly displayed. A secondary collection of Annie Bargerstock is her spoons from all Ken created steps on top of several over the world.

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Tea pot collector, Annie Bargerstock, of Carmichaels, shows off a tiny portion of her collection.

The tea pots of collector, Annie Bargerstock, are of all shapes and sizes. GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2016


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Stuck Enterprises

s demonstrated by consistent growth and development of new markets over nearly 40 years, the Stuck Family continues to grow Jacobs Petroleum Products and related companies to new heights, and in turn bring valuable services to the communities in which they operate. Jacobs Petroleum Products also operates Oakland Oil & Propane in Maryland, and various commercial fueling sites and retail locations in PA, WV, MD, and OH. The family operations are now all under one corporate umbrella – Stuck Enterprises, Inc. The corporate headquarters proudly remain in Waynesburg, PA, at 1115 East High Street. A recent benefit most notable to Stuck’s clients is the introduction of propane sales by both Oakland Oil and Jacobs Petroleum. Now delivering propane to western Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland and Ohio, Stuck Enterprises is serving a wide range of customers that includes residential, agricultural, commercial, industrial, and drilling industry. Forward thinking and a commitment to the use of clean, economical and domestic energy inspired Stuck Enterprises to add propane distribution. “This is one of our most exciting expansions as we all experience the pride of using a fuel such as propane, which is a byproduct of natural gas refining directly from our area.” said Steve Stuck, President. The Stuck Enterprise operations include: • Bulk Plant Facilities Stuck Enterprises owns two of the most modern and safe bulk plant facilities in the country – the Jacobs Petroleum plant in Waynesburg, PA and the Oakland Oil & Propane plant in Oakland, Maryland. Stuck Enterprises also operates daily from Bulk Plant facilities in Morgantown, WV, Belle Vernon, PA, and Caldwell, OH, which enable the company to provide superior service to residential customers with heating oil, kerosene and propane. The five strategically placed bulk plant locations also allow superior service to its growing wholesale delivery business and managing commercial ac-

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2016

• GreeneSaver

counts such as many gasoline stations. Stuck has also seen impressive growth as one of the region’s preferred providers of fuel and lubricants to the oil & gas industry for drilling and fracking sites. Stuck also provides services and products to excavating, trucking, construction, agriculture and many other industries. • I-79 Exxon, True Convenience Store, Laserwash and McDonald’s Near I-79 in Waynesburg, this super convenient center includes a McDonald’s restaurant with 24 hour dine-in and drive-thru service. Also open 24/7 is the True Convenience store which boasts a huge cooler filled with grab & go bottled waters, energy drinks, soda, fruit juices, dairy and more. The coffee kiosk offers classics and gourmet blends and the Brand New open air cooler which offers a variety of items such as Fresh sandwiches, healthy snacks, deserts, and many other new items. Gasoline and on-road diesel islands with convenient pay-at-the-pump options and the state-of-the-art Laserwash car wash complete the center. • Lone Pine Exxon and Subway Lone Pine Exxon customers enjoy the same great selection as our I79 Exxon with the addition of Hunt Brothers Pizza, or they can choose from the extensive and delicious Subway menu - the best of both worlds. Lone Pine customers can also take advantage our Brand New open air cooler which offers items such as Fresh sandwiches, healthy snacks, deserts, and many other new items. Lone Pine also offers a spacious parking lot and easy in & out fuel pumps for gasoline, plus on-road and off road diesel, open 24/7 right off the Lone Pine Exit of I-79. • Lone Pine Beer The new Lone Pine Beer Store has earned its reputation as the most convenient beer store in Washington County. Sharing the same plaza as the Lone Pine Exxon & Subway, it is right off the Lone Pine Exit of I-79 and stocks over 500 varieties of beer, including seasonal and craft beers, and 12 packs available in many brands. It’s open 7 days a week!

Jacobs Petroleum • Stuck Retail Oakland Oil & Propane

• Grantsville, MD Exxon & Subway Grantsville Exxon customers enjoy a giant beverage cooler, beer cave, and grab-n-go food cooler for quick in and out, or they can choose from the extensive and delicious Subway menu the best of both worlds. Grantsville also offers easy in & out fuel pumps for gasoline, plus on-road and off-road diesel, Open 24/7, right off the Grantsville Exit of I-68 in western Maryland. • Uniontown, PA Exxon & True Convenience Store Uniontown Exxon is conveniently located on the corner of Rts. 40 and 21 in downtown Uniontown. It has the True Brew coffee area, large beverage coolers, and snack options throughout the store. • Commercial Fueling Stations in Waynesburg, Oakland, MD, and Morgantown, WV Located in downtown Waynesburg, on Rt. 21 (High Street) with a Stuck’s Laser Wash right next door; also on Rt. 19 between Mt. Morris and Star City, WV; and in downtown Oakland, MD. All are open 24/7 with gasoline, both on & off road diesel,

and DEF (diesel exhaust fluid). Stuck Enterprises Universal Fleet Card provides access to these locations along with numerous fueling stations nationwide. By consolidating all fuel purchases into one detailed statement, with security and transaction controls in place, business owners or fleet managers can stay in control of spending and economize fuel costs – across the county, the state or the nation. The locations in Morgantown, WV and Oakland, MD also accept bank cards such as Visa, Discover, Mastercard, and American Express. Locally owned and operated, Stuck Enterprises, Inc. continues to grow and invest its resources in our community and beyond. Significant growth, reinvestment and keen management to meet changing demands and tap new opportunities has brought about an evolution in this company that now employs over 100 people. Richard Stuck, CEO and founder, said “I consider the employees and customers of Stuck Enterprises to be our most valuable assets. We could not have grown our business through the years without great employees and loyal customers”.

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GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2016

February / March Greenesaver 2016  

The first of our Growing in Greene Issues for 2016. Learn all about local companies of Greene County and how they got their start. Make it a...

February / March Greenesaver 2016  

The first of our Growing in Greene Issues for 2016. Learn all about local companies of Greene County and how they got their start. Make it a...

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