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COMMUNITY C OMMUNITY MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Yingling Insurance Agency

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ingling Insurance Agency, formed in 2000 by husband and wife Curtis & Brenda Yingling, is an independent agency offering multiple lines of insurance including their primary – Erie Insurance – along with Progressive, Farmers Fire, (L-R) Pam Whyel, Carmichaels office, Marilyn Kurilko, Carmichaels Foremost, AIC, Aegis and others. According to Brenda, Erie continues office, April Sowden, Waynesburg office, Kathryn Waddel, Waynesburg office and owners Brenda and Curtis Yingling. to be a primary choice for customers because the company demonstrates why it plans, the costs and considerations necessary to continues year after year to be rated among the top make informed decisions – that is knowledge that insurance companies by J.D. Powers and Associ- Yingling associates have, and impart to their clients ates for claims and insurance shopping experience. in easy to understand terms. “Erie’s founding purpose is ‘To provide policyholdYingling Insurance Agency operates two ofers with as near perfect protection, as near perfect fices, one in Waynesburg and one in Carmichaels. service as is humanly possible and to do so at the There are four licensed agents in the Waynesburg lowest possible cost,’ that matches our operating office and one licensed agent and a receptionist in philosophy well and is why we are proud to offer the Carmichaels office. Also, a most popular recent Erie Insurance, which typically does prove out to addition to the office crew is “Blue”, a Blue Belton be the best choice for auto, home, renters, business, English Setter (see Blue pictured at left, as he premotorcycle, boat, life and annuities,” she explains. pares to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day). If you surveyed its clients, you would quickly Office hours are Monday-Friday 9-5 with evefind that Yingling Insurance Agency is also distin- nings and weekends by appointment. Brenda inguished from many other agencies because of their vites all those looking for quotes to “Give us a call superior personal service. It takes time and sincere and let us see if we can provide you with the best interest to know customers’ lifestyles, current and insurance at the lowest cost for all your needs.” Call future plans and what their very individual insur- 724-852-2770 for Waynesburg and 724-966-5073 ance needs are – that is time that Yingling associ- for the Carmichaels office. And be sure to follow ates are ready and willing to invest. It takes knowl- Yingling Insurance on Facebook, where Blue will edge of the market, the available coverages and be giving helpful tips and info throughout the year.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


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Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union

he staff of Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union would like to take the opportunity to let you know that we are happy to serve your financial needs! We are conveniently located at 222 Elm Drive, Unit #3. Stop in and ask for one of our Member Service Representatives for any information you may need.  For more than 55 years, Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union has delivered one-on-one service to our members, serving them for generation after generation.  Our credit union is a full-service, federallyinsured financial institution.  The National Federal Credit Union Insurance Fund insures all deposits at our credit union up to $250,000.  Our membership is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Fayette, Washington, and Your friendly customer service representatives at the Waynesburg office of Frick Tri-County FCU are Jessica Greene Counties.  And we have four conveniently located branches – Waynesburg, Uniontown, Reichard, MSR I (seated), back row (l-r) Connie Churchel, MSR II and Danielle Wise, MSR I. Washington, and Charleroi. Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union emmake it possible for you to be a homeowner and ploys 23 full-time staff members and currently manages nearly 84 million dollars in member de- avoid high bank fees. All our mortgages are underposits.  Services include but are not limited to sav- written and serviced locally. And we offer loans for ings accounts, checking accounts, money market marginal credit applicants. If you are looking for a financial institution accounts, certificates of deposit, IRA accounts, and more.  We offer VISA credit cards and debit cards, that offers great personal service, lower rates, and on-line banking, E-statements, and other conve- a variety of financial options, contact us.  Stop in at nient electronic options.  Our lending services pro- one of our convenient locations, visit our website at vide solutions ranging from personal loans, auto www.fricktricountyfcu.org, or call us at 1-800-SAY loans, home equity loans, to first mortgages. We FRICK!

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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I Love this P l a ce

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here’s a sign on Rolling Meadows Road near the Greene County Historical Society that says Bobtown - 20 miles, and you’d better believe it. This scenic, historic drive is long and winding, but worth every mile, as roads once rutted by wagon wheels take you through forgotten towns like Garards Fort where the Reverend Corbly lost members of his family to ambush while walking to church on May 10, 1782. Further on, a sign says Carmichaels - 6 miles. But if you turn right instead of left, you’re six miles from Bobtown, once known as Bob’s Town, named for Robert Mapel. His grandfather Stephen came to the frontier in 1777 and founded nearby Mapletown and Robert developed his share of the family acreage into a pioneer industrial hub that turned into a village bearing his name for the workers who lived there and helped run the mill. When Jones & Laughlin Steel bought nearby land in the first years of the 1920s, the apostrophe “s” was removed and a new generation of immigrant families moved into a new town and a new American way of life. It was a life of hard work, with no guarantee of steady employment, but hundreds of families took their chances, forged a community and learned to care for each other through good times and bad. All those rows of identical houses in Bobtown were built by J&L on 1200 acres known as Sandy Hill. When the company sold the houses to the workers in 1950 and turned the town and its muddy streets over to Dunkard Township, the proud new owners put on additions and covered the plain clapboard exteriors with their own tastes in siding and trims. The war years were over and wages were up. The future was looking better, but they knew from experience that things might change any day. Still, life was good in Bobtown because they had each other’s backs. The town overlooks Dunkard Creek and is three miles from Pt. Marion, on the Monongahela River. Those who built the mines down the hill near the creek lived in tents and bachelor shacks and even the first miners lived in tents in 1926 while their company houses were being built. The battle between the United Mine Workers of America and mine owners over a fair wage for the dangerous, backbreaking work of shoveling coal from the earth into shuttle cars to be hauled by barges to steel mills to build America was ongoing since the 1890s. Bloody strikes over inhumane working conditions were giving way as the 20th century moved past World War I into the modern era of electricity and the automobile. Companies like J&L took advantage of the post war boom, opened new mines and built decent homes for their workers, while fighting hard to keep out the unions and their demands for higher pay. Jobs were scarce and times were still tough for the workingman, so when word got out that a new mine was opening, men began to apply. Many came from Hungary, Russia, Italy, Ukraine and the Slavic states, looking for a better life. Bobtown was a model

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for its day, with indoor plumbing and two-room bungalows, four room two-story houses and a circle of larger houses higher up the hill for company families to rent. The town may have been owned by J&L’s Shannopin Mine Company, but the community was vibrant, neighborly and hard working through years of strikes and layoffs, one lasting from 1934-36 during the Great Depression. Parents learned to speak English from each other and with all their hundreds of kids playing and going to school together, Bobtown was a great place to grow up. When Shannopin mines were producing, there were hundreds of men working. When the economy was down, the work force shrank dramatically. When the mines shut down, only a handful of men were employed to keep the mines dry until the next upswing in the economy. But through it all, most of the men of Bobtown stuck it out, hunted to keep food on the table and went to nearby towns to get what work they could and waited for better times. Author Robert S. Bennett, who grew up in Bobtown and wrote the book ‘The Road to the Top of the Hill” tells many stories that fill in the gaps of what people who still live in Bobtown remember. Bennett, who was born in 1924,writes of his own family’s life and times, when father Stanley followed his brother Slim to Bobtown to work in a mine that was plagued with layoffs, strikes, a depression and some dangerous years as workers crossed picket lines and were blackballed; or honored the picket lines and went into debt with the company for rent and “owed their souls” to the company store for necessities like flour, yeast, sugar and coffee. Bennett’s memories of going to school in patch clothes, clean but worn, of foraging for berries and nuts, hunting to bring home rabbits, squirrels and deer for the family table and being quarantined at home during the scarlet fever epidemic of 1938, paint a picture that is as real as it gets about the will to survive and have a better life no matter what. People who still live in Bobtown remember those days as well. “We kids were always outside and we played so many games. We didn’t have money but we made things up to do, mostly with sticks. We tied tin cans to our feet and walked around and thought it was fun,” Andy Garnek remembers. “My dad came here in 1937 and I was born in 1939. I was ashamed of my patch clothes but now I see kids going to school with holes in their jeans to be fashionable and I have to laugh.” Shannopin mine finally closed in 1993, leaving behind a community of children and grandchildren of miners who spent their lives working hard for the American dream of a better life. Bobtown is now a bedroom community for those who work elsewhere but still love the warmth of the community they grew up in. Their houses sport cheerfully decorated front yards and a sense of pride can be felt in the little details of life here. The town’s honor roll celebrates the bravery of the men and women who served their coun-

BOBTOWN, PA

by Colleen Nelson

try in war and the Shannopin Civic club, surrounded by old oak trees next door to the post office has served the community since it was built in the early years of the town when wives, including those who lived in the “Circle” of management houses sponsored fund raisers, put on plays, played bingo, started a library and did charitable work for their neighbors to help them through the hard times. Cyril Wecht, famed coroner of Allegheny County known for his critique of the Kennedy assassination, came to visit his hometown in September 2016 and the Mapletown band and cheerleaders joined law enforcement officers, county commissioners and Representative Pam Snyder welcomed him at a reception at the civic club. Commissioner Blair Zimmerman presented him with a made-in-Greene-County-

Frank “Scrubby” Wozniak, who entered the Shannopin mine at age 12 in 1929, is representative of the classic coal miner of the day and time in Bobtown. This photo was taken circa 1970 in the foreman’s office, though Scrubby spent most of his time below ground. “He started young when his little boy’s body could mine coal from places a grown man couldn’t fit,’ says his daughter, Juliann Wozniak, “As a foreman, he was a stickler for safety. He would be the first person to enter the mine and go around tapping the roof with a sounding stick to make sure it was safe for the crews,” she adds. Scrubby Wozniak worked for 50+ years at Shannopin Mine, until it was closed and the job was no more. “My dad was a walking, talking encyclopedia of mining technology,” recalls Julieann, who shared this and many other photos for our feature - she is a self-proclaimed “Bobtown Fanatic”.

The “Bobtown Bulldogs” originated as an adult Men’s baseball team. Today the mascot lives on as a little league team, photo supplied by Julieann Wozniak. GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


crock with a sketch of Shannopin Mine on it, showing the shuttle cars and old buildings where hundreds of miners once worked. “It was a lot of fun and Cyril said ‘I’ve been greeted by many people but the people of Bobtown brought me home’,” civic club president Denise Desmot remembered, as she took a break from making this year’s massive quantities of pierogies for sale, just in time for Lent. The annual pierogi sale is a big deal in Bobtown. “My best memories are that there were so many kids The crock made for Cyril Wecht depicting my age to play with and we the Shannopin Mine. stayed outside until curfew. We played hopscotch and whiffle ball and the teeter-totter in the playground was broke so we used the rail for a balance beam. We had fun and now those of us still here still have fun working together. My mom belonged to the civic club and so do I.” Denise gestured to the shirt she was wearing. “This is her lucky bingo shirt and I still wear it in her memory.” Healthcare in Bobtown was once part of mining life, with a company doctor living in House two in the Circle and the company paying for vaccinations for the children for diphtheria, typhoid and other communicable diseases, then taking the cost out of their father’s pay in weekly increments. But this end of the county didn’t have adequate health care until Lydia Aston of Greensboro helped bring in doctors and dentists to town through the National Health Services Corporation in the 1970s and opened a clinic in the building what was once the old St. Ignatius Church. The clinic offered both dental and regular health care and the old church added a special touch to visits, recently retired Cornerstone Care director Bob Mt. Joy remembers. “You could sit in the dentist’s chair and look out a stained glass window.” Within a year the clinic and Mt. Joy as its new director moved to Greensboro, changed its name to Cornerstone Care and the old church eventually became a private residence.

The new St. Ignatius Church on Grant Street was built in 1975 as they want, “ he admitted with a grin as he dug into his meal afand for years was a community force to be reckoned with. Most of terwards while sharing his memories of growing up in Bobtown and the miners were Catholic and the parish offered what families needed having to move away to find work. “Now that I’m retired I’m back. through layoffs, funerals, festivals and the spiritual celebrations of Yeah, I love this place.” marriage, confirmations, fish fries and bingos. It drew the community together to share the happiness of living in communal grace. “We used to make so many pierogies for Lent and we women worked all day making them,” Mary Ference, age 86 remembers. “Now the pierogies are being made at the Shannopin Civic Club and I’m happy about that. I can’t stand on my feet that long any more, but I told them I’ll be up to see how they’re doing.” Now St. Ignatius hosts a cheerful band of seniors, children of those first families of Bobtown, who meet every Tuesday at their Community Action sponsored Senior Center to socialize, catch up on community happenings and play bingo before taking a break at noon to salute the flag, say grace and eat a healthy lunch. “Shush!” center regular Kitty Friend told this reporter as she interviewed Andy Gresnek at a back table about some of the inventive games kids used to play “back in the day” – a tale Last year, fourth grade students at Bobtown Elementary School participated in an Artist in Residency program through the Pittsburgh Center for Arts which resulted in the design and construction of a 15’x5’ ceramic tile, that had both of them laughing. “We’re trying to read announcements up here! covered bridge display. Laura Jean McLaughlin, the participating PCA artist, assisted students with this project And remember – don’t talk during that now hangs in the hallways of the elementary school. This opportunity was provided through a Community Foundation of Greene County educational grant, EITC, which was funded by the EQT Corporation. Some of the bingo!” Bobtown Elementary 5th graders, now, point to their favorite parts of the mural they helped make that tells the Meals on Wheels are delivered to world why they love Bobtown, for its history, its environment and especially for what they can learn in school. shut-ins by volunteers like Jack Kovalic From left, Braden Nicklow, Alexzanderia Courtwright, Felicia Ross and Emil Enoff. who took special valentines treats to the people on his list along with lunch before making it back to eat his own lunch on February 14. “They really like the company and I stay to talk as long

Making pierogies at the Shannopin Civic Club (l-r) Denise Desmet, Club President; Leslie Namet of Dilliner, Laura Sarapa, “church lady”

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Knights Farm Supply

ark your calendars now for the Annual Spring Open House at Knight’s Farm Supply in Glen Easton, West Virginia: March 23, 24 & 25. Folks from three states come to Knights for some of the best pricing of the year and excellent financing opportunities on tractors, implements, equipment and everything else a busy farmer or gardener needs to get ready for spring (plus door prizes all weekend and some mighty tasty food and refreshment on both Thursday & Friday!) It’s a great opportunity to see new models and talk to factory reps, even watch demos. Knight’s has recently added several new product lines, including Blue Diamond attachments, Wheatheart Post Drivers and Generac generators. And during Open House Knight’s offers 10% off all parts for equipment and implements from New Holland & Massey Ferguson, Krone, Woods, Echo, Shindiawa, Land Pride, and others. If you’re thinking about buying a new tractor, or any equipment, the inventory of both new and used is at a high just for this event – it’s the best time of the year to make your deal. Spring Open House also brings discounts on supplies like New Holland & Massey Ferguson oil, baler twine, net wrap and sileage wrap, wire, fence supplies and more. The poplar 1X6X16 fence boards will be on sale and yellow pine fence posts (4-5X7) will be offered for $7.69. You can’t find a better source of livestock feeds, supplements and

show supplies than Knights, including Weavers, Purina, Nutrena, Moormans and now Kalmbach feeds too. Everyone’s feeling spring in the air – so Knight’s will be well stocked on all farm and garden supplies including seed potatoes, vegetable and flower seeds, all types fertilizers and tools. Knights is a full line Muck Boot dealer, too – with all styles and sizes for the whole family, even the Muck Met Guard boots for coal miners. “A lot of people take advantage of the deals and plan to purchase during Open House,” says Missy Knight, “But our efforts don’t end there. Our customers expect a high level of service and we take pride in our ability to accommodate their needs all the time – especially during their peak seasons. We strive to keep our inventory of equipment, parts and supplies ready for their needs all year. The Open House is really just our chance to say THANK YOU to our loyal customers…please come and enjoy it.” Don’t wait to order your parts – you can call your parts order in early, and they’ll have it ready for pick up at Open House with the 10% discount. Call 304-845-1525 or 304-686-2525 or email your parts order to missy@knightsfarmsupply.com. Then plan to come Thursday March 23 8am-6pm, Friday, March 24 8am-6:30pm or Saturday March 25, 8am-12:30pm, to Knight’s Farm Supply on Fork Ridge Road, Glen Easton, WV.

Padgett Business Services

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adgett Business Services prepares income tax returns for individuals and business returns for sole proprietors, partnerships, corporations, farms and non-profits. Padgett provides financial reporting and tax consulting services, payroll services, preparation and filing of payroll taxes and sales tax. Padgett also works with individuals to calculate estimated tax on gas leases, royalty and right of way payments. Ami Cree has been the owner of Padgett Business Services and a Registered Tax Return Preparer since June 2002. She is a 1989 graduate of Bethlehem-Center High School, earned both her Master’s and Bachelor’s Degrees from Waynesburg College. Prior to opening Padgett, Ami worked at Ellis & Everard for eight years where she was promoted from accounts payable administrator to accounting manager to assistant controller. She taught numerous evening classes at Westmoreland County Community College. Ami resides in Khedive with her husband Bill, a third generation dairy farmer, and their three children, Al, Beth and Ani. Ami enjoys volunteering at school activities and her business proudly sponsors numerous Greene County events. Toby Whipkey, a 1991 graduate of West Greene High School, earned her Associate’s Degree in Executive Office Administration from Penn Commercial. Toby has worked at Padgett for four years. She is a Registered Tax Return Preparer and manages the administrative functions. She also does client payroll, payroll taxes and bookkeeping. Previously, Toby served Washington Federal for twelve years as

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a Senior Loan Processor in Residential Lending and as a Senior Loan Closer. Toby resides in West Greene with her husband Jim, owner of Scotty’s Pizza, and their two children, London and Pieper. Charlotte McMillan is a 1967 graduate of Canon McMillan High School. Charlotte has worked at Padgett for three years. She is a Registered Tax Return Preparer and does client bookkeeping. She resides in West Greene with her husband, William. Together they operated a small business, Railroad Repair. Charlotte was employed by Catholic Charities as a Secretary for fifteen years, and also volunteered for the Greene County Food Bank for 15 years. She raised 3 children and has eight grandchildren. Padgett staffs three additional employees during the busy tax season, Beverly Arthur, Johnny Hair and Derek Hermann. To have your income taxes filed or to see how Padgett can help improve your business, call Waynesburg 724-627-3800 or Carmichaels 724-3192274. Both offices are IRS approved to e-file and provide friendly, affordable services! GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

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by Colleen Nelson

hen miner John Rohulick of Czechoslovakia came to Bobtown in 1926 he was looking for a job in the brand new Shannopin Mine. But from the beginning, mine work “was not steady”, so he set about buying a piece of land from Henry Linton just outside of town and built a two-story mercantile building that would house his family as well. When finished, John quit the mines, moved his growing brood out of their company house on Duff Street and opened for business. And what a business it was! The signs on the store windows only tell part of the story. There was a pool table but the idea of a bowling alley was a bit of a stretch, granddaughter Julieann Wozniak admits. “The family lived upstairs and my mother Julia was born in that bedroom,” Julieann said, pointing to a window on the left. What about the bowling alley? – well, “it was one of those neat old machines that you put a nickel in, got a ball and knocked down metal pins. I really wish I still had it!” But grandfather John sold the bowling alley to a business in Pt. Marion, and when he died, his old store building was leased to the Polish American Club. The club bought it outright in 1970 and turned it into a gathering place to eat, drink, socialize and remember the good old days at Shannopin Mine. Later, the building was torn down and the new club was built at the bottom of the hill before you drive past today’s “Welcome to Bobtown sign.” The club offers karaoke nights, fish fry nights, dances and a chance to watch games together on big screen TVs. But when John Rohulick opened his doors in the late 1920s, the good old days were in full swing and Rohulick’s Hall was the place to buy groceries, dance, shoot pool, drink in the saloon, gather for church services (yes…really), have local meetings and, in time, it became the UMWA union hall after the unionization of Shannopin Mine workers. This photo of Rohulik’s Hall, circa 1930s, came from the archives of the Shannopin Civic Club. The source of the information provided here is from The Story of Bobtown, The Road to the Top of the Hill by Robert S. Bennett.

Julieann Wozniak, granddaughter of John Rohulik, shared this photo. It is a picture of her mother and aunt (Julie and Olga Rohulik, John’s daughters) standing in front of the store. Julieann’s mom is holding Sarge, the family dog.

After Rohulik’s Hall was sold to the Polish America Club, it was later razed and another building took its place at the foot of the hill, still in use today. This wide angle shot catching the front of today’s Polish American Club also shows a good view of some the row houses still common today in many small coal towns.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Bobtown United Methodist Church

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t is a church on top of a hill – Sand Hill, that is, in Bobtown, near the circle where the bosses for the Shannopin Mines once lived. Surrounded by old pine trees, the white steeple of the Bobtown United Methodist Church seems to touch the heavens. Across the parking lot, its more modern community center serves up community dinners and seasonal activities that are just as welcome in the neighborhood as what happens across the street at the Shannopin Civic Club. Self described “Church Lady” Laura Sarapa was all smiles as she left the Civic Club after an afternoon of making pierogies for the club’s Lenten fundraiser and stood on the lawn of the Methodist Church, hands outstretched. It is volunteers like Laura and other church regulars Laura Sarapa in front of Bobtown United Methodist Church who live in and around Bobtown who make the community one big pierogies at the civic club in the tradition begun by happy family. “We serve home cooked dinners once the Catholic women who once made them. Then a month to anyone who can come and we deliver to she, like Kitty, go to the Methodist community those who can’t make it,” Laura said. She knows her building to make soup for soup sales the first Frineighbors. When not busy at work or at her hair day of the month from October until March, maksalon, Laura’s Impressions, she devotes her time to ing sure quarts of soup, homemade bread and tasty making her town a good place to live. baked goods are delivered to those who no longer In the early days, Bobtown miners and man- get out and about. agement families alike were forced to go beyond “We have a before school picnic every year in town limits to go to church on Sunday. Protes- August for the kids, from pre-school to high school. tants went to old colonial churches like Paw Paw We have picnic food and a balloon release and evChurch on Davistown Road and Catholics went to ery kid gets school supplies.” Kitty Friend said. “It’s St. Nicholas Church in Newtown. The first St. Igna- a lot of fun.” tius of Antioch was built in 1928 and Protestants Pastor Ed Hanley drives from his home near began meeting in the coal company’s Show Hall Rogersville to tend to his flocks in Garards Fort when it was built that same year. When the Great UMC and Bobtown UMC, and when it comes to Depression hit in 1929, plans were shelved to build doing big happy events for nearly every season, it’s a Protestant church, but finally in 1938 everybody, those church ladies and their husbands and neighincluding members of St. Ignatius, got together bors who pitch in to get the job done - and have a and, using recycled materials and donated labor, darned good time doing it. built Bobtown Methodist Church. You can visit Bobtown UMC for regular weekThat spirit of community is still alive and well. ly services at Sunday mornings at 9:30 for Sunday Kitty Friend, who volunteers at the Senior Center at School and 10:30 for worship service. Father Holpp St. Ignatius, is active in her Methodist church, help- of St. Ignatius of Antioch will welcome you to their ing with funeral dinners, soup sales, setting up to regular weekly services on Saturday evenings at bring Santa in at Christmas, and making the church 5pm and Sunday mornings at 10am. basement scary for Halloween. Laura Sarapa makes

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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Clay-Battelle Health Services Association

lay-Battelle Health Services Association Welcomes Back Familiar Faces The Clay-Battelle Health Services Association (C-BHSA) is excited to welcome back two physicians to its medical staff: Wade Harvey, MD, and Bill Minor, DO. Both worked previously for the C-BHSA. They are joining Larissa Fordyce, MD, Aaron Hoekje, PA-C, Andrea Hoekje, PA-C, and Megan Moore Curry, PA-C, in providing family medical care, across all age groups and income. Wade returns to both the Clay-Battelle Community Health Center and Community Health Center of NE Wetzel County after a 2 year absence. A native of Preston County, WV, Wade did his training at West Virginia University, where he served as Chief Resident. Bill, a Greene County native who was the solo medical practitioner at the Community Health Center of NE Wetzel County until the early 90’s, trained at the WV School of Osteopathic Medicine in Lewisburg, WV. He will also maintain office hours at both health centers. Both physicians are board certified in family medicine and bring several years of experience to our practices. The health centers (Clay-Battelle Community Health Center in Blacksville and Community Health Center of NE Wetzel County in Burton) recently received recognition from the National Committee for Quality Assurance as Patient Centered Medical Homes. Both health centers were recognized at the highest level.

FEBRUARY / MARCH

GreeneScene by Amy Duout

With its continued focus on patient centered health care, the Clay-Battelle Health Services Association (CBHSA) is also adding behavioral health to its list of available services. Dental services are provided by Tara Hilleary, DDS, Julie Gamble Goist, DDS, (also a Greene County native), and Loniann Wallman, RDH. Clay-Battelle Health Services Association strives to make treatment as accessible as possible. “We see patients from West Virginia and Pennsylvania, and offer a sliding fee scale for patients with limited incomes,” Janice Morris, CEO explains. “We also have a mileage Wade Harvey, MD, and William Minor, DO, “new” physicians at Clay-Battelle Health Services Association. reimbursement program to assist low income patients in getting to their appointments. Evening the best health outcomes.” hours are available to make it as accessible and conClay-Battelle Health Services Association has venient as possible, and Saturday appointments are been a provider of family medical and dental care available for medical services at the Clay-Battelle in northern West Virginia and southwestern PennCommunity Health Center.” sylvania since 1973, offering residents from both “When you walk into our health centers, you’re states convenient, affordable, quality healthcare. A not just a number,” Janice notes. full service retail pharmacy, Clay-Battelle Pharmacy, Patients at Clay-Battelle Health Services Asso- is located next door to the Clay-Battelle Community ciation are “at the center of what we do. You can ex- Health Center in Blacksville, and C-BHSA patients pect us to use current technology and clear commu- may qualify for significant discounts on prescription nication to help you make the best choices to achieve medications if they are uninsured.

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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Roman’s Acupuncture & Wellness Center

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believe that everything happens for a reason. If I hadn’t been so sick when I was young, my life might not have turned out the way it has.” This pragmatic philosophy from Stacy Roman not only encouraged the creation and development of her successful business, Roman’s Acupuncture & Wellness Center, but helped shape her life. From about the age of 12, Stacy experienced near-constant colds and flu-like symptoms, chronic fatigue and low white blood cell count. The cause of her suffering was unknown, and went undiagnosed by the legion of doctors she and her parents visited. The consensus of the medical practitioners fell along the lines of “We don’t know what’s causing this, and we don’t know how to fix it. Try something else.” That’s what they did. Her open-minded parents sought the help of an acupuncturist, and Stacy experienced a nearly-miraculous recovery from all symptoms. The experience made a lasting impact, igniting a passion for healing that has made Roman’s Acupuncture & Wellness a major center for “alternative medicine” therapies throughout southwestern Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia, and drawing clients from as far away as Maryland, Ohio and beyond. Stacy’s twenty years of experience in health care have earned her a variety of credentials, including being a licensed massage therapist and a licensed acupuncturist. She has received a Health Sciences degree, a Masters of Oriental Medicine degree, is certified in Injection Therapy, and is a member of the American Pregnancy Association, specializing in infertility. Clients find effective solutions at Roman’s for many conditions, among them chronic pain, allergies, digestive problems, sleep problems, skin conditions, chronic illnesses like fibromyalgia, diabetes and arthritis to name just a few. Weight loss remains very high on the list of successful treatments, influencing the recent decision to add two new services. The VelaShape® and UltraShape® - new technology designed to reduce fat or cellulite, help shape and sculpt the body. The VelaShape, which has been used by Kim and Khloe Kardashian, enables you to safely achieve a toned, contoured and wellshaped body in typically three treatment sessions; making you look and feel more youthful. The technology combines infrared light, bipolar radio frequency energy and vacuum, which cause deep heating of the fat cells, their surrounding connective tissue and the underlying dermal collagen fibers. This type of efficient heating and vacuum stimulates the growth of new and better collagen and elastin which results in localized reduction in skin laxity, body volume, and an overall improvement in skin structure and texture. It provides dramatic results without downtime or significant discomfort. “Most patients find VelaShape comfortable and describe the treatment as feeling like a warm deep-tissue massage. The treatment parameters are easily adjusted to ensure a comfortable treatment experience,” Stacy explains. The UltraShape technology added at the same time is a non-invasive, body-shaping procedure that uses focused, pulsed ultrasound for selective fat destruction. The UltraShape procedure targets and instantly destroys stubborn fat, without discomfort or downtime. UltraShape delivers ultrasound energy directly into the stubborn fat below your skin’s surface, stresses the fat cell membranes, causing them to rupture, while leaving the surrounding skin, nerves and blood vessels unharmed. The UltraShape procedure is a pleasant, relaxing experience. Since it’s nonsurgical, the process is completely free of anesthetics or incisions. Traditional acupuncture services remain in high demand at Roman’s. In use for, literally, millennia, acupuncture works by helping regulate the flow of a body’s natural energy by stimulating precise points under the skin with special needles no thicker than a human hair. These needles, which are used only once and then discarded to insure sterility, are so thin that they do not even cut the skin to penetrate it as, for example, a hypodermic needle must do; rather, they spread apart the skin cells to allow the needle to do its work. Effective

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for treatment of chronic pain, high blood pressure, weight loss, stress, infertility and much more, acupuncture is a safe, effective technique, appropriate for all ages. For those among us who may have reservations about needles, Roman’s is providing, “Light Photon-Cold Laster” therapy. This device uses a low-level laser light to target acupuncture trigger points, similar to regular acupuncture, but with no needles. It can also be used for broad coverage of tissue with infrared or red light photons to reduce pain and stimulate healing, help relieve a host of skin conditions, and much more. Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (MHBOT), also a specialty at Roman’s, is a medical treatment in which a person is exposed to increased atmospheric pressure inside an inflatable chamber. The increase in pressure allows more oxygen to reach the cells in the body, which has many healing and therapeutic benefits. MHBOT accelerates cellular renewal, decreases swelling and inflammation, and increases the body’s ability to fight infections. Used to treat a variety of conditions, the increase in cellular oxygen can be especially beneficial for cancer or stroke patients, and those diagnosed with autism. In addition to the many methods that help alleviate the chronic ailments noted above, Roman’s also offers many custom-designed weight loss programs, using a variety of therapies that can fit any lifestyle or budget. This brief overview is just a small sample of the various treatments available at Roman’s. There are also detoxifying foot baths, advanced allergy therapeutics, an infrared sauna, massage therapy, yoga classes, and more. With compassionate care for the whole body and mind, instead of masking symptoms, Roman’s treats the source. “As a result of having health issues early in life, I want to help others heal, as well as prevent health conditions before they develop. With more and more health issues and concerns being diagnosed in today’s world, my goal is to offer a relaxing and safe environment to support the community and offer services that allow for healing in the most natural way possible,” Stacy says. To learn more about Roman’s Acupuncture & Wellness Center, call (304) 322-0093, or visit www.romansacupuncture.com.

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Community Foundation of Greene County

ou can give more for less and make a big difference. Using IRA Charitable Transfers can qualify for tax-free charitable distributions for senior citizens. The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) can help you connect to the causes you care about most. You can set up a charitable fund in your name, make a gift to an existing fund or make an unrestricted gift. Giving is one of life’s pleasures; we can help you enjoy it today. Did you know that American seniors can now make the gift of a lifetime by giving their IRAs to charity without federal tax penalty? Your retirement funds can go further than ever before. As part of the PATH Act, Americans age 70½ and older can make tax-free IRA contributions directly to public charities such as CFGC. The law permits individuals to transfer any amount - from $1 up to $100,000 - from individual retirement accounts directly to a qualifying charity without the transferred assets considered as income for federal tax purposes. By giving your gift through CFGC you can use your gift to meet ever-changing community needs—including future needs that often cannot be anticipated at the time your gift is made. Your gift can target the causes and programs you care about most. CFGC understands our community’s most pressing issues and can help you establish a fund to make an impact in areas of need or opportunity

that are important to you. CFGC will invest your gift for long-term growth and issue grants to your favorite cause on a regular basis. Here are four great ways to turn your IRA into community good by making a gift to an existing fund or to establish a new fund, such as: Unrestricted Fund—Address a broad range of current and future needs. CFGC evaluates all aspects of community well-being and awards grants to local projects and programs. Field of Interest Fund—Target gifts to the cause most important to you: arts, education, youth welfare, animal services, environmental issues and more. CFGC awards grants to community organizations and programs addressing your special interest area. Designated Fund—Support the good work of a specific nonprofit organization—a senior center, church or any qualifying nonprofit charitable organization. Scholarship Fund—Support students as they attend school and expand their learning and career opportunities. Scholarships can support children attending pre-kindergarten programs or private K-12 schools; as well as those planning to attend post-secondary schools such as college or technical schools. There is so much more we’d like you to know. To learn more, contact Bettie Stammerjohn by email at cfgcpa@gmail.com, or phone 724-6272010, or visit our website at http://cfgcpa.org

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Waynesburg University Students assist program attendees with homework

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by Tyler Whipkey

Cool “After” School

very Monday through Thursday, from Mid-September through April, the Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach (GWCO) operates an AfterSchool Program. This program provides students from Waynesburg Central Elementary with homework help, a bible lesson, free play, and a snack. The program is staffed mostly by college students from Waynesburg University. “I started back in January of 2015. I absolutely love working with the kids, so I knew right away I wanted to be there all four days of the week,” says Dave Sullivan, a Waynesburg University student from Pittsburgh, and Site Coordinator of the Program. “I didn’t know until I met the kids how addicting it would be…I’ll continue to be there as long as I possibly can while I am here at Waynesburg,” Dave adds, admitting that the program is so important to him that he schedules his own classes around it. The After-School Program provides an opportunity for all Waynesburg University students to volunteer and interact with students; the main volunteers are Bonner Scholars and Freshman Education students. Volunteers assist the students with homework, also during snack time and supervise free play time. “I believe this program fulfills a great need in the

community because it provides a safe space for students to complete their homework and grow closer with God. Students have the opportunity to increase their academia as well as their friendships with one another. The students can sometimes be a little chaotic but they are loved and cared for so much by the volunteers and the students are very appreciative of the program as well,” states Amy Smith, Senior WU Secondary Education Biology major from Akron, Ohio; and the Program’s Kitchen Coordinator for the past three years. While the University students are key to its operation, Dave is quick to credit the real source of the program’s success: “It would be nothing without Ashley Beaman, the program director for GWCO, she is just amazing all the way around. The work and dedication she puts in is impressive. I know she is a great role model and mentor for the kids, and also for me…” Dave vows with enthusiasm. In addition to the After-School Program, Ashley Beaman, as Director of the Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach, also organizes the GWCO Summer Day Camp and the West Sides Youth Program. Amy Smith also has nothing but praise for Ashley: “Ashley Beaman … has done a tremendous job of working with the students and making this program great. If Ashley was

not here I don’t know what we would do! She is such a blessing to the community and to the kids. In his 3rd year pursuing a double major of Criminal Justice and Psychology and a minor in Child Development, Dave Sullivan will likely spend one more year at Waynesburg University. “That is completely alright with me because that is an extra year I get to be with GWCO and these kids,” he beams. “You know how, when you are feeling down, people will tell you to ‘think about a happy place’….well the GWCO Afterschool program is my happy place, and I think it always will be.” The Greater Waynesburg Christian Outreach is located in West Waynesburg on Jennings Avenue. The After-School Program serves Waynesburg Central Elementary students in Kindergarten through fifth grade runs Mon-Thurs, 3:15- 5:30pm. The Program is for. Students ride the school bus to the site and are picked up by parents at the end of the day. There is a $25 registration fee for the program per school year. If you are interested in learning more information about the Program or if you would like to volunteer, contribute, or donate call Director Ashley Beaman at 724710-1393 or email ashley.gwco@gmail.com.

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Scholarship Seminar The Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) will host a Scholarship Information Seminar on Tuesday, February 28, 6pm, at the Foundation’s conference room, 106 E. High St., Waynesburg. The seminar is open to Greene County students and their parents. CFGC will share application guidelines for 14 different scholarships offered through the Foundation. Other local scholarship providers will also share guidelines, including The Greater Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary Club of Waynesburg, Greene County Association of School Retirees, and Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation. There are many opportunities for students in Greene County to secure scholarships. Not all scholarships are for students with the top grades, nor just for students with the highest financial need. If you don’t ap-

ply, you won’t receive an award. Please pre-register by calling the CFGC office 724-627-2010, or email cfgcpa@gmail.com.

Waynesburg Chamber Scholarship The Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce is now accepting applications from Greene County graduating seniors for the 27th Annual Chamber of Commerce Scholarship to be awarded this May in the amount of $1,500. Winner will also receive a laptop, compliments of PC-

Got A GreeneScene? GreeneScene Community Magazine encourages our readers to keep their smart phones and cameras ready to snap pictures of the sights, scenes, activities and beauty of Greene County and surrounding area! Then submit your photos for consideration as GreeneScenes inside the magazine, or even a Front Cover shot! We’re looking for photos that depict the good life we live and the natural beauty that surrounds us here. Nature, people, pets, scenic views, community activities…our small towns and country lanes, farms and woods and creeks – there are plenty of opportunities for GreeneScenes. If your photo submission is selected as a GreeneScene Magazine Front Cover, you will receive a free GreeneScene T-shirt and $25! Pictures that appear inside the magazine as GreeneScenes will earn the photographer a free t-shirt…and the privilege of seeing your picture in the area’s most popular publication.

squared in Waynesburg. Completed applications must be received by 4pm 4/17/17. Applications are available online at www.waynesburgchamber. VFW Post 4793 in conjunction with Greene com . FMI 724-627-5926 or email info@waynesCounty Veteran’s Club and the County of Greene burgchamber.com. has announced an effort to bring the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall to Greene County. Plans are underway for the memorial wall to be at the Greene County Fairgrounds Sep 28 – Oct. 2, 2017, on display 24 hours a day. The traveling al information and letters of recommendation. wall is a 3/5 scale of the Vietnam Memorial in Applications with complete details are available Washington D.C. It stands 6 ft. tall at center and at the five area high schools, GCCTC and Open covers almost 300 ft. in length. It was created for Door Christian, or by calling 724-627-5926. The the purpose of healing and providing opportudeadline to apply is 5/19/17. nity to pay tribute to loved ones and all veterans past and present, without the need to travel to Washington D.C. The exposition will attract regional visitors from all surrounding communities in Southwestern PA and northern WV. According to Rick Black of VFW Post 4793, poems to the library during the month of March. Awards will be granted in the following competi- chairman of the effort, this massive undertaking tion categories: Kindergarten-2nd Grade; grades is requiring the combined efforts of sponsors, 3-5; grades 6-8; grades 9-12; and adults. All en- volunteers, companies and citizens. He has antries must be submitted by April 1. FMI call 724- nounced a fund raising goal of $20,000 to defray 627-9776.

We’re looking for colorful, candid shots that celebrate the season. Photos must be of good quality, high resolution and properly submitted by the person who took the picture online at www.greenescenemagazine.com or by email to info@greenescenemagazine.com. Name of photographer, address, phone and date and location of picture must accompany all submissions. Submission implies permission to publish and treat photos (crop, resize, enhance, etc.). Submissions may kept under consideration for up to 12 months.

Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall

Rotary Scholarships The Rotary Club of Waynesburg offers two $1,000 scholarships, open to graduating high school seniors who reside in Greene County. Applicants must provide a brief essay, 400 words or less, on what the Rotary motto, “Service Above Self ” means to them, along with addition-

National Poetry Month National Poetry month is coming up in April, so the Eva K. Bowlby Public Library is holding a Poetry Competition! Greene County citizens are invited to participate by submitting original

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the cost of travel expenses for moving the wall, 24 hour security, restroom facilities at the site, advertising, special lighting and other expenses. Anyone can support the effort with a tax deductible contribution at any level and/or by volunteering to help in the planning, fund raising and execution. For more information on how you as an individual, your organization, company, school or church can help, or to learn more about the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall effort, please call Rick Black at 724-998-0598.

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Little Shop in the Woods

ust this past December, Little Shop in the Woods opened its doors and welcomed Greene County residents looking for unique and custom created decor, furniture and gifts. The shop’s location is easy for those familiar with the former Smitty’s Auto Service, which shared the same address at 164 Browns Road near Jefferson. We’ll explain Sampling of the type of goodies you can find at Little Shop in the Woods more about that in a minute. Owner Leslie Smith says her love of antiques came from her mother who ly an appropriate choice with the tree lined driveway loved to go to flea markets and garage sales search- that leads to the shop. In fact, Leslie’s young granding for great treasures. “My mother had the ability children have called the bottom of the driveway “the of looking at something that others may consider tree tunnel.” junk and see its possibilities. I learned from her The shop carries a mix of new and vintage that it doesn’t take a lot of money to have a beauti- farmhouse style furniture, hand painted wood signs, ful home, it just takes imagination” reflected Leslie. wreaths, and Swarovsky crystal jewelry. In addition A retired teacher, Leslie began making there are a variety of gift items from crocheted hats Swarovsky jewelry and wreaths and selling them for children to aromatic candles, fairy houses and from her home. Soon, her creativity was taking garden items. up a lot of room in her home, so she convinced her “I try to find and make unique items that I husband, Will Smith (aka the Subaru Man – now would display in my own home. So whether you’re retired) to give up part of his building so she could shopping for a piece of jewelry, a gift or something display and sell her goods. Will was supportive and for your home, check us out,” Leslie invites. encouraged her through the journey of registering Hours vary at this time of year, but the shop is the name, getting a business license, and opening open most Saturdays from 9am-2pm. For more info, the shop. After considering many options, she set- call 724-833-7027 or find Little Shop in the Woods tled on the name Little Shop in the Woods – certain- on Facebook.

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Roberts Orthotics & Prosthetics

ust settled in their new home, Roberts Orthotics and Prosthetics is now at 244 Elm Drive Waynesburg. The move from its previous location at Central Plaza has facilitated an expanded shop and lab – an important advantage for Roberts Orthotics, where they actually make the custom braces and prosthetics their patients depend on. That custom fit is a passion for Jeff Roberts. After working for 20 years at another company in the orthotics and prosthetics industry, Jeff Roberts had a well-established career and enjoyed his profession. When he was laid off in a company downsizing, he took that passion and put it to work for himself and his own patients. “I never pursued my dream of having my own business until being laid off, but I knew this business, and I knew how much it meant to me to work with people and make a difference in their lives,” Jeff remembers. That was motivation enough to open the doors of Roberts Orthotics & Prosthetics, Inc. over 16 years ago in Waynesburg. Jeff began putting his extensive experience, knowledge and skills to work for the people of Greene County and surrounding area. Roberts Orthotics & Prosthetics, Inc. offers custom fitted braces for a wide range of disabilities and injuries; as well as custom designed and fitted artificial limbs for both upper and lower extremities. Foot orthotics include custom made inserts for a variety of foot conditions. “People come right here and we measure and work with them until the

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fit is perfect” Jeff explains. If individuals are unable to come to the office, Jeff makes house calls to provide the patient with the care they need from the comfort of their home. “We work closely with our patients and their health care providers to meet both their specific needs and individual preferences. We provide oneon-one personal care and believe in providing our patients with the opportunity to live their lives without limitation.” Open 8am – 5pm, Monday-Friday and Saturdays by appointment, Roberts Orthotics & Prosthetics, Inc. is also a very convenient choice. They accept most major insurances and handle all your billing needs. For more information please phone our office at 724-627-4600 (toll free 1-866-3335462) or visit our website at www.robertsprosthetics.com.

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BOWLBY BITS

GreeneScene

Interactive Wildlife Presentation – Mar 2, 5:30pm, by Game Conservation Officer Bill Lubich, featuring antlers and furs from wildlife of southwestern PA. For all ages. It’s Movie Night – Mar 8, watch Disney’s “Moana”, beginning promptly at 6pm. FREE popcorn and beverages! T.O.P.S. - weight management support group meets every Sat., 9:3011:30am. Author Book Talk – Mar. 13, 11:45am-1:15pm, featuring former Greene County resident Cora Mae Jewell, author of “Larry: ‘Hell-Bent’ Transformed to ‘Heaven-Sent,” Ms Jewell’s recollections of her father’s becoming a minister. Please pre-register. Lego Club – Mar 4 & 18 at 11am. All ages Lego building Bowlby Book Club – Mar. 13, 6pm. Discussion on “Killing Kennedy” by Bill O’Reilly. Coding Camp – Children ages 5-8 learn core coding concepts as they create their own interactive stories and games using PBS KIDS characters. 6 weeks remaining. March meetings are 3/9 & 3/23, 5-6pm. Call to register. St. Suess Party – Mar. 10, 4-8pm. Combined St. Patrick’s Day and Dr. Suess Shindig. Wear your green! Eat Green food, Play St. Patty & Suess games. Register the whole family. After-After Hours, presented by Teen Advisory Group (TAG), Mar. 10, 8-10pm, for teens aged 13-18. Suggested $2 donation at the door. Please pre-register. Spring Story Time – Register NOW for Story Times offered 3/65/12, 2017. For all ages from babies to young adults; call for schedule. Nature Cat Story Time – Mar. 25, 11am-1pm, for ages 3-8 years. Games, crafts, stories & light lunch. Please pre-register. Poetry Month Contest – categories for all ages, entries due by April 1. Call for info. Free test prep for adults studying for SAT, GED, Civil Service exams, Drivers Licensing and Life skills, and for basic reading and math skills. Free after school tutoring for school-age children. Call to schedule appointments. Color Outside the Lines - adult coloring group meets every Wed., 11am-1pm or 6-8pm. Brainfuse - Free online tutoring database, with one-on-one tutoring available daily 2-11pm. Writing lab, study guides, and skill building resources available 24/7. Access using your library card at www.evakbowlby.org. Freegal & Freading - Enjoy free music, videos and books and magazines online. Library patrons can stream or download with mobile apps, visit www.evakbowlby.org. Rocket Languages - 15 online Language courses are available through your library website, with your library card. Or download mobile app, visit www.evakbowlby.org. State & Federal Tax Forms available at the library. Call or stop in Eva K. Bowlby Public Library for more info or to register for any of the above events. 724-627-9776 • 311 N. West St., Waynesburg, PA 15370

Picture Puzzle Winner Congratulations to Tyler Groves of Waynesburg, winner of the picture puzzle contest from last month. Tyler’s grandfather, John Ealy, is pictured picking up Tyler’s prize – a $50 gift certificate for the Perfect Arrangement. The answer was, of course, CUPID. Granddad said Tyler was out of town right now, but he’ll be back in time to plan picking out something special for the upcoming Mother’s Day at The Perfect Arrangement

Congratulations Tyler! 16

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Area Youth at the 101st PA Farm Show

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everal area 4-H’ers made the trip to Harrisburg last month for the 101st Pennsylvania Farm Show which was held Jan 7-14, 2017. Home to the largest indoor agricultural expo in the nation, The PA Farm Show Complex houses 24 acres under roof, spread throughout 11 buildings, including three arenas. The 2017 event hosted nearly 6,000 animals, 10,000 competitive exhibits and 300 commercial exhibits. This year’s theme was “Our Commonwealth’s Blue Ribbon Experience” and several of our kids certainly shared that!

Grand Champion Junior Market Lamb “Loaki” with (l-r) Judge Dr. David Roper, Dave Demniak, Hayden Demniak, Cindy Demniak, PA Secretary of Agriculture Russell Redding

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Hayden Demniak of Carmichaels captured the Grand Champion Junior Market Lamb for the third time in his 4-H career at the PA Farm Show with his 156 lb. Hampshire Lamb named Loaki. Hayden took the same honor in 2012 and 2013, and Reserve Champion in 2015. Interestingly, the Reserve Champion Junior Market Lamb at this year’s show was a cross bred raised by Hayden and purchased from him by 13-year-old Alexa Miles of Hickory. Benjamin Archer of West Finley took a 1st place with his Jr. Yearling Female and Sr Champion female Shorthorn in the youth division. RJ Wolen of Clarksville also grabbed a 1st place and Champion in the light heavyweight Market Steer class. Rodney Parson of West Finley

PA Shorthorn Lassie, Judge Dan Eversole, of Blacksburg, VA and Benjamin Archer with his Champion Shorthorn.

took first place with a Jr. heifer calf and the Reserve Champion Jr. Heifer Calf in Other Breeds youth division. Alexus Grecoe and Katie Eitner both placed in the top ten in Market Goats; DJ Jones, Sierra PA State Fair Queen Darby Kasper of Tioga County Pettit and Katie poses with Jenna Longstreth and her award winning Eitner all placed rabbits at the Pennsylvania Farm Show. 2nd, 3rd or 4th repeatedly in various weight classes of Market Lambs. Rodney Parson (6th place), Benjamin Archer(5th place) and Joshua Archer(10th place) all participated and placed in the top ten in the their respective age classes for Showmanship. Longstreth sisters Cara & Jenna of Waynesburg represented the Greene County Rabbit Club well and brought home some impressive awards. Cara Longstreth shows Holland Lops and won Best Opposite of Variety with her Jr. broken doe - Roo. Jenna Longstreth shows Dwarf Hotots and Polish.  With her Dwarf Hotots she won Best of Breed with her Sr. Buck - Pickles.  She also won Best Opposite of Breed with her Sr Doe - Fran.  With her Polish, Jenna took 1st place with her Sr. Chocolate Buck Gillian.

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Stuck Enterprises, Inc. sion of our facilities greatly in Waynesburg. We recently purchased the former Agway building and properties on East First Street and have converted the store building into a Training Center for our growing distribution service to the Oil & Gas industry, which requires our employees to have extensive safety training and mulJust a portion of the outstanding management team at Stuck Enterprises, pictured here are the tiple certifications. voices in this “Growing in Greene” progress report, (L-R) Ryan Vance, Chief Operating Officer; Additionally we Gerald Jones, Director of Wholesale Operations; Lisa Haines, Director of Retail Operations; are in the process Steve Stuck, President of Stuck Enterprises, Inc. of converting the old Agway storage tuck Enterprises, Inc. operations include Jacobs Petroleum Products, Oakland Oil building into a full service truck center to service & Propane in Maryland, and various com- our fleet of trucks, currently numbering 50.” Stuck Enterprises retail division recently acmercial fueling sites and retail locations in PA, WV, MD, and OH. The corporate headquarters quired the Cheat Lake Exxon which is located off proudly remain in Waynesburg, PA, at 1115 East Exit 10 (Cheat Lake) of I-68 just outside of Morgantown, WV. Lisa Haines, Director of Retail OpHigh Street. Steve Stuck, President of Stuck Enterprises, erations said “I am excited to announce that we are Inc., is enthusiastic about the company’s recent expanding our True Convenience Store business. achievements and sustained development. “I am We are in the process of converting it into a True very excited about and proud of our company’s Convenience store similar to our I79 Exxon in continued success and growth in Greene County Waynesburg and the Lone Pine Exxon. The new and throughout our various market areas. With Cheat Lake store will include a large beer cave and our headquarters in Waynesburg, our expansion in expanded food services. Our plan is to grow in this local business is a real blessing to us as well as the area and continue to provide the best c-store expecommunity. I credit our success to our top-notch rience to every customer.” Stuck Enterprise operations include: management team, our wonderful employees and • Bulk Plant Facilities our ever-growing list of loyal customers.” Stuck Enterprises owns two of the most modRyan Vance, Chief Operating Officer of Stuck Enterprises, is proud to announce that Jacobs Pe- ern and safe bulk plant facilities in the country – the troleum has recently acquired the assets and cus- Jacobs Petroleum plant in Waynesburg, PA and the tomer base of Full Throttle Fuel, formerly Caprini Oakland Oil & Propane plant in Oakland, MaryOil of Millsboro, PA. “This will become a nice fit land. Stuck Enterprises also operates daily from into our already strong residential heating oil, pro- Bulk Plant facilities in Morgantown, WV; Belle pane, and commercial fuel services in Greene and Vernon, PA; and Caldwell, OH which enable the surrounding counties,” Ryan notes. This acquisi- company to provide superior service to residential tion continues the consistent growth and develop- customers with heating oil, kerosene and propane. ment of new markets and business growth for the The five strategically placed bulk plant locations also allow superior service to its growing wholesale 42 year old company. A recent benefit most notable to Stuck’s cli- delivery business and commercial accounts such as ents is the introduction of propane sales by both many gasoline stations. Stuck has also seen impresOakland Oil and Jacobs Petroleum. Stuck is now sive growth as one of the region’s preferred providdelivering propane to western Pennsylvania, West ers of fuel and lubricants to the oil & gas industry Virginia, Maryland and Ohio. Stuck Enterprises for drilling and fracking sites. Stuck also provides serves a wide range of customers that includes resi- services and products to many other industries dential, agricultural, commercial, industrial, and including excavating, trucking, construction, and the natural gas drilling industry. Forward thinking agriculture. • I-79 Exxon, True Convenience Store, Laand a commitment to the use of clean, economical and domestic energy inspired Stuck Enterprises to serwash and McDonald’s Near I-79 in Waynesburg, this super conveadd propane distribution. “This is one of our most exciting expansions as we all experience the pride nient center includes a McDonalds’ restaurant with of using a fuel such as propane, which is a byprod- 24 hour dine-in and drive-thru service. Also open uct of natural gas refining directly from our area,” 24/7 is the True Convenience store which boasts a huge cooler filled with grab & go bottled waters, said Steve Stuck, President. Gerald Jones, Director of Wholesale Opera- energy drinks, soda, fruit juices, dairy and more. tions said “Our growth has necessitated the expan- The coffee kiosk offers classics and gourmet blends

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and the New open air cooler which offers a variety along with numerous fueling stations nationwide. of items such as Fresh sandwiches, healthy snacks, By consolidating all fuel purchases into one dedeserts, and many other new items. Gasoline and tailed statement, with security and transaction on-road diesel islands with convenient pay-at-the- controls in place, business owners or fleet managers pump options and the state-of-the-art Laserwash can stay in control of spending and economize fuel car wash complete the center. costs – across the county, the state or the nation. • Lone Pine Exxon and Subway The locations in Morgantown, WV and Oakland, Lone Pine Exxon customers enjoy the same MD also accept bank cards such as Visa, Discover, great selection as our I79 Exxon with the addition Mastercard, and American Express. of Hunt Brothers Pizza, or they can choose from Locally owned and operated, Stuck Enterpristhe extensive and delicious Subway Restaurant lo- es, Inc. continues to grow and invest its resources cated in the store - the best of both worlds. Lone in our community and beyond. Significant growth, Pine customers can also take advantage our new reinvestment and keen management to meet open air cooler which offers items such as fresh changing demands and tap new opportunities has sandwiches, healthy snacks, deserts, and many brought about an evolution in this company that other new items. Lone Pine also offers a spacious now employs over 100 people. parking lot and easy in & out fuel pumps for gasoline, plus on-road and off road diesel, open 24/7 right off the Lone Pine Exit of I-79. • Lone Pine Beer The new Lone Pine Beer Store has earned its reputation as the most convenient beer store in Washington County. Sharing the same plaza as the Lone Pine Exxon & Subway, it is right off the Lone Pine Exit of I-79 and stocks over 500 varietJacobs Petroleum’s consistent focus on superior service to ies of beer, including seasonal and craft beers. The its wholesale customers and the oil & gas industry keeps the expanding truck fleet on the road 24/7. Beer Store just installed two brand new coolers for Singles and 6 Pack sales in addition to 12 Packs and full cases. The Lone Pine Beer Store not only has a convenient location but also a one stop shop for anything from a 24oz can of Miller Lite to a 30 pack case of Bud Light. It’s open 7 days a week! • Grantsville, MD Exxon & Subway Grantsville Exxon customers enjoy a giant beverage cooler, beer cave, and grab-n-go food cooler for quick in and out, or they can choose from the extensive and delicious Subway menu the best of both worlds. Grantsville also offers easy in & out fuel pumps for gasoline, plus on-road and Stuck Enterprises recent acquisition of the Cheat Lake off road diesel, Open 24/7, right off the Grantsville Exxon in Morgantown is another step in the company’s Exit of I-68 in western Maryland. continued expansion in the Morgantown area. • Uniontown, PA Exxon & True Convenience Store Uniontown Exxon is conveniently located on the corner of Rts. 40 and 21 in downtown Uniontown. It has the True Brew coffee area, large beverage coolers, and snack options throughout the store. • Cheat Lake Exxon Latest Acquisition in Morgantown, WV. • Commercial Fueling Stations in WaynesPropane Delivery to both residential and commercial burg, Oakland, MD, and Morgantown, WV destinations continues to grow. Located in downtown Waynesburg, on Rt. 21 (High Street) with a Stuck’s Laser Wash right next door; also on Rt. 19 between Mt. Morris and Star City, WV; and in downtown Oakland, MD. All are open 24/7 with gasoline, both on & off road diesel, and DEF (diesel exhaust fluid). Stuck Enterprises Universal Jacobs Petroleum has completely remodeled the former Agway Bldg. on First St. in Fleet Card provides ac- Waynesburg to a new Training Center complete with large meeting room, digital display cess to these locations and training facilities. GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Spo r t Sh o rt s

by Jason Tennant

Memorable Season For Waynesburg, West Greene Rifle Teams

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ifle is a WPIAL sport relatively new to Greene County, which makes having the only two teams in the County share a Section Title a pretty special season. Meet the 2016-2017 Waynesburg and West Greene Rifle teams. So how long have these teams been competing in the WPIAL? Well it started in 2010 when Dave Ziefel spearheaded the start of the West Greene Rifle program. He is the only head coach the team has known in its 7-season existence. Starting the program was a particularly daunting task when you consider the competition in the sport of rifle. In any other sports, West Greene’s opponents typically are schools like Jefferson-Morgan, Mapletown, Avella, etc. In rifle you hear the BIG SCHOOL names like Woodland Hills, Upper St. Clair, and Hempfield…just to name a few. The Pioneers start was understandably difficult and very few matches were won over the

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course of the first 6 seasons. That makes a Section title this season, seemingly out of nowhere, quite remarkable. “It’s a tremendous accomplishment,” said Ziefel. “I’m very proud of the hard work and dedication of the entire team. They have come together to form a strong unit.” Up until this year, West Greene hadn’t found much success as a team and hung their hat on two state qualifiers: Ziefel’s daughter Christa in 2012 and Lexi Keller in 2016. Success came a little quicker for the Waynesburg program. Waynesburg started its team, a co-op program with Jefferson-Morgan, in 2012. They were able to find a great deal of success in their third season, qualifying for the WPIAL Team Championships in 2015. There are a total of three sections in WPIAL Rifle and the top two teams from each section qualify for the WPIAL Championships. Waynesburg, with a 5-4 record in section were able to

qualify as the 2014-2015 Section 1 Runner-up behind only undefeated McGuffey. The Raiders finished 6th in the WPIAL that season. That success bred even more success as the following year, Waynesburg went 7-1 in Section, and won the outright Section Title! That team, which placed 4th overall in the WPIAL, was led by the program’s first two state qualifiers: Emily Ozohonish (from Jefferson-Morgan) and Emilee Tuttle. That background sets the stage for what was to come this season, an unprecedented 3-way tie for a Section title in Rifle. West Greene was able to finally find success as a team, going 6-2 in Section. The Pioneers lost one match each to Waynesburg and McGuffey. Waynesburg also went 6-2, losing one match each to West Greene and to McGuffey. And McGuffey went 6-2, losing one match each to…you guessed it…West Greene and Waynesburg. Defending Champion Waynesburg was happy to share the title with their County “rival.”

“Honestly, to split with West Greene was the best thing for both teams because it brings recognition to the sport in our area,” said Waynesburg head coach Rich Rush. “It also helps the kids from both schools realize that they can compete with the best.” Not only was the 3-way tie for 1st place a first for any Section in WPIAL Rifle, there were also 2-way ties atop the standings in the other two Sections this season as well. So 7 teams qualified for the WPIAL Championships and ALL of them were Section Champions! That was also a first. Waynesburg took 5th place as a team this year and added two more State Qualifiers: Hunter Wasson, and for a second time, Emilee Tuttle. Wasson was also presented with the Dave Cramer Award for shooting a perfect score of 100 in every section match. West Greene finished 7th in the WPIAL this year and Noah Lemley became the Pioneers’ third ever state qualifier.

GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


Greene County Industrial Development Authority

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Crystal Simmons

he Greene County Industrial Development Authority (GCIDA) is actively partnering with the Greene County Board of Commissioners to foster economic growth in the county. The authority’s concentration is on economic development and strives to further expand business opportunities throughout the county. The authority provides links to financial resources for County-owned businesses for expansion or retention and administers a revolving loan fund, funded in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development program. The fund was established to provide seed money to promote job development and business growth and expansion within Greene County. In coordination with Pittsburgh Regional Alliance the authority has developed a free online commercial real estate database Greenesitesearch. com for finding the optimal business location. The authority’s focus is on the creation, attraction and retention of business. The Authority has established the Greene County Brownfield Redevelopment Advisory Committee (GC-BRAC) to create more public involvement in its effort to address brownfield sites. The committee will improve public participation and community involvement in the brownfield redevelopment initiatives. The Director of the Industrial Development Authority is Crystal Simmons and the Board of Directors is led by Joseph Simatic, who serves as Chairman. Other members include Sheila Elliott Stewart, Branch Manager and Assistant Vice President of First National Bank; Andrew Corfont, VicePresident and Marketing Administrator of Community Bank; Jason Neighbors, owner of Vending Solutions and Assistant Secretary Treasurer of the board, and Mike Belding, Secretary of the board. The Authority offices are located on the street level of the Fort Jackson Building at 49 South Washington Street in Waynesburg. For information or assistance, please call 724-627-9259.

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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GreeneScene by Rebecca Bradmon

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Relay for Life

n the United States, men have a one in two lifetime risk of developing cancer; for women the risk of developing cancer is about one in three. The American Cancer Society and Relay For Life volunteers are urging local businesses and organizations to take up the fight against cancer in their community by supporting the Relay For Life of Greene County. Relay is the signature fundraising event for the American Cancer Society and is critical in raising funds for cancer research, education, prevention, and early detection to increase the chances of living a cancer free life. May 6, 2017, from 8am to midnight, has been set aside for this year’s Relay For Life of Greene County Celebration. Relay involves teams of walkers who raise money for the fight against cancer. One member of each team is encouraged to be on the track throughout the entire 18 hour event. During the Opening Ceremonies, the first lap is dedicated to Cancer Survivors. All survivors and their caregivers from the community are invited to attend and take part in this tradition. At dusk a Luminaria Ceremony is held to honor survivors and to remember those who have lost their battle with cancer. Ending the evening with Closing Ceremony at 11:30 P.M. Greene County held its first Relay For Life event in 1999 and has seen the event grow from raising $33,000 in that first year to raising over $234,000 in 2012. Over the past five years, Greene County was ranked in the top 10 events in the nation for per capita fundraising. In 2017, the Relay

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For Life of Greene County is continuing to reach out to more participants, survivors, businesses, and all of the individuals living in Greene County. Relay For Life is a community based event, and their Event Leadership Team would like to have as much participation from as many members of the community as possible. There are several different ways of getting involved. Businesses can take advantage of sponsorship opportunities, or sponsor a “Paint the Town Purple” banners that are hung in town prior to the event. Individuals are able to visit the Relay For Life website (www.relayforlife.org/ greenecountypa) to join an existing team or start their own. Anyone wishing to offer support can also visit the website to make a donation ($10 recommendation) for a luminaria in honor of someone who is battling cancer, or in memory of someone who has passed from cancer. Luminaria are the white bags that are placed around the walking track at the Relay For Life event, and during the Luminaria Ceremony a candle (glow stick) is lighted to show support, or to remember loved ones. At the event, organizers and participants take the time to honor the cancer survivors of Greene County with a Survivors Lap and luncheon. All survivors and a caregiver are welcome to attend the luncheon following the Opening Ceremony’s Survivors lap. If you are a cancer survivor in Greene County and would like to attend the relay and the luncheon, please contact Erin Kuhns at cozzy.05@ hotmail.com or go online and register at www.relayforlife.org/greenecountypa.

GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


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Ophthalmology and Retina Associates

pon meeting Dr. Nima Tirgan, his wide and welcoming smile is undoubtedly the first thing you’ll notice. Such an expression comes easily to one who finds his profession as rewarding as Dr. Tirgan does. As an ophthalmologist, Dr. Tirgan was in a unique position to see the extent of damage some patients suffer from diseases of the eye; he was driven by compassion to become a specialist who can offer not only evaluation, but also full treatment including medical and surgical management of conditions including retinal disorders, macular degeneration, cataracts, corneal diseases and glaucoma. “When I first saw the damage and suffering that a disease such as diabetes could so quickly do to my patients’ vision, I knew I wanted to be more involved, in a better position to help them,” he explains. It is Greene County’s good fortune that Dr. Tirgan decided to bring his expertise to Waynesburg – patients no longer need to wait to see a specialist or treatment from another source. Ophthalmology and Retina Associates opened the doors one year ago, at the Washington Hospital System - Greene Professional Building. It is the area’s only provider specializing in diseases and surgery of the eyes. Dr. Tirgan can take immediate action to help his patients. He was trained at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galves-

ton, though Dr. Tirgan grew up not too far from here - in Cleveland, Ohio. He did his retina fellowship in West Virginia, and now resides close by in Morgantown with his wife & daughter. “I really enjoy being here in Greene County,” says Dr. Tirgan, “I find the people to be so friendly and I feel that I am answering an important need here – I’ve grown to really care about the people of this community.” His staff includes local residents Jenny Bradmon, office manager, and Ronda Rishell, receptionist. Jenny emphasizes what patients value most is Dr. Tirgan’s concern for the whole individual and how he listens and considers each person’s whole health, including individual feelings, fears and expectations. “People come to us, sometimes with easy to treat conditions and other times facing serious problems. They need individual attention and accurate information they can understand. The focus of the practice is to provide the highest quality eye care in a compassionate and caring environment, with preservation and enhancement of vision as our ultimate goal,” Jenny says. Dr. Tirgan is welcoming new patients at this time. All insurance plans are accepted. The office is open Monday – Friday from 8:30am – 4pm. Call for more information or to schedule an appointment at 724-852-3008.

Queen City Business Systems

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ueen City Business Systems is your fullservice authorized dealer of Canon and Sharp multifunction office equipment. For over 35 years throughout the tri-state region, we have been consistently providing outstanding service and support to businesses both large and small. We take care of our customer before, during and after the sale ensuring that we reliably support every product we sell. Our process begins with a free Queen City Business Systems office at 1628 Mileground Road in Morgantown. equipment analysis with one of our experienced sales representatives. The goal is to make anytime you call. Service calls are completed by our sure that you are recommended the equipment best manufacturer-certified technicians who respond in suited to your business needs. Next, our adminisan average of 4 business hours. trative personnel will guide you through the instalTechnology is ever-changing and our staff is lation process to make sure that your new equiprequired to take classes to learn about new product ment is integrated with minimal disruption of your lines as they are launched. Both our sales and serworkflow. Delivery, installation, IT assistance and vice personnel are constantly receiving training on training are standard and never an additional cost the latest technological enhancements allowing us to you. For service and support after installation, to remain the office leader in state of the art product QCBS is only a phone call away. Our phones are performance, efficiency and reliability. Call today manned by customer support staff so you will alfor your free office analysis, 1-800-634-4536. ways speak with an actual person, never a recording

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

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$50,000 in Memory of Robert W. Fox

Celebrating CAP The newly formed Greene County Composite Squadron 606 of the Civil Air Patrol is hosting a celebration and presentation on Monday March 20, 7pm, at the Waynesburg VFW, 445 E Lincoln St. Waynesburg, PA. The entire community is welcome to attend and learn more about Civil Air Patrol and celebrate the presentation of the Greene County Squadron Charter from National Headquarters. Men and women (19 and over in age ) and boys and girls (12 to 18 in age) are eligible to become members of the Civil Air Patrol. Training and activities offered include emergency services, aerospace education, cadet programs, and Drug Demand Reduction. Civil Air Patrol, the longtime all-volunteer arm of the United States Air Force auxiliary, is the newest member of the Air Force’s Total Force, which consists of regular Air Force, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve, along with Air Force retired military and civilian employees. CAP, in its Total Force role, operates a fleet of 550 aircraft and performs about 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the

Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 78 lives annually. Civil Air Patrol’s 56,000 members nationwide also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. Its members additionally play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 24,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet program. Performing missions for America for the past 75 years, CAP received the Congressional Gold Medal in 2014 in honor of the heroic efforts of its World War II veterans. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. “On behalf of Greene County Composite Squadron 606, I encourage you to come and celebrate with us,” invites Captain Dave Shaw, Squadron Commander. For more information, call 724 627 8545.

Waynesburg University recently presented the Waynesburg-Franklin Township Volunteer Fire Company with a $10,000 check, the final of five installments totaling $50,000, to offset the $417,000 cost of the company’s 2013 Sutphen Rescue Pumper fire engine. The donations were given in memory of Robert W. Fox, a member of the Waynesburg-Franklin Township Volunteer Fire Company from 1948 to 2011, who died on May 15, 2012, at the age of 83. Remarkably, Mr. Fox was still actively answering fire calls until 2009. Fox served in many leadership capacities within the fire company during his 62year tenure including president for 28 years.  His father was a member of the company from 1941 to 1965, and Robert’s four sons and four of his grandsons are active members of the fire company. unteer Fire Company Fire Company, $11,844 & Waynesburg University President Douglas G. EMS, $7,448; Jefferson Volunteer Fire Company Lee, along with Heidi Szuminsky, Vice President – Fire Company, $12,616 & EMS, $7,448; Morris for Institutional Advancement and University RelaTownship Volunteer Fire Department, $11,844; tions, presented the donation to Jeff Marshall, Fire Mt. Morris Community Volunteer Fire Company, $12,616; Nemacolin Volunteer Fire Company Fire Company, $11,844 & EMS, $7,448; New Freeport Volunteer Fire Department, $11,844; Rices Landing Volunteer Fire Department – Fire Company, $11,844 & EMS, $7,448; Wayne Township Volunteer Fire Company, $11,844; Students in Waynesburg University’s Honors Waynesburg Franklin Township Volunteer Fire and History programs are preparing to begin a Company, $15,000. Fayette County: $128,255: Brownsville Fire cemetery conservation project in conjunction with Company No. 1, $13,387; Brownsville Ambulance Hill’s Schoolhouse Cemetery. Led by senior history major David Service , $7,448; South Brownsville Fire Company No. 1, $9,020; Hiller Volunteer Fire Company – Fire O’Donoghue, the project is the result of collaboraCompany, $15,000 & EMS, $7,448; Republic Volun- tion between students in the Honors Program, the teer Fire Company, $14,417; Isabella Volunteer Fire History Club and a Public History course taught by Department, $11,844; Luzerne Township Volunteer Dr. Karen Fisher Younger, chair of the Department Fire Company, $12,873; Tower Hill 2 Volunteer of Humanities. Throughout the semester, history Fire Department, $11,844; Allison Volunteer Fire students will research the history of the cemetery Department 2, $12,358; Masontown Volunteer Fire site and delve into the genealogy and lives of families buried there. Department, $12,616. Then, the Honors Program will host a cemWashington County: $40,420: Denbo-Vesta Six Volunteer Fire Department, $12,358; East Beth- etery preservation workshop March 18, the Univerlehem Township Volunteer Fire Company, $14,417; sity’s Day of Service. The hands-on workshop will teach students about upkeep of grounds and preRicheyville Volunteer Fire Company, $13,645. serving and documenting tombstones at the cem-

Local Fire Department & EMS Grants State Rep. Pam Snyder announced the award of $386,923 in state grants to more than two dozen fire and ambulance companies in the 50th Legislative District. The grants are made possible by the Fire Company and Volunteer Ambulance Service Grant Program, and can be used toward repairing, building or renovating facilities. The money also can be applied toward the purchase of new equipment, training and certification of staff, or it may go to repay debt related to equipment purchases or facility building and maintenance. “Although they do a tremendous job for our local communities, everyone knows that our volunteer firefighting and EMS organizations face financial challenges,” Snyder said. “They, as well as I, are aware that every penny counts. That’s why I am pleased that the state is providing these muchneeded funds.” The grant list by county & department follows. Greene County: $218,284: Bobtown Dunkard Volunteer Fire Department/Ambulance Fire Company, $12,101 & EMS, $7,448; Carmichaels and Cumberland Township Volunteer Fire Department, $13,895; Center Township Volunteer Fire Company, $12,616; Clarksville & Community Volunteer Fire Department Fire Company, $11,844 & EMS, $7,448; Crucible Volunteer Fire Department, $11,844; Greensboro Monongahela Township Vol-

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Chief, and Ron Fox, President of the fire company. This donation to the fire company from Waynesburg University continues the University’s longstanding support for fire safety in the community. Previously, the University had presented the company with $50,000 for the purchase of the Fire Simulation Training Trailer and $30,000 toward a new fire truck. The University has also donated more than $460,000 to the Waynesburg Borough for the purchase of new police cars, improvements to borough infrastructure, downtown beautification projects, contributions to the Borough Master Plan, recreational fields and parks maintenance and construction equipment.  Pictured, from left to right: Ron Fox, President of the fire company; Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee; Heidi Szuminsky, Vice President for Institutional Advancement and University Relations; and Jeff Marshall, Fire Chief.

Hill’s Schoolhouse Cemetery Conservation etery. Younger said the project is just one example of the University working to tie students’ learning into contributions to the local community. “History is alive all around us. I hope students will come away with a feeling of great satisfaction knowing that they served the surrounding community by caring for the final resting place of over two dozen men, women and children,” said Younger. Members of the community with information about individuals or families buried at the site and/ or old photographs of the cemetery that could aid students in their research are encouraged to contact O’Donoghue at odo1639@student.waynesburg. edu. The University owns and maintains the cemetery; it was acquired in the same purchase as the land that now holds the baseball fields and tennis courts.

GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


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Redevelopment Authority of the County of Greene

ACG was activated in 2009 to increase affordable housing and home ownership opportunities, redevelop blighted areas and, in conjunction with other County, State and Federal entities, provide for community revitalization in Greene County. RACG is committed to enhancing the quality of life for all of the County’s residents by advancing housing development and potential redevelopment sites across the County. Housing development includes senior housing, market rate housing, affordable housing, low-and moderate-income housing and special needs housing. In addition to assisting commercial and residential developers with site location, acquisition and preparation, RACG has created an Acquisition, Rehab and Resale Program to assist the County with the redevelopment of its underutilized properties and the remediation of blighted properties. This program is sourced by the County’s 26 municipalities identifying blighted properties in their communities as well as RACG identifying vacant/ abandoned/ underutilized properties through fore-

closures, sheriff sales and the County tax repository. RACG has received grants from the Pennsylvania Housing Affordability and Rehabilitation Enhancement Fund (PHARE) through the Act 13 impact fees to assist with its work. RACG currently has projects underway in Rogersville, Crucible, Mt. Morris, Waynesburg, Jefferson, and Clarksville. Recent completed projects include rehabilitated homes in Dunkard Township, Pitt Gas, Waynesburg, Jefferson, Clarksville, Crucible, two new modular homes in Waynesburg and Jefferson and demolition projects throughout the county. Construction of new townhomes in Rogersville will start in April. If you are interested in purchasing a home, advancing housing, developing commercial or residential property, or own land that you are interested in selling, developing or donating to RACG, please contact Dave Calvario, Executive Director, RACG, at 724-852-5306 or at dcalvario@co.greene.pa.us. Also check the County’s website at www.co.greene. pa.us for links to available housing programs and more details on RACG.

Completely Renovated! • 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath • Detached Garage • Side Covered Porch • New Railings Clarksville, PA

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Jefferson, PA

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

BONNER SCHOLARS PROGRAM By Linda Moon

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The 2017/18 Bonner Scholars at Waynesburg University

orella Allen and Bertram Bonner met in New York and were married in 1942. Although from different places, the similarity of experiences these two people shared influenced a joint vision. Both had known severe poverty in their youth and both had learned the value of hard work and education in overcoming disadvantages. Bertram put himself through college and became highly successful in business and real estate. As a couple, they placed a high priority on community service, with emphasis on feeding the hungry and education. They established a foundation to support philanthropic efforts including the Crisis Ministry, a cooperative effort between church congregations and food banks; and the Bonner Scholars Program, first initiated in 1990 at Berea College in Kentucky with the intent of providing access to higher education and involvement in community service. Since then, the Bonner Scholars program has grown to become the largest privately-funded, servicebased scholarship program in the country, offering scholarships to students with financial need and a willingness to serve. Today there are 21 Bonner Scholar schools across the US, two of those are in Pennsylvania. Waynesburg University is one of the two, with the program established here in 1992. 15 Bonner Scholars are accepted each year, typically incoming freshman, to foster a program with 60 students total. Once accepted into the program, students do not have to reapply each year as long as they remain in good standing with the scholarship requirements, which include performing 140 hours per semester of unpaid public service to non-profits, completing 280 hours of service each for two summers, and maintaining a minimum 2.0 GPA. The scholarships are need based and typically amount to $2,500 per year. Kelley Hardie is Director of the Bonner Scholars Program at WU and Adrienne Tharp is the Coordinator. “Service has been a major part of my life and allows me to become more integrated with the community. Working with our students at Waynesburg and seeing them grow through their service experiences is very rewarding,” Adrienne says. Katelyn Hunsicker, senior Psychology major from Reading, PA, and current Bonner Scholar at

WU, comments on the impact of the program in her life: “Being a Bonner has been life changing. It has taught me about service…and it provides once-in-a-lifetime opportunities to assist others, to go on mission trips, expand world views and become a better person. It also helps you to figure out what your passion is and how to pursue it along with your career.” Currently Katelyn is the WU Bonner’s site coordinator at St. Ann’s Soup Kitchen as well as Bridge Street Commons and she served on a mission trip to Jamaica to volunteer at an orphanage for abandoned children. She also participated in a service trip to Las Vegas, enabling her to become certified in trauma therapy, which will help in her chosen career as a counselor. Nicholas Lies of Pittsburgh is a Sophomore Bonner Scholar majoring in Creative Writing and Biblical Minisitries who plans on becoming a longterm missionary in Malawi, Africa. “Being a Bonner has allowed me keep an open mind and open heart. It gives me the opportunity to see people as people, as brothers and sisters—not as people in poor circumstances. Their circumstances don’t define them,” he says. Currently Nicholas serves at St. Ann’s Soup Kitchen, First Baptist Church youth program, and Ronald McDonald House. There are 17 planned trips for WU Bonners during the 2017/18 term; though Bonner service includes more than mission and service trips. Serving needs in local communities is an integral part of the program. Several local agencies regularly receive services from WU Bonner students including St. Ann’s Soup Kitchen, Bridge Street Commons, Social Rehab, Bowlby Library, Catholic Charities, Community Action, Corner Cupboard Food Bank, Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA, CBM, Greene ARC, Greene County Career and Technology Center, Community Foundation of Greene County and the Crisis Pregnancy Center. Nicholas Lies sums up his feelings regarding service by saying “Buckle up, open your eyes and open your heart. It’s time to serve—all of the time.” To learn more about the Bonner Scholars Program at Waynesburg University, visit www. waynesburg.edu or call Adrienne Tharp at 724852-3460. Learn more about the Corella & Bertram F. Bonner Foundation at www.bonner.org

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Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, Inc.

aynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful (WP&B), a Main Street initiative, is named after an historic 1906 souvenir pictorial directory of Waynesburg touting it as the Biggest and Best Little City in Pennsylvania. It is WP&B’s mission to preserve and revitalize historic downtown Waynesburg, Pennsylvania and to cultivate a heightened public awareness of the educational, cultural and historical opportunities and conveniences in shopping associated with visiting downtown Waynesburg. Work to accomplish this mission is performed by volunteers in various focus groups, including an economic restructuring committee which examines current economic and marketing forces affecting the downtown; and works to bring the mix of retail, professional services, and housing that will prosper in the area. A recent example is WP&B’s collaboration with PIRHL Developers to establish Gateway Senior Housing at the Borough’s eastern downtown gateway. Construction on this beautiful 52-unit apartment building, designed for independent seniors 62 years and older, was completed with the first residents moving in June, 2016. By the end of the year, Gateway Senior Housing was at 100% occupancy, accomplishing the dual objective of providing much needed, new and affordable housing to Greene County seniors; and introducing a new resident population to the convenience and advantages of shopping and doing business in the downtown district. The building features a fitness center, multiple laundries, community room and outdoor living space and zero-step access to East Street and at the main entrance and parking lot on Nazer Street. A great indication of the project’s success occurred during a ribbon cutting celebration in October when resident representative Sarah George thanked those responsible for the building, its décor and facilities, and praised the management staff as she related stories of the fun and rich social life the residents now enjoy there. The WP&B Promotions Committee, which strives to maintain a vibrant downtown with innovative retail promotions and special events, is responsible for several of Waynesburg’s most popular festivals, including the 50’s Fest & Car Cruise in September, the Sheep & Fiber Festival in May and the merchant’s “Open House” events during summer and holiday season in winter. Working with the Waynesburg Merchant’s Guild in downtown, and with the support of corporate sponsorship from EQT, the recent Holiday Open House again drew large crowds to downtown in December, including both local shoppers and visitors from West Virginia and Washington and Allegheny Counties. The Summer Open House, with live entertainment and the popular “Rock the Chalk” artists’ competition is planned for June 23rd this year. Another collaborative effort with like-minded organizations, the “Buy Local, Buy Greene” initiative’s purpose is to educate consumers about the impact they can have on their community by spending locally. The mission statement is “Unleashing the power of the Consumers’ Dollar in Greene County.” The Downtown Waynesburg Farmers’ Market presented by WP&B is a prime opportunity for consumers to enjoy the high quality and flavor of locally produced goods while con-

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Beautiful Gateway Senior Housing for seniors.

Consumers buying local at the Farmers Market.

tributing to the economy in a powerful way. The Farmers Market is staged on Church Street next to the courthouse from 10am – 2pm each Wednesday mid-May through October. With the support of a grant from EQT, this year’s market will feature activities for youth and adults, workshops & demonstrations to increase awareness of the positive impact of progressive “Farm to Table” practices. Motorists on High Street in downtown Waynesburg are also “flagged” with an invitation to shop locally by large OPEN banner flags in front of the stores. One OPEN flag is provided free of charge to local merchants by WP&B and replacement flags are provided at cost. During the past year, WP&B’s Board of Directors supported and worked closely with Waynesburg Borough Council’s design of a long-term comprehensive plan for the borough, strategic to developing funding opportunities and possible future grants for improvements. The comprehensive plan, approved by council in January 2017, addresses infrastructure, building code, parking and all matters under the governance of the Borough. The WP&B Board will continue to support and work with Council’s next planning phase to update zoning regulations within Waynesburg Borough. Each calendar quarter, WP&B organizes and hosts “downtown dialogues” for business owners and stakeholders to come together to keep communication open and cooperation high in the common goal of improving downtown Waynesburg. The public is welcomed to these early morning breakfast meetings; a schedule can be found on the WP&B’s website www.waynesburgpa.org. You can also keep up on all the current events, enjoy celebrations, pictures and positive vibes in Waynesburg by friending Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful on Facebook, or following it on Twitter and Instagram. Definitely mark your calendar for the various exciting events scheduled in 2017 (see ad on this page); and best choice of all, just head downtown and hang out for awhile – you’ll discover on your own how prosperous & beautiful we are!

GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


Community Builders

2016 Community Builders of Greene County Class: Front Row (l-r): Community Builders of the Year Award recipients, Teresa Roberts and Don Chappel. Back Row: Alisa Hatchett, Sandy Wilson, Eric Braun, An’Etta Neff and Cathy Garber. (Not pictured: Caitlin Carlisle and Petrina Supler.)

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016 Community Builders of Greene County leadership program were honored at a ceremony held at The Foundation Room of the Community Foundation of Greene County. Eight individuals received the Community Builders Nonprofit Leadership certification for completing the course on management and leadership of nonprofit organizations. Each graduate received a framed certificate, a pin, a chocolate hammer and a copy of How Effective Nonprofits Work. The eight individuals who earned the Nonprofit Leadership certification were: Eric Braun, Community Action Southwest; Caitlin Carlisle, Farmers Insurance; Don Chappel, Greene County Industrial Developments, Inc.; Cathy Garber, Children’s Bible foods. Seeing the parent’s reacimilar backgrounds and a shared Ministries; Alisa Hatchett, tion is fulfilling, and knowing that desire to work with children and PA Career Link; An’Etta you were successful in making a their families brought Valerie Neff, Community Foundapositive impact in a child’s life,” says Kerr-Lapana, M.S. CCC-SLP and tion of Greene County; TeValerie. Kristie Pekar-Rohrer, M.Ed. together to resa Roberts, Second Sam Valerie earned both a Bachestablish STARS - Specialized Therapy elor’s degree in Speech Pathology Nine; Petrina Supler, Soup’s and Related Services, LLC, an Early InMarketing and Sandy Wiland Audiology and Master’s degree tervention provider serving infants and son, Producers Supply. in Speech Pathology. She holds the toddlers throughout Greene & Fayette The 2016 Community Certificate of Clinical Competency Counties. Builder of the Year Award from the American Speech-LanEarly Intervention (EI) supports was presented to Don and services can make a significant im- The STARS Team (L-R) front row: Destiny Chambers- guage-Hearing Association and is a pact on a child’s development during Special Instructor, Kristie Pekar-Rohrer-Special Instruc- Pennsylvania State Licensed Speech Chappel, Executive Director/Co-Owner, Dawn Altman-Speech Therapist. Back Language Pathologist. Valerie has tor of Greene County Inthe first few years of life. The services are delivered in the child’s natural envi- row:  Ranelle Hartley-Special Instructor/Behavior, Audra more than 15 years working in dustrial Developments, Inc. Levicky-Physical Therapist, Valerie Kerr-Lapana-Speech Early Intervention, and 22 years ronment which is typically their home and Teresa Roberts, board Therapist/Co-Owner, Jamie Bate- Speech Therapist, (not of experience as a clinical Speech member and co-founder or childcare setting. To qualify for these pictured) Meghen Milinovich-Occupational Therapist. Language Pathologist and Rehab of Second Sam Nine. The services, a child must exhibit a 25% delay Manager in a long term care setting, award, which is based on in a developmental area, have a qualified diagnosis, or through informed clinical opinion. EI is a federally supervising an interdisciplinary team of physical, occupational nominations by class memand speech therapists. funded program and provided at no cost to families. bers, recognizes the parKristie holds a Master’s in Education and is dual certified to With over 30-years of combined experience in Early Interticipant who displays the vention Services, Valerie, Kristie and their team of professionals teach Special and Elementary Education. She has been working characteristics of a commuare well qualified to accomplish STARS primary mission – work- in the field of Early Intervention for more than 18 years. Krisnity builder throughout the ing side-by-side with families, empowering them with the skills tie has provided specialized instruction services to hundreds of families throughout Greene County, and served as program di- program. necessary to optimize their own children’s development. Community Build“Working with families to help their children reach devel- rector of an Early Intervention program in Fayette and Greene ers provides training for opmental milestones is rewarding,” states Valerie. “We provide Counties; successfully managing its daily operations while sua coaching model and teach techniques to help a child function pervising a team of special instruction teachers and physical, oc- persons interested in volunteering their time and and become successful in his or her environment…and these cupational, and speech therapists. Valerie and Kristie are recruiting experienced and skilled talents to support Greene services are available to all children who qualify,” she adds. County nonprofit organiza“As a professional working in the home, it is wonderful to professionals in Early Intervention to join their STARS team. facilitate the skills needed for the child to succeed with taking Please email them at admin@stars4ourkids.com, or call 724- tions. their first steps, to saying their first words, to eating their first 319-2043 for additional information.

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STARS/Specialized Therapy and Related Services

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

The nonprofit leadership program explores leadership, nonprofit governance and boards of directors, financial management, communication and team work, strategic planning, public relations, grant writing, fundraising and volunteer engagement. This series is geared to helping citizens become better volunteers with non-profit organizations in the community, whether it be through activities such as serving on non-profit boards, volunteering on fundraising committees, or providing volunteer services. Instructors for the program are local and regional experts in each of the topics: Introduction to Leadership was led by Joy Eggleston, Director of Operations, Washington Health System Greene. Strategic Planning was led by Bruce Decker, Founder and Principal Partner of Collective Impact. Marketing Your Success was led by Lynn and Joe Manning, Principal Partners, Alpha Omega Communications. Introduction to Board Governance was led by Darlene Bigler, President and CEO of Community Action Southwest. Financial Management for Boards was led by Thomas G. Milinovich, CPA, CFP, Milinovich & Company. Effective Communication was led by Jon Laughner, Penn State Cooperative Extension. Engaging Volunteers was led by Nancy Riggle, Southwestern Pennsylvania Area Agency on Aging, Greene County Coordinator. Developing Nonprofit Resources was led by Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director of the Community Foundation of Greene County.. Local leaders serving on the Community Builders steering committee in 2016 were Karen Bennett, Director, Greene County Department of Human Services; Darlene Bigler, Executive Director, Community Action Southwest; Kim Grimes, Vice President, CFGC board; Thelma Szarell, Secretary CFGC Board; Barbara Wise, Executive Director, Greene County United Way, Bill Monahan, Monongahela Township Supervisor and Nancy Riggle, Greene County Coordinator Area Agency on Aging. The 2017 series of Community Builders of Greene County will begin Monday, August 28, 2017. The program will meet every other Monday through December 4, 2017 from 5:30-8:30 each session. Registration will open later this spring. For more information on Community Builders of Greene County, or to be placed on the list, call 724627-2010, or email cfgcpa@gmail.com.

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Greene: Earth and Sky SIGNS POINT TO SPRING AS THE SUN MAKES ITS RETURN

By Pete Zapadka

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Coltsfoot flower.

eeling tired? Maybe sick and tired? You might even be downright depressed or gloomy. Invariably, that’s what many people experience at this time of year. Cabin fever has set in, and there seems to be no cure. Snow, while pretty at first, has become the bane of travelers, along with its slick and dangerous cousin, the so-called black ice. Too warm for snow? Watch out for the mud. Constant cloud cover and short hours of daylight create a lot of sighs and exasperation. Yet despite Punxsutawney Phil’s prognostication of more winter, heartening signs of spring are appearing in many spots in Greene County – but it helps to know where to look. The most visible example, of course, comes from above: the lengthening hours of daylight. Even though we’re still receiving slightly fewer than 12 hours of daylight, we’ve made great progress. Let’s use Waynesburg, our county seat, as our example. The earliest sunset of the year occurs Dec. 7 at approximately 4:54 p.m. EST (do not confuse earliest sunset with the “shortest” day, which occurs

Dec. 21, at the solstice). By the beginning of February, sunset rebounded to about 5:41 p.m. And by March 1, sunset amazingly is at 6:13 p.m. and growing later. Since about Jan. 4, sunrise has become earlier, from about 7:12 a.m. until 6:25 a.m. when March arrives. And where there is sunshine and warmth, ultimately there is growth. There already are several local wildflowers starting to bloom. They may be difficult to find at first, but these signs of spring are sprouting. Here are some examples to seek: Few plants say “it’s February!” like the unusual-looking skunk cabbage. Its flower admittedly is alien-looking, emerging in moist areas and looking completely outworldly. Skunk cabbage displays a maroon-colored hood that may be mottled with green or yellow. Inside is the spadix, a flower cluster that most often is yellow. Chemical reactions inside the plant’s hood can raise the temperature to around 60 degrees warmer than the surrounding air, so lingering snow causes little problem. The plant is not poisonous to the touch, but it can emit a terribly foul odor, hence the name skunk cabbage. While not widespread in Greene County, skunk cabbage does grow in several damp locations. One of these easily seen sites is along Byard Road in Washington Township, north of Waynesburg, The plant appears annually along the first stream to the right of the road after the intersection with Waterdam Road. Coltsfoot has been described as sunshine on the face of the Earth, but it too often is mistaken for the ubiquitous dandelion. There are marked difference, though, most notably the coltsfoot’s purple buds and the likelihood of its appearance ear-

lier in the year. Its stalk is covered with fibers, opposite of a dandelion’s smooth stem. Coltsfoot enjoys growing roadside or in disturbed soil or loose shale, and if the site receives afternoon sunlight, it’s all the better. The brilliant yellow flower appears and then turns to seed long before its leaves emerge. The leaves can be quite large, sometimes growing by late summer to about 10 inches across. They will last until late in the year when they succumb to frost and snow. While the plant is widespread across Greene County, early coltsfoot often is seen on a rocky embankment next to Crooked Hill Road in Jackson Township, about 200 yards from the intersection with Route 18. This is a remarkable location that gives the lovely coltsfoot flower much-needed solar radiation and a headstart over many other sites. Snow melting from above offers plenty of water. Other easily accessible locations for finding early coltsfoot include the hiking trail at Enlow Fork in state Game Lands 302; the intersection of Meighan Run and Toms Run roads on the hillside across from Dunkard Creek east of Jollytown; and along Falling Timber Run Road, on the right and just yards after the road crosses the stream in Jackson Township. Remember, never pick or disturb wildflowers. If you leave them alone and simply adore their beauty, they will return to shine again. It’s like that moment it becomes clear that, hey, here comes the Sun. And I say it’s all right. Pete Zapadka is a Greene County property owner and a retired local news editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. He can be reached at pzapadka@yahoo.com. To follow Pete’s annual Countdown to Spring clock, visit http://bit.ly/2lF8bAY.

Skunk Cabbage flower.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017


Manure Management Workshop

If you pasture any livestock or apply manure to your land, this is for you! If you own any livestock that pasture at your place, or if you use any manure to fertilize your garden or fields, you need to read on. The Greene County Conservation District is hosting FREE Manure Management Plan Writing Workshops. The first workshop will be held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, March 7 at the Carmichaels Grange, and the second will be held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, March 22 at the Nineveh Community Center. The third workshop will be held on Wednesday, April 5 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the lower level of the 4-H Building at the Greene County Fairgrounds in Waynesburg. Any farm in Pennsylvania that applies manure to the land - whether you fork it on there, spread it with a machine, or let your livestock drop it directly in the pasture - is required by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to have a written manure management plan, regardless of size of the property or the operation. This is really nothing new; these requirements have been around for over 30 years, beginning with the passing of the Clean Water Act in 1972. Wherever livestock (cattle, horses, goats, swine, fowl etc.) graze on grass, in any size field, large or small, is considered “land applied manure”. Most of these pastures will also have “Animal Concentration Areas” (ACAs) which is where animals congregate and release lots of manure. The importance of a written manure management plan becomes even more evident when you see these areas. The good news is, it’s nothing to fear, and it

doesn’t cost anything. For the past few years, the Greene County Conservation District has sponsored these FREE workshops, to help local gardeners, farmers and livestock owners write a plan and come into compliance with these regulations. Most of the time, it is relatively simple and they will walk you through the process. Remember, this is not just for Dairy Farmers or beef cattle operations. You may have a horse or two that runs pasture at your place – this is for you. If your kids have a 4-H project with goats or sheep that are pastured and dropping manure on the land – this is for you. If you haul in horse manure from your neighbor’s place and spread it on your cornfield or vegetable garden – this is for you. Realistically, anytime you apply any manure to your ground, you need to have a management plan. “The DEP’s goal is not to go out policing people about this, what they really want to do is educate everyone about the impact of livestock on the land, and help people manage it properly,” said Karlie Wright, agricultural technician with Greene County Conservation District. While the workshop is free, REGISTRATION IS REQUESTED. For more information, call Karlie or April at 724852-5278. Financial and other support for this workshop has been provided by the Pennsylvania Association of Conservation Districts, Inc., through a grant from the state DEP under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act, administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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County of Greene Department of Economic Development

he economic initiatives of the Greene County Commissioners and the Department of Economic Development are changing to meet the demands of Greene County’s future. “We are working to bring more technology education into Greene County – for youth and adults. The school superintendents and the Career and Technology Center Administrator are leading the way,” said Robbie Matesic, Executive Director of Greene County Department of Economic Development. “We are currently working on obtaining funding to support some very exciting programs and upcoming projects in this area. Working together to prepare our workforce with the best technology skills leads to an abundance of opportunities for our area in new manufacturing, entertainment, health care, fashion and many other sectors.” Plans this year continue helping existing local manufacturers develop new markets to increase their business. A manufacturers business consortium and technology are driving the program. Reliable access to high speed internet is key to success in business and marketing. “Broadband is as important an infrastructure

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017 • GreeneScene Magazine

issue as water, sewer, roads and bridges – and it’s being tackled as a huge need,” Matesic adds. Agriculture and food production are also very high on the county’s list of economic initiatives. If you are a farmer, a small business owner, want to develop a cottage industry, or if you have an interest in food preparation, safety, branding, marketing or distribution . . . there’s an opportunity out there waiting for you. Entrepreneurships in every realm, from start-ups to business expansion, are the #1 priority focus. The Greene County Department of Economic Development wants to connect your ideas for a small business to experts that will help and guide you. Perhaps you want to update your website to sell your product or service? They have access to many experts that are available to you. If you or anyone you know is interested in this, the Department of Economic Development wants to help link you to the many available resources. You never know what an idea can become, unless you take that big first step! For more information, call 724 852-5300 and ask for Mimi Ritenour or Jeremy Kelly.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

FEBRUARY / MARCH

2017

Feb Mar GreeneScene 2017  

Join us this month for part one of our Growing in Greene Special Progress Edition of the GreeneScene Community Magazine. Learn about local b...

Feb Mar GreeneScene 2017  

Join us this month for part one of our Growing in Greene Special Progress Edition of the GreeneScene Community Magazine. Learn about local b...

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