Page 1

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

1


GreeneScene by Donna Whipkey

2

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


H

Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union

ello Greene County! The staff of Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union would like to take the opportunity to let you know that we are happy to serve your financial needs! We are conveniently located at 222 Elm Drive, Unit #3 (right next to Verizon Wireless). Stop in and ask for one of our Member Service Representatives, Tracy Pettit or Jamie Vilella, for any information you may need. For more than 51 years, Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union has delivered one-on-one service to our members, serving them for generation after generation. We have been making some changes this past year in order to make your credit union experience even better and we are busy everyday working for you. Our credit union is a full-service, federally-insured financial institution. The National Federal Credit Union Insurance Fund insures all deposits at our credit union up to $250,000. Our membership is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, or attends school in Fayette, Washington, and Greene Counties. And we have four conveniently located branches – Waynesburg, Uniontown, Washington, and Charleroi. Frick Tri-County Federal Credit Union employs 18 full-time staff members and currently manages over $67 million dollars in member deposits. Services include but are not limited to savings accounts, checking accounts, money market accounts, certificates of deposit, IRA accounts, and more. We offer VISA credit cards and debit cards, on-line banking, Estatements, and other convenient electronic options. Our lending services provide solutions ranging from personal loans, auto loans, home equity loans, to first mortgages. If you are looking for a financial institution that offers great personal service, lower rates, and a variety of financial options, contact us. Stop in at one of our convenient locations, visit our website at www.fricktricountyfcu.org, or call us at 1-800-SAY FRICK! Waynesburg Office Member Service Representatives We look forward to hearing from you! Tracy Pettit and Jamie Vilella

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

3


Domo Arigato, Mr. Roboto... by Regis Whetzel

S

how of hands: who remembers participating in a science fair where the height of technology was an alarm clock powered by a potato, a model of the solar system made from Styrofoam balls and unbent wire coat hangers, or a papier-mache volcano that erupted a foam of baking soda and vinegar? Those are “the classics,” there’s no doubt; but times have changed. Education has evolved, and today’s students, many of whom have been using “tech gadgets” since before they were old enough to speak, demand more of themselves and their learning opportunities. Enter the “G.E.A.R.” (Getting Excited About Robotics) program, a unique and challenging method of learning about science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Open to children from 9 to 14 years old, participants build robots, then put those robots through rigorous competitions. A non-profit, volunteer-based program, G.E.A.R. began in 2002 as a way to get students interested in STEM-related careers, and demonstrate that science and math can be both fun and interesting. The challenges, according to the official G.E.A.R. Internet site (www.gearrobotics.org), “…are designed to make students think at a higher level, and give them an opportunity to see how everyday math and science apply to the real world with the relative L-R, Chase Faddis, Jesse Wolfe, Erik Sullenbarger, and Adam Hobe safety of a classroom environment.” At the heart of the G.E.A.R. program are Lego “NXT” robotics kits, collections of parts that resemble the Lego bricks that many of us remember fondly from childhood, but which also feature multi-tasking motors for walking, grasping, and other tasks; light sensors which can enable robots to “see” (some sensors even allow robots to distinguish between different colors); and a programmable computer “brain” box that helps builders turn these disparate parts into functioning robots. Locally, the acronym has conveniently altered; in this area, “G.E.A.R.” stands for “Greene Engineering and Robotics,” to highlight the spirit of hometown participation, under the guidance of Coach Bill Faddis, and Associate Coach John Wolfe. Bill points out that, in addition to designing and building the robots to carry out a series of specialized tasks, participants must also engage the judges. “They have to talk about their design, and how it was created,” he states, noting the importance of the public speaking skills that can be developed through this part of the process. He also notes that anyone within the specified age range can become involved with the program, as it is not dependent on belonging to a specific school or district. As for the tasks that the robots must actually perform, they are akin to perilous obstacle courses in miniature. Not only must the robots make it through the course intact; there are also signs to erect, people to rescue, automobiles to move from harm’s way, and any number of other “emergencies” to address in order to complete the mission and obtain valuable points. This most recent competition theme was “Nature’s Fury,” wherein participants had to choose a natural disaster, and then find a solution to the challenges presented. One example, according to Bill, was a scenario involving “…a palm tree in which one of the palm fronds was hanging above power lines.” The difficulty in this case, he notes, was that participants’ robots had to find a way to remove that part of the tree without having it hit the power lines, below. With Lego Robotics “starter kits” averaging $400 to $500, the “nuts and bolts” of the program don’t begin and end with the robots, themselves. The local program began through self-funding by Bill and John, along with James Wolfe, an engineer and son of John, who also contributed. Currently, Bill’s two local companies, ISM Services and ISM Weapons Systems, sponsor the team. With the hope of growth in the near future, Bill notes that additional sponsors would be more than welcome. “We intend to keep this going, and make it happen every year,” he reports. A part of that intended growth is the establishment of a team in another, more advanced league. The “First Robotics Competition” (F.R.C.) is for participants over the age of 14, and involves building sophisticated robotics from the ground, up, rather than using pre-existing Lego parts. The cost to create this type of team, according to Bill, is around 50 to 60 thousand dollars. When the time comes, he says, Bill will be taking over coaching duties for this new team, with John coaching the 9-14 year old Lego bracket. It becomes obvious that, rather than simply being a fun extra-curricular activity in which young people can participate, the G.E.A.R. program functions on a much higher level, planting seeds of inspiration in eager minds. Learning the mathematics, programming, engineering and building skills that can lead to productive, well-paying careers may not feel that important in the heat of competition, when the only thing that matters is transporting a small, plastic ambulance out of the path of an oncoming (if imaginary) hurricane or tsunami. It takes only a short step of thought, however, to realize that the 13 year-old who is building a plastic Lego robot, today, may well create a new way to save lives in the event of a real disaster in the near future. To witness Lego Robotics in action, visit www.youtube.com, and type “FLL Nature’s Fury” into the search box near the top of the screen. Visit the local G.E.A.R. program’s Facebook page by going to www.facebook.com, and searching for “Greene Engineering and Robotics.” To become a sponsor for the program, or to find out more about how to join or volunteer, call 540-974-0446 to reach At a recent robotics competition, Jesse Wolfe and Adam Home make adjustments and change the Bill Faddis, directly. program on their robot in order to complete the next task

4

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


David Balint, CPA D

avid Balint, CPA, is in its second year of business at 1050 E. Greene St., Suite A in Waynesburg. A Waynesburg Native, David Balint, who currently serves as the elected Controller for the County of Greene, has worked in accounting for over 13 years. Last year he made the decision to open his own office for tax preparation and accounting as well. “I grew up in this area,” David said, “and I care about the residents of this county. They are my neighbors, my friends, and I see them on a regular basis. So I want to help take the stress out of the tax season by helping them professionally, too,” he explained. David earned a B.S. in Business Administration from Waynesburg University, majoring in Accounting and minoring in Business Management. “I am a licensed CPA, which means that I have passed a stringent exam that is regulated by the state,” he added. “In addition, to maintain my license, I have to have 80 hours of continuing education credits every two years. I work hard to stay fully abreast of new laws and changes to the law that affect my clients.” David is currently taking new clients by appointment, and is capable of handling income tax preparation, tax consulting, IRS notice assistance and IRS audits, among other things. David is also a QuickBooks Certified Pro Advisor. “I am able to handle all aspects of accounting,” David said, “I look forward to assisting area residents with all of their accounting needs.” To make an appointment, call David Balint at (724) 833-9326 or (724) 998-0817

Waynesburg Auto Sales W

aynesburg Auto Sales is in its third year of business, and is continuing to offer great deals on quality, pre-owned vehicles. Waynesburg Auto Sales is located at 1050 E Greene St. (across from Staley’s Tire), and is owned and operated by Kayla Balint, who is no stranger to the automotive business. “I had worked on the wholesale side for numerous years and really took a liking to and interest in the business, so I decided to open my own retail outlet,” says Kayla, who knows how to find and select the best retail inventory. “Our business has grown a lot and we look forward to another year in Waynesburg.” Waynesburg Auto Sales uses trained buyers who go to the auto auctions, auto dealerships, and online buying sites to locate inventory. Waynesburg Auto Sales also buys vehicles from individuals. “My buyers, along with myself, find quality merchandise and bring it to our location,” Kayla added. “One of the advantages to this method is that someone can come in and request a particular vehicle and our buyers will track it down.” Waynesburg Auto Sales also specializes in building and repairing credit, regardless of past credit history. “We can finance anyone,” Kayla explains. “Everyone deserves a second chance. All of our vehicles are mechanic checked and approved before we sell them. We also offer vehicle warranties ranging from three months to three years. I enjoy helping people find a quality vehicle that is affordable. All of our inventory is priced below $6000.” Kayla lives in Waynesburg with her husband, David Balint, and their two sons. To see what Waynesburg Auto Sales can find for you, call 724-833-9127, or stop by Monday- Friday 10-4, or evenings and weekends by appointment. “You can also look on our website at www.waynesburgautosales.com to view our inventory and apply for credit,” Kayla added.

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

5


Local Home Care Agency Exceeds Expectations

Pictured (l-r) front row: Tammy Wilson, RN; Rea Kutcher, RN; Lisa Balint, RN, Director; Gloria Hoyle, RN; Kitty Morarity, Occupational Therapist; Tori Campbell, RN Back Row: Sarah Bowman, RN; Tracy Cole, RN; Mike Wilson, RN; Mike Tharp, Physical Therapist; Shawn Adamson, Physical Therapist; Tara Bland, Physical Therapist.

A

recent rating and comparison study performed by Medicare shows that Southwestern Home Care of Waynesburg meets or exceeds patient satisfaction results when compared to state and national standards. The agency also exceeded state and national standards in key quality performance areas. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), an estimated 27 million people will need some type of long-term care by 2050. Of those 27 million, the majority will receive their care from either a home health or hospice care agency. Comparatively, about 7.6 million people annually now receive communitybased care. The most common reason individuals need this level of care include after hospital care, chronic disease management, disabilities or terminal illness The reason this number is expected to grow relates to the desire for many to remain in their homes for as long as possible. Southwestern Home Care was established in 1979 and provides many services to support this growing need. Registered nurses, physical and occupational therapists and aids offer a range of medical and therapeutic services including, but not limited to, wound therapy, lab testing, IV therapy, enteral/parenteral feedings, administration of chemotherapy and medical social services. Southwestern Home Care has an established partnership with Advanced Physical Therapy of Waynesburg to provide physical and occupational therapy services. “Our goal is to provide as much care and treatment as possible to maintain the patient in their home or residential environment,” shared Lisa Balint, RN, BSN, MBA and Director of Southwestern Home Care. “Each patient is managed according to an individualized plan designed to restore health, maximize independence and minimize the impacts of illness.” For more information on these ratings visit www.medicare.gov/homehealthcompare/ or call Southwestern Home Care at 724-627-1900.

6

E

InMotion Dance and Fitness

xciting things are going on at In Motion Dance & Fitness at 48 West High Street in Waynesburg! At the heart of it all is owner and instructor, Dolly Throckmorton whose training and accomplishments are too numerous to mention. “I have always loved teaching and choreography,” says Dolly, “Sometimes it’s a challenge, but you keep working at it, and the outcome never lets you down. It’s very rewarding.” In Motion provides instruction in all traditional forms of dance; the big news, however, is that they’ve added a brand new, equipment-based circuit-training program called “Life Fitness,” which, Dolly says, offers “a 30-minute circuit that people can do anytime, at their own pace,” providing muscle strengthening as well as heart conditioning. What sets the “Life Fitness” equipment apart from many competitors is its unique automatic “set-up,” which helps users find the correct resistance, then automatically takes care of the details—no weights to move, no pins to line up with holes; none of the hassles of traditional fitness equipment, in other words. Because “Life Fitness” is based around resistance bands rather than traditional weights, the action is “…very smooth and not jerky,” says Dolly, “simple for men and women of any ability level.” F o r those who prefer fitness classes, In Motion has it covered. Their new “TRX Training” is a “revolutionary total body fitness p r o g r a m .” Developed by a Navy Seal commander, Clients enjoy the Life Fitness Circuit at In Motion Dance and Fitness in downtown Waynesburg. this suspension-based system uses a body’s own weight to create hundreds of challenging exercises for upper and lower body, and “core” strengthening. Beginner classes are available, as is a separate “men only” class. The “Barre” classes use exercises adapted from ballet training to focus on strength and toning. No prior experience is needed, and the class is suitable for any fitness level. Traditional cardio-training classes are offered, as is a “Pilates/Yoga based class.” A “Club Cardio” class offers a “fun class, with easy-to-follow routines” set to music. Morning classes are available 3 times per week, and there are 5 certified personal trainers on staff to provide individual guidance and instruction. To complete the fitness package, In Motion now has an “online nutrition app” for smartphones that provides a fitness tracker, keeps track of what foods are eaten, and even provides suggestions for meals and recipes, including shopping lists for necessary ingredients. The perfect first step to getting fit is getting yourself “in motion,” at In Motion Dance & Fitness!

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


GreeneScene FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

7


O

National Wild Turkey Federation

n their official Internet site (www.nwtf.org), the National Wild Turkey Federation describes itself as, “…the leader in upland wildlife habitat conservation in North America,” stating, “Collectively, we come from all walks of life to engage in conservation and preserve the hunting heritage we all hold dear.” In Greene County, that mission is carried on by the Warrior Trail Gobblers Chapter of the NWTF. Since 1993, the Gobblers have worked toward their goal to “…get the youth more involved in the outdoor world—not just hunting,” says current President of the chapter, Guy Hostutler. A founding member of the chapter, Guy remembers, “In those [past] 21 years, we’ve had many highs and lows,” but the dedicated work of members like current Vice President Jim Garber, and Gary Wood, along with the generosity of their corporate sponsor members, Bill Wise, Blue Mountain, Inc., 4Seasons Lawn and Garden, Jeff Rode and Rush Grocery and Video, just to name a few, have caused the group to grow to over 400 members. Philanthropy is key to their work, as all proceeds from events such as their upcoming banquet (March 29) are devoted to assisting local shooting groups, such as the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, and the West Greene Rifle Team; and to providing scholarships, at least one per year, to “a youth member [of the Gobblers] who is graduating high school,” says Guy. Last year, their efforts provided three scholarships of $250 each to deserving students. Creating a lasting, positive impact on the land is of paramount importance, also. “We help finance a lot of work that goes on in [state] game lands,” Guy reports, adding, “When the game commission can’t get money from the state, they come to us.” As Chairman of the Warrior Trail Gobblers’ banquet for the last four years, he is quick to point out that the success of this annual event is crucial to raising the funds to provide these types of service. Ongoing since the foundation of the chapter more than two decades ago, the banquet is not only a way for the community to support the efforts of the Gobblers, but is also an opportunity for guests to win valuable prizes. With a live auction, a silent auction, and raffles taking place throughout the evening, the public is invited to come out and join in the fun.

8

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


W

H&R Block

hile we may know the company by name, or from the countless television, radio, and print ads they’ve created over the decades, the simple beginnings of H&R Block may not be as well-known. During World War II, Henry Bloch served in the Army Air Force, and dreamed of starting a family business with his brothers once the war was over. When he arrived home in 1946 he opened a bookkeeping business in Kansas City, MO, with his older brother, Leon. Leon left the business to go to law school, and Henry’s mother suggested that he take younger brother, Richard, under his wing. Together, they formed the United Business Company, which continued bookkeeping work, and did tax preparation, on the side. A suggestion that the brothers make tax work a separate business intrigued the Bloch brothers, and, once they began, their bookkeeping offices were flooded with clients eager to take advantage of the Bloch’s new “$5 Tax Services,” thus beginning a revolution in how Americans prepared their income taxes. By 1956, the company had begun establishing franchise offices, and changed the spelling of their last name from “Bloch” to “Block,” to avoid mispronunciation by the public. In 1965, the company started its first “training school,” to help meet the demand for skilled professionals at their quickly-growing number of offices, and, by 1986, the company was completing over 10 million tax returns per year. That same year, H&R Block introduced electronic filing, which reduced paperwork, and helped clients to obtain tax refunds faster than ever before. In 2007, H&R Block reported serving nearly 20 million clients, obtaining $30 billion in tax refunds and credits for its customers. Locally, H&R Block is eager to help people “get their billion back,” as the current advertising campaign states, at the Waynesburg and Carmichaels offices owned by Charlotte Virgili Smith, and staffed Left to Right: Pat Sanner, Brenda May, Elizabeth Shrader, Brandy Hammett, Judy by her team of tax experts. Landis, Anne Blystone. Seated: owner Charlotte Virgili Smith

WAGGIN Libraries Acquire Learn4Life for Community Education

W

ho says that school has to end when you turn into a grown-up? We’ve chosen to go in a slightly different direction from usual, and here’s why: our “Cool @ School” column, which is printed every month during the school year, typically features a fun, challenging, interesting activity that is taking place (or has recently taken place) at one of our area schools, be it elementary, middle, or high school. However, countless reports and scientific studies show that people who strive to keep their brains sharp throughout their lives, after their “formal” education is over, receive many benefits. Aside from the obvious potential for better employability and increased wages that might be acquired through continuing education in one’s chosen field, it also appears that the “mental exercise” experienced when learning new information can lead to increased mental functioning as we age, encouraging better communication between brain cells. With that in mind, this month’s “Cool @ School” focuses on some exciting news for adult learners who want to expand their minds beyond what was taught in school, and the best part is that there is no cost to the individual. WAGGIN Libraries have acquired Learn4Life from Gale, part of Cengage Learning. Through this unique program, residents of Washington, Greene, and Fayette Counties can access instructor-led, online courses through their library’s website. WAGGIN Libraries strengthen our community by inspiring life-long learning and promoting literacy and knowledge. With Learn4Life online courses, residents will be able to enroll in courses covering all types of topics and subjects. Whether someone is considering going back to school to pursue a degree or just interested in digital photography, the Learn4Life course catalog offers something for everyone. Learn4Life offers patrons access to hundreds of instructor-led online courses covering everything from health and wellness to creative writing, computer programming, GED test preparation and much more. Learn4Life courses are developed by expert instructors, many currently working at universities around the country, and have continuous enrollment dates. Patrons are entitled to enroll in up to five courses per calendar year at no cost. Courses run for six weeks, with two new lessons being released weekly (for a total of 12), and new sessions beginning every month. The courses are entirely Web-based with comprehensive lessons, quizzes, and assignments. A dedicated professional instructor coordinates every course by pacing learners, answering questions, giving feedback, and facilitating discussions. WAGGIN Library Card holders can enroll and participate in courses from library computers or remotely from their home computer. For more information on the catalog of courses offered or to enroll in a course, residents should visit the library website www.greenecolib.org and click on the Learn4Life icon. About WAGGIN This overview of the WAGGIN system was provided by Therese M. Barry, System Administrator for the Greene County Library System: “WAGGIN is made up of 17 libraries in Washington, Greene, and Fayette counties. Through a web-based catalog and special resources, residents have access to over 800,000 items, shared databases, and free online classes with their WAGGIN Library Card. WAGGIN Libraries strengthen our community by inspiring lifelong learning and promoting literacy and knowledge. Your Library can help you discover what you’re looking for—What do you seek?”

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

9


Pro L&T Supply “Not just another Hardware Store” P

ro L&T Supply is owned and operated by the Yost family. Mom and Dad, Sara and Gene Yost and their daughter, Vonda Yost Fisher, and son-in-law, John Fisher, have been in operation for the past 22 years. They originated in a small 800 square foot building in Mt. Morris, PA that was originally the Allmeda Theater building (one of the first movie theaters built in the area). Pro L&T has since expanded to a new 5,000 square foot building in order to increase their highly desired and sought after inventory, and provide the community with the convenience of big city selections while maintaining a small town business atmosphere. Pro L&T Supply offers an amazing variety of good and services, including: • Household supplies for repairs or cleaning • Custom cut and threaded pipe, made to order • Custom cut equipment repair hose • Animal feed • Propane tank refilling • Fire resistant clothing • Boots, belts, purses, and many other fashion items for men, women and children • Greeting cards • Equipment rental Whatever your need, at Pro L&T you’re guaranteed to be greeted with a smile, and a friendly, “How can we help ya?” Lots of folks just stop by to sit a spell and catch up on the community happenings (if all of the “chatting chairs” are taken, they’ll be sure to find one for you if you’d like to sit and visit!). Pro L&T is owned and operated by Vonda Yost Fisher and family. Vonda is dedicated to serving the community in which she and her family have lived for generations, with quality products and service. She has often received calls in the middle of the night from someone in urgent need of a part for equipment, a heater, or generator, and has opened her doors in order to provide whatever was needed to make the situation better. As Vonda often says, Pro L&T Supply is “NOT just another hardware store!” To prove the point, she prides herself on offering 10 different brands of boots in several styles, for work, play, and dress, in sizes for men, women, children, and infants. Her eye-catching selection of purses and belts is well-known, even attracting customers from out of state who are eager for what Vonda has to offer. Hard at work creating a new website, Vonda will soon make it possible for people far and wide to see Pro L&T’s vast selection. Pro L&T carries a large variety of “Wrangler” and “Vocal” brand clothing in all sizes, and if they don’t have a size needed, Vonda will take measurements and create a special order. In fact, if Pro L&T doesn’t have what you need, no matter what kind of goods, they will do whatever they can to locate it, and get it in stock for you, or send you to someone who can. Offering over two decades of friendly, quality, timely service which speaks for itself, Pro L&T Supply truly has to be seen to be believed.

10

Wrangler Murray, 22 months Royce Murray, 7 months

Great Niece, Tenley Hart 8 months

Lincoln Fisher, 5 years old

Photos taken by Murray’s Moments in Time Photography Studio 724-998-9222.

GreeneScene by Linda Nalitz GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

11


TEEN DATING VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH PROCLAIMED FIRST RESPONDERS RECEIVE GRANTS

State Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Fayette/Greene/Washington, today said that 34 area fire companies and ambulance squads have been awarded more grants totaling almost $385,000 through the state Fire Company and Volunteer Ambulance Service Grant Program. “Our first responders save Pennsylvanians an estimated $6 billion every year and richly deserve this money so they can focus on saving our lives and properties,” Snyder said. “It is but a small down payment on what they provide our communities.” About $30 million was awarded statewide for eligible uses, including construction or renovation of facilities, purchase or repair of equipment, debt reduction and training. Greene County area fire companies and ambulance and rescue squads were awarded the following grant amounts: • Masontown Volunteer Fire Co., $12,486 • Bobtown-Dunkard Volunteer Fire Department, $12,161 • Bobtown-Dunkard Volunteer Fire Department/EMS, $7,091 • Carmichaels & Cumberland Township Volunteer Fire Department, $12,324 • Center Township Volunteer Fire Co., $12,473 • Crucible Volunteer Fire Co., $12,000 • Graysville Volunteer Fire Co., $12,000 • Jefferson Volunteer Fire Co., $12,647 • Jefferson Volunteer Fire Co./Ambulance, $7,091 • Morris Township Volunteer Fire Co., $12,000 • Mount Morris Community Volunteer Fire Co., $12,486 • Nemacolin Volunteer Fire Co., $12,500 • Nemacolin Volunteer Fire Co./EMS, $7,091 • New Freeport Volunteer Fire Department, $12,000 • Rices Landing Volunteer Fire Co., $12,161 • Rices Landing Volunteer Fire Co./EMS, $7,091 • Wayne Twp. Volunteer Fire Co., $12,000 • Waynesburg-Franklin Twp. Volunteer Fire Co., $13,619 The complete list of fire companies and ambulance and rescue squads and their grant awards is available at the state Fire Commissioner’s website, www.osfc.state.pa.us, under “Loans and Grants.”

$1,500 SCHOLARSHIP AVAILABLE

Greene County Commissioners recently proclaimed February 2014 National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month in Greene County. The proclamation urges county residents to work toward ending teen dating violence by empowering young people to develop healthier relationships; assisting victims in accessing the information and supportive services they need; creating better and more resources for young people in need; instituting effective intervention and prevention policies in schools; and engaging in discussions with family members and peers to promote awareness and prevention of the quiet epidemic of teen dating violence. “We have to start somewhere to stop this,” said Natalie Schwoerer, Greene County satellite office counselor/advocate for Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern Pennsylvania. “It is very important for us to educate our youths and teens and help stop this cycle.” Schwoerer noted that one in three adolescent girls in the United States is a victim of physical, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, but that not everyone knows that help is available or where to go. For more information, call the Greene County satellite office at 724-852-2463.

Pictured (l-r): Commissioner Chuck Morris, Natalie Schwoerer and Commissioner Blair Zimmerman.

24TH ANNUAL MISS GREENE COUNTY PAGEANT

Eleven local young ladies will compete in the 24th annual Miss Greene County Pageant, scheduled for 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23, in the auditorium of Waynesburg Central High School in Waynesburg. This year’s theme is “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.” Sponsored by CONSOL Energy, Inc., and the Greene County Commissioners, and presented by the The Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce is now accepting applications from Greene County county Department of Recreation, the pageant is open to Greene County girls ages 2 to 17. During the students who will be graduating seniors in 2014 for the 24th Annual Chamber of Commerce Scholarship pageant, each contestant will be judged on her photo and modeling of sportswear and formal wear. All age to be awarded this May.   High school seniors who have been accepted to a college or technical school as an incoming freshman categories are required to perform a talent routine, and some will also be judged on interviews conducted this fall and have maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better while in high school may prior to the pageant. All contestants are eligible for the Director’s Award, which will be presented to the apply. Applicants will be required to write an essay and furnish a listing of their school activities and local contestant who sells the most in advertising sponsorships. The value of the award is worth up to $300. Doors open to the public at 1 p.m. Admission to the pageant is $5, and a pageant booklet showcasing community involvement. Applications are available on the Chamber website at www.waynesburgchamber. all the contestants costs $15. In addition to CONSOL Energy, Inc., and the Greene County Commissioners, com  Completed applications must be submitted by 4:00pm on Monday, April 14th. The $1,500 scholarship additional pageant sponsors include Alpha Natural Resources, Community Bank, Greene County Sheriff award will be presented at the Chamber‘s monthly General Membership Luncheon on May 28th. For more Brian Tennant, Hoy’s Construction, Rhodes and Hammers Printing and Wal-Mart. All proceeds from the 2014 Miss Greene County Pageant will benefit Department of Recreation programs. information, call the chamber at 724-627-5926.

12

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


Knights Farm Supply M

ark your calendars for March 19th - 22nd. You don’t want to miss the Annual Spring Open House at Knight’s Farm Supply in Glen Easton, West Virginia. One of the most popular community events, this is a weekend of fun that has become a tradition in the region. Folks from three states come to Knights for some of the best pricing of the year and excellent financing opportunities on tractors, implements, equipment and everything else a busy farmer or gardener needs to get ready for spring. During Open House Knight’s offers 10% off New Holland & Massey Ferguson parts, plus discounts on oil, baler twine, net wrap and sileage wrap, wire, fence supplies and more. While the discounts are enough reason to come to Spring Open House at Knight’s Farm Supply, the food and entertainment just make it a “must do deal” for most people. Free food and refreshment on Friday & Saturday, dozens of door prizes all three days, and on Friday night - live entertainment with the Cabin Fever Band. Spring Open House is the perfect time to see the year’s new models and learn all about the tractors and equipment from the factory reps that will be there on Friday to answer your questions. You’ll find the reps from New Holland, Massey Ferguson, Land Pride, Wood, Krone and Kuhn. It’s also a good time to take a close look at Knight’s huge inventory of used tractors and equipment, and get sale prices on everything from fence posts to feeders. Months are spent in advance, building inventory and making preparations to kick-off the season with Spring Open House at Knight’s Farm Supply. “A lot of people take advantage of the deals and plan to purchase during open house. It’s a busy weekend. We always encourage people to call in their parts orders early, so we can have them ready to pick-up any time during open house, that’s really important...don’t wait till you come, call us now,” advises Missy Knight. It’s happening Mar. 19th - 22nd (Wed & Thu 8am - 5pm, Fri 8am - 8pm and Sat 8am - noon). Don’t miss it.

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

13


Clipper

14

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


“Keep On Clipping!”

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

15


W

Greene County Career and Technology Center

hile it may be difficult to attach a concrete meaning to the term, “perfect career,” consider that there is a readily available option wherein being of help to others is the chief priority, with ample opportunities locally and nationally for employment, and which has no set pre-requisites to begin. The Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) program offered by the Greene County Career and Technical College offers all of this, and so much more. Started in 1970, the LPN program has graduated over 1000 nurses, and, for the last 3 years has had an astounding 100% “pass rate” for the students’ nursing licensure exam, the NCLEX-PN. Wendy Bouchard has been with the program since 1990, and became its Coordinator in 2008. She is eager to point out the many benefits of the program, saying, “We have good instructors, and our clinicals are local—the furthest we go is Washington Hospital,” which means that students don’t have to travel far afield to complete their education. Classes are kept small, Wendy reports, with no more than 30-40 students per class. Another advantage is that there are no specific pre-requisites to join the LPN program; an applicant does have to pass a rigorous entrance examination, and obtain security clearances, but a college degree or prior health care experience is not required. The LPN program takes just 1 year to complete, divided into three 16-week levels, starting in July. Once training begins, students will be happy to learn that everything needed for the training—books, clothing, computer software, and many other supplies—are all included in the tuition price, at no extra charge. Because the LPN program is accredited and approved by the PA State Board of Nursing, students are also eligible to apply for financial aid in the form of “Title IV” funding and/or Pell Grants. Combined, these factors emphasize a point that Wendy was quick to note: “We work with our students. If they come and want to succeed, we really try to help them.” How does that translate into real-world experience, once training is complete, though? “There are jobs available for PNs, not just here, but in any state,” Wendy assures, adding, “You can be licensed in all 50 states, if you want to be.” To learn more about the LPN program at Greene County Career and Technical College, contact Coordinator, Wendy Bouchard, at bouchardw@grvt.org, or visit http://www.grvt.org/practicalnursing.html

Greene County Industrial Development Authority T

he Greene County Industrial Development Authority (GCIDA) is actively partnering with the Greene County Board of Commissioners to foster economic growth in the county. The authority works with our federal delegation and state legislators, as well as development partners, including Waynesburg University and the University of Pittsburgh Institute of Entrepreneurial Excellence, to further expand business opportunities throughout the county. The authority provides links to financial resources for County-owned businesses for expansion or retention and administers a revolving loan fund, funded in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development program. The fund was established to provide seed money to promote job development and business growth and expansion within Greene County. The GCIDA also has the ability to issue tax exempt Industrial Development Bonds (IDB’s) as a means for manufacturers, 501(c)(3) entities, and owners of qualified facilities to obtain a lower and more flexible interest rate than conventional financing. Interest income earned by purchase of IDB’s is exempt from Federal Income Tax and State Taxes. These savings result in lower costs to the borrower. The Board of Directors of the Industrial Development Authority is led by Joseph Simatic, who serves as Chairman. Other members include Sheila Elliott Stewart, Branch Manager and Assistant Vice President of First National Bank; Andrew Corfont, Vice-President and Marketing Administrator; and Jason Neighbors, owner of Vending Solutions. The Authority offices are located on the street level of the Fort Jackson Building at 49 South Washington Street in Waynesburg. For information or assistance, please call 724-6279259.

16

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


Burns Tire Service K

nowing you can trust the product and the people – that is the number one reason generations of customers have continued to return to Burns Tire Service in Waynesburg, now in its 46th year in business. The Burns family has continued to earn that trust with superior service and products beginning with Buck & Amanda, who started with the re-treading shop on Cherry Alley in 1968, still familiar faces working the business on South Morris Street with son Randy Burns today and the third generation is on board with Randy’s daughter, Kayla Patton, on staff as well. It’s that kind of personal approach and customer care that has made this business a leading source for automotive service and tires. Burns Tire is fully equipped and staffed to handle all tire service, repair and installation including vehicles with tire pressure monitoring systems. Firestone remains a leading seller, and other tire brands are available at Burns as well. In addition to cars and light trucks, Burns is the leading source in the area for truck, tractor and equipment tires. “We do a lot of work on large trucks and equipment in the local energy industry also,” Randy said. With a warehouse on site, Burns keeps a large inventory in stock of all tires – passenger, light duty, agricultural, industrial, etc. Burns Tire is also a full automotive service center, with skilled and trained technicians who work on brakes, transmission and all engine mechanics. Burns Tire Service is your single source for automotive service, under the hood or on the wheels. Call 724-627Randy Burns with grandson Luke – looking forward to the 4th generation to TIRE for an appointment. keep Greene County rolling into the future on Firestone….

GreeneScene by Shelly Koss Courtwright

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

17


T

his month’s GreeneScene of the Past comes to us courtesy of Ms. Dawn Bell of Community Bank, who wrote to us, “Thought this was an interesting photo of Rices Landing.” That’s putting it quite mildly! “I grew up in Rices Landing (although much later than that photo!). I live in Fredericktown now,” Dawn continues. Very often, we place a picture in this space and ask readers for help identifying what the scene is, or what’s taking place; here, we see exactly, as noted in the bottom left corner of the photograph, that this is “High Water, Jan. 30, 1911, Rices Landing PA.” Dawn adds, “The Rices Landing School is the building in the back. It is now gone.” It may be a fairly safe bet that many other things in this photo are gone, as well, but the picture remains, and we thank Dawn for her consideration in providing it to us!

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

“T

Carmine’s House of Furniture

ravel a little, save a lot” is a good motto for Carmine’s House of Furniture. A trip on State Rt. 21 to the old village of McClellandtown will lead you to great prices and experienced people who back their products and their work. Prepare to be delighted at the selection you will find there. “If I had a dollar from every customer who said, ‘I can’t believe how big the store is!’ I’d be retired today!” owner Jack Hudock declared. “Our store is 17,000 square feet, and we carry all brand name furniture—Ashley, Catnapper, Lancer, Riverside, Coaster, Homelegance, Amish-made recliners and furniture plus many, many more. We also Sales Manager Joel Riggen have a complete line of flooring. We have complete bedroom, dining room and living room sets; something for every room in the home, and so much more. Our pricing is very competitive, if not the lowest in the area.” At Carmine’s, it’s easy to match furniture to the flooring on display. “I’d say that 30 percent of our business is in flooring. We do all kinds—carpeting, vinyl, laminate, hardwood; and we have two crews to install,” Jack said. Financing can be arranged, and the store accepts all major credit cards. Jack continues, “We offer up to 12 months same as cash. We look forward to doing business with you.” “We have low prices every day at Carmine’s, and offer free delivery. There are not too many stores who offer free delivery, but we have for over 34 years, and will continue to do so,” Jack adds. “Our sales manager, Joel Riggen, has been with us for 31 years, and he and I can answer all your questions. Longtime employee Eddie Bergman has also been installing for us for over 20 years.” “We’re having our inventory clearance sale right now—up to 60 percent off on all furniture, accessories and carpeting. We have free carpet installation, and free eight pound padding. You don’t want to miss this one—give us a call!”

18

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


Debbie Gilbert: Plexus World I

t was a cold spring day when I realized everything I had known about myself was slowly fading into the distance. My health was branding me for the world to see and forcing me out of my element, and I wasn’t someone who enjoyed going to doctors or wearing my health like a giant neon sign above my head. Now, I have a new appreciation for life and hope that by sharing my story you may find hope within it. My name is Debbie Gilbert. I was born and raised in Greene County, and still live in West Greene. I am your typical 40 year old wife and mother of two. Like many, I have experienced life-altering illnesses, including Hypothyroidism, Fibromyalgia, Bell’s Palsy, and unexplainable tremors. My health and quality of life was worsening on a daily basis and my mind was not one I recognized any longer, nor was my once active, healthy body. I suddenly had begun to forget things—a lot of things. Occasionally, I found myself unable to form sentences because I couldn’t remember the words, and daily tasks that I could normally perform in my sleep now seemed foreign to me. Mentally, I thought that I was going crazy, and physically I was in pure agony. My house was suffering and so was my family. My children had activities that I was unable to participate in because I was too tired or in too much pain to go. I couldn’t climb stairs without my legs shaking and becoming very weak, and I experienced muscle spasms in my feet and calves along with all over muscle twitching. My social life was non-existent because I was too embarrassed to be seen with my facial drooping, and the fear of having to speak, knowing I may forget the words, was not appealing. My love of barrel racing came to an end as well, as my legs were either dead weight around my horse’s back, or they would shake uncontrollably. I was put on more medication that made me feel less like myself, and my weight was skyrocketing. I felt helpless and the thought of giving my family only a piece of who I was hurt me deeply. It was October of 2013 when a friend introduced me to the Plexus product line. She told me that Plexus could give me back my life but, honestly, the thought seemed impossible at that point. I was very skeptical of these all-natural products because I had never heard of them before, and probably would not have even tried them if it were not for the fact that all of the products carry a 60 day money back guarantee. I was in my third week of using the Plexus products when it hit me: it was 9:30pm and I was still awake. Normally, I would be in bed long before, but I wasn’t tired! I felt great! My mood was the best it had been in a very long time. My pain was almost non-existent and I realized that I couldn’t remember the last time I had tremors, twitching or muscle spasms. My facial drooping was almost unrecognizable and I had lost a whole pants size! All of my symptoms were going away! What’s more—I can’t wait to start barrel racing with my beautiful horse, when spring comes. I couldn’t believe the results I had gotten in just 3 weeks! By the end of that first month, I knew I would NEVER be without these products again. They offered me what nothing else could: my life. I joined the Plexus team and became an Independent Ambassador, because I wanted to sell these products that I had become so passionate about. I never wanted another person to think that hope was lost. The products are not a cure for any illness but they make living with them a whole lot easier; and weight loss as a side effect? I’ll take that! My results were achieved by using Plexus Slim, Fast Relief Pain Cream and Capsules, ProBio5, Bio Cleanse, and X Factor. I would love to speak with you and help put together the perfect Plexus plan to meet your needs, and encourage you to call or e-mail me for more information!

GreeneScene by Jerry Fontana FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

19


W

P.W. Auto Sales and Service

hen looking for a customerfriendly auto service you can trust, look no further than PW Auto Sales & Service of Waynesburg. “We provide our customers with the peace of mind to know that their vehicle will be taken care of by an honest, trustworthy and knowledgeable staff,” remarks owner, Pat Westich. “Satisfaction is our L-R: Pat Westich, Philip Westich, Thomas Tharp, William Crowe, Greg Calix goal, and we go out of our way to make sure that’s what our customers are— safety check and come with a basic warranty. If desatisfied.” sired, additional aftermarket warranties are availFounded over 30 years ago, PW Auto Sales & able for purchase. Service has grown into one of the most trusted auto To keep his customers comfortable, Pat has services and used car sales centers in the area. Wes- created a new and improved waiting area, featuring tich and his staff of four full-time employees have complimentary coffee and candy while you wait. In over 100 years of combined automotive experience. warmer weather, customers will also enjoy the outPW Auto is a full-service garage, provid- side picnic table and shaded pavilion. ing mechanical work, light body work, tune ups, Pat has started Freedom Baptist Church, 113 brakes, exhaust, oil changes and alignments with Second St. in Jefferson, and attributes his success up-to-date equipment. “You can always expect the to his faith in God. “It is through the Lord that I latest in diagnostic information and technology am able to succeed, both in life and in business,” from PW Auto,” promises Pat. “We also offer tow- humbly states Pat. “We would like to thank all of ing.” our loyal customers. One thing that proves our cusPW Auto also sells dependable used vehicles tomer satisfaction is that many of them have been at affordable prices. All vehicles undergo a 30 point with us from the start.”

Welcome to ! r e k c e B a Christin T

he GreeneSaver invites our readers to join us as we welcome Greene County’s new Penn State Extension 4-H Educator, Christina Becker. “Chris” is a lifelong resident of the area, who, as she puts it, “…lives in the middle of nowhere,” on the farm where she grew up, near Brownsville, Fayette County. Growing up as a farmer’s daughter, Chris’ passions took root—no pun intended—at a very early age. “I love agriculture and farming,” she says, noting that she has a particular interest in sheep and cattle. Chris is quick to state her firm belief in what she calls “4-H values,” adding, “I spent my younger years growing up in 4-H.” It could be said that she engineered her whole destiny to become involved with the organization, in fact. As Chris pointed out, “I started my college career thinking I wanted to be a 4-H educator.” Following high school and college, she obtained her master’s degree in Agriculture Education at West Virginia University in the late 1980s, and taught Agriculture Science at Waynesburg Central High School, and also at the Morgantown Vo-Tech School, and Morgantown High School. Chris states that she is already “…feeling fairly settled…” into her new position. Her pre-existing comfort and familiarity with both 4-H in general, and with Greene County in particular are sure to make her transition a smooth one. There is bubbling enthusiasm in her voice as she notes, “I’m very excited about working with the youth and the 4-H program in Greene County,” emphasizing her desire to, “…offer more opportunities for county youth to grow.” The GreeneSaver is pleased that Chris is fulfilling her chosen purpose here with us, in Greene County, and we wish her great success in all of her endeavors! For information about joining, volunteering, or donating to the 4-H in Greene County, please call 724-627-3745, or e-mail greeneext@psu.edu.

20

GreeneScene by Michele Deems

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA T

here is hardly a month that passes that the GreeneSaver doesn’t post information, either in our Message Board, or elsewhere in the body of the paper, from Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA (DVSSP). The simple truth is that there is no telling how many people this organization has helped over its history. DVSSP offers a range of services in Greene, Fayette, and Washington counties to assist those who are abused or threatened with abuse, and their children. These services include a 24 hour hotline, 24 hour transportation and intake, counseling and support groups, legal advocacy, prevention programs, transitional housing, and much more. Although every month is important when it comes to the prevention of domestic violence, February is particularly noteworthy, as it is “Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month.” As stated on the DVSSP Internet site, www.peacefromdv.org, “The repercussions of teen dating violence are impossible to ignore—they hurt not just the young people victimized, but also their families, friends, schools and communities.” The mission of DVSSP, for both teens and adults, is to, “…increase awareness of domestic violence and its effect on the community, to empower those victimized by providing advocacy and safe and effective services, and to work for social change designed to eliminate domestic violence.” The story of this vital organization is unique, spanning nearly four decades. Although its presence is now strong in Greene County, DVSSP began in Washington County. DVSSP originated with the YWCA Women’s Resource Center in 1976, primarily as an information and referral service and to be a “listening ear.” The scope of the problem of domestic violence in the area quickly became evident and, through grants from the Washington Presbytery and the Circle Foundation, the YWCA of Washington was able to rent a nearby apartment in May of 1980. This became Washington County’s first shelter for victims of domestic violence. Early in 1985, the Women’s Shelter became a member of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence. That November, the Women’s Resource Center Advisory Committee of the YWCA voted to leave the YWCA and become an independent agency. The new agency became incorporated in February of 1986 as Washington Women’s Shelter (WWS), and was fully autonomous in July of 1986. In March of 1986, WWS, Inc. moved its operation to a much larger house, and in 1989, they entered into a contract with Washington County for a grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (H.U.D.). The Board of Directors mortgaged a large, older home in Washington and used H.U.D. monies to furnish and remodel the building. In 1993, WWS, Inc., at the request of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence, opened a satellite counseling center in Waynesburg, at 43 N. Morgan St., to facilitate the provision of domestic violence services in Greene County. In 2010, the Coalition and the PA Commission on Crime and Delinquency asked WWS, Inc. to provide services in adjoining Fayette County, which they have been doing since October of that year. In February of 2011 the Board of Directors legally changed the organization’s name to “Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern Pennsylvania” to more adequately describe their work and expanded service area. DVSSP works to spread its message through its website, and through extensive community outreach events. Volunteers and contributions are vitally important to the ongoing mission. To learn more or donate, call 724-852-2373 or visit www.peacefromdv.org. If you are experiencing domestic violence, and would like immediate help, please call their 24 hour hotline, at 724-852-2463.

GreeneScene by Missy Henry

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

21


County of Greene Department of Economic Development

I

GreeneScene by Kathy Evans

22

n our lifetime, it has never been more important to create jobs. The County’s Department of Economic Development, located at the ground level of the Fort Jackson County Building at 49 South Washington Street in Waynesburg, is prepared and glad to assist you in your land development, business start-up, expansion, and entrepreneurship efforts. Our department is prepared to partner, to provide resources and access to capital for a seamless process. The Department staff provides access to site information, capital and workforce training and will assist you via an array of services which include: countywide aerial photography; property and utility information; research; business loan programs; tax abatement; permitting assistance; consistent administration of the Greene County Subdivision and Land Development Ordinance; land use planning and zoning; subdivision of property; commercial land development review; financial assistance; water resources planning; housing; infrastructure; and grant writing and administration services. The Economic Development department also provides advocacy for many needs and coordination of services with our 26 municipalities and strives to assist residents to become and to remain good stewards of the air, water and land of this beautiful county - the Cornerstone of the Keystone State. We partner with The Redevelopment Authority of the County of Greene, Tri-County Oil and Gas Expo, Waynesburg University’s Center for Research and Economic Development, Southwest Training Services, Waynesburg Chamber of Commerce, Greene County Tourism, Greene Alliance for Development, and our municipalities. Working together to advance the economy of Greene County is a critical component for success. To access more resources and to reach beyond our boundaries for opportunities for growth regionally, we partner with Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission and The Allegheny Conference on Community Development and Affiliates. Ms. Robbie M. Matesic is the Executive Director of the Department of Economic Development. Here to help are Lisa Snider, Greene County Conservation District Manager; Jeremy Kelly, Planning & Business Development Manager; Crystal Simmons, Grant Coordinator; Kelli Koval, Economic Development Associate; David Craft, GIS and Mapping Specialist; Richard Davis, Housing Rehabilitation Specialist; Mary Jane Kent, Program Support and Mimi Ritenour, Fiscal Officer. The Department of Economic Development today incorporates: • Greene County Conservation District Board of Directors Bradley Eisiminger, Chairman. Meets third Tuesday of every month at 10:00 AM. • Greene County Farmland Preservation Board of Directors William A. Cree III, Chairman. Meets third Wednesday of every month at 1:00 PM Sept - April and 6:00 PM May - August • Greene County Planning Commission Brent Burnett, Chairman. Meets first Monday of every month at 7:00 PM. • Tax Abatement Review Board John Mariner, Chairman. Meets second Friday of every other month at 8:00 AM. • Greene County Industrial Development Authority Joseph Simatic, Chairman. Meets third Wednesday of each month at 8:30 AM. The department welcomes constituents to call or to stop by with questions or concerns. The department office is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM. The office phone is 724-852-5300, fax is 724-852-2944. Visit our website: www.co.greene.pa.us.

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


by Regis Whetzel

I

t’s impossible not to take notice when an entire high school class attracts the attention of an important regional employer within the gas and oil industry, and this is exactly what happened recently, right here in Greene County. The story features a dedicated teacher who knew his students would benefit from specialized training, but it begins with a bit of history about the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo Committee, and the Tri-County Energy Development Alliance. The efforts behind the Alliance began around 2007, when Community Bank President, Pat McCune, approached his Vice President Andrew Corfont with questions about how best to serve the area’s citizens and businesses in light of the (then) newly-emerging Marcellus Shale boom. Andrew opened talks with Waynesburg University and Greene County government officials to explore options. This led to the formation of the “Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo Committee,” which set about presenting a forum and exposition designed primarily for landowners, and featured vendors, presentations and meetings to help people get answers to their questions, and avoid any unscrupulous individuals or agencies who might be attempting to undervalue the owners’ rights. “At that time, we worked closely with the Penn State Extension, and Waynesburg University,” remembered Andrew. It wasn’t long before the Committee branched out to meet the needs of regional businesses, which were eager to learn how to connect with the industry that was fast becoming a dominant presence in the area. Over the next several years the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo committee presented annual Business-toBusiness Expos, and worked extensively with area CareerLink offices to facilitate job fairs, and produced a nationally-recognized business directory which, says Andrew, “…is considered a Bible of contacts across the industry.” It seems a natural outgrowth that this work with individuals and businesses would lead to becoming involved in area schools trying to answer the challenge of workforce preparation for this unprecedented growth in the natural gas energy industry. That involvement began with the Tri-County Oil & Gas “Education Summit” hosted by Waynesburg University with educators, policy makers, legislators, administrators and industry leaders coming together to discuss what educational needs would be required to meet the burgeoning demand for all types of workers. Today, there are programs in place at several area school districts featuring presentations, special classes, and a variety of other events directed toward showcasing “energy careers for the future,” according to Andrew. This includes “Career Forums for Educators” in Greene and Washington counties, and throughout the Mon Valley region. By way of these abundant avenues, Justin Golsky, a Tech-Ed teacher at Waynesburg Central High School, made contact with the Expo Committee. “He realized that his students needed to be exposed to the industry,” says Andrew. This led to Justin requesting funding from the Oil & Gas Expo Committee to send him to “SafeLand” training. According to their official Internet site, www.safelandusa.org, SafeLand USA is, “…a volunteer organization comprised of major and independent operating companies, industry associations, and educators, with the purpose of developing a standardized orientation which sets minimum requirements for the US Onshore E&P [Exploration & Production] Industry.” In other words, vital training to provide to students in order to put them on the leading edge when vying for jobs within the industry. Since SafeLand’s objectives were closely aligned with the Tri-County Energy Development Alliance’s mission, they agreed to use funding raised from their business-to-business expos to cover the cost of the training. As a result, Andrew reports, “If we get approached, a lot of the training can be done locally, because Justin is now a certified trainer,” which reduces costs, and creates an easier path to opportunity for those interested in receiving SafeLand training. The immediate result of Justin’s ability to provide training for his high school students was stunning. As Justin recalled in a recent e-mail to Andrew Corfont, “Mr. Mason (Central Greene Principal) just came to me this morning with news of Elite Oilfield wanting to hire my students because they heard of the program and the certifications that these students have. He just informed me that Ms. Hanlin [of Elite Oilfield] wants to come in and meet all of my students and make them offers. I really see some great things happening for our school and our students.” Underscoring the value of the Committee’s investment in Justin’s training, Andrew Corfont is unyielding in emphasizing the importance of working with students and parents. “There are good, familysustaining jobs available in this industry,” he affirms, “and you may not need a college degree.” He praises Justin’s hard work and dedication in successfully exposing his students to the range of opportunities available, saying, “Justin has really gone above and beyond to help his students.” To learn more about the Tri-County Oil & Gas Expo Committee and Tri-County Energy Development Alliance, Andrew Corfont welcomes inquiries at: acorfont@communitybank.tv.

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

T

Waynesburg Memorial Sales

rust. Quality. Experience. These are the attributes Waynesburg Memorial Sales has taken so much pride in attaining. Approaching their ninth year in business, owners Rick and Jennifer Kolat, have learned the value of these three qualities, and the importance they hold for customers. “Creating a monument is personal and requires a lot of thought and patience.” says Jennifer. “Our goal is to help families work through the design process, making it as effortless as possible. We change and revise things until the layout perfectly depicts what the family envisions.” When purchasing a monument the choices are endless and often overwhelming. Rick explains, “Our job is to ensure the family gets the perfect memorial, using materials of the highest quality while staying within their budget.” Rick and Jennifer can create any type of memorial including granite, bronze markers, hand sculpted pieces and mausoleums. They are able to produce custom monuments designed to represent an individual’s personal vision or idea or artwork. They can design monuments to match existing family stones as well. “Many people are under the incorrect impression that they must purchase monuments through their cemetery or funeral home,” Waynesburg Memorial Sales offers bronze markers at very affordable prices. The common states Rick. “Not 2X1 size begins at $1,075, and smaller sizes are available as low as $800. only can we help you save money because we are independently owned and there is no middle man, we are also able to offer so many more options.” Waynesburg Memorial Sales carries an extensive line of bronze markers offered at a fraction of the cost typically paid through a third party. “We have access to a smaller, less expensive foundry as well as large production plants with more options. These markers can be set in any memorial park or cemetery, we take care of all the arrangements for installation as well.” In addition to cemetery monuments, Waynesburg Memorial Sales also offers ways to enhance memorials. Admired Life and Memory Medallion are both digital ways to provide lasting details of one’s life. Stories and photos are preserved for future generations to access and read. Waynesburg Memorial Sales also does large scale restoration projects, on-site engraving and civic monuments. Located at 1040 East Greene Street in Waynesburg, PA. Office hours are Mon., Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 10am to 4pm. They offer evening and weekends by appointment as well as in-home consultations.

23


24

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


A

Padgett Business Services

mi Cree and Bill Karns partnered together in June 2002, purchasing a Padgett Business Services franchise. After 11 years of dedicated service, Bill Karns recently retired from the business, and Ami is now sole owner. While maintaining the office located in downtown Waynesburg, Ami has recently expanded services with the opening of a second office in Carmichaels, PA, and welcomes two additional staff members to her team, Toby Whipkey and John Hair Jr. Ami’s offices are part of a network of over 400 independently owned and operated Padgett offices throughout North America. The local offices serve Greene, Washington and Fayette counties. Padgett offers income tax return preparation services to individuals, using the IRS efile system. In addition, Padgett prepares business income tax returns for sole proprietors, partnerships, corporations, nonprofits, and farms. Ami has experience in dealing with the issues and opportunities associated with the oil and gas industry. Padgett specializes in providing financial reporting and tax consulting services to businesses with less than 20 employees. “Padgett Business Services has the reputation of knowing what the owner-operated business needs,” said Ami. “We’ve enjoyed providing this service and meeting the financial reporting and tax needs of our small business community.” Padgett also offers payroll services, preparation and filing of payroll taxes, estimated taxes, and sales tax. Ami Cree, a 1989 graduate of BethlehemCenter High School, earned her Bachelor’s Degree from Waynesburg College, where she majored in Accounting and minored in Management. She also obtained her Master’s Degree from Waynesburg College. Prior to becoming co-owner of Padgett, Ami worked eight years with a Pittsburgh area financial group. In her eight year career with Ellis and Everard she was promoted twice, from accounts payable administrator to accounting manager to assistant controller. She taught numerous evening classes at Westmoreland County Community College. Ami resides on a small farm in Khedive with her husband Bill, a third generation dairy farmer, and their three children, Al, Beth and Ani. Ami enjoys volunteering her time at school activities and helps coach baseball and soccer. As a contributing member of the community, Padgett proudly sponsors baseball, softball, soccer, Greene County 4-H and many other local events.

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

Toby Whipkey, a 1991 graduate of West Greene High School, earned her Associates Degree in Executive Office Administration from Penn Commercial. She worked for Washington Federal for about twelve years as a Senior Loan Processor in the Residential Lending Department and as a Senior Loan Closer. Toby resides in West Greene with her husband Jim, owner of Scotty’s Pizza, and their two children, London and Pieper. She is vice president of the Graysville parent organization and enjoys volunteering her time to help the school and the kids. John Hair Jr., a 2009 graduate of Carmichaels High School, earned his Bachelor’s Degree in Finance from California University of Pennsylvania. His career in the financial industry began at Community Bank. John resides in Khedive. He enjoys playing and watching sports, making music, and

(l to r) John Hair Jr., Owner Ami Cree, and Toby Whipkey

spending time with family and friends. Since 1966, Padgett has provided financial reporting and tax consulting services to independent business owners throughout North America. Padgett has been ranked as the #1 small business accounting firm by Entrepreneur, Success, and Income Opportunities magazines, as well as being ranked in Accounting Today’s Top 100. If you are interested in seeing how Padgett can help improve your business, or just looking to have your income taxes filed, call either office. Waynesburg 724-6273800; Carmichaels 724-319-2274. Both offices are IRS approved to e-file and provide fast, accurate and affordable services!

25


Koo-rek-shun… In a recent GreeneSaver Message Board, we let readers know about the “Christmas Tree Extravaganza” at the Carmichaels First United Methodist Fellowship Hall, stating that “…trees were auctioned to benefit the Extravaganza sponsor, A.C.T.S. (Arts, Crafts, Talents, Services). It was brought to our attention that, while A.C.T.S. is the sponsor, the proceeds from all tree auctions actually went to the Cumberland Township Food Bank. We commend the Town and Garden Club of Rices Landing (whose members were featured in our piece), and all participants in the Extravaganza for doing their part to provide food for those in need in our area. This year’s event set a new high for the number of trees auctioned, and enabled A.C.T.S. to donate $2,305 to the food bank!

Do You Play? The National Pike Days celebration at Waleski Horse Farm in Richeyville is one of the best Bluegrass Jam Fests of the year with three days of great music and good food, too. The Waleskis are recruiting Bluegrass Bands right now. If you or your group wants to be considered for performing at the Pike Days Bluegrass Festival at Waleski Horse Farm, May 17 & 18, 2014, call now before they are all booked. Call 724-632-3812.

Veterans Outreach Schedule

Red-Tailed Hawk Talk The Town & Country Garden Club posts this photo of member Betty Robison, who recently gave a detailed presentation on the Red-Tailed Hawk, the most common hawk and one of the largest birds in North America. Occupying every type of open habitat on the continent, the Red-Tailed Hawk is so named because its tail, which is usually pale on the underside, is cinnamon-red, above. Betty also shared that the hawk typically nests in the crowns of tall trees, and can be aggressive when defending its nest or territory. Betty said the Red-Tailed Hawk population is stable and increasing in North America, and that the oldest known example lived to be nearly 29 years old. Betty is a 16-year member of the Washington County Master Gardeners, and owner of Robison Plant Sanctuary in Scenery Hill.

Name the New Mascot!

Greene County Veterans Affairs posts the following remaining dates, locations and times for their “Veterans Outreach” services: Mar 25, Carmichaels Senior Center, 10am; Apr 23, Mt. Morris Senior Washington, Greene, and Fayette County Libraries have a new mascot. The Information Retriever Center, 10am; May 29, West Greene Senior Center, 10am; Jun 3, Bobtown Senior Center, 10am; Jul 22, Clarksville Lions Center, 11am; Aug 27, Jefferson Senior Center, 10am; Oct 1, Mt. Morris Senior Cen- included on the WAGGIN Logo and each new library card needs a name. Individuals, families, businesses, and organizations are invited to submit possible names to any library in the WAGGIN Network ter, 10am; Nov 6, West Greene Senior Center, 10am; Nov 18, Bobtown Senior Center, 10am. before March 16. You can download a digital entry form at www.greenecolib.org. The top five selections will be presented to the public for voting Mar. 26-Apr. 9. Visit your library, in person or online, to support your favorite. The winning entry will be announced on Apr. 16 at a Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA posts the following notice for those in need: Naming Celebration held at Citizens Library & “Looking for a comfortable, confidential atmosphere where you can discuss your current or previous District Center in Washington as part of National abusive relationship? Domestic Violence Services of Southwestern PA provides a low-pressure support Library Week. The winner will receive their very group that will help.” FMI: 724-825-2463 in Greene Co.; 724-439-9500 in Fayette; or 724-223-9190 in own WAGGIN mascot plush. WAGGIN is made up of 17 libraries in WashWashington (including info on Mon Valley support group) ington, Greene, and Fayette counties. Through a web-based catalog and special resources, residents have access to over 800,000 items, shared databases, and free online classes with their WAGGIN Library Card.

Domestic Violence Support Group

Oh, Deer!

Samuel and David Moore post this picture of a deer in the yard of their Clarksville home with the message, “You think you have it rough in this snow? We are in it continuThe town and Country Garden Club recently ously, sleeping, walking, playing, eating… Even the best of hosted Bill Aupperle, owner and chef of the Lardin us need help this time of year House in Masontown, who presented a program on “Growing and Cooking with Herbs.” He disto survive!” cussed the characteristics of several herbs - basil, rosemary, mint, oregano, cilantro, chervil, parsley, thyme - and noted their many uses in cooking. Recipes were given for their use in marinades, sauces, salsa, meat, poultry, fish, and vegetables. Aupperle maintains his own herb and vegetable State and Federal Tax forms are available at the Eva K. Bowlby Public Library in Waynesburg. The garden at the Lardin House. He also introduced forms are supplied by the federal and state governments and the Bowlby Library has no control over the and discussed specialty coffees, many of which are amount of forms or the lack thereof. The IRS will provide listings for tax help lines if more assistance high in anti-oxidants. Chef Aupperle apprenticed is needed; library staff is not trained to offer tax advice. at the Pittsburgh Field Club and has 30 years of experience in the food industry.

Herbal Options with Aupperle

Tax Forms

26

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014


The Community Foundation of Greene County - 2014

T

he Community Foundation of Greene County is the focal point within the county for individual donors, nonprofit organizations and businesses to create legacies that support today’s needs and promote long-term investment in the County. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable corporation, CFGC manages nearly $4 million in assets, including 65 permanently endowed and restricted funds – and continues to grow! The funds are professionally managed and integrated into grant-making programs that address current and emerging needs in areas such as arts and culture, economic development, education, the environment, health, human services, recreation, and religion. Through careful investing, the impact of gifts received is multiplied, and resources are extended to help future generations. A permanent endowment will invest money and distribute a portion of the earnings to support designated organizations, scholarships, or discretionary grants. “When people make a gift to the Foundation, whether setting up their own new fund or adding to an existing fund, we invest that gift to grow,” said Bettie Stammerjohn, executive director of the Foundation. “Income from that investment goes back out the community in the form of grants and scholarships for whatever charitable purpose the donor has determined. The best part is that the income from that investment will be distributed year after year, so your gift gives back to the community year after year.” “During the past thirteen years, CFGC has distributed nearly $2 million dollars in grants and scholarships back into the community,” said Stammerjohn. “Many of these grants are given in the name of individuals who have lived in, worked in, and loved Greene County – Attorneys Bill and Kathy Davis, Steven Phillips, Gregory Cox, Bob Bradford, Rocky Doman, Leah Zwerver, Viola and Leroy Willis, Thelma Hoge, and many others. Their lives are remembered and their legacy continues each year a grant is made in their name.” Through philanthropic services, strategic investments and community leadership, CFGC helps people support the causes they care about now and for generations to come. To learn more about leaving a legacy in your name or a loved one by establishing a new fund, contact Bettie Stammerjohn, Executive Director, at (724) 627-2010, email cfgcpa@gmail.com or visit our office at 108 E. High Street in Waynesburg. For a list of existing funds, visit our website www.cfgcpa.org.

Redevelopment Authority of the County of Greene T

he Redevelopment Authority of the County of Greene (RACG) is a statutory agency of the Commonwealth which operates within Greene County, Pennsylvania. RACG was activated in 2009 to increase affordable housing and home ownership opportunities, redevelop blighted areas and, in conjunction with other County, State and Federal entities, provide for community revitalization in Greene County. The Redevelopment Authority operates under the Urban Redevelopment Law of 1945 as well as the Redevelopment Cooperation Law of 1945. RACG is committed to enhancing the quality of life for all of the County’s residents by advancing housing development and potential redevelopment sites across the County. Housing development includes senior housing, market rate housing, affordable housing, low income and special needs housing. In addition to assisting commercial and residential developers with site location, acquisition and preparation, RACG has created an Acquisition, Rehab and Resale Program (ARRP) to assist the County with the redevelopment of its underutilized properties and the remediation of blighted properties. This program is sourced by the County’s 26 municipalities identifying blighted properties in their communities as well as RACG identifying vacant/abandoned/ underutilized properties through foreclosures, sheriff sales and the County tax repository. In 2013, RACG was awarded a $600,000 grant of PHARE funds from the Act 13 impact fees to assist with its ARRP. RACG also donated two properties to Accessible Dreams to enable the development of a $700,000 quadruplex to be built in Jefferson Borough. The quadruplex will consist of two fully accessible two bedroom units for persons with mobility impairments and two additional two bedroom units for those needing affordable rental housing. If you are interested in advancing housing, developing commercial or residential property, or own land that you are interested in selling, developing or donating to RACG, please contact Dave Mirkovich, Executive Director, RACG, at 724-852-5306 or at dmirkovich@co.greene.pa.us. Also check the County’s website at www.co.greene.pa.us for links to available housing programs and more details on RACG.

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

• GreeneSaver

27


28

GreeneSaver •

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2014

February/March 2014 - GreeneSaver  

This month: Growing in Greene focuses on local businesses, Lego robotics, contests, a great recipe, and more! Enjoy!

February/March 2014 - GreeneSaver  

This month: Growing in Greene focuses on local businesses, Lego robotics, contests, a great recipe, and more! Enjoy!

Advertisement