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GreeneScene by Mike Belding

Letters to Santa

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e are privileged to share with you in this December issue of GreeneScene Community Magazine several really fun, original drawings and “letters to Santa” from Mrs. Allen’s 1st grade class at West Greene Elementary. Thank you to Mrs. Allen and her students for sharing these fun images and hopeful letters. They are scattered throughout our pages. If you look closely, we think you’ll see most of the pictures are self-portraits of the children as they wait for Santa’s appearance on Christmas Eve.

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Spo r t Sh o rt s

NATIONAL WRESTLING HALL OF FAME

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wo men with strong ties to Greene County were recently awarded one of the highest honors in the world’s oldest sport. Former Jefferson-Morgan wrestling legend Cary Kolat and Waynesburg University multi-time national champion Tony Gizoni were announced as members of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame’s Class of 2017. Kolat is famously known as maybe the greatest high school wrestler in United States history. He was a four-time state champion for the Rockets, compiling a 137-0 high school record. He was named Outstanding Wrestler at the state tournament every year, an honor that no other wrestler had achieved even twice. After graduation, he wrestled two seasons at Penn State University, reaching the Big Ten finals as a freshman before winning the title and being named Big Ten Wrestler of the Year as a sophomore. He reached the NCAA finals as a freshman and finished third as a sophomore. After transferring to Lock Haven University, he won backto-back NCAA Championships in 1996 and 1997, finishing 25-1 as a junior and 25-0 as a senior. He also won two Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference titles and back-to-back Eastern Wrestling League Championships where he was named Outstanding Wrestler both years. He finished his college career with a 111-7 record and 53 falls. He was a member of the United States Men’s Freestyle team from 1997-2001 and won a silver medal at the World Championships in 1997 and a bronze medal in 1998. He won gold medals at the World Cup in 1998, 1999 and 2000, and at the Pan American Games in 1999 and 2000. He was a silver medalist at the World Cup in 2001 and finished ninth at the Olympic Games in 2000. He was the University National Freestyle champion in 1995 and the U.S. Open champion in 1997, 1999 and 2000. Kolat is currently the head wrestling coach at Campbell University after being an assistant coach at Lehigh University, the University of Wisconsin, West Virginia University, Lock Haven and the University of North Carolina. Prior to coming to Waynesburg, Gizoni wrestled at Washington (Pennsylvania) High School, where he became the fourth wrestler in Pennsylvania history to win three state championships, capturing the title at 101 pounds in 1946, at 103 pounds in

1947 and at 112 pounds in 1948. He won back-to-back NCAA championships for thenWaynesburg College, being voted Outstanding Wrestler after winning at 121 pounds in 1950 and defeating Bill Borders from the University of Oklahoma in 1951. He was ineligible to compete in the NCAA tournament as a freshman and was declared ineligible as a senior due to competing in dual meets and tournaments that were not approved by the NCAA Rules Committee. Gizoni finished his college career with a 52-0 record. His overall mark for high school and college was an impressive 1203-1 with the three losses and the tie occurring in his freshman year of high school. Gizoni did not lose during his final three years of high school and four years of college, winning 108 consecutive matches. Following his competitive days on the mat, Gizoni served in the Korean War and earned a Bronze Star in 1956. Gizoni is also a member of the Pennsylvania Wrestling Coaches Association Hall of Fame, the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame WashingtonGreene and the Helms Foundation Wrestling Hall of Fame. “I think it’s a wonderful honor,” Gizoni said of being inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame. “I am truly grateful for my high school and college coaches for guiding me in the sport.” Kolat was one of two individuals tabbed as Distinguished Members for the Modern Era. Gizoni was one of two inductees picked by the organization’s Veterans Committee. “The Class of 2017 features truly remarkable individuals who have been successful on and off the mat,” said Lee Roy Smith, Executive Director of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame. “We look forward each year to honoring those who have not only made contributions to our sport, but also those who have taken what they learned in wrestling to excel throughout their life.” The Hall of Fame Board of Governors approved the selections at its meeting in Kansas City on Oct. 27. The induction ceremony will be held at the 41st Annual Honors Weekend on June 2-3 in Stillwater, Oklahoma. For more information on Honors Weekend, please telephone (405) 377-5243.

Cary Kolat

Tony Gizoni

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GreeneScene

DECEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

Dear Santa, My name is Austin and I am 6 years old. I have been a good boy this year because I cleaned up my house without giving anyone any problems. Sometimes I help with the dishes, too. I have a few Christmas wishes. Could you please bring me Legos Dimensions, a robot, and some Star Wars toys? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave some carrots, crackers, and cookies out. I hope you like the ornaments on my Christmas tree. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Austin

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Watching the Full Moon Rise can be Super By Pete Zapadka

permoon on Nov. 14 and again Dec. 14, a perigee full Moon will not occur in 2017 by strictest astronomical definition. The full Moon and perigee will not align until Jan. 2, 2018. While so many people rush out to see this apparently much larger and brighter supermoon, returning with claims of its great size and brilliance, most actually cannot distinguish between an average full Moon and this so-called supermoon. In reality, one of the universe’s most-powerful optical illusions, something scientists cannot explain completely, is hard at work. Be truthful – nearly all of us have seen it and have been overcome by it. When any full Moon is rising – it doesn’t have to be the so-called supermoon – it looks absolutely huge, sometimes hanging gigantically behind any foreground objects on the Earth, such as a farmhouse, barn or trees. Even at sea, with nothing else for our minds to compare it to, the full Moon appears to be a behemoth that shrinks rapidly as it moves higher into the sky. So here’s a test to try to prove there is no difference in size: The next time you see a full Moon on the rise, hold out a dime at arm’s length. You’ll find that the dime exactly covers this apparent huge Moon. Now wait two hours when the Moon is higher. Hold out that dime again at arm’s length, and you’ll see that the coin again exactly covers the face of the Moon. Fascinating! Various culture throughout the millennia have given names to the full Moon of each month. Here are some common names for northern hemisphere months:

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The Moon, about two days before it was full in May, 2016. Sometimes called the Flower Moon that month, it was lying near the star Spica in the constellation Virgo.

magine a nighttime scene in which rolling hills are coated with a fresh blanket of snow, the new-fallen flakes glistening like tiny stars in the light of a full Moon. Trees barren of leaves cast stark shadows, and the cold wind makes a whistling sound as it sails through the needles of a nearby stand of pines. Such a landscape at Christmastime may evoke these lines from “A Visit from St. Nicholas” by Clement Clarke Moore: “The Moon on the breast of the new fallen snow, gave a lustre of mid-day to objects below.” With its many hilltops often clear of trees, and with a thankful lack of widespread artificial illumination, Greene County certainly fills the bill as a moon-watching or stargazing mecca. It’s the reason the Amateur Astronomers Association of Pittsburgh – the largest astronomical society of any kind in Pennsylvania – for years has used a private observing site near Beulah Church in Mor-

ris Township as a welcome escape from the garish manmade lights of the big city. Despite the frigid temperatures outdoors, what a welcome sight the Moon can be in the winter sky. Because it rides through the heavens opposite to the Sun, the full Moon rises as darkness falls and is higher overhead at night during the cold-weather months, offering welcome illumination to holiday travelers. And for those who brave the temperatures, few sights equal a full Moon rising above a glistening landscape. There has been growing public interest recently in observing our planet’s natural satellite because of a popular term: supermoon. The misnomer was coined by an astrologer, someone who believes the stars and planets can predict our future. The electronic media for the most part has spread this term, one that most astronomers spurn in favor of the correct phrase, perigee full Moon. So what is a supermoon? Like a foggy night,

it’s not entirely clear. No one agrees on how close or far the Moon must be to be a supermoon. One source calling for a supermoon may not agree with another. Astrologers say the Moon must be within 90 percent of its closest approach to Earth, a far too generous definition that means, on average, there are four to six supermoons each year. In more accurate scientific astronomical terms, however, it is a full Moon that occurs at perigee – its closest approach in its elliptical orbit of our world – when the center of the Moon is less than 360,000 kilometers, or 223,694 miles, from the center of Earth. At this time, the perigee full Moon appears about 7 percent larger and about 16 percent brighter than an average full Moon (by the way, the average distance from the Moon to Earth is 238,857 miles; the Moon orbits the Earth every 27 1/3 days.). And while we most recently experienced a su-

December: Moon Before Yule, or Long Night Moon January: Old Moon, Moon After Yule February: Snow Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon March: Sap Moon, Crow Moon, Lenten Moon April: Grass Moon, Egg Moon, Pink Moon May: Planting Moon, Milk Moon June: Rose Moon, Flower Moon, Strawberry Moon July: Thunder Moon, Hay Moon August: Green Corn Moon, Grain Moon September: Harvest Moon, Fruit Moon October: Hunter’s Moon (Harvest Moon sometimes occurs this month) November: Hunter’s Moon, Frosty Moon, or Beaver Moon A telescope is not necessary to enjoy this monthly moondance. Turn off the TV, bundle up, step outside and enjoy one of the finest shows nature can offer. Chances are, no matter what time of year you’re mo onw atch i ng , you’ll find that it’s super.

Editor’s Note: Pete Zapadka is a Greene County property owner and a retired local news editor at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. We are pleased to have him on our team of contributing writers for GreeneScene Community Magazine. Pete has been wandering the backroads of Greene County for more than two decades and has been keeping watch on the night sky for a lifetime. Look for his new column, Greene: Earth and Sky, starting in January, for seldom-seen views of our rural landscape and a vision of all things astronomical. He can be reached at pzapadka@yahoo.com.

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I Love this P l ace above the state average for women teachers. Aleppo Township High School even had its own football team, though just a six man squad in the very beginning (See our GreeneScene of the Past on page 11 for more). The high school closed in 1947, as the area schools consolidated into what is now known as “West Greene.” West Greene has a proud history in athletics that has ramped up in the last few decades to include many firsts in its history. The Boys Varsity basketball team won their first playoff game in the early 1990s and the Girls Varsity team reached the same achievement in 2012, just to name a couple. 2016 saw the Varsity Girls Softball win the school’s first section championship since 1983, the school’s first-ever female WPIAL Championship, and advanced to the PIAA State Championship game a first for any sport in West Greene’s history. Back to the history of Aleppo - as its population grew, a US Post Office was esOverview of the village of Aleppo tablished in 1869 that is still in operation Date and photographer unknown, photo compliments of Tom Headlee. today. Anyone who has visited Aleppo ometimes it’s is easy, when you live your everyday life in Greene knows it’s an isolated area, far from modern conveniences. However, County, Pa, to forget what a privilege it is to enjoy our rural the gas & oil boom of the day was bringing some money and more communities and nostalgic scenery of Mail Pouch barns and people to the area. In 1920, a general store was opened that provided covered bridges still in use after centuries of weathering…and local residents, farmers and laborers with groceries, dry goods and how our area was settled by American pioneers in the earliest days livestock feeds. At some point, however; the building was completely of this nation’s infancy. The history and fascinating tales recounted destroyed by fire. Local lore says a carriage driver threw his cigar onto in Samuel P. Bates’ book, A Biographical History of Greene County, the side of the road into some dry brush close to the building, causing Pennsylvania, published in 1888, will remind you of these things. I the fire. A new store building was constructed on the same site and recommend you read it. continued to do business for another century and beyond, as a matter This month, we are journeying yet further west in the county to of fact, it is still in operation today. Everyone in Aleppo Twp. is familthe township of Aleppo, and the village of the same name. Formed in iar with Jordan’s General Store, renamed by Louis A. Jordan, a native 1817, the township wasn’t officially organized until 1821. The area saw from Pittsburgh, who bought the store in 1989. much conflict between settlers and the natives. Samuel P. Bates men“Dad always said he wanted to be his own boss. But with Mom tioned a humorous tactic deployed by the natives where they would around, I don’t know how well that worked out for him,” says Bonni imitate the call of a turkey at night in order to bate naive settlers into Jordan, one of Louis’ daughters. Bonni and her sister, Teri Jordan, an ambush. This history is reflected in the area’s census report as there now operate the store, assuming its management when Louis passed appears to be descendants of natives still living in the area at the time. away in 2010. “The store used to be a hub, information central, for the Otis Kuhn Lancaster, daughter of Lewis Kuhn, is credited with area. This is where everyone hung out. There used to be a pool table helping name the township. After traveling to the foreign country of upstairs where patrons could go to relax and a hole in the ceiling used Syria, and visiting the town of the same name in Syria, Otis fell in love to let them request more coins to play or ask for another soda. Our with the beauty of the foreign city and returned home to suggest the relationship with our customers is my favorite thing about this place. name for the township. Her suggestion was accepted and, the town- We’ve met so many people, some have even become family. With my ship and village of Aleppo was born. grandson being born, this is the 3rd generation of Jordans to be in As the area started to gain in population, schools began to crop the store.” up in several areas. An 1855 school report revealed the township Indeed, the atmosphere in the store is one filled with the interest housed nine schools with 149 pupils between them which then grew of families in mind. Photos, new and old, of Aleppo natives adorn to ten schools with 448 students in the next 32 years. These schools the shelves and walls. “It’s been an interesting time,” Bonni says. “The were often referred to as “satellite schools” since they were scattered area is beautiful and the people are very friendly. Everyone is willing throughout the township. Aleppo Township High school was estab- to help and everyone is genuinely kind. It’s home.” lished at Aleppo in May 1912 and a new three-room high school Aleppo is also home to an active ministry at the Aleppo Brethren building was erected. Roscoe C. Mitchell was the first principal and Church, currently pastored by Rev. Lanny Hewitt. We have featured Minnie I. Phillips was Assistant Principal. As many as 475 students the church in our “Shining the Light” Column this month. You’ll attended over the years, however records show only 234 of those stu- learn of its history as well as todays’ activities including an interactive dents were graduated from the school. According to G. Wayne Smith’s puppet theater – see page 12. History of Greene County, Lou Olive McCracken and Mattie McVay In June 2014, Aleppo Township erected its own veterans monuwere the first two students to graduate in 1914 (they had begun high ment dedicated to honoring local veterans and fallen soldiers of World school work at Richhill Twp. high before transferring to Aleppo). The War I, World War II, and the Vietnam war. Currently the monument following year ten more students were graduated with commence- lists 300 names with room for more. If anyone has a name they want ment held at the local church. added to the monument, call Aleppo Township supervisors office at At that time, the average salary of a male teacher in Greene 724-428-3875. County was $61 per month, while female teachers averaged $53 per James Lang, a retired chemistry teacher and member of Aleppo month. Mr. Smith notes that the state average for men was $69 per Brethren Church, moved to Aleppo from Pittsburgh when he was month at the time, however Greene County was paying $2 a month ready to retire. “When I was moving to the country, I called up my

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ALEPPO, PA

By Katherine Rockwell

realtor and asked if he could find me a place where I could sit on my front porch and nobody would bother me. And he did. He found me Aleppo,” said James Lang. “It’s home! I love the neighborly approach, of families helping families, I grew up with. I think we have gotten away from that, but its roots are still here for some people,” says Bill Simms, athletic director at West Greene High School and Aleppo native whose family goes back several generations in the area. It’s an area rich with history stemming back to America’s roots, gorgeous scenery befitting its exotic name and peaceful, friendly people – that’s why it’s easy for its residents to say – Aleppo, I Love This Place.

Aleppo Township High School The original Aleppo High School, built circa 1912. Here’s a bit of interesting trivia. After the high school was closed in 1947 this building was dismantled, transported and converted to a large barn on a farm in Ruff Creek owned by Paul Horn. The barn building is easily visible today from Rt 19 and even I-79 as you pass by the farm now owned by Archie and Jeanette Trader. Photo compliments of Tom Headlee.

Aleppo General Store Townspeople and travelers gather round the storefront of Aleppo’s original general store, operated by EB Lough. The store provided conveniences for local farms and residents. Photo compliments of Jordan’s General Store.

After the Fire Workers and townspeople stare at the debris and remains of the original general store which burned to the ground when a carriage driver tossed a lit cigar too close. Photo compliments of Jordan’s General Store. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Dear Santa, My name is Melony and I am 6 years old. I have been a good girl this year. I drew pictures for my cousins to make them smile and I gave my family kisses. I have one Christmas wish. Could you please bring me a stuffed unicorn? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave a note, some cookies, and a candy cane out for you. I am going to listen for the jingle bells on your sleigh. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Melony

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GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry 10

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Dear Santa, My name is Maranda and I am 7 years old. I have been a good girl this year because I always share and play with my friends. I have a few Christmas wishes. Could you please bring me a computer and a baby doll that eats and drinks from a bottle? I hope you come to my house on Christmas Eve. I will leave cookies and milk out for you to eat. I promise to sleep in my bed until morning. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Maranda

G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

by Katharine Rockwell

ALEPPO HIGH FOOTBALL TEAM

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e found this fun shot in an album of photos collected over the years from customers and friends of Jordan’s General Store. This picture features the 1946 Aleppo Township High School football team, a bit larger than the original six-man team first formed at the school. Like many small rural schools of the time, Aleppo Twp. High School could not afford the more expensive sports equipment and went without protective gear in the beginning. According to Bill Simms, instructor at West Greene High School and local sports historian, John Watson was the first player to ever wear shoulder pads, on loan from Waynesburg College. “Allan Simms [Bill’s father] and Sam Hopkins were the first players to wear a leather

helmet with a single metal bar on the front to form a facemask,” Bill added. Aleppo High had no football field and instead had to use the Center Township Park field for their games. Unfortunately, the high school was closed in 1947, one year after this photo was taken. The names of the men in this photo were written on the back of the photograph and include: Ralph Caldwell, Jennings Watson (Jinx), Paul Clutter, Paul Strait, Ernest Mackey, Ralford Riggle, Harold (Pete) Hughes, Tex Simms, Donald Ward (Dimp), Gene Jones (Redbuck), Gene Barnhart, Jack Miller, Rex Galentine, Rex Hartley, Billy Huskey, Bob Anderson, and Richard Simms. Thanks to Jordan’s General Store for preserving and sharing this and other photos of Aleppo Twp. communities and people.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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ALEPPO BRETHREN CHURCH By Katherine Rockwell

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ccording to James Lang, Aleppo resident and longtime church member, sometime before 1894, the “German Baptists” were a branch of the local Mennonite community. “They wanted to become more modern and broke away from the others, and this resulted in two branches of the Brethren Church: the Grace Brethren and the Church of the Brethren. Aleppo Brethren Church is an offshoot of the Grace Brethren,” explains James. Using horse drawn carriages, the Aleppo Brethren Church building was moved, piece by piece, from its original position atop Fairview Road to its current location in 1894. It was rebuilt using all of the original pieces, including the beautiful stained glass that is still in place today. The church is also one of few churches to retain the original bell and rope for ringing the chimes that called worshipers to mass. “We always have a kid back here pulling the rope to ring the bell. They really get a kick out of that,” says current pastor of Aleppo Brethren, Lanny Hewitt. A fellowship room, office, and children’s school area were added onto the church in 1964. According to surviving church records, Clifford Chapman is listed as the first pastor. There have been others over the years; Pastor Hewitt recently assumed the position in August of this year. “I had been toying with the ministry since I was a teen when I felt the call of God, but I never really pursued it. When I was 50, I went back to school at Liberty University and graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Religion. I was an associate pastor for a while when I did some guest speaking at Aleppo Brethren Church and they were looking for a new pastor. They asked me to take the position and I agreed,” Pastor Hewitt said. It was James Lang who brought a whimsical and effective new ministry to life at Aleppo Brethren in 2015, when he introduced a puppet theatre

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for children. Through this program, the children learn about the bible in a fun, interactive way that leaves them with a strong message they can take home. “We do a bible story for the children every Sunday morning,” says James, “the children participate in the service every morning up until the pastor is ready to do the sermon, then they are dismissed to the Sunday School in the back of the church. Some of them are puppeteers and they do the voices. Sometimes we have more children than adults and they all want to play with the puppets even more than watching the show.” Throughout the years, this rural church has strived to keep up with the times, and today offers several conveniences of modern technology. They have incorporated projectors and DVD’s into their regular service for music and video, and special “Movie Nights” are offered to the community. During summer, the children can participate in a variety of activities at Vacation Bible School. Still, perhaps the most inspiring services occur when the live music abounds. “We have a lot of excellent musicians. We welcome anyone to come perform for the Sunday service,” invites James. Aleppo Brethren Church holds weekly worship service Sunday mornings at 10am and Bible Study Classes on Wednesday evenings at 7pm. The church recently participated in a community Thanksgiving Service held at Harmony Presbyterian in Windridge and will be holding an open Christmas Eve service for those interested in attending. Pastor Lanny Hewitt welcomes everyone to join them in worship. “We’re just a small country church with a small attendance, but it’s a lovely group of people.” James Lang shares his enthusiasm and makes it clear all are welcome. “We accept all who want to follow the Christian faith. We all believe the same things…words and ways may differ but the message is the same. There is no prejudice here.”

Dear Santa, My name is Connor and I am 7 years old. You will see that I have been a good boy this year because I helped my Dad with the woodstove. I would like a couple of things for Christmas. Could you please bring me a toy crossbow and a remote controlled car? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave chocolate chip cookies and milk out for you. I have carrots for your reindeer to eat, too. I will be sleeping and waiting for my presents! Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Connor

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Dear Santa, My name is Lily and I am 6 years old. I should be on the “Good List” this year because I clean up my room and my sister’s room, too. I have a couple of Christmas wishes. Could you please bring me a dog and a baby kitten? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave reindeer food out. I promise to sleep in my bed and not peek. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Lily

Bowlby Bits It’s Movie Night –Dec. 21, watch “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” starring Jim Carrey, beginning at 6pm. FREE popcorn and beverages! T.O.P.S. - weight management support group meets every Sat., 9:30-11:30am. FREE American Red Cross CPR training – Jan 9, 5-8pm. Pre-registration required. Coding Camp – Children ages 5-8 learn core coding concepts as they create their own interactive stories and games using PBS KIDS characters. Kids snap together colorful programming blocks to make their favorite characters move, jump, dance & sing, they will learn to solve problems, design projects and express themselves creatively. Ten weeks beginning Thursday, Jan 12, and every other Thursday through May 18, 5-6pm. Call to register. Author Book Talk – Jan. 18, 6pm, featuring Greene County author Judson Lacko, with his 2nd book, The Four Apostles. Copies will be available for purchase. Please pre-register. Free test prep for adults studying for GED, Civil Service exams, Drivers Licensing and Life skills, and for basic reading and math skills. Free after school tutoring for school-age children. Call to schedule appointments. Board of Trustees Meeting – Jan. 23, 6:30pm. Open to the public. Community members are encouraged to attend. FREE computer classes – Thursdays in Jan, 5:30-6:30pm, beginning Jan 12 with “How Do I Use This Device?” for help with tablet or smartphone (bring your device). Jan 19 is “Getting Started with a PC” for beginners with computers. Jan 26 is “Using MS Word”. Friends of the Bowlby Public Library are people who care about libraries and who are interested in promoting the welfare and growth of the Bowlby Library. New members welcome. Call for more info. Seeking Local Artists - to display artwork at the library during 2017. Collectors also. Call for more info. Color Outside the Lines - adult coloring group meets every Wed., 11am-1pm or 6-8pm. Brainfuse - Free online tutoring database, with one-on-one tutoring available daily 2-11pm. Writing lab, study guides, and skill building resources available 24/7. Access using your library card at www. evakbowlby.org. Freegal & Freading - Enjoy free music, videos and books and magazines online. Library patrons can stream or download with mobile apps, visit www.evakbowlby.org. Rocket Languages - 15 online Language courses including French, German, Italian, Spanish, bic, Chinese Mandarin, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese Brazilian, Russian, American Sign Language, and ESL for Spanish, Japanese English. Access on library website with your library card. Or download mobile app, vist www.evakbowlby.org.. Holiday Hours - Closed Dec. 24 -26 and Dec. 31. Call or stop in Eva K. Bowlby Public Library for more info or to register for any of the above events. 724-627-9776 • 311 N. West St., Waynesburg, PA 15370

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Dear Santa, My name is Mason and I am 7 years old. I have been a good boy this year because I helped my Dad clean out the garage. I also helped my Dad work in the shed. I have a few Christmas wishes. Could you please bring me a toy truck with a trailer Puzzle WINNER and some Legos? Please come to my The winner of last house on Christmonth’s Picture Puzzle is mas Eve. I will leave corn for your Tara Taylor of Waynesburg and reindeer and milk daughter Casey with chocolate chip cookies out for They won “The Works” package you. I promise I will from Quicklane. sleep when you Answer was: arrive. Merry Pilgrims Christmas Santa! Love, Mason GreeneScene Magazine •

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Dear Santa, My name is Caiden and I am 7 years old. I have been a good boy this year because I helped my Mom wash the dishes, I helped my brother build cars, and I split wood with my Dad. I have just one Christmas request. Could you please bring me a toy car track? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave magic reindeer food and cookies out for your reindeer and you to eat. I promise to be asleep on Christmas Eve when you come. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Caiden

Christmas Parade

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1st Place Float from Waynesburg Health & Rehab

he sights and sounds of Christmas were at a peak the first Saturday of December when the Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce staged its annual Christmas Parade in historic and beautiful downtown Waynesburg. The execution of the Parade was underwritten by FirstEnergy Foundation. Hundreds of families turned out to enjoy the parade, with 92 units representing various schools, churches, teams, organizations and businesses from all over the county and beyond. The parade was very well attended this year, despite the cold temperature, according to Melody Longstreth, Executive Director of Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce. “We also saw a large number of floats entered in the parade - fifteen in

total. As a result we added three more places to the float competition. The floats were all really well done and added great entertainment and fun to the parade,” she added. Winners of the Float Entry Competition were: 1st Waynesburg Health Care & Rehab 2nd Patriots Dream Riding Assoc. 3rd Seldom Seen Farm 4th WWJD Center 5th Freedom Baptist Church 6th Greene County Special Olympics Best Design – Four Seasons Resort Most Spirit – VFW Post #4793 Mort Original – Greene County 4-H Clubs Another Greene County tradition is the selection of a “Miss Merry Christmas” from each high school in the county to represent her school in the parade. The 2016 Miss Merry Christmas line-up is pictured here in front of the Greene County Courthouse. L-R: Madison Six - West Greene HS, Abby McIntire - Mapletown, Kaitlin Fisher - Waynesburg, Caitlyn Ricco - Carmichaels, Jamie Lawrence - Jefferson The Waynesburg Area Chamber of Commerce thanks all those businesses and individuals who helped to make this year’s parade a success. Photos by Jeanine Henry.

2016 Miss Merry Christmas representatives

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CONSOL Donates $5,000 to Corner Cupboard

Operation Christmas Child From left to right: Chuck Shaynak, Senior Vice President of Operations, CNX Coal Resources LP; Craig Neal, Vice President of Operations, CONSOL Energy; Jessica Cole, Operations Manager, Corner Cupboard Food Bank; Candace Tustin, Executive Director, Corner Cupboard Food Bank.

The Greater Purpose Team Ministry composed of Methodist Churches located in Denbo, Fredericktown, Howe, Jefferson, Rices Landing and Roscoe participated in the annual collection of shoeboxes for Operation Christmas Child. The churches came together to complete 255 shoeboxes that were delivered to Oakview Methodist Church for the next step in their journey to a child. “ Last year we completed 231 boxes. We increased that by 24 boxes to 255 boxes,” said spokesperson Susan Christopher. Pictured are Marjie

On Thursday, December 1 at the Greene berland Township Pantry, Dunkard Township PanCounty Courthouse, CONSOL Energy presented try, Franklin-Waynesburg Township Pantry, JackGreene County’s Corner Cupboard Food Bank son Township Pantry, Jefferson Township Pantry, with a $5,000 check to support the food bank’s mis- Mon-Greene Township Pantry, Springhill-Freeport sion throughout December. CONSOL employees Township Pantry, Wayne Township Pantry and also donated food items and volunteered on site to Whiteley-Perry Township Pantry. The Corner Cuphelp collect public donations. board is staffed by 2 employees, 9 board members CONSOL’s $5,000 donation will allow the and 150 pantry volunteers. Corner Cupboard to purchase food needed to fulfill CONSOL Energy Inc. is a Pittsburgh-based orders for its 11 pantries for an entire month. energy producer, and one of the largest indepenCorner Cupboard serves more than 2,000 dent natural gas exploration, development and proindividuals each month, half of which are chil- duction companies, with operations centered in the dren and seniors. Annually, the Corner Cupboard major shale formations of the Appalachian basin. provides 867,604 lbs. of food through its 11 pan- Additional information may be found at www.conShaffer, Judith Hamlin, Pastor Brian Carroll, Jim tries in Greene County, including Aleppo-Richhill solenergy.com. Howard, Lynda Smith, Skip Smith, Kathy Howard Township Pantry, Center Township Pantry, Cumand Sara Christopher. Not pictured is Janie Shrum, Tammy Amalong and Susan Christopher. “We would like to thank Dr. Jane Weinzierl for helping out with dental floss and toothpaste and Joyce & Jane Snyder for providing toothbrushes that were Congratulations to Margaret put into each shoebox,” Susan added. You can find Bell Miller Middle School’s (Cenmore information about Operation Christmas tral Greene School District) JuChild at https://www.samaritanspurse.org/whatnior League Quiz Bowl teams on we-do/operation-christmas-child/. a successful 2016-2017 season and tournament. The MBM Varsity team, made up of 7th and 8th graders Jonah Higley, Brady Kelly, Abby Lipscomb, Olivia Sanvicente, and Makenzie Barchiesi completed the regular season with an 8 and 1 record for a 1st place finish. They walked away from the double elimination tournament held last month with a first place finish as Margaret Bell Miller Middle Quiz Bowl Teams (Varsity in black shirts) Row 1: Makenzie Barchiesi, Olivia Sanvicente. Row 2: Abby Lipscomb, Brady Kelly, well. The Junior Varsity team, Jonah Higley; Row 3 (Junior Varsity in red shirts): Olivier Sanvicente, Sarah Stephenson, Eli Makel, Vivian Greenwood. consisting of 6th grade students Vivian Greenwood, Eli Makel, Olivier Sanvicente, and Sarah Stephenson, finished The Quiz Bowl Academic competitions are the regular season in fourth place, after a hard sponsored by the Tri-County Academic League fought battle at the double elimination tournament. and are held at Penn State University’s Fayette CamQuiz Bowl is a Jeopardy-style question and pus. Teams from Central Greene compete against answer competition with categories in literature, their counterparts from Albert Gallatin, Jeffersonscience, mathematics, arts, music, religion, my- Morgan, Uniontown, Laurel Highlands, Brownsthology, philosophy, history, geography, general ville, Carmichaels, West Greene, and Southeastern knowledge, current Events, pop culture, and sports. Greene (Mapletown) school districts. “Central Greene is proud of our students for veterans hospitalized in the Aspinwall VA Hospital. Students benefit by being exposed to a broad range of academic subjects, increasing memorization and the outstanding effort they consistently put forth to Mark Pompe (left) Devil Rays +35 team, presents his check to Linda Binns of the Post #391 auxiliary. study skills, developing critical and strategic think- accomplish such amazing tasks,” said Alice Matis, John Greenlee (right) +25 team presents his check ing skills, learning teamwork and fair play, experi- Gifted Support Teacher for Central Greene School to Herb Hermann, Commander of Post #391. Pho- encing leadership and expanding capacity for re- District. sponsibility. to by Lisa Pompe.

MBM Quiz Bowl Champs!

Devil Rays Donate to Help Hospitalized Veterans

The Devil Ray teams of the WashingtonGreene Adult Baseball League made two $30 contributions to the Auxiliary of the Hanson-Cole American Legion Post #391 in Fredericktown, Pa. The team’s donations will be utilized by the Auxiliary to provide Christmas Gifts to four families of

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Dear Santa, My name is Wyatt and I am 7 years old. I always listen to my parents so I should be on your “Good List.” I have a few Christmas wishes. Could you please bring me a toy crossbow, an airplane, and a car that can drive on the ceiling? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave cookies and milk out for you. I promise to stay in bed when you come. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Wyatt

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Dear Santa, My name is Allison and I am 6 years old. I should be on the “Good List” this year because I really love you Santa! I am wishing for something special this Christmas. Could you please bring me a new Halloween costume of Batgirl? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave carrot flavored cookies out for the reindeer. I promise to sleep good until you come and then listen for you when you get to my house! Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Allison 18

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n 1891 Salvation Army Captain Joseph McFee of San Francisco placed a large pot at the foot of Market Street with hopes of obtaining enough donations to provide a free Christmas dinner for the poor and homeless. Little did he know this would become a tradition that would spread across the world and become widely known as the Salvation Army Red Kettle. Kettles are now placed in the United States, Korea, Japan, Chile and several European Countries. Today in the United States, the Red Kettle campaign helps the Salvation Army help 30 million people every year with various services. Learn more on the fascinating history and scope of this far reaching effort by visiting www.redkettlevolunteer. org. Here at home, the Red Kettle Campaign is an on-going effort of our local Greene County Salvation Army. According to Sister Audrey Quinn, Director for the last nine years, Greene County has been participating in the Red Kettle campaign as long as there has been a Service Center here. Bell ringers, as they have come to be known, volunteer to ring bells at many locations throughout the county. Red kettles are placed at Walmart and Giant Eagle in Waynesburg, Shop and Save in Carmichaels, Giant Eagle in Rices Landing and Belko in Mt. Morris. Churches, organizations and individuals all take turns at “manning” the kettles every day from the day after Thanksgiving until Christmas Eve. Volunteers come and go, but one organization that deserves special recognition is WWJD from West Waynesburg. Every Friday during the campaign, people from WWJD “man” the kettles at both doors of Walmart, and have been doing this for as long as Sister Audrey has been over-seeing the program. “They are steadfast volunteers whose efforts are vital to the campaign. We have several folks who keep coming back year after year, we couldn’t do it with them,” she says. 79 year old Harland Headlee has been ringing bells for at least 10 years if not longer. “I always take a shift on the days Oak View UMC has signed up to provide bell ringers, and I used to do several more shifts on my own, but I’ve slowed down a bit these last couple years,” Harland says with a smile. Dressed in his orange hunting clothes he admits that “Sometimes it can get really cold, so that’s why I wear my hunting clothes. Even on a mild day it can get a bit cold.” If you ask Harland why he keeps ringing the

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bell even when it is so cold, he has a quick and firm answer: “My faith. Jesus went around helping everyone. The Salvation Army helps people who need help and everything in this kettle stays right here in Greene County.” Last year the campaign raised $23,000. While there is no specific goal set for the year, the hope is that the amount raised will surpass last year’s total. “People of Greene County are very generous. Some people will make a donation every time they go to the store…and isn’t the giving what Christmas is all about?” asks Sister Audrey. As Harland noted, all money raised in Greene County stays in the county. The Red Kettle Campaign helps the local center provide services which include a free clothing warehouse, emergency food boxes, emergency utility/rent assistance, disaster services, Kids Birthday Club, Treasures for Kids, Project Bundle-Up, Camp Allegheny, prom attire, coupon exchange and Produce to People. According to Sister Audrey it is challenging to get enough volunteers. Many shifts will not have anyone ringing bells and the loss of volunteers translates to a loss in donations. There are no special qualifications for being a bell ringer, just a willingness to help the Salvation Army help the needy. There are many shifts that still need to be filled for this year’s campaign. Chances are good that you can find a time and location that will fit your schedule. Anyone wishing to volunteer to ring bells or volunteer in other areas at the local service center should call 724-852-1479. The center is open Monday-Friday with office hours from8:00 a.m-3:00 p.m. and 10:00 a.m.2:00 p.m. for the clothing warehouse.

Dear Santa, My name is Alden and I am 7 years old. I have been a good boy this year because I always help my Mom do the dishes. I have one Christmas wish. Could you please bring me a new iPod? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave cookies out for you. I might try to scare you when you get to my house! Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Alden 19


Operation Christmas Child Members of the Town & Country Garden Club participated in Samaritan’s Purse, an international Christian Organization. Club members filled provided shoe boxes with items such as toothpaste, toothbrush, soap, small toys, gloves, stuffed animals, which were delivered to the Oakview United Methodist Church in Waynesburg for distribution through the program. “Operation Christmas Child” was a very heartwarming project…” said project chairman, Tami Burnworth.

Mailbox Mania

Thanks to Frank King of Waterdam Road near Waynesburg who submitted this picture of his unusual mailbox, a Cub Cadet riding lawn mower that catches his daily post. Frank received a FREE t-shirt for sharing. If you, or someone you know, has an unusual or entertaining mail-

Rogersville Christian Church

Tom Headlee of Waynesburg brought us this historic photo of the Rogersville Christian Church, which was featured in a recent Shining the Light column. This photo shows the original church building in Rogersville, which stood on the lot where Pioneer Grocery is now, before it was dismantled and moved to the church’s current location further south and across the

highway. After removing much of the original church’s structure and contents, a fire destroyed the remains. Though the date is unknown, it appears this picture was taken during a town celebration. We know it was prior to April 1923, when church records indicate the final service was held at the original church building. Thanks to Tom for sharing!

Turkish Bible

Pleasant Valley Presbyterian Church of Clarksville recently presented a historic Turkish Bible to Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee. The Bible, written in Arabic, was printed in Lebanon with the first edition dating back to the year 1000. Richard Teegarden, elder and clerk of sessions at the church, presented the Bible to President Lee in the president’s office in Miller Hall. In a letter that accompanied the Bible, the church stated: “We would be grateful if this valued treasure of our church would be received by the University so that it may be properly, respectfully and securely preserved. Our hope and intention would be box, send us a picture! You’ll get a free t-shirt too! that by this decision we will not only Email to info@GreeneSceneMagazine.com snail protect and preserve this unique mail to GreeneScene Magazine 185 Wade St., translation but also make it available (L-R) Seated: Richard Teegarden; Rev. Dr. Donald Wilson, member of the Waynesburg, PA 15370 or stop by our office with for others to use and gain knowledge University’s Board of Trustees; Standing: Rea Redd, professor and director of the Eberly Library, President Lee. your picture. from, now and for many years to come.” Richards shared that the church is closing of the University to Teegarden and presented him at the end of the year and they felt that the Bible with a special woven Alpaca Waynesburg Univershould be given to someone who would have the sity scarf. knowledge to appreciate it and the ability to keep “We are honored to receive this gift,” said it. The Bible was originally left to the church by Lee. “We will treasure this wonderful resource you may only be needed one or two days a week. John Hassen, a member of the church, upon his and wish to express our gratitude for the generMust not have following medical problems: dia- death in 1966. Hassen was born in Europe but osity of the Pleasant Valley Presbyterian Church.” betes, high blood pressure, hearing problems; and lived most of his life in Clarksville and worked The Bible will be on display in the Eberly Library you’ll need a background check. Call VA office as a coal miner. on the University’s campus. FMI: 724-852-5274. President Lee expressed his thanks on behalf

VA Needs Drivers The Veterans Affairs Office of Greene County is looking for part-time van drivers for the van that transports veterans to the Pittsburgh VAMC hospitals. The van goes four days a week – Mon-Thu, though

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Color Them Happy!

F

irst Federal Savings & Loan of Greene County hosted a award presentation and reception for all the winners in their 2016 Christmas Coloring Contest earlier this month. Three winners were selected in each of three age categories, with first place winners receiving $50 each, second place receiving $40 each and third place receiving $30. Pictured (L-R) Chuck Trump, Vice President of First Federal of Greene

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County; Ariana Palone, first place, ages 8 & 9; Lauren Rossiter, first place, ages 4 & 5; Kristin Keller, first place, ages 6 & 7; Haven Cizmek, second place, ages 4 & 5; Lindsay Dean, second place, ages 6 & 7; Kendall McKay, third place, ages 4 & 5; Cheyanne Locy, second place, ages 8 & 9; and Caleb Dane, third place, ages 8 & 9. Not pictured is Zoey Malone, third place, ages 6 & 7.

Dear Santa, My name is Autumn and I am 6 years old. I was a good girl this year when I stayed with my sister while Mommy had a new baby. I have a couple of Christmas gift ideas. Could you please bring me a talking baby doll and a puppy? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave Pepsi and Rock N’ Roll cookies out for you to eat. I promise to sleep when you come because I know you won’t come if I’m awake. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Autumn

I T’S ! E R E H

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ell into its 4th decade of publication, the latest edition of the Greene Country Calendar, by Wendy Saul and Colleen Nelson, is now available for just $15 at many local retailers, including Waynesburg Milling Company, Artbeat, Specialty Herbal and the GreeneScene Community Magazine office in Waynesburg, Thistlethwaite’s Vineyards in Jefferson, and Gloria’s Ceramics in Rogersville. Featuring pen-and-ink drawings of local scenes, historical commentary and holiday markers, the 2017 Greene Country Calendar makes a great gift - even if it’s a gift for yourself! If you can’t find one in your neighborhood, contact Colleen Nelson by email at crnelson@ windstream.net, she’ll make sure you get one.

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Dear Santa, My name is Ava and I am 7 years old. I am nice to everybody at school so I should be on your “Good List.” I have just one request for Christmas. Could you please bring me a sewing machine? I know you are real, Santa! My brother isn’t so sure. I will leave cookies and milk out for you on Christmas Eve. I might sneak behind the couch to see if I can see you! Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Ava

Co o l at Sc h o o l

by Tyler Whipkey

WU Forensic Science Students’ Community Outreach

T

here were over 25,000 deaths from heroin overdoses in the United States in 2014, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. 25,000 mothers, fathers, daughter, sons, grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins died in 2014 because of this epidemic that has continued to rise in the last two years, and has swept into our rural county in Pennsylvania as well. Some students at Waynesburg University, however, are motivated to take action against it, and have created a particularly cool way to attract the attention of local youth as they help educate them on the risks, effects and community issues associated with heroin use. The WU Forensic Science Club recently teamed up with Communities That Care to bring a special presentation to youth in Greene County. The event was held on November 9 at West Sides in Waynesburg. Highlights of the event included an opening informational session, and leading the attendees through a mock crime scene, complete with interview of a suspected heroin user regarding a friend’s overdose. Morgan Newbauer is a senior Forensic Science and Pre-Medicine Major at Waynesburg University. She is also Vice President of the Forensic Science Club. Morgan expressed satisfaction with the reaction of the youth attending the presentation: “We came in to set up a mock crime scene that consisted of one deceased individual who had overdosed, and another

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individual who overdosed, but was revived by the medics with Narcan. I think the kids enjoyed it, which makes me think that they are actually taking it seriously and trying to understand what is really happening, and that it can happen so easily. They take it very seriously, I think, so I truly believe we have achieved what we set out to do, which is spread awareness.” “We also showed pictures so that they could see what it looks like when people do drugs or drink a lot of alcohol, and they were all horrified, which is a good thing because they didn’t seem like they ever wanted to look like that. Ultimately, we go there to spread awareness because anymore it is so easy to get ahold of pills, drugs, alcohol, etc. We want to make sure these kids are making the right choices and try to help anyway that we can,” Morgan said. This is the second consecutive year that Waynesburg University and Communities That Care have cooperated to make this presentation available to local youth. The event helps WU students use the skills and education they are obtaining at the University, while also serving the community with a very beneficial activity - increasing the knowledge and awareness of youth about the effects of drug and alcohol abuse. In addition to Morgan, others participating in the project include Faith Musko, Forensic Science Club Advisor and Instructor, and Brandon Bosley, Forensic Science Club President and Pre-Medicine Major. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Dear Santa, My name is Chance and I am 6 years old. You can tell that I have been a good boy this year because I help people at school when they want to play a game on the computer. I have one Christmas request. Could you please bring me an “Elf on the Shelf”? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave chocolate cookies and milk out for you to eat. I want to hug you when you come! Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Chance GreeneScene by Jeanine Henry

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Wreaths Across America By Linda Moon

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hen Morrill Worcester was at the very impressionable age of 12, he won a trip to Washington D.C. One of the sites he visited was Arlington Cemetery, a visit he never forgot. As a man, Morrill founded Worcester Wreaths located in Harrington, Maine. In 1992 the wreath company had a large amount of leftover wreaths. Not wanting to throw them out, Morrill remembered his trip to Arlington and decided to lay the wreaths at Arlington in an older section of the cemetery where very few people visited. Blue Bird Ranch, a trucking company donated the truck and time to transport the wreaths to Virginia. Others like the American Legion and the VFW joined in to place the red bows on the wreaths. Morrill quietly kept up the laying of wreaths for several years to come until 2005 when a photo of the cemetery with the wreaths went viral. Suddenly Morrill was inundated with requests from people that either wanted to help at Arlington or to lay wreaths at their own state or private owned cemeteries. In 2007 the Morrill family established the non-profit organization “Wreaths Across America” with the mission of Remember. Honor. Teach. which stands for Remember our fallen US veterans, Honor those who serve and Teach your children the value of freedom. In 2008 wreath cer-

emonies were held in every state, Pearl Harbor, Bunker Hill, Valley Forge and sites of the 2011 attack on America with the aid of 60,000 volunteers who laid 100,000 wreaths. The above information was taken from the company’s website: wreathsacrossamerica. org. Today the annual laying of wreaths continues on the 2nd or 3rd Saturday of December and the annual trek to Arlington continues. Locally, the Carmichaels Women’s Club organizes a program that is held at Laurel Point Cemetery, located behind the Greene Academy in Carmichaels. According to club president Andrea Semenoff, the club has participated in this program since 2010 and that very first year placed 10 wreaths along with a ceremonial wreath. There was a short and simple program with the color guard of the American Legion and wreaths were laid in the oldest part of the cemetery. Today the club seeks donations for the wreaths which cost $15 each. Many people ask to order a wreath every year. Last year there were 324 wreaths laid and this year the club’s goal of 330 was reached. The program has also grown. Frank Ricco the American Legion Band Director wanted to be part of the ceremony. In addition to the color guard, the band plays The Star Spangled Banner and will be sung by Paige Armstrong a senior at Carmichaels High School and the Pledge to the flag will be led by Paige’s sister Peyton who is an 8th grader at Carmichaels High School. In the past Pam Snyder, Judge Terry Grimes and Sharon Willison from Tim Solobay’s office have been the keynote speakers. This year’s speaker is Joseph Brodak. The community should know that this is not a political program. The program focuses on those that have fallen and those that are veterans or are still serving. According to Representative Pam Snyder who spoke at last year’s event, “ It is so important that we remember those who gave the ultimate sacrifice for our freedoms. The laying of the wreaths is a away to remember each veteran by name so they are never forgotten. I sponsor a wreath each year at the ceremony. It was an honor for me to speak at the event last year.” The 2016 ceremony will be held on December 17th at noon. The community is invited to attend this very moving ceremony.

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Dear Santa, My name is Ryan and I am 6 years old. I should be on the “Good List” this year because I am quiet when I go hunting. I have a couple of Christmas wishes. Could you please bring me a toy crossbow and a remote controlled car? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave cookies and milk out. I promise to sleep when you come. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Ryan

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Dear Santa, My name is Aiden and I am 6 years old. You can tell I’ve been a good boy this year because I helped my Mom put the Christmas tree up and I do what my Mom and Dad tell me to do. I have a few Christmas wishes. Could you please bring me a Nintendo, Lego Dimensions, and two walkie talkies? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave cookies out for you, but I don’t have any carrots for your reindeer. Sorry! I promise to go to bed early. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Aiden Dear Santa, My name is Justin and I am 6 years old. I have been a good boy this year because I am nice and kind to my classmates at school. I have a big Christmas request. Could you please bring me a four­-wheeler that runs on batteries? I can’t wait for you to visit on Christmas Eve. I will leave cookies, milk, and carrots out for you and your reindeer. I will sing Christmas songs before I go to bed that night. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Justin 26

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Dear Santa, My name is Zachary and I am 6 years old. I should be on the “Good List” this year because I helped my Dad get the deer I shot out of the creek. It was hard work! I have a couple of Christmas wishes. Could you please bring me some Hot Wheels cars and a Thomas the Train toy? I can’t wait for Christmas! I will leave cookies and carrots out for you and your reindeer to eat. Merry Christmas Santa! Love, Zachary

Toys for Tots Fill The Truck

Your Hometown Radio Station

1210

AM

Tune in for Crazy Dougie Wilson weekday mornings & J.T. Cash weekday afternoons

(Pictured L-R): Dave Fox, Santa’s Elf, Ron Fox, Santa, and Mark Fox. Fox Ford donated $2,150 in toys, along with their month long collections this past Saturday.

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ot only did they fill the truck – they over flowed it! Fox Ford’s “Fill the Truck” event for Toys for Tots was definitely a Santa’s success story as generous owners, staff, customers and friends of Fox Ford produced enough new toys to fill the bed of the Ford F150 on display in the showroom, and

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surround it with brand new bicycles and more toys. On top of all that, Fox Ford Hosted Santa and his elf for a celebration on Saturday, Dec. 10 – the final day of the toy collecting event, and in addition to all the collected toys, the company purchased $2,150 in toys for the 2017 Toys for Tots campaign. Merry Christmas to All!

The Best Mix of current country hits and

country classics you’ll ever find! 27


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Dec GreeneScene 2016web  

Seasons Greetings form all of us at The GreeneScene Community Magazine. In this issue we tell some of the history of Aleppo, PA. Get the sco...

Dec GreeneScene 2016web  

Seasons Greetings form all of us at The GreeneScene Community Magazine. In this issue we tell some of the history of Aleppo, PA. Get the sco...

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