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BUILDING DREAMS AND SHARING WISDOM By Tara Kinsell

Em il y M at h as o n

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n 2008 with just $1,000 and a dream, West Greene High School graduate, Emily Mathason set out to take on the world. Her father drove her to Los Angeles, kissed her goodbye, and Emily embarked on the beginning of the rest of her life. She had just graduated from Penn State with her bachelor’s degree in theater and knew LA was the best starting point for a career in film. Emily is no stranger to working hard or overcoming obstacles. We first met when she was a sophomore in high school and already one of the best high jumpers in Pennsylvania. She came out strong in her junior year, jumping 5 feet 5 inches, enough to make her the WPIAL Class AA highjump champion and the number one seed entering the state competition. Emily planned to prove she was “the best” in the state and no doubt would have done so. But, her jump at states was not where it needed to be and Emily soon learned the reason, Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Less than six months after her last treatment she placed 7th at the state competition as a senior. Today she is 12 years cancer free. “I’ve been through a lot in my life,” the 29-year old said, noting that she doesn’t dwell on it but has always been willing to be there behind the scenes for others who have faced cancer. Recently, she began using her keen sense of humor to do some standup comedy. We discussed how it often seems that comics have a dark side. Emily is effervescent. Undoubtedly it is her energy and zest for life that helped her gain more-and-more attention when she hit the west coast, that, along with a strong work ethic and a willingness to try new things. Like many actors before her, she has waited tables, bartended and done other various jobs to pay the bills. She also networked-- a lot. “One thing you find is the business becomes

small when you start working in it,” Emily said, talking about the many people one encounters over-and-over while working in film and television. It wasn’t long before she had earned her screen actor’s guild card. Emily has worked on How I Met Your Mother, Ghost Whisperer, C.S.I. New York, and started her own production company, EMRO, with friend, Rowan Castan. They are about to release a new project that is “innovative” and “completely revolutionary,” she gushed, “And, it takes place in Pittsburgh.” Although she has been living in Los Angeles primarily, Emily has found herself working in several other locations, one of them being back “home” in Pennsylvania. She’s even done two Pennsylvania State Lottery commercials. “L.A. is like one big social experiment. People of all ethnicities and all experiences are there,” she said of her second home. “At points I miss the good nature and people looking people in the eye and the trust [of Greene County].” Eight years after the journey began, Emily has learned a lot. She enjoys being both in front of and behind the camera. She hopes to do more documentary work. Recently she put together one about organ donation with a focus on fellow Greene County girl, Morgan Yoney. It falls in line with her self-professed need to do something that helps others. That has led her to working for a financial health company, Tranont where she can “see the tangible benefits to others. That makes all the difference she said. To that end, Emily has this piece of motivational advice to share. “Build your own dreams and stop building someone else’s, especially to your detriment. Take care of yourself and take care of some others along the way,” she said. GreeneScene Magazine •

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Pet Therapy in Greene and Fayette Counties

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Staff at Golden Living Center in Waynesburg react to a patient’s interaction with Rocko, a pet therapy dog, that is part of the offerings of local non-profit animal rescue organization, Teddy Bear Care, Corp.

relatively new local non-profit, Teddy Bear Care Corporation, aka TBC, has joined the ranks of Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and the Mayo Clinic in the belief that pet therapy provides beneficial healing properties. Whether it is children or adults, those with a mental or physical ailment, this type of therapy has been proven to lower blood pressure, reduce stress, and elevate one’s mood. “Pet Therapy is an institute all of its own that generates not just smiles on the face, but stimulates reactions of the heart, mind and body,” said TBC board president Donna Roberts of Carmichaels. “Pet Therapy is used in many, many other facets of the human condition.” Donna had an opportunity recently to put the TBC Pet Therapy Program into practical use on a visit to Golden Living Nursing Home in Waynesburg. “For children and adults it brings with it certain healing properties that can’t be denied,” Donna said. “Rocko is a local resident of Greene County that is on loan to TBC for this program.” A Collie mix, Rocko, is accredited through the United States Dog Registry for Pet Therapy. Donna described him as a “gentle and mild manner dog that was selected especially for his job,” as a pet therapy dog. “TBC prides itself om being an organization that is committed to training and education for both the fur-baby and the parents,” Donna said. “Among many other programs TBC has

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established this new pet therapy program to promote and enhance smiles among residents at local nursing homes and personal care homes through pet therapy.” Rocko made his debut at Golden Living Center in July with State Rep. Pam Snyder there to experience what Rocko and TBC brought to such an environment. Donna said the residents seemed delighted to have the visit from both Rocko and Rep. Snyder. “Because the animal’s soul and spirit are comprised of unconditional love, it reaches into the human much deeper and wider in most cases than any other way,” she said. This became especially clear when Rocko interacted with a specific resident at the request of nursing home staff. “Joe” had been primarily non-responsive since his arrival at the facility so it was heartwarming to Golden Living Staff and all who bore witness to Joe’s interaction with Rocko. It was clear that pet therapy does indeed have an effect. TBC plans to have Rocko visit with other facilities in both Greene and Fayette County. “As a favor to Rocko, you can also contact TBC if you are looking to adopt one of his fellow fur-friends that need a forever home! Put a smile on Rocko’s face too,” Donna said. For more information about TBC programs, including pet therapy, visit the Teddy Bear Care Corp. Facebook page or phone the organization at 856-397-3167.

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D.A.R.E. Receives Funding

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Pictured, from left is Greene County Sheriff Brian Tennant, GCMHF President Sheila Stewart and GCMHF Executive Director Dave Jones.

he Greene County Sheriff ’s Office recently received a $2,000 grant from the Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation (GCMHF). Sheriff Brian A. Tennant said “This grant money is going help with our D.A.R.E. program. This money will help us train a second D.A.R.E. Deputy to be used in the public schools in Greene county as well as cover the expenses associated with the program for the next 3 years.” D.A.R.E. stands for Drug Abuse Resistance Education and the program is listed on the national registry of evidence based practices. The main purpose of the program is anti-drug related and to

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teach students the dangers of drug abuse. In addition, it teaches kids about school safety, internet safety, community safety, how to deal with peer pressure and bullying, awareness, education, and prevention.  But beyond these it teaches children how to make better decisions as a whole.  Greene County Memorial Hospital Foundation Board President, Sheila Stewart said “The Foundation is pleased to be able to assist the Sheriff ’s Department in this incredibly vital program.” If you are interested in contributing to the D.A.R.E. program please contact the Sheriff ’s Office at 724-627-7207.

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50’s Fest

in Downtown Waynesburg

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The collectible Dash Magnet for the 2016 50s Fest & Car Cruise features the WaynesburgFranklin Twp. Volunteer Fire Company’s 1925 American LaFrance type 75 pumper truck.

eptember 10, 2016 Downtown Waynesburg welcomes back for the 15th year what has become one of the most popular car cruises in southwestern, Pennsylvania. The 50’s Fest & Car Cruise, presented by Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful, Inc., typically draws 150+ classic vehicles to downtown, including a wide assortment of hot rods, street rods, rat rods, and other classic cars, trucks and motorcycles. It’s a great day of family fun, because 50’s Fest & Car Cruise is so much more than a typical car show. The festival also offers retro fun with dance contests, bubblegum blowing and Hula Hoop contests and oldies music broadcast live all day by Sponsor WANB Radio’s “Greene County Greaser” aka Doug Wilson. There are also plentiful door prizes and unique shopping and specials from many downtown merchants and restaurants. Support is offered by several local sponsors who are featured on the back of the festival’s annual collectible T-shirt. The hand drawn t-shirt art is created each year by local artist Colleen Nelson and usually features an actual classic vehicle belonging to a cruise participant. This year’s shirt features a 1956 Ford Crown Victoria owned by Bryan Cole of Bluff Ridge Pa. The design has this iconic car parked near a loaded coal train coming down the Cumberland Mine Road near Kirby. “We thought it would be great to pay tribute to the car, and to Greene County’s history and association with coal,” says Shelly Brown, Promotions Committee Chairperson for Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, who helps organize the 50s Fest event with co-chair Doug Wilson. “Production was very limited on that particular Ford model, which makes it a valuable collectible; unfortunately, our coal production is getting limited too, and that reminds us of how valuable the industry has been to

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our community,” she added. The coal train depicted in the artwork on the t-shirt was driven by Rodney Grimes, an active member of the 50s Fest Committee for many years. It serves as a perfect backdrop for the “Peacock Blue & Colonial White” car, as Ford officially named the colors of Bryan Cole’s Crown Vic. “Don’t miss your chance to buy one of the 2016 t-shirts…they are going to go fast,” Shelly added. 50s Fest tradition also offers a collectible magnetic dash plaque free to all participants and for sale to spectators as long as they last. This year’s magnet features the 1925 American LaFrance type 75 pumper which belongs to the Waynesburg Franklin Twp. Volunteer Fire Company. It was the very first fire truck the Waynesburg VFC ever owned, and it was purchased in March 1926. “The truck was retired from service sometime in the mid 1940s,” explains Fire Chief Jeff Marshall, “There have been several partial restorations over the years, but the final and complete restoration was accomplished late last year. That truck is one of the coolest things we have in our fire company, because every single member of the company – whether a veteran member or past chief to a new volunteer just coming aboard – everyone of them has touched and knows that truck.” Featured aboard the historic truck on the 50s Fest dash magnet are fire company members Adam Chapman, Richie Policz and Chris Lash. “The generous support we receive from the downtown merchants and local businesses is what enables us to make this a free event for spectators and participants. There are no admission fees or registration fees for the 50’s Fest & Car Cruise in down town Waynesburg. Make your plans now to be there, or be square,” warns Shelly.

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I Love this P l a ce

FREDERICKTOWN, PA

by Tara Kinsell

THE MELTING POTS of FREDERICKTOWN and MILLSBORO

Photo of Front Street in Fredericktown today.

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he river towns of Fredericktown and Millsboro are so intertwined that it seemed somehow fitting that we write about them together. Millsboro got its name and start from grist mills that operated there and its proximity to the water made it a perfect location for such a trade. Not only is it bordered by the Monongahela River but it is also the point where Ten Mile Creek (or “crick” to the locals) connects. Millsboro once held two stores, a foundry, three cooper shops, and a cabinet and wagon factory. Dozens of artisans made their living there making everything from cigars to shoes. The waterways helped commerce in Millsboro as goods could be transported easily on the river. Then, in the early 1900s, the railroad being built through it and Fredericktown made it even easier. If you drive over that way with any frequency, chances are you have had to sit and wait for a train to pass to continue on your route. It can be frustrating for sure. The next time you find yourself delayed, consider this, Italian immigrants came to the area in the early 1900s to build it. They didn’t have housing so they slept in shacks. And, one hot cooked meal was provided to them daily by Mary Booze who is also said to have baked bread for them to eat at night. On July 23, 1907, passenger train service came through the area on the Pennsylvania, Monongahela and Southern Railroad with stops in Millsboro and Fredericktown. There is no passenger service on the line today but it is still used for commerce as coal is hauled via the tracks. The other great connector of these two towns was of course the Clyde Mine. Remnants of its existence still pepper the path between Millsboro and Fredericktown. One literally drove beneath a part of the mine’s working components passing from one to the other for many, many years. Of course, in more recent years, road improvements made transportation via the river and the rails less necessary. But for businesses like the Millsboro Lumber Company, established in 1906, and for

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cabinet/casket maker, Charles Dalby, the river and rails were at one time vital to business. At the base of Greene County Hill, crossing into Millsboro, there are still businesses for which the water is essential, such as Engle’s Holiday Harbor and the Greene Cove Yacht Club. Perhaps the busiest of businesses in Millsboro would have to be Albert Giles’ Fredericktown Butcher Shop, operating for over 30 years now. Many a graduation party, wedding reception and family reunion has included the chicken and potato logs from the Fredericktown Butcher Shop. As for Fredericktown proper, it was named for settler Frederick

The old Route 88 bridge at the base of Greene County Hill after the Election Day Flood of 1985.

Wise. Like Millsboro, many businesses have found a home in Fredericktown through the years, even a whiskey distillery that was said to have been located where the old Packrall’s Bay Restaurant once stood. In Greene County we are quite familiar with Greensboro Pottery and Hamilton Pottery but one who isn’t a collector may not be acquainted with the pottery that came from Fredericktown. Donaghho Pottery, made in Fredericktown, began in 1843. Less then 20 years later, it is reported that around 30,000 gallons of stone ware was being churned out by Donahoo and Beale Company in Fredericktown. It lasted for roughly a decade longer in full swing in Fredericktown and then tapered off. Last year at auction, a two gallon stoneware jug of Donoghho Pottery from Fredericktown went for $1,035. I say from Fredericktown because it was at times produced in other towns. Today we have the Riviera Restaurant and Lounge. Prior to its opening in 1990 the location was home to Bartoletti’s Hotel. The hotel/restaurant and lounge was started by Josephine Bertanzetti Bartoletti to service families and traveling businessmen. One such person, a pharmacist from Carmichaels by the name of Chuck Fedutes, even had a steak sandwich named after him at the restaurant. The Fedute was almost as much a tradition of Bartoletti’s as its well-known broasted chicken and potatoes. Josephine’s daughter, Irma Bartoletti Rohland and her husband, Bill, ran the establishment for many years. Irma got her start helping her mother there at the age of 19. The 15-room hotel/restaurant/lounge was in operation from New Year’s Eve 1944 through New Year’s Eve 1988. The town had Mod Laundromat, Shipley Niklos Appliances, Cizmek Dry Cleaners, its own bank, and even a Kaufmanns. At one time, where the appliance store was, people could see silent movies. Other establishments included Gross Furniture Store, Rosenthal Jewelers, multiple service stations and an optometrist (it was there that I got my first pair of glass many years ago). Who could forget the store started by Russian immigrants, Abraham Lazovik and Gustov Stein? These friends came to the United States in the early 1900s. Gustov started in business in Smithfield. Later, he and Abraham opened a modest clothing store in Millsboro and then moved it to Fredericktown. The Steins and Lazovik’s eventually decided to sell their enterprise and move to Detroit where both families had relatives. Shortly after the move, Gustov fell victim to the flu epidemic of the period. Upon his passing, Abraham and his family decided to return to

The former Shop and Save store in Millsboro when it was hit by the Election Day Flood of 1985. It is now a Save-A-Lot. GreeneScene Magazine •

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I Love this Pla ce (co ntinue d) Fredericktown where he resumed business. He eventually settled in the location along Main Street that anyone who lived in the area before 1985 would recall. The business continued to operate in the Lazovik family all of those years. Abraham’s sons took over the business upon his passing in 1954 and grandson, Mark, was there at the end. Although Mark had already made the decision to close the clothier when the Election Day Flood of 1985 swept through Millsboro and Fredericktown, the flood changed the final offerings from closing sales to flood sales. It may be hard for some to imagine these towns when they were bustling with business and thriving commerce as described above, but, for those of us who are old enough to remember, there is a fondness for the days when one could go shopping for school clothes at Lazovik’s and then have dinner at Bartoletti’s. I can still remember as a child the anticipation of paying the bill at Bartoletti’s, for that meant a special treat was coming. A jovial Bill Rohland was most always behind the bar cash register with a smile and a lollipop for the little ones. I imagine it is a similar feeling to the little kids today who step up to the meat counter at the Fredericktown Butcher Shop, where a smiling clerk offers them a chicken drumstick to snack on while their family shops. Like Brownsville, Rices Landing and Greensboro along the Monongahela, Fredericktown and Millsboro have ebbed and flowed like the water itself. Each locale has faced a need for reinvention and some have been more successful than others. The rise and fall of industry, floods, and residents being called to war have all played their part in the hard times. Inversely, that same industry, the water and the people who lived there were responsible for the towns’ successes and rebuilding. There may not be the same busy streets as there once were in Millsboro and Fredericktown, but it would not be surprising if one day they are again. I am grateful to the ladies at the Fredericktown Library, to those who have written extensively about the towns of Fredericktown and Millsboro, and to each of the families of these towns who left an indelible mark on our lives through the years. They are among the reasons why we love these places.

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The historic Bower Hotel in the early 1900s, perhaps at its grand opening

The Bower Hotel as it looks in 2016.

The Clyde Mine during its heyday as it looked when one drove from Millsboro into Fredericktown.

Leaving Millsboro to Fredericktown modern day with just remnants left of the Clyde Mine.

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Heart and Soul Leads Local Archer to Olympics

here is no doubt that Kevin “K.J.” Polish has “earned” his spot in the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio this year. K. J. has traveled a long road to get there but every time life tossed him a curve ball he made adjustments and was right back at it…his love of shooting archery that is. As the story goes, K.J. started his road to Rio when he was just a toddler with equipment fashioned for him by his dad. By the time elementary school rolled around, K.J. was already entering competitions and winning. In 1999, the now 33-year old, was involved in an auto accident that derailed his archery career, if only temporarily. The accident left him with Parapalegia. His determination to continue on with the sport he loved since he was three overrode his physical limitations. K.J. adapted and only worked harder to get to where he is today. In 2005 he was a member of the team that won gold at the World Archery Championships. He was at the top of his game and then health problems started to set in, first diabetes and then bladder cancer. Late last year he was declared cancer free and K.J. knew an opportunity was waiting just around the corner, the 2016 Paralympics were just months away. He immediately set his sights on earning his spot on the team. It wasn’t easy but K.J. worked through the cobwebs of a break in competition to finish first at the third of the U.S. Paralympic Team Trials in June. The win in the compound bow division earned him his shot at gold in Rio.

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by Tara Kinsell

“It’s been a long journey,” K.J. said, just 11 days before leaving for Rio. “It is something that I have put my heart and soul into.” In addition to the rigorous training that was required to get there, K.J. said the budget he, his fiancé and mother need to get there and compete is an estimated $16,000. They had fallen a little short at the time we spoke by roughly $5,000 but K.J. said they would find a way to make it work. The flights were already booked and on Aug. 29 the three would be on their way. He is as prepared as one can be. He shoots in all types of weather and tries to get in at least two hours per day. He said he prepares for the worst

and the best situations. He doesn’t worry about the competition. There is no arrogance from K.J., simply confidence in his abilities. Ranked number one in the United States, he has a right to be. He called the United States archers the best competitors in the world. For the moment he is curbing his excitement, saving that for when he mounts the podium to receive a medal. “I’m not nervous or excited,” he said. “I won’t get exited until I win.” K.J. will compete on Sept. 10, 12, and 14. He returns home on Sept. 19.

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A Star Was Born in Millsboro

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ne day a few years ago I was in an especially nostalgic mood. You children of the 70s may recognize the names Sid and Marty Krofft. If you don’t, you should be familiar with at least one of the television shows they were responsible for creating, H.R. Pufnstuf being the most famous. Others on the list include: Sigmund and the Seamonsters, Dr. Shrinker, Lidsville, Electra Woman and Dynagirl, Land of the Lost, and the Bugaloos. Those with little ones today may have caught an episode of Mutt n Stuff with Mutt’s uncle Pufnstuf making occasional appearances. That too is the magic of Sid and Marty Krofft. Through the years, there was one actor who seemed to show up in Krofft productions more than any other, William Bertanzetti, also known as Billy Barty. If you don’t recognize the name, chances are you do know the face. What made me start to pine away for the 1970s, was an episode of the television show Little House on the Prairie that was airing that day. There was Billy Barty in a role that spoke to how cruel people can be to people who aren’t like them. As a little person, Billy was just 3 ft. 9 inches tall, he was the subject of the ignorance of the shop keeper’s wife, Harriet Olsen. If you are so inclined to check it out, the episode was entitled, “Little Lou.” As was the case with that series, all was well that ended well. Watching Billy, whom I had seen so many times before, I wondered if he was still with us. A quick Internet search proved he was not. But, I learned something else that day. Billy Barty was born just down the road from where I grew up. When I read he was from the town of Millsboro I thought surely there was a Millsboro in another state. How could I have not known that this man who had entertained me so many times as a child was born just three-and-a-half miles away from my childhood home? Indeed, Billy was from “our” Millsboro. A little more digging into his life turned up other interesting information, like, he was a cousin to the Bartoletti family, who operated a restaurant in town for many years. It is now the location of the Riviera Restaurant. And, with the towns of Millsboro and Fredericktown featured for this month’s I Love This Place, I knew I had an opportunity to tell a little bit of Billy’s story. Although he only lived in Millsboro for 3 years, Billy did return for a visit or two. In a letter he sent expressing regret that he could not attend the Fredericktown 200th Birthday Celebration in 1990 he recalled a time he and his sisters, Evelyn and Dolores, performed their musical comedy act at the theater in Fredericktown. When Billy’s family left the area in 1927 he pretty much went directly into life as an entertainer, being cast alongside Mickey Rooney in more than

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By Tara Kinsell

two dozen films as Mickey’s brother. He became known as a consummate performer who was always prepared and gave more than was asked of him, according to Within Reach, a book about his life. In this book, many of the actors who worked with him during a distinguished career that included 194 acting credits shared their love and admiration for Billy. Off screen, Billy was one of the founders of Little People of America, a support and advocacy group for people with dwarfism and he served on the board to help pass the Americans with Disabilities Act. As a backup plan to acting, Billy earned a degree in journalism at what is now California State University, Los Angeles, where he was the sports editor of its collegiate newspaper and a member of the football and basketball teams. He credited his parents for never telling him he was small, never limiting him and supporting him as he proved that “little people can get along in a big world.” When he wanted to play collegiate football and the coach said there wasn’t a uniform in his size his mother sewed him one overnight. The coach designed plays especially for Billy. And, they worked right up until he ignored the route of the next play and went after the biggest guy on the field, the coach would say. When the action stopped there was Billy grinning from ear-to-ear as he exited the field, he added. Billy fought long and hard against the stereotypes that come with being of a short stature, for himself and for others in his situation. He once said, “You don’t see any little people doing newscasts, you don’t see any doing sports writing, you don’t see any doing sports announcing, you don’t see any coaches, but there are little people who are capable of doing these things, who have proven themselves.” There is a YouTube video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aovExk_iptA) created by Billy’s son, Braden, for what would have been Billy’s 90th birthday in 2014. It shows Billy growing up and entertaining. Part of the video is a clip from the 1960 television show, “This Is Your Life.” Host Ralph Edwards tells Billy, “The yardstick by which we should measure a man is not by how high he stands from the ground but by his heart and spirit, and by this measurement, Billy Barty, you have always been the equal of any man.” And, with that, we remember William Bertanzetti, who was born Oct. 25, 1924 in the little town of Millsboro and went on to be known to the world as the one and only Billy Barty.

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THE FAIR AT SANDY PLAINS

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Sandy Plains Fair Ad from 1910

Sandy Plains Fair tag

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ith our own fairs in Greene County coming to a close for 2016 we happened across a fair of yesteryear from across the border. The Sandy Plains Fair, held at the former Millsboro Fairgrounds, operated in the late 1800s and early 1900s. It seemed especially fitting since we are writing about our neighbors in Millsboro and Fredericktown in this edition. In 1911, a newspaper article quipped about how its location could be tied to three counties in a few short moves. “Just at the foot of the hill, near the river, one can stand on the Pennsylvania Railroad

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bridge over Ten Mile Creek and with little effort can jump into Greene County, and by falling off the bridge would get wet in water that washed mud from the slopes of the Washington County hills,” it read. “An ordinary rifle would shoot a ball across the river into Fayette County, so the fair has the tri-cornered interest.” There is no mention of the fair after 1917 in any newspapers that we could find. Perhaps that was the final year for some reason. One thing is for sure, like many of the local fairs that have come and gone in this

region, the Sandy Plains Fair was a draw to thousands of people when it was in operation. Some years there were reports of 4,000 and in a particularly well-attended year of the fair the claim was closer to 7,000. We wonder, was there really an old wild cherry tree at the Sandy Plains Fair as an ad of the day suggested? And, was it held past 1917? Perhaps there is a reader out there who knows these answers. If so, we’d enjoy hearing from you.

Racing at Sandy Plains

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G ree n e Sce n e of the Pa st

by Tara Kinsell

A Bygone Mode of Transportation

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t was such a fixture in Fredericktown that the ferry which once took passengers and automobiles across the Monongahela River had its own nickname, Fred. Never-the-less, in 2013, even public outcry wasn’t enough to save Fred’s service from being permanently discontinued. If only Fred could have talked. One can only imagine the stories it would have told.

Fred was there through prosperous times and down times of the town for which it was named. It survived flooding and even colliding with a tow boat in 1967. That incident sidelined Fred for a decade but Washington and Fayette counties recognized its importance and took over the operation of it. It is too bad that they could not see its importance in 2013. Perhaps Fred would still be with us today, instead of having been sold to Blank River Services, Inc. of Elizabeth. Originally built at the turn of the 20th century, Fred was a Fred as it looked before its demise. convenient means to cross the Mon for those who did not want to drive the additional mileage to either the Brownsville Bridge or the Masontown mere 50 cents. Autos were charged $2. Although it was adapted from steam energy to diesel fuel, and Bridge to cross. It was a convenience to those who were employed at the state correctional facility, just the wooden parts replaced by steel, Fred was the same stalwart mode across the river in Fayette County. And, it was a piece of transportation at the end that it was in the beginning. We remember taking a ride on it now and then and fondly share of history on cables that drove it across the river. There was a time that Fred even played a part its photos as our GreeneScene of the Past. To see more pictures of in a movie, ferrying the likes of Nastassja Kinski and Fred or to share memories with others who feel as we do about the historic Ferry, visit the Friends of the Fredericktown Ferry Facebook John Savage in 1984’s Maria’s Lovers. Fred circa 1920s. The cost to travel on Fred for a pedestrian was a page.

If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneScene Community Magazine can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

CFGC SUPPORTS BOTYIN LIFE SKILLS TRAINING

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he Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC) has awarded three grants to support the new Botvin Life Skills Training in three local school districts. Central Greene School District, SouthFrom left, Philomena Blaney, Coalition for a Brighter Greene; Morris Harper, M.D., eastern Greene School chairman, board of directors, Community Foundation of Greene County; Brian District and West Greene School District will each Uplinger, Superintendent, Central Greene School District; Rich Pekar, Superintendent, Southeastern Greene School District; Brian Jackson, Superintendent, West Greene receive a $2,000 grant to School District; and Pastor Berkey, Coalition for a Brighter Greene assist with implementing the program in their schools this year. The grants, awarded as part of county and it is important to encourage our youth the Foundation’s competitive summer Community to make good choices.” Grant cycle, are made possible from the Bradford/ CFGC has two Community Grants cycles Forever Greene Fund. The grants will help the each year to make grants that address community schools with training and materials for the project. needs. Funding for the Community Grants is made The Botvin Life Skills project is a proven, possible through several field of interest funds as school-based substance abuse prevention program well as funds that the board of directors sets aside that will be implemented this year in each of the each year from their unrestricted funds. The FranGreene County schools, grades 3 through 9. The cis “Bob” Bradford Fund is one such unrestricted Coalition for a Brighter Greene has been working fund that was established by a testamentary gift with each of the schools, the county human servic- through Mr. Bradford’s estate. The Fund has helped es program, and other local organizations to help CFGC award more than $100,000 in community bring this program to the community. grants since 2009. “Helping to address critical community needs For more information about the Community is a priority for the Foundation,” noted CFGC’s Foundation contact Bettie Stammerjohn by phone board of directors chairman, Dr. Morris Harper. at 724-627-2010, email cfgc@gmail.com, or visit “Substance abuse is a growing problem in the www.cfgcpa.org.

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GreeneScene Magazine •

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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

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Co ol at S cho o l by Tara Kinsell

Giving back extends down the branches of local family tree

Fredericktown United Methodist Church

EARLY 1900’s

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CHURCH TODAY

he First United Church of Fredericktown was literally the first church in Fredericktown, dedicated on Sept. 11, 1904 on south Main Street. How it looked on that day, as history records note a tropical storm drove rainfall to the area, is quite different than what it looks like today. The circa 1920 picture above shows the original church, before it received its brick façade in 1948 and an addition at some point. The picture on the right was taken just last month. One thing remains very recognizable – the large distinctive window on the left side of the church cannot be mistaken. As with many rural churches, Fredericktown UMC has seen a decline in membership through the years. In an effort to keep the doors of it and several other United Methodist churches open in Greene and Washington counties, the Greater Purpose Team Ministry charge was formed. Pastor Richard Bowser came to the GPTM four years ago. “It’s a juggle,” he said of serving as pastor of a half dozen different churches. With the help of associate pastor, Brian Carroll, and lay persons in the churches, they have found a way to make it work, he added. “The ministry works together so they can continue to have the little churches. That’s why it was put together two years before I came.”

The Greater Purpose Team Ministry Facebook page is a testament to just how well this group effort has taken off. There you will find members of the Fredericktown, Denbo, Jefferson, Rices Landing, Roscoe, and Coal Center churches interacting. Photos on the page range from fun fundraisers the churches have held to choir performances and humanitarian relief work. To continue thriving and growth, the GPTM recognizes the need to build a children’s ministry. “We are about children. All churches are trying to get young people to come in. We have a vacation bible school and a youth group,” Pastor Bowser said. The number of children, as with congregants, varies from one of the six churches to the other but across the board the GPTM has something in common, he said. “We are friendly and we welcome everyone with open arms. We are a place to congregate together and to worship God,” he added. The GPTM is part of the Western Pennsylvania Conference of United Methodist Churches. The times of worship, contact information, and address of churches in the GPTM can be found on the conference website at wpaumc.org. Pastor Bowser may be contacted by email at gptm6@windstream.net or by phone at 724-883-2161.

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his month we look at a of his mind when he has collectyoung man from Bethed monies each year to ensure Center School District, that dozens of sick youngsters Cameron Palmer, for receive a special Christmas gift. our Cool at School. Districts are “I’ve been doing it since I about to return for the 2016-17 was 8. There have been kids in school year, and we wanted to my school who have had to go give this young man and his famto the hospital who have had ily some assistance with a project cancer. A couple of them were that has become an annual tradigone for probably the whole tion. year,” Cameron said. “They spent Hugs for the Holidays, an Christmas in the hospital. It was effort to provide Build-A-Bear just a nice thing to do.” stuffed animals to children in loThe first year Cameron cal hospitals, shelters, long-term raised enough money to stuff care facilities and more, was ac10 bears. Last year that number tually started by Cameron’s cousjumped to 62, Jody said with in, Janae Layhue. pride in her voice. Janae started the project When he isn’t on the pitching mound, Hugs for the Holidays is a as a way to teach her three little Cameron Palmer, 13, of Fredericktown, year-long effort on the part of boys about the “true meaning of busies himself with a family tradition, all who are involved that culmiChristmas.” She said she thought making sure that children in need receive a nates with a Build-A-Bear party special gift each Christmas. by having them make a bear and at the South Hills Village branch then give that bear to another of the store in early December. child in need was a perfect way Even with three growing boys to do this. Since that first lesson, there have been and a return to her full-time teaching job last year, over 2,000 stuffed animals given away. And, what Janae and her extended family and friends ensure started out as a lesson for her children has grown the bears, unicorns, reindeer, frogs and more get to one where others have that same opportunity to funded and made. give in the true spirit of the holiday. A dedicated baseball player, Cameron was en Cameron has various reasons for his participa- route to a Cal Ripken Baseball Experience in Marytion over the last 5 years. land when we caught up with him by telephone, but Mom, Jody Savage Palmer, a Jefferson-Morgan he isn’t so busy that he won’t be at the Build-a-Bear High School graduate, explained. Within hours of party scheduled for Dec. 10. Cameron’s birth, the now 13-year old was whisked “They (the Build-a-Bear staff) stuff them a away from his parents and taken by medical heli- little for me,” he said. Jody noted this takes place copter to a different hospital from where he was before they arrive at the Hugs for the Holiday event born. He had stopped breathing. each December to make things go more quickly. Only later did Jody and her husband, Keith, “But, I get to stick the heart inside and finish stufflearn that their baby boy had suffered strokes on ing them for them to sew them up,” Cameron emboth sides of his brain. Doctors prepared the Palm- phasized. ers for the worst of it. If you or your loved ones would like to join “They said he couldn’t talk, walk and wouldn’t in the Hugs for Holiday campaign by making a dospeak,” Jody said. “He is our miracle. He is our ab- nation or building your own stuffed animal to give solute miracle.” away, contact Janae at holidaybearhugs@yahoo. Although Cameron has no memories of his com or by calling, 724-678-3404. early struggles he agreed that it has been in the back

Janae Layhue, her children and husband are surrounded by stuffed animals for Hugs for the Holidays. The program was started by Layhue in 2009 as a family project to teach her children about the true meaning of Christmas being to give, rather than receive. As others joined in, Hugs for the Holidays has grown to the point that more than 2,000 Build-a-Bear stuffed animals have been distributed to children who need them.

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Greene County Fair Rabbit Awards

Best in Show and Reserve in Show.

Showmanship Winners.

est in Show was awarded to Alexus Grecoe who took top honors with her Dutch rabbit. Reserve in Show went to Hannah Cole with her Californian rabbit.  Nineteen 4-H members competed and just over 250 rabbits were on display in the rabbit barn at the 2016 Greene County Fair. Pictured above left (L-R): 2016 Greene County Fair Queen Lindsey Gilbert, 4-H member Hannah Cole, Judge Hannah Means, 4-H Member Alexus Grecoe and Judge Tom Schweikart. Showmanship winners were (above right L-R) Intermediate Novice Kelly Courtwright; Junior Experienced – Thomas Good; Intermediate Expe-

rienced – Vivian Marx-Good; Senior Experienced – Johnna Calvert; Senior Novice – Samantha Lambeth; Junior Novice – Jenna Longstreth In addition, retired 4-H Leaders Melody Longstreth and Amber Mankey presented the annual “Rabbit Leadership Scholarship” to Lindsey Gilbert. Club members who have completed at least three years of the rabbit project and are still a member in the year that they graduate high school will be awarded a $500 scholarship to further their education.  The private fund was started in 2012 and the first scholarships were awarded in 2013. 

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AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

2016 • GreeneScene Magazine

Breaking Ground for New Operations Center

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ith the symbolic first cut of the spade, Community Bank, the bank subsidiary of CB Financial Services, Inc. (Nasdaq: CBFV), marked the official start of the construction of its new Operations Center in the EverGreene Technology Park in Waynesburg. The construction of this new 22,500 square foot facility is another milestone in the 115 year history of Community Bank. “This investment in Greene County shows our commitment to our roots. Community Bank was founded 115 years ago as the First National Bank of Carmichaels. Today we honor our heritage by locating this state of the art facility in our home county”, said President and CEO, Pat McCune. The name of the new facility will be the “Ralph J. Sommers, Jr. Operations Center”, named

in honor of Community Bank’s Chairman of the Board, Ralph J. Sommers, Jr. The new Sommers Operation Center will house approximately 70 employees, now located in several facilities. Architects for the project are SASI Inc., Mark Viola, Susan Viola and Doug Baker. Contractor for the project is Nello Construction. Pictured breaking ground with Chairman Ralph J. Sommers, Jr. is former Chairman Charles Baily, Sr., President Pat McCune and the Community Bank Board of Directors, Senator Bartolotta, Representative Snyder, Greene County Commissioners Zimmerman, Coder and Trader and GCID, Inc Executive Director Chappel. For more information about CB Financial and Community Bank, visit the website at www. communitybank.tv.

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MONEY Magazine names Waynesburg University a Best College

Grads Awarded First Federal Scholarships

Pictured (L-R): Kaitlin Kreuzer; Judi Goodwin Tanner, First Federal of Greene County President/CEO; Jacob Wamsley; Chuck Trump, First Federal of Greene County Vice President; Desiree Rose; and Trish Eddy, First Federal of Greene County Education Coordinator, Waynesburg main office. Not pictured is scholarship recipient Kaitlyn Reagan.

Four local 2016 high school graduates were recently selected by the Waynesburg main office of First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Greene County to receive four-year college scholarships: Kaitlin Kreuzer, West Greene High School, daughter of Chuck and Lisa Kreuzer of Sycamore, will attend West Virginia University and major in business and economics with a minor in fashion merchandising;   Kaitlyn Reagan, Trinity High School, daughter of Traci Dobish of Carmichaels, will attend Baldwin Wallace University in Ohio and major in psychology; Desiree Rose, Waynesburg Central High School, daughter of Joshua and Crystal Rose of Waynesburg, will attend the University of Pittsburgh and major in biology with a pre-dental track;  Jacob Wamsley, Carmichaels Area High

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In recent months, Waynesburg University has also been ranked nationally as a top school for educational value by The Economist, the Brookings Institution, CollegeNet and Christian Universities Online. These ranking systems examined data such as outcomes, value and job placement. Waynesburg graduates consistently achieve high placement rates. Ninety-five percent of 2014 graduates and 97 percent of 2013 graduates reported working or studying in their chosen field  within one year  of graduation.  Additionally, the University’s tuition, room and board is more than $11,500 below the national average for private, non-profit, four-year colleges, according to College Board.  Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region.

Local Sunday School Students Live What They Learn

School, son of James and Lisa Wamsley of Carmichaels, will attend Allegheny College and major in economics. Each winner will receive a $1,000 scholarship renewable for a maximum of four years, or $4,000 total. Eligible students must reside in Greene, Fayette or Washington counties; have been accepted full-time to an accredited educational facility; and maintain an Education Club savings account with minimum regular deposits.   In addition to the Waynesburg main office, the Uniontown office also randomly selects four winners each year. This year’s winners, awarded in June, are Abigail Abraham of Uniontown, Noah Gatten of Bentleyville, Joshua Miller of Uniontown and Mackenzie Wagner of Canonsburg.

Hunting Hills Hawkeyes place at National Championship Four members of Greene County’s Hunting Hills Hawkeyes placed at the 2016 Scholastic Clay Target (SCTP) American Team National Championships held recently at Cardinal Shooting Center located in Marengo, Ohio. Sixteen Hawkeyes members competed with over 900 shooters from across the country in a 200-target shoot to determine national winners in six skill divisions. In the intermediate advanced division, the squad of Tristan Cole, Arran Hinnerman and Hunter Orrahood, all of Waynesburg, took third place with a combined score of 477. Cole finished first overall with a score of 177 in the men’s intermediate advanced division. Robert Dillon III of Adah finished third overall in the men’s rookie division with a score of 145. The Hawkeyes’s home base of Hunting Hills

Waynesburg University has been named to MONEY Magazine’s 2016 “Best Colleges” list, a ranking system that examined three primary factors: educational quality, affordability and alumni success. Included on the list are 705 four-year U.S. colleges and universities that, according to MONEY’s website, “deliver the most value – that is, a great education at an affordable price that prepares students for rewarding careers.”  MONEY measured comparative value by assessing how well students at each school did verses what’s expected for students with similar economic and academic backgrounds, as well as the college’s mix of majors.   “This ranking is another reminder of the value of a Waynesburg University education,” said Waynesburg University President Douglas G. Lee. “We offer a distinctive educational experience at an affordable cost, preparing our graduates for successful careers and lives of purpose.” 

is owned and operated by Sally and Roy Sisler. The Sislers approached the Greene County Commissioners in 2008 about starting a Scholastic Clay Target Program with a team formed in February 2009. More than 60 students from 5th grade to 12th grade have participated in the program annually. The program’s mission is to promote and teach young people the fundamentals of gun safety, team work and outdoor sports. Overseeing this year’s program was head coach Chuck Mallory, assistant head coach Randy Coss and several assistant coaches. Nationally, the program is sponsored by the Scholastic Shooting Sports Foundation. For more information on the Hunting Hills Hawkeyes, call the Department of Recreation at 724-852-5323, or visit www.co.greene.pa.us.

Front Row (L-R): Nathan Iams, Ethan Iams and Dr. Morris Harper, CFGC Board Chairman. Back Row: Mrs. Kim Grimes, CFGC Board Vice-Chairwoman, Darren Knight, Roxy Lightner and Alyssa Lightner.

The First Christian Church of Waynesburg Sunday School students practice what they learn by giving back to their community. Some of the students of the NextGen Ministry class at the church recently delivered a donation of One Hundred Dollars to the Community Foundation of Greene County (CFGC). “I was so thrilled to hear that the Community Foundation had been selected to receive this gift,” said Bettie Stammerjohn, CFGC’s Executive Director. “Learning about philanthropy is an important lesson for all of us, but it is especially touching to see young children experience the joy of giving back. Each gift, no matter how big or how small, has an impact. Most of all, the children are learning an important lesson in giving that will last them a lifetime.”

According to Asher Knight, the NexGen Ministry leader, students ranging from 2 to 13 years old select a nonprofit each month to receive their weekly offering. “Their goal is to raise $50 in the month,” said Knight. “We share with them some information about two organizations each month and the children select one to receive the donation.” Ms. Knight said the students selected CFGC to receive the June offering because of the work it does to help promote the Weekend Food and Summer Food programs in Greene County, along with many other projects that give back to the community. Some of the other organizations the children have supported include the Corner Cupboard Food Bank, 2ndSam9, Inc., Camp Christian, and Christmas for Teens. The children are currently collecting for Cornerstone Care.

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RAIN DAY RESULTS Umbrella Contest: Participants are asked to bring a decorated umbrella in a Rain Day theme at the event to be judged. 1st Place winner receives $100.00 prize, 2nd place prize is $50.00 & 3rd Place prize is $25.00.

Best Decorated Baby Rain Day Can Winner will receive $25.00 check. Aaron Renner

1st Place: Johni Yeager

Rain Day Window Decorating Contest Winners: First Prize is $100.00 plus ownership for one year of the coveted Golden Watering Can. Second Prize is $50.00 and the 3rd prize is $25.00. Honorable mention receives a certificate and an official Rain Day Hat.

Jack McCracken Award: Sister Audrey Quinn & Sister Sue Fazzini

1st Place: RUFF CREEK CRAFTS & ANTIQUE 2ND PLACE: 5 KIDZ KANDY 3RD PLACE: ARTBEAT Honorable Mention: Ben McMillen Photography

2016 Baby Rain Day Contestants Winners Winners received a $100.00 CASH PRIZE, crown or tiara, title banner, and special gifts and the honor of representing Rain Day throughout the coming year. PRINCE: Cale John-Vester Hugo Parents are Shayna Hugo and John Seamon of Waynesburg, PA PRINCESS: Kaylee Rose Scott Parents are Brittany & Zachary Scott of Graysville, PA KING: Aaron Renner Parents are Meghan & Jason Renner of Crucible, PA QUEEN: Bexley Humble Parents are Jess & John Humble of Waynesburg, PA

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Jamie Brown acts silly when being photographed with a bust of her likeness created by artist, Jamie Lester, of Morgantown, during the 2015 Art Blast on the Mon.

n its 11th year, the Art Blast on the Mon will be held at the Ice Plant Pavilion on Labor Day weekend, Sept. 3-4. The hours for Saturday are 10am to 5pm, and for Sunday noon to 4 p.m. Interactive artists on the schedule this year will be Jennifer Adamson doing Raku firing, Dana Bell with recycled art, Lisa Kalsey with printmaking, Zachary Kinsell holding Anime drawing workshops, Dan Templeton on the pottery wheel, and Colleen Nelson doing face painting. Additionally, a pair of artists from the Pittsburgh Council of the Arts will be there doing paper making and metal art. A weaving activity will be provided by the Monon Center. Artwork will also be on display from Greene County students. Musical artists for Saturday include the Vibrations, Red String Turtle Snappers, and Eighteen Wheelers. Sunday will feature Blended Reality, Vinnie Farsetta on banjo and a return of acoustic duo Tara Kinsell and Steve Halo members of the Plan B band. Pony rides for the weekend will be given by Save-A-Horse of Sycamore. Vendors scheduled to be at the Art Blast include Uncle Dave, Tupperware, Scentsy, Plum Run Winery, Uncle Jim’s Donuts, Linda Metzler with her handmade sterling silver and gemstone jewelry and Corner Star Farm selling 24 flavors of soft serve ice cream. Food for the weekend will be provided by the Lardin Inn, Nathanael Greene Community Development Corporation, and other local vendors. Hot dogs, sandwiches, Greek salads, and more will highlight the menus for the Art Blast. For more information, visit natgreene.org.

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GreeneScene by Caitlin Carlisle

BOWLBY BITS September is Library Card Sign-up Month Pick up your new Waggin card, damaged or lost cards will be replaced free of charge. Teddy Bear Picnic – Sep 10, 11am-1pm. Children ages 2-6 enjoy a picnic on the lawn, crafts & other activities. Bring your favorite Teddy Bear so that he or she can make some new friends! Advance registration. FREE S.A.T. Prep Classes - Three Saturday sessions: Sep. 10, 17 & 24, 10am – 2pm. Bring scientific calculator & bagged lunch. PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED. Back-To-School Family Game Night - Sep 16, 4-8pm for children ages 6 & up. Games, nutritious snacks & just chillin’ out! Bring your favorite game. Please pre-register. Teen Advisory Group (TAG) After-After Hours – Sep 16 8-10pm. Teens 13-18 are invited for a Blast to the Past party! Suggested $2 donation at the door; pre-register. Fall Story Hours - Begin Tuesday, Oct 3. Call for info on themes, age groups and schedules. “WAGGIN Presents...” Sep 21, 6-9pm, at the Golf Club in Washington to benefits the libraries in Washington, Greene & Fayette Cos. Speaker is Mark Brewer, author/illustrator of Brewology; an Illustrated Dictionary for Beer Lovers, Enjoy local craft beers, music, great food, book signing & Chinese auction. Tickets $60. FMI: email WAGGINPresents@gmail.com.

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WINNERS OF

FAMILY OF 4 POOL PASSES LISA PETRO JADE MCKENZIE LINDA ZIGLEAR ANNIE BAYSINGER LORI BIALKO NATHAN FESTOG MARCELLA BLACK DEBBIE WILSON NICK BUDAY AMANDA DARR

WINNER OF

5 FREE

ULTIMATE CAR WASHES From

High St. & I-79

ANSWER: RAIN BOOTS Dominick Petrucci of Carmichaels, PA

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WU Freshman Orientation Service Project

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aynesburg University’s incoming freshman class participated in several service projects in Greene County on Saturday, Aug. 20. Noble Energy sponsored the event. Service projects included the development of a five-mile trail at the Greene County Airport; the restoration of a five-mile nature trail that loops through the woods behind the Greene County Historical Society; the cleaning and reorganizing of the Historical Society’s Collick Schoolhouse; and the relocating of artifacts into the Civil War Cabin. The approximately 500 volunteers also assisted the Corner Cupboard Food Bank with preparing boxes for pantry distribution and helped build a community garden consisting of five raised beds which will provide fresh produce to individuals in need. State Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Jefferson, addressed the volunteers following the service projects. “I look at you, and you are the future,” she said. “We need leaders like you. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for what you did for Greene County today. God bless you.” This service initiative, during which the freshman class served alongside faculty, staff, Bonner scholars and upperclassmen, was a part of New Student Orientation Weekend. “I love that Waynesburg does a lot of service because I love to volunteer; I really enjoy making someone’s day and helping others,” said Jenna Bartley, a freshman computer science major from Irwin,

AUGUST / SEPTEMBER

Pennsylvania. “We are so blessed to be able to make a difference in this community and meet a lot of great people while doing it.” Noble Energy, Inc. is a global independent oil and natural gas exploration and production company. For more information, please visit www.nobleenergyinc.com. Stacey Brodak, Senior Advisor Government, Community and Media Relations, said, “Noble Energy’s purpose is ‘Energizing the World, Bettering People’s Lives,’ and we take that very seriously. We strive to find projects and partnerships that provide long-term sustainable benefits for the areas where we operate. All of the projects involved in this partnership with Waynesburg University were impactful, and the community garden, pumpkin patch and orchard project are outstanding models for all communities. Waynesburg University and each of the agencies we worked with were very appreciative and most gracious. It personally made me very proud to give back to my home county.” Founded in 1849 by the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Waynesburg University is located on a traditional campus in the hills of southwestern Pennsylvania, with three additional sites located in the Pittsburgh region. The University is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) and is one of only 21 Bonner Scholar schools in the country, offering local, regional and international opportunities to touch the lives of others through service.

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Run4Morgan Being Held

FFSL Helps Stuff the Bus Customers and employees of First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Greene County recently donated six bins worth of school supplies for Greene County United Way’s 14th annual “Stuff the Bus” campaign. Supplies from backpacks and lunch boxes to notebooks and crayons were collected at First Federal of Greene County’s main office and drive-thru location in Waynesburg and at the Carmichaels and Mt. Morris offices. The supplies were used to fill backpacks which were then “stuffed on a school bus” where students got to board and select a free backpack during the annual picnic held earlier in

August. The picnic also feature free food, activities and library books for the children receiving backpacks. This year’s “Stuff the Bus” campaign was sponsored by First Federal of Greene County. FMI: Greene County United Way at 724-8521009. Pictured from left, Barb Wise, Greene County United Way executive director; Chad Moore, First Federal of Greene County first vice president/treasurer and Greene County United Way board president; and Liz Menhart, First Federal of Greene County marketing coordinator with items collected for the 14th annual Stuff the Bus campaign.

Morgan’s Army is partnering with the Greene County Commissioners and the Department of Recreation to host the first Run4Morgan 5K Run/Walk beginning at 9 a.m. on Sept. 10, along the Greene River Trail. A sleep-in category is also available for those who would like to donate but not participate in the walk/run with a donation of $20 or more. A tent will be set-up to serve as race-day registration and packet pick-up from 7 am to 8:30 am at the Greene Cove Yacht Club in Millsboro, Pa. Race starts promptly at 9 am at the Greene River Trail Head. Race times will be officiated by SERJ Racing Services of Uniontown. Refreshments and awards will be held following the race. Proceeds from the event will benefit Greene County native, Morgan Yoney, 22, who has Cystic Fibrosis and awaits a lung transplant. On January 15, 2010, Morgan received a double lung and liver transplant at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh. For the first 3 ½ years, she did incredibly well and was able to achieve many dreams as a normal teenager, such as celebrating her Sweet 16, getting her license, graduating high school in 2012, and attending college at Slippery Rock University where she joined Alpha Sigma Tau Sorority. Unfortunately, in May 2013, Morgan took a turn for the worst and was diagnosed with Humeral Rejection of the Lungs and Steroidal Rejection of the Liver. As her liver recovered, her lungs did not; and over the next few months, it was confirmed that Morgan was in Chronic Rejection of the lungs.

Recently, it was decided that Morgan has declined enough that she has been listed for another double lung transplant at UPMC Presbyterian. FMI on Run4Morgan, send your request by mail to Morgan’s Army, 200 South Oakview Drive, Waynesburg, PA 15370; by phone to Christina at 724-678-1696; by email at run4morgan@gmail.com; or visit the Facebook page Morgan’s Army.

National Event Coming to Waynesburg

The Greene County Airport will be buzzing from Sept. 23-25 with the sights and sounds of scale model planes both in competition and flying for the fun of it. The 3rd Annual NASA

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(National Association of Scale Aeromodelers) Scale Classic is open to the public. All of the classes held at NASA Opens will be held in both RC (remote control) and CL (control line) Scale. Aircraft storage is available at the airport. A Sat-

urday night banquet will be held and the unofficial class this year is RC World War II trainers. Dry camping is also available on site. If you have not received an invitation from one of the opens you can still fly in Fun Scale and the WWII Trainer class. John Brodak of Carmichaels, who is well known in NASA circles as a competitor, retailer and also host of the annual Greene County FlyIn, worked hard along with NASA officials to secure the Greene County airport site. Uniform judging is in place across all NASA competitions. The purpose of the organization is to encourage, promote and advance all phases of scale aeromodeling, regardless of size, power or mode of control, to encourage the formation of scale clubs, to encourage flying scale competition at all levels, and to encourage the training of scale judges for competition. NASA encourages scale contests in addition to building and flying scale models just for the fun of it. Visit www.nasascale.org for more information.

Race to End Hunger The Corner Cupboard Food Bank will hold its Second Annual Race to End Hunger on Sep. 17 at the Pennsylvania Army National Guard Readiness Center, 500 Evergreene Drive in Waynesburg. Race day registration begins at 7:30am with the 5K run/walk kicking off at 8:30 am and the 2.5K Family-FunFitness Walk beginning at 8:35 am. Early bird registration is $18. It will increase to $20 after Sep. 3. The 2.5K Family-Fun-Fitness Walk is free; however, monetary and nonperishable food contributions are welcome. FMI or to locate a downloadable registration form, visit www.cornercupboard.org/news/raceto-end-hunger/.

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Aug Sep GreeneScene 2016  

Great big "Thank You" from the local 4H Lamb, Goat and Steer clubs. Check out the Rain Day results and see some great photos taken at the 20...

Aug Sep GreeneScene 2016  

Great big "Thank You" from the local 4H Lamb, Goat and Steer clubs. Check out the Rain Day results and see some great photos taken at the 20...

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