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KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON

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ilian Ladisic and Cayla Rush, (pictured) were among 70 dancers, ranging in age from toddlers to adults, that were part of a 3-hour production put on by For the Love of Dance (FLD) in Carmichaels. Our cover shot is of Farrah Lough Doman, owner and instructor of the studio who participated in the production which was dedicated to the coal mining industry and the hard-working men and women in the mines. The opening of the program included all 70 performers performing to “Coal Minin’ Man,” by Ricky Skaggs. The emotions of the production carried through several additional songs as dancers held signs with names and handprints representing coal miners in their own families as “Coal Miners Hands,” by Black Water Outlaws played. “There were few dry eyes to be seen in the crowd,” Doman said. The great-granddaughter of a coal miner who is married to a fourth generation miner herself in Bobby Doman, Farrah said she became passionate about the industry watching her husband work long hours. “One trip underground changed my entire outlook on reality,” she said, noting the problems facing the industry today. “What better way to support a cause you are passionate about than to use the talents you already have (referring to the dance recital).” Doman said the commonwealth records Greene County’s top four employers being coal mines and over 40,000 jobs in the state tied to the coal mining industry.

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“FLD hopes our opening number stirred conversation and brought awareness to the community in support of the coal miners that keep your lights on,” she said. “This show was dedicated to the coal miners that go to work every day, afternoon and night to keep, not only our stage lights on but the lights on across the greatest country in the world.”

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Co o l at Sc h o o l

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inning a medal in culinary competitions has become sort of second-nature for Paige Bedilion, 17, of Mather. She has consistently represented the Greene County Career and Technology Center at competitions going on three years now. A senior at Jefferson-Morgan this fall, Bedilion most recently won a bronze medal over the summer at the FCCLA Pennsylvania STAR Events National competition. She added that to a collection of three others earned since she started in the culinary program at the GCCTC in her sophomore year. A gold at the state level competition qualified her to move on with her presentation analyzing careers in health inspection. “Not only did I investigate health inspection as a whole but I also narrowed it down to the different branches of (food-related) health inspection,” Bedilion said. She focused on jobs within the Food and Drug Administration and the United States Department of Agriculture. “I visited the Hungarian Smokehouse in Carmichaels to see how deer and beef are processed. I learned there are different regulations between processing wild and domesticated animals,” Bedilion said, noting a higher standard for wild animals, such as deer, because these animals do not receive vaccinations. She also spent time with Jerry Simkovic, a food sanitarian with the Department of Agriculture learning about restaurant inspections. There was a lot to be learned from the many components of

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by Tara Kinsell

the work done by the FDA and USDA. Bedilion walked away with knowledge of everything from how imported foods are treated to the salaries of the employees who inspect them. When discussing what she learned, Bedilion’s thoroughness and grasp of the work seem well beyond her years, as noted by her culinary instructor, Dan Wagner. Although winning medals is certainly a nice aspect of competing, Bedilion said her focus this year has shifted beyond that part of things. “Last year when we competed in San Antonio, Texas, I met a lot of different people from a lot of different places and they all knew what they were going to do with their lives,” she said. “I realized I didn’t.” This didn’t sit well with the driven young woman, especially with her high school graduation looming ahead. “When I came home I decided to dig my heals in and find out what I wanted to do with my life and health inspector caught my eye,” she said. After researching jobs within the FDA and USDA, she has determined it will be the FDA where she sets her sights. “Waynesburg University just got a new lab for biological sciences. That is where I am going,” Bedilion said. “After four years in biological sciences plus my three years of culinary, my chances rise greatly, having experience in both fields, of getting a job with the FDA.”

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Signs with Penn State Fayette Emma Lewis, a 2015 graduate of Carmichaels Area High School has signed to play volleyball with Penn State Fayette. The daughter of Mary and Mike Lewis of Carmichaels, Emma was a four-year member of the Mikes volleyball team, starting three of the four years. An honor student, Emma served as captain of the volleyball team her senior year at Carmichaels and played club volleyball in the off-season. Standing behind Lewis are her parents and sister, Emily. Seated to Emma’s right is Nancy Wheeler, head volleyball coach at Penn State Fayette.

King Coal Tournament Champions

W&W Railroad Coach #6 Coming Home

The Waynesburg Little League Pinto team won first place in the King Coal Tournament in Carmichaels. The tournament was July 10th through the 12th. Front row, kneeling, left to right, Briena Coon (bat girl); Ethan Kiger; Brayden Coon; Daryn Henry; Kory Taylor; Cameron Wise; Nick Willard; Connor Van Sickle (bat boy)

Second row, standing, Travis Tedrow; Kaiden Wise; Derek Turcheck; Jarius Baker; Ben Barr; Vince Maley; Jake Thomas; Alex Van Sickle; Braydon Phillips Back row, coaches, Craig Henry, Michael Wise, Craig Maley, Craig Thomas, and Scott Van Sickle

Jefferson Fire Department Members Recognized

Two members of the Jefferson Volunteer Fire Department were recognized at the 2015 Western Pennsylvania Firemen’s Association Award and Scholarship Banquet on Aug. 11.

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The Greene County Historical Society has announced the return of the Waynesburg & WashLadies Auxiliary member, Diane McMannes is ington Rail Road Coach #6 to Greene County. The presented with the Russell Davis Service Award and coach has been in the care of the Connecticut AnFire Chief Duane Walters with the Big Jim McK- tique Machinery Association since 1996. The assoelvey Campers Award for the most active camper.

ciation graciously agreed to send the coach home without charging the historical society to purchase it. Look for photos and a story about this historic train car in the next GreeneSaver.

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hen you run a photo asking for individuals to be identified, you always run the risk of no response but GreeneSaver readers typically come through for us. In the case of a young baseball player, with just a last name known to us, we received more than one response to our request for his first name. Esther Rigby of Jefferson, who saw the picture of young Mr. Harris with his Clarksville Oriole Baseball team, said she thought, “Oh, my brother was an oriole. We used to go watch the games,” Rigby said. When she looked closer she realized an unnamed lad in the photo was in fact, her brother, Richard Harris, who now lives in Ohio. Rigby planned to give him a call so he could go to the GreeneSaver website and see the photo for himself. She said she remembers going to the games lots of times, and her dad always going to the company store, located next to the ball field. A second person to phone in identifying Richard was his high school classmate, Joe Zammerilli. “We graduated together from Jefferson High School in 1969. I grew up in Clarksville, saw the picture, and was reading the names and saw the last name was Harris,” Zammerilli said. “I got my magnifying glass out and looked and said, ‘That’s

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Richard.’” Zammerilli now lives in Jefferson and is a retired teacher from Intermediate Unit 1 at Coal Center.

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I Love this P l a ce

BOBTOWN, PA

by Tara Kinsell

Bob’s Town Through the Years

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J.C. Hager, Gino Barzanti, Dan Borinsky, and Shorty Zvonkovich at Shannopin mine, circa 1970’s.

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illiam “Bill” Yelenik, III, 64, and Fred Morecraft, 42, may have grown up in Bobtown in two different eras but you wouldn’t know it by listening to them share what life was like growing up in the small patch town on the hill. Yelenik, whose father mined coal for the company responsible for building the town, said it was like growing up in the television show, “Leave it to Beaver,” living there. “You couldn’t get away with anything. Your parents knew about it before you ever got home,” Yelenik said. It was red dog roads and staying out fishing all night when Yelenik reached his teens. “We were outside all of the time and mostly you stayed within hearing distance. When you were called, or a parent whistled, you better get home or you were in trouble,” he said. “When we fished all night they knew where we were and you better be there

if they came to check on you too.” Like Yelenik, Morecraft, his brothers and his cousins, who all lived in Bobtown, were “out of the house in the morning and didn’t come back until dark.” “You knew everybody in town and you always had somebody looking out for you,” Morecraft said. “We’d ride bikes, play basketball or football and build cabins in the woods with scrap wood from an old house the Menear’s tore down. To them it was just a pile of wood but to us it was treasure.” Nails and screws were bummed from Morecraft’s pap who kept an assortment in jars. Yelenik and his buddies would sled ride through those woods. “It was all coal mining families at that time,” Yelenik said of his youth. “Just about all” of Morecraft’s family members worked for the mining company that built Bobtown at one point or other, he said. Yelenik’s father forbade him to get a job there when he graduated from Mapletown in 1969. “By that time Robena had blown up and mines were having lots of accidents. He said to find something else, ‘something you can make a better living doing,’” Yelenik said. In 1993, the Shannopin Mine at Bobtown, a subsidiary of Jones and Laughlin Steel, closed. Prior to becoming a mining town, Bobtown, or Bob’s Town as it was once known, had been mostly farmland, except for the business ventures of its namesake, Robert Maple. A savvy business man and entrepreneur, by the mid part of the 1800s, Maple was transporting a host of products from linseed oil to textiles, woven at his own woolen mill, via the Monongahela River. Then, around 1860, a few people, including Bob, began to notice an oily substance on top of Dunkard Creek. As it turned out, it really was oil and before too long, Bob’s Town was a boom town with people coming from as far away as England to strike it rich. When the boom went bust, Bob’s Town turned back to agriculture as a means of commerce until coal mining became the new way of life. But, this too would come to an end in 1993 when Shannopin closed for good. Today, one passes remnants of the mine while climbing the hill to Bobtown with its company built houses in neat rows. The exception being bosses circle. Not much has changed in the 90 years since the town was constructed. “I have a lot of good memories,” Morecraft said. “It was good times growing up there.”

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Kid’s Party in Bobtown, circa 1960

1st row-Bernie Galanko, Christine Campbell, Bill Galanko, Veronica Novak, Tina Barzanti; 2nd row - Denise Sereg, Penny Ellenberger, Johnny Orban, Lisa Barzanti, (?), Steve Burless, Jeannie Namet, Linda Bittinger; 3rd row - Bob Galanko, Debbie Miller, Cindy Burless, Mary Jo, Rita Vargo, Diane ? ; and Cathy Caldwell.

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elebrating a decade, the Annual Art Blast on the Mon brings together interactive artists, vendors, musicians, foodies and more to the Ice Plant Pavilion in Greensboro, brought to you by the Nathanael Greene Historical Community Development Foundation. Art Blast for 2015 will be held two days this year, operating from 10 am to 5 pm on Sept. 5 and noon to 4 pm on Sept. 6. A celebration of music and art for all ages, the Art blast offers hands-on art for children and adults presenting an opportunity to experience the fun and expressionism of different mediums of art. This isn’t a festival where one just watches art being created, although there is that too. Instead of simply watching the potter at the wheel, one can try their own hand and working the clay. There have been opportunities to learn paper art, print making, photography and even washing machine spin art through the years at the Art Blast. One never knows what each new festival will bring. One steadfast component of the event is Saihou Njie, a resident artist with the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, who graciously makes the trip each year to share the art of Batik. Another repeat guest of the Art Blast, Miss Teacup, will be on site to share her special face painting techniques. Among the musical entertainment will be two-time National Banjo Champion Vince Farsetta with friends, Keith McManus and the Vibrations. There will be a special showing of the art that made Greensboro famous world wide with Dave Reid presenting a display of historic Greensboro Pottery, the unique stoneware that was manufactured from local red clay. Its very distinctive color-

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ing was a an important influence on Greensboro’s early history and economy. Also harkening back to the days of old, the Greensboro Baptist Church will again be hosting a spectacular Quilt Show on Saturday until 4 pm. The church is located on the corner of Water St. in downtown Greensboro. Bringing area students into the mix, the Art Blast will again feature the work of art students from the Greene County School Districts with each participating district receiving a cash award, Whether you would like to view, create or purchase art, the Art Blast can accommodate it all and offer some free wine tasting opportunities while you do it. There is no cost of admission thanks to the sponsorship of several area businesses so bring a friend and enjoy an afternoon of art in Greensboro. Make a weekend of it and take a ride on the bike trail or visit the historic downtown section where you can share a picnic lunch in the pavilion that overlooks the Monongahela River.

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50’s Fest

in Downtown Waynesburg

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eptember 12, 2015 Downtown Waynesburg welcomes back for the 14th year what has become one of the most popular car cruises in southwestern, Pennsylvania. The 50’s Fest & Car Cruise, presented by Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful, Inc. typically draws 150+ classic vehicles to downtown, including a wide assortment of hot rods, street rods, rat rods, and other classic cars, trucks and motorcycles. Lead sponsor for the festival this year is Ron Lewis Automotive Group and the Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram store in Waynesburg. “We appreciate the opportunity to support such a popular event in our community. Our employees not only work here in this area, they live and play and raise their families here, and the 50’s Fest and Car Cruise is great entertainment. It’s free, it’s fun, and, of course, when it comes to cool cars – that’s right up our alley,” says General Manager Scott Spehar. It is a great day of family fun, because 50’s Fest & Car Cruise is so much more than a typical car show. The festival also offers retro fun with dance contests, bubblegum blowing and Hula Hoop contests and oldies music broadcast live all day by sponsor WANB Radio’s “Greene County Greaser” aka Doug Wilson. There are also plentiful door prizes and unique shopping and specials from many downtown merchants and restaurants. AdditionaI support is offered by several local merchant and business sponsors who are featured on the back of the festival’s annual collectible Tshirt. The hand drawn t-shirt art is created each

Shannopin Mine coal yard in Bobtown, PA

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year by local artist Colleen Nelson and usually features an actual classic vehicle belonging to a cruise participant. This year’s shirt features a 1957 Chevy Belair owned by Craig & Kim Stoneking of New Freeport, Pa, parked at Greene County’s own iconic drive-in – the Sky View in Carmichaels. The collectible magnetic dash plaque offered to all participants features the “Smokey & the Bandit” look alike 1979 Black Pontiac Firebird owned by Jeff Hixenbaugh of Waynesburg, Pa. “The generous support we receive from the downtown merchants and local businesses is what enables us to make this a free event for spectators and participants. There are no admission fees or registration fees for the 50’s Fest & Car Cruise in down town Waynesburg. We have door prizes – nice stuff and lots of it. Make your plans now to be there, or be square,” says Shelly Brown, Promotions Committee Chairperson for Waynesburg Prosperous & Beautiful, who helps organize the 50s Fest event with co-chair Doug Wilson. Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful is a nonprofit, Main Street program that operates in conjunction with the Pennsylvania Downtown Center. Funded by the state Department of Community and Economic Development, Waynesburg Prosperous and Beautiful represents a community endeavor to preserve and revitalize historic downtown Waynesburg and raise awareness of the educational, cultural and historical opportunities, as well as the convenience of shopping, associated with the town.

Waynesburg Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram staff members (L-R) Dave Rischell, Kyle Meza, Dave Eitner, Marc Neeley, Scott Spehar, Nick Ames & Betty Tretinick surrounding one of Dodge’s iconic muscle cars - a 2015 Dodge Challenger Scat Pack 392 Shaker.

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OUR WORK IS

185 WADE ST. WAYNESBURG, PA 724-627-2040

PROMO PRODUCTS ▪ SCREEN PRINTING ▪ EMBROIDERY ▪ VEHICLE GRAPHICS ▪ PRINT SHOP 14

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Corner Cupboard Food Bank in Search of New Director The Corner Cupboard Food Bank is accepting applications for a new executive director. Practical experience in managing a non-profit organization is preferred. Excellent communication skills, including public speaking is required. Fiscal management, strategic planning, program development, and fundraising are all elements of the position. The ideal candidate will have the ability to work independently and take initia-

tive. Must have knowledge of Microsoft Office and QuickBooks software. A bachelor’s degree in business management is preferred but a combination of education and experience will be considered. Salary is commensurate with experience. Resumes and letters of interest may be mailed to, Corner Cupboard Food Bank, Attn: President, P.O. Box 209, Waynesburg, Pa. 15370. The deadline to apply is Aug. 31.

Race to End Hunger A 5K run/walk benefitting the Corner Cupboard Food Bank will be held Sept. 26, starting from the Pennsylvania Army National Guard Readiness Center, located at 500 Evergreene Drive in Waynesburg. Registration for the run/ walk is $18 if paid by Sept. 12 and $20 thereafter. A 2.5K family fun fitness walk will be offered at no cost. Participants are required to sign a liability

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waiver on race day to take part in the run/walk or fitness walk. Monetary and nonperishable food donations are welcome. Strollers, walkers, wheelchairs and scooters are prohibited to enter the 5K run/walk for safety reasons. However, they are welcome during the 2.5K fitness walk. Checks can be made payable to Corner Cupboard Food Bank, 881 Rolling Meadows Road, Waynesburg, Pa. 15370 with 5K included on the memo line.

Covered Bridge Festival in Greene Coming Soon The Annual Covered Bridge Festival in Greene County with events at the Carmichaels and White Covered Bridges will be held from 10 am to 5 pm on Sept. 19-20. The White Covered Bridge Festival is held in Garards Fort at the site of the bridge. The Carmichaels Covered Bridge Festival is held on the grounds of the Greene Academy. This covered bridge is located just down the street from the academy. Craft vendors featuring items such as; wood, floral, jewelry, pottery, fabric crafts, maple syrup and embroidery will be at these bridges. However, not all of these craft types will be featured at both locations. Civil War Reenactors and a Native American reenactment camp will highlight the White Covered Bridge Festival, along with horse drawn wagon rides, gospel music and children’s activities. Music will play heavily into the Carmichaels Covered Bridge activities with the Carmichaels American Legion Post 400 Band opening the musical selections on Saturday.

Other acts set to perform include: vocalist Timm Reeves, Spoonwood Station, Triple Dare, the Augsburg Little German Band and the Greene Academy Dulcimer Players. Horse-drawn wagon rides, a petting zoo, and face painting will entertain the children in Carmichaels. Offering a variety of foods for sale inside the academy will be the local Boy Scout troop, the Chuck Wagon, and the Hartley Inn.

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Spo r t Sh o rt s Scott at Top of His Game

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Coleman Scott flanked by his mother, Mary and father, Jamie Scott, receiving the Dave Schultz High School Excellence Award.

nyone who knows Waynesburg Central High School graduate Coleman Scott knows he has a strong work ethic evident as far back as the days he participated in youth wrestling. So, it wasn’t entirely surprising when the announcement was made earlier this month that Coleman was named the new head wrestling coach at the University of North Carolina. He is just the sixth coach to hold the job in the history of the program. Coleman, along with his wife, Jessica; daughter, Leighton Ann; and son, Stetson Lewis moved from their home in Oklahoma to North Carolina in 2014 when Coleman accepted an assistant coaching position at UNC. Earlier this year he was asked to serve as the interim coach before the decision was made to make it permanent. His resume certainly backs the move by UNC to snag him for the leader of its program. Twice before the age of ten Coleman was a state junior wrestling champion. After that, he kept on winning right through his high school days at Waynesburg Central where he was a 3-time state champion in the PIAA. His tournament wins in his teens were too numerous to list but suffice it to say his record in those years was 156-12. In his senior year at Waynesburg Coleman’s work was recognized by the wrestling community when he was presented the Dave Schultz High School Excellence Award for his achievements both on and off the mat. His next stop was Oklahoma State University. There, he became a four-time All-American and the 2008 NCAA Champion at 133 pounds. At the moment, Coleman is at the Olympic Training Center preparing for his second, and most likely final, run at Olympic gold in 2016. He will turn 30 by then, which is considered old by Olym-

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pic wrestling standards. As a four-time member of the United States National Team, Coleman won a wrestle-off in 2012 on live television in Times Square to secure a spot at the 2012 Olympic Games in London. It was on this world stage that Coleman earned a bronze medal in dramatic fashion while groups of fans back home were listening to a live-feed over the Internet. Although proud of the accomplishment, Coleman said, that wasn’t what he set out to achieve and he wasn’t going to be satisfied until it was a gold medal that was placed around his neck. It is a lofty goal, especially with the demands of a head coaching position now part of the equation but if anyone can do it, Coleman has proven time and again that he is the guy.

by Tara Kinsell

Just Another Football Player

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urning the tables during an interview, a Waynesburg youth football player said, “Can I ask YOU just one question? Why me? What makes you want to write a story about me,” she asked. To 10-year old Shauna Buttermore, it is no big deal that she is the only girl playing football in the Waynesburg league. She has been at it for four years now, having moved up this season to the A Team level. That means in two years she will be eligible to play on the school sanctioned team and she has every intention of doing so. Satisfied with the answer to her question, which happened to be that this writer once played little league Shauna Buttermore with her brother, Richard. baseball in an all-boy league and consequentially thought it was “cool that she was not intimidated by being the only girl,” we continued. “I thought about doing cheerleading. When my older brother (Daniel Ryan) played football I came to the games and I observed everything that was going on. Football is a hitting sport. I have two brothers and they pick on me,” she said, grinning. “I take out all of my anger in football. Since I’m a girl I hear some things, they (opposing players) say things and I get mad. That’s why I like the defense, because I can get them back.” This may be a rough and tumble girl when it comes to playing football but to her it is all just a part of the game she loves. When she takes off the helmet and pads she is all girl. Shauna in action on the field. In fact, prior to the practice where we spoke, she and her mother, Lesli, were doing each “The only thing that lets you know she is a girl others nails and make-up. on the field is a ponytail or a braid sticking out of “Her room is purple. She plays saxophone in her helmet,” Lesli said. “Otherwise, she hits just like the elementary band. She loves Disney princesses, the boys and they know Shauna is a football player. horseback riding, and wants to be a vet. Shauna is She’s earned it.” as comfortable in football pads as she is a dress. Don’t think that Shauna doesn’t take as well She’s still a very girly girl,” Lesli said. as she dishes it out. Those bruises and cuts that are While we talked, her six-year-old little brothvisible are all just part of playing, she said. “At first er, Richard, or ‘Wiggles,’ as everyone calls him, was I would get a cut, it hurt and I’d ask someone to fix working off some post-practice energy. Wiggles is it. Now, I get a cut, it hurts and I really don’t care,” on the C Team. Shauna encouraged him to play she added. football as well. To help opposing teams and fans with the, ‘Is “Some people in the stands look at me strange that a girl,’ question, Direct Results is working with and I hear them say, ‘Is that a girl?,’” Shauna said. Lesli to design a shirt that will be seen when the Then they see her play and it changes to, “’Oh, okay, pads come off. you are involved in the team.’ Hello!,’” she said. “Everything you find for football says, ‘my son As the starting safety for the Waynesburg A or my boy.’ I wanted something for her to wear,” Team, Shauna is the last line of defense to a touchLesli said, displaying an image of a football player down being scored. with a ponytail on her cell phone. “On the back of “Last year I stopped a touchdown and I was the shirt it will say, ‘I’m the girl your coach warned like, “Yeah!” When they call me on the field or when you about.’” they announce my name for making a play it makes A Team home games are scheduled for Sept. 5, me really happy,” she said. “I love football! I love to Sept. 13, Oct. 10 and Oct. 18 at the Raider Field of tackle people! I love to kick the ball and throw the Pride, located at Waynesburg Central High School. ball! Sometimes they let me be quarterback.” Admission is $4 for adults and students are admitTo her fellow teammates Shauna is just one of ted for free. the team. GreeneSaver •

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Children’s Outreach Helps Mather Christian Church to Thrive

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hen the Rev. Dr. Kenneth Jones found himself behind the pulpit of the Mather Christian Church 17 years ago, there were just 12 people attending, including his own wife and children. Today, the reverend sees an average of 50 in the pews. The national average is 70. “That is pretty amazing for a church as small as ours. On special occasions like Mothers’ Day or our Friendship Sundays where members invite others to come with them we have seen between 100-120,” Jones said. “In a town the size of Mather we have seen a member attend from every family in the town in our church at one time or another.” His youngest child, Noah, 16, grew up there and his two older children now bring their children from their homes out of state to attend the Vacation Bible School program. “I am baptizing the children of the children I baptized. That has really been exiting,” Jones said. It is the children that drive the membership numbers, he said. “We have a huge children’s church. There are 10 to 15 kids on any given Sunday and on a good Sunday there are 19,” according to Jones, who gave the credit to three ladies who oversee it. “It is the strongest part of our ministry. The children like it and they bring their parents. In the old days it was the other way around.” When Jones first came to Mather it was a different time. An African American, he said only recently the church got its second African American family that attend, including his own in the number. Following the original church doctrine of the Disciples of Christ, who founded the church in 1925, but not specifically being directed by that order today, Jones said the congregation is “still fairly rigid in our doctrine. We hold to many of the old values but it is not like we have a dress code,” he added. He said it was “an act of God” that brought him to the Mather Church after he attended law school in West Virginia. He currently lives in Morgantown. It was there that he met a family from Greene County whose church was without a pastor. Jones agreed

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to be part of a group of people who would rotate in the role until someone filled it permanently. Instead, the others were informed that their services were not necessary after Jones preached his first sermon. “I did it for about a year and I learned a lot. It was essentially an internship with me learning budgets and how to hold a meeting. It is really a lot more like running a corporation than people like to believe,” he said. That church did find a full-time pastor and Jones was quickly approached by a member of the small Mather congregation. “It is a special relationship [with his congregants]. They have embraced my family. In the midst of personal tragedy (he recently lost his mother) they were there to support me,” he said. “If there are better people in the world I don’t know where they are. I’m honored to be the pastor here with such great, good, caring people. Many made the trip when my mom died of 9 hours round trip to be there.” In her honor a $1,200 scholarship fund was established at the church to award two scholarships annually for needy kids. In the winter, coats are collected and distributed to children in need. Recently, there was a picnic held at the town park where the children’s ministry handed out backpacks with school supplies. “It is an amazing little church,” Jones said. Services are held on Sunday form 10:40 am to noon. Adult Sunday School is from 10:00 am until time of service; Children’s church is held during the Sunday service.

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e Pu r u ct

z zl e W in n

er

Pi

winners

Bob Headlee of Waynesburg, PA is a

Winner of a DOMINO’S PARTY PACK

e Pu r u ct

z zl e W in n

er

Pi

Last Month’s Picture Puzzle Answer: Umbrella

Betty Bandish of Carmichaels, PA is a

Winner of a DOMINO’S PARTY PACK

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G ree n e Sce n e of the Past

by Tara Kinsell

A then future Coal Queen

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here have been dozens of little girls who have dressed up and dreamed of the day when they would be old enough to tryout for the crown of Pennsylvania Bituminous Coal Queen. In 1999, a 5-year old Carmichaels girl had a chance to do it before a packed auditorium when she served as the crown bearer for the Coal Queen Pageant. For that little girl, Victoria Buchtan, now 21, it was indeed a foreshadowing of the future. “Vanessa Riedmann (representing Albert Gallatin High School) was crowned Coal Queen and I remember looking up at her and the other contestants thinking they were like princesses,” Victoria said. “When I got the chance to be in the pageant I wanted little girls to look up to me that same way and to be a good role model for them, just like these ladies were to me.” In 2011, it was Victoria who would be crowned Coal Queen, representing Carmichaels Area High School. Did she dream of becoming the Coal Queen specifically? “Absolutely! I was a pageant girl

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when I was little so this was like the ultimate trophy,” Victoria said. There was another factor that made this title particularly special for her. Victoria’s mother, Vanessa Davidson Buchtan, held the title in 1983, also representing Carmichaels Area High School. She is currently a nurse with the WVU Healthcare System. Victoria’s crowning marked the first time a mother-daughter pair were Coal Queens. Today, Vanessa Reidmann is the owner of Vanessa’s Hair Studio in Uniontown. Victoria, now 21, is currently a senior communications and theater major at Robert Morris University. She is also a 3-year member of the Pittsburgh Musical Theater company, having performed several leading roles at the Byham Theater. Some of her favorite dramatic parts include, Mimi in “Rent”, Narrator in “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat”, and Eponine in “Les Misérables”. Watch for a behind the scenes story about the acting careers of Victoria and other local actors in an upcoming issue of the GreeneSaver.

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If you have an interesting old photo from the area you’d like to share, just send it to: GreeneScene of the Past, 185 Wade Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370. Or email to: info@greenesaver.com with GreeneScene Past in subject line. The GreeneSaver can even scan your original in just a few minutes if you bring it to our office. We are particularly interested in photos of people and places in the Greene County area taken between 1950 and 1980, though we welcome previous dates, too.

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Jacktown Fair 150th Wrap-Up

“T

he most important thing at any fair is the weather and we had really great weather,” said Jacktown Fair secretary/treasurer, Jamie Dinsmore of the recently held 150th Jacktown Fair. “A couple of years back we got rained out the whole week. Especially for a small fair, like ours, that really kills you.” With three evenings of fireworks held to celebrate the occasion, it became even more important. “There are always certain people that enjoy fireworks. Hopefully a few people came because of that and we had some in the grandstand that were watching the tractor pulls that I know stayed for it,” he said. “They were really nice. I overheard a couple of people who had been to see the Altoona Curve baseball team play and they said our fireworks were better.” It takes a large volunteer effort, the generosity of sponsors and gate sales for ride tickets to cover the costs it takes to put on the Jacktown Fair, with no admission charge, something that began a few years ago. Harkening back to the golden age of fairs when the midways were full, the fair association made the move to bring in those who just “want to see the livestock or get a sandwich,” Dinsmore said. “That’s what we were trying to recapture and I think we have recaptured that,” he said. “The key to being able to

do that (keep admission free) is to get sponsorships to help defray the costs. Even with a lot of volunteers there are still a lot of things that have to be paid for so we can’t promise we will always be able to continue it (free admission).” The hope is that they can. Although the numbers aren’t in yet, the 150th drew good crowds. Some attendees even flew in for the occasion, like Dinsmore’s cousin, Frank Dinsmore who lives in Portland, Oregon. Frank was in the Air Force in 1965 and flew back home especially for the 100th fair, he said. While going through some old photos to share for the 150th, Frank came across something he forgot he owned, a pocket watch. “My dad (Harry Dinsmore) gave it to me. It belonged to my great-great grandfather Robert Dinsmore, who was one of the organizers of the first Jacktown Fair,” Frank said, from the west coast. An old photo revealed a visible pocket watch chain on Robert. Frank surmised the pocket watch in his possession was likely the same one at the end of that chain.

“I can’t say for certain but I can speculate from his age, the photo and the fact he was one of the organizers of the first fair that the watch was likely with him at the first fair,” Frank said, adding. “I carried it (the watch) back with me to the 150th.” Although he lives across the country now, Frank talks about the Jacktown Fair as if it were only yesterday that he was a young man helping on the farm where cousin, Jamie, grew up. “There has always been a family connection to that fair,” Frank said. “I can remember when they had large posters and Jamie’s dad would nail one on the side of the barn so everybody would see it as they drove past. On the last day of the fair we’d say, ‘Only 365 more days until the next Jacktown Fair,’” That sounds like a new slogan. “If you missed it again this year, you only have 365 more days until you can attend the next Jacktown Fair and die happy.”

Help keep the gate FREE at the fair by buying 150th fair memorabilia at www.jacktownfair.org.

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Frank Dinsmore

Robert Dinsmore, one of the originators of the Jacktown Fair.

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GreeneScene by Tara Kinsell

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RAIN DAY 2015 RESULTS

Rain Day Window Decorating Contest Winners 1st Place: 5 Kidz Kandy 2nd Place: Catholic Charities 3rd Place: Domestic Violence Services of South Western PA Rain Day Umbrella Contest Winners First Prize is $100.00, second place $50.00 and 3rd place is $25.00 1st Place: ELLA KINCER MER Rain Day 2nd Place: AUBREY HOLMES Circus Umbrella 3rd Place: ASHANTI COLE Where There Is Rain There Is Always A Rainbow Best Decorated Baby Rain Day Can AUBREY CZAKO - Receives a $25.00 Cash Prize The Texaco Country Showdown 1st Place: EAST AND WEST OF GROVE CITY, PA 2nd Place: JASON WOODS OF NEMACOLIN, PA 3rd Place: COLE LEATHERS

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2014 Baby Rain Day Contestants Winners Winners will receive a $100.00 CASH PRIZE, crown or tiara, title banner, and special gifts and the honor of representing Rain Day throughout the coming year. PRINCE: GAVIN HOPKINS Parents Are Amy & Jonathan Hopkins of Waynesburg PRINCESS:

MARKLEE MAE BEAL Parents are Devan & Jason Beal of Waynesburg

KING:

GARRETT CLARK Parents are Samantha & Joshua Clark of Graysville

QUEEN:

EMILY MCALLEN Parents are Elizabeth & Robert Mcallen of Waynesburg

2014 T-shirt Design Contest Winners each received $100.00 cash prize, certificate and T-shirt AMANDA STAUFFER Jack McCracken Award Reverend Donald Wilson

Busy times at Bowlby Public Library • September is Library Card Sign-up Month at the Bowlby Public Library! Make sure to stop by and pick up your new WAGGIN card today. The library will replace damaged or lost cards at no charge during the month of September. • An After Hours Back-To-School event will be held from 4 pm to 8 pm on September 18, for children ages 6 and up. Games and nutritious snack foods will be offered. • The Annual Teddy Bear Picnic for ages 2- 6 will be held from 11 am to 1 pm on September 12. A free picnic lunch on the lawn of the library, crafts, and other activities will take place. Don’t forget to bring along your favorite Teddy Bear. • S.A.T. preparation classes will be held on Sept. 12, 19, and 26 from 10 am to 2 pm covering math, language arts, and writing. If you have a scientific calculator it is recommended that you bring it with you, along with a bagged lunch. • A screening of the 2015 version of Disney’s “Cinderella” will be held at 6 pm on Sept. 16 with free popcorn. Seating is limited. • The Bowlby Library Book Club will meet at 6 pm on Sept. 14 to discuss “Irish Country Doctor,” by Patrick Taylor. New members are encouraged to attend. • Ten weeks of Story Hour begins Oct. 5 for infants, toddlers and preschool age children. Phone the library for meeting times for the Acting Up Group for ages 7 to 12 or the Teen Advisory Group. • Library Week in October will be celebrated with a reception from 4 pm to 6 pm on Oct. 20 with live entertainment, door prizes, and refreshments. This event is free and open to the public. For information, or to preregister for any of the program offered at Bowlby Public Library, contact the library at 724-627-9776.

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Annual bicycle parade at the Coal Show in Carmichaels gives area youth an opportunity to be inventive with the theme of that years show. This youngster, carrying his lunch pail and offering coal for sale did a great job of representing the coal heritage of the area. Does anyone know who this little guy is?

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Community Service Program Lends a Helping Hand

A

s Judy Calvert, 4H rabbit club leader for Greene County, talked about the more than 200 rabbit pens being constructed for the Greene County Fair, she was actually smiling. Thanks to help from the Greene County Community Service Program, there were extra hands available to accomplish the work in half the time it usually takes. As those in non-profit groups know, finding volunteers, especially during the 9 to 5 workday, is often difficult, at best. Fortunately, the community service program can fill the gaps when members of these groups find themselves spread too thin. The program, administered through the 13th Judiciary District, isn’t new to Greene County. However, it has a new director and a somewhat new direction under Waynesburg native and 30year educator, Bret Moore. Moore was appointed to oversee court sentenced community service hours from the judges that comprise the newly formed Greene County Board of Judges, including President Judge Farley Toothman and district magistrates: Glenn Bates, Lou Dayich and Lee Watson. Toothman said Bret brings a unique perspective to the position as a former teacher. “Bret instinctively recognizes this opportunity to establish best-practice protocols and programs known to be effective in efforts to rehabilitate an offender’s behavior and develop skills,” Toothman said, noting the program provides much needed services to qualifying organizations within the community. He noted the criminal and family courts in Greene County are “very busy intersections in the lives of so many. When individuals are sentenced, a good Community Service Program can be the appropriate intervention to manage risks, identify skills, address motivation, addiction and simply being prepared to get up, go to work, or go to jail.” Moore said his job is to streamline the connection between those needing to have work completed and those assigned community service hours who are best suited to do it. The response from non-profit agencies and charities requesting assistance from those serving community service has “been tremendous,” according to Moore. From installing new fencing at Meadowlark Park to cleaning up area roadways, community service workers in the county have been making a tangible impact for the hours as-

signed to them as part of a sentencing order for non-violent crimes. Judge Toothman would like to see the program expanded to address at-risk youth through a Saturday alternative school. Toothman is very passionate about keeping kids in school through graduation, Moore said. “It would serve as a credit recovery program. Everything is still in the planning stages and we are still working out the details but essentially it would be an alternative to just traditional community service,” Moore said. The program would include on-site, online instruction, supervised by qualified educators, who would help a student tasked with community service hours to be successful in school. Kids who have issues with compulsory school attendance, behavioral issues, and various legal infractions that may have them falling behind could be helped through credit recovery for those classes that they have failed or simply failed to complete. “We have spoken with the superintendents from each of the county school districts and everyone seems to be excited with the potential to keep kids from falling through the cracks,” Moore said. He noted there is only a 16 percent dropout rate in Greene County but 67 percent of those incarcerated in the Greene County Jail have found themselves among that 16 percent, higher than the national average. For now, the community service program continues to be a means of offering help for nonprofits and agencies with various tasks. “When they are in need of help we are more than happy to give it to them, Moore said. If an organization is interested in providing community service opportunities, contact the Greene County Office of Probation and Parole by calling 412-874-5246 or email bmoore@ greenepacourts.us.

Clowning around at a 1960’s Coal Show parade.

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Aug Sep GreeneSaver 2015  

The August - September issue of the GreeneSaver includes the Annual Market Lambs, Steers, and Rabbits from the local fairs. There is a compl...

Aug Sep GreeneSaver 2015  

The August - September issue of the GreeneSaver includes the Annual Market Lambs, Steers, and Rabbits from the local fairs. There is a compl...

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