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April 2011

THRiVE » NORTHERN COLORADO WELLNESS

Diabetes rates are increasing, and so are obesity cases

DIABESITY WHAT ARE WE DOING TO OURSELVES? Page 8

» INSIDE: HOW TO MAKE YOUR WORKOUT FUN • WHY CONCUSSIONS MATTER • EVENTS


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Where

Experts Work Best.

Ask the Expert: KidnEy StonES

Question:

Is there anything I can do to prevent kidney stones?

Answer:

one of the most common reasons patients are seen in our urology practice is kidney stones. Studies have suggested they affect 10 to 15 percent of the U.S. population. Most kidney stones are made up of various crystals of calcium. the crystals form into stone when urine becomes overconcentrated. Kidney stones, though seemingly tiny, can be very painful to pass through the body. However, there are some simple things you can do to prevent the formation of kidney stones, or the growth of any stones you may already have. Most people do not need to avoid dietary calcium or supplements in modest DPRXQWV,WLVLPSRUWDQWWRGLVFXVVDQ\VLJQL多FDQWGLHWDU\FKDQJHVZLWK\RXU urologist or primary care physician.

Curtis Crylen, M.D. north Colorado Urology Appointments: (970) 378-1000

Five simple things you can do to prevent kidney stones: Drink plenty of water throughout the day

Eat a healthy diet

Limit salt intake

Stick to lean animal proteins

Consume drinks that contain citric acid

Banner Medical Group North Colorado Medical Center www.BannerHealth.com/Coexperts

Banner Health has been named as a Top 10 Health System in the U.S. for patient care according to Thomson Reuters. Connect with us: Although the content of this ad is intended to be accurate, neither the publisher nor any other party assumes liability for loss or damage due to reliance on this material. if you have a medical question, consult your medical professional.

March 30, 2011


March 30, 2011

FITNESS

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10 WAYS TO MAKE YOUR WORKOUT MORE FUN By Erin Holdgate

Experts say you can make your workout more fun by joining a class or incorporating energizing music to the workout.

gtreporters@greeleytribune.com

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ust because “work” is in “workout,” doesn’t mean it has to be a job. If you’ve just about given up on that boring, repetitive exercise routine, don’t! Megan Babkes Stellino, a psychology of sport and physical activity professor at the University of Northern Colorado and certified personal trainers Mark Warburton of Work Out West in Greeley and Tom Forsyth from Team Tom at Conditioning Spa Health and Fitness in Greeley have offered some tips so you can have fun while you work out.

Photo by istockphoto

MAKE IT SOCIAL

Forsyth, Stellino and Warburton agree that one of the easiest ways to make your workout more fun is to do it with friends. “Invite your neighbor. Share a goal. I’m all about having stories,” Warburton said. “You want to be able and sit down with a friend and say ‘Hey, remember when we climbed that tree? That was fun.’ ”

TURN UP THE TUNES

Whether it’s country, heavy metal or hip-hop, Forsyth said listening to your favorite music is a quick way to unwind, get in the zone and flow through your workout. “Music impacts mood,” Stellino said. “So working out to music of your choice makes your workout more fun.”

DO WHAT YOU’RE BEST AT If you run at the Olympic level, throw on those tennis shoes and head out the door. If you’re the next gold-medal swimmer, then grab your goggles and dive into the deep end. Whatever your niche may be, Stellino said the easiest way to make

your workout more fun is to do something you know you’re good at. “It’s called perceived competence,” Stellino said. “If we think we’re good at something, we’ll have more fun doing it.”

MAKE IT SWEET

Team Tom suggests eating a piece of fruit, such as a banana, 30 minutes before your workout. “(Fruit) keeps your sugar levels and energy up, which will help you feel good during the workout,” Forsyth said.

MIX IT UP

If you’re bored with a repetitive exercise plan, change it up.

Warburton suggests doing a different class each week. “It can be the same class, but at a new time with different people,” Warburton said.

SET GOALS

Setting goals and achieving them can make anyone feel good about their workout. “If you’re working toward something you want, then it will be fun and not just work,” Forsyth said.

LISTEN TO YOUR BODY

“People who enjoy swimming like feeling the buoyancy of their bodies in the water,” Stellino said. “Runners enjoy getting that run-

ners high.” According to Stellino, this is called movement sensation. When your body enjoys the way something feels, your brain will, too. On the other hand, Stellino said, “avoid painful activities.”

DECISIONS, DECISIONS

There are plenty of options when it comes to exercise. Don’t do anything you feel like you’re forced to do. Stellino explained that people who choose their workout have more fun than people who don’t, a concept called autonomy. “Remember that you volunteered to do it, and that it’s meant to be fun,” Warburton said. “It shouldn’t

be a chore.”

TAKE CLASSES

Forsyth and Warburton agree that classes are a great way to enjoy a workout. “There’s a lot of smiles in the classes,” Warburton said. “You get in a workout, but it’s fun, as well.” Forsyth said meeting people in the class with a common interest also makes time go by faster.

DO WHAT YOU LOVE

“Figure out what you enjoy doing the most and design that into some sort of physical activity,” Warburton said. “If it’s walking the dog, walk the dog a little faster.” Forsyth suggests doing an activity you enjoyed as a kid.


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March 30, 2011

APRIL HEALTH EVENTS BLOOD TESTS

valid for two years. » WHEN: 6:45-9:15 p.m. April 14. » WHERE: Greeley Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave., Greeley. » COST: $48 (save $5 if taken in conjunction with Heartsaver First Aid.) » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-9400 to register.

« » WHAT: North Colorado Medical Center’s Wellness Services offers

low-cost blood screenings. Open labs are available on the second Wednesday and fourth Wednesday of every month from 7-8:45 a.m. Some immunizations are available upon request and availability. » WHEN: 7-8:45 a.m. April 13 and 27. » WHERE: Union Colony Room, Area C, ground floor, North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., Greeley. » COST: Costs vary. » DETAILS: To schedule an appointment, call (970) 350-6633 at least 24 hours in advance. Walk-ins also welcome. For complete list of blood screenings, go to www.bannerhealth.com/ncmcwellness.

HEARTSAVER FIRST AID

« » WHAT: This class covers first aid basics, medical emergencies,

injury emergencies and environmental emergencies. The certification is valid for two years. » WHEN: 4:15-6:15 p.m. April 14. » WHERE: Greeley Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave., Greeley. » COST: $45 (save $5 if taken in conjunction with Heartsaver CPR with AED.) » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-9400 to register.

BODY CHECK

« » WHAT: This head-to-toe health assessment gives you the tools to

put your health first by receiving a comprehensive set of preventative health screenings. This screening includes: health fair panel (fasting blood work), sleep questionnaire, lung function test, body composition, weight and body mass index, hip and waist measurements, health education with a wellness specialist, EKG with results read by a board-certified cardiologist, bone density screening, peripheral arterial disease screening, education about peripheral vascular disease, stroke, stroke prevention and osteoporosis prevention, ankle brachial index, ultrasound of the carotid vessels and ultrasound of the aorta. Above four screenings are read by a board-certified radiologist. Upon request are a colorectal take-home kit ($10) and a prostrate specific blood antigen screening ($23). » WHEN: 7-10 a.m. first and third Tuesdays of the month. » WHERE: Summit View Medical Commons, 2001 70th Ave., Greeley. » COST: $175 » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-6070 to schedule an appointment. All results are sent to your personal physician and to you.

COOKING CLASSES

« There will be two classes this month taught by registered dieticians. Learn about heart-healthy cooking and how to modify unhealthy cooking habits. » WHAT: “It’s all about Technique!,” taught by Chef Peter Sisneros and Mary Branom, R.D. Learn tricks of the trade from Chef Peter. » WHEN: 6-7:15 p.m. April 13. » WHERE: Cardiac Kitchen, North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., Greeley. » COST: $10. » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-6633 to register. ----------» WHAT: “Toddler Nutrition,” taught by Danielle Lynch, R.D. Learn how to feed toddlers with nutritious foods. » WHEN: 5:30-6:45 p.m. April 18. » WHERE: Cardiac Kitchen, North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., Greeley.

SAFE SITTER (GREELEY)

« » WHAT: This class is designed for 11-13-year-olds. Participants

learn care of the choking infant and child, babysitting as a business, success on the job, child care essentials, safety for the sitter, preventing injuries, injury and behavior management and preventing problem behavior. » WHEN: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. April 6. » WHERE: Greeley Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave., Greeley. » COST: $45. » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-9401 to register.

SAFE SITTER (WINDSOR) Creatas Images

» COST: $10 » DETAILS: Call (970) 350-6633 to register.

DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

« » WHAT: This program sponsored by the area Agency on Aging.

Program covers preventing low blood sugar, delaying complications, reading nutrition labels and learning tools to fight fatigue and frustration and dealing with depression. » WHEN: 9-11:30 a.m. Tuesdays, April 12-May 17. » WHERE: Colonial Room, North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St., Greeley. » COST: Free. » DETAILS: Call (970) 346-6950, ext. 6117, to register.

HEARTSAVER CPR WITH AED (GREELEY)

« » WHAT: This class covers adult and infant/child CPR, obstructed

airway, the Heimlich maneuver, the use of a barrier device and AED hands-on training. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a Heartsaver course completion card. The certification is

« » WHAT: This class is designed for 11-13-year-olds. Participants

learn care of the choking infant and child, babysitting as a business, success on the job, child care essentials, safety for the sitter, preventing injuries, injury and behavior management and preventing problem behavior. » WHEN: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. April 4. » WHERE: Windsor Recreation Center, 650 11th St., Windsor. » COST: $45. » DETAILS: Call (970) 674-3500 to register.

WINNING THE WEIGHT LOSS BATTLE

« » WHAT: Dr. Emily Anderson will discuss America’s favorite

pastime — dieting. Learn the difference between fad diets and evidence-based methods. In addition, hear the experts from NCMC Behavioral Health tackle the mental side of the weight loss battle. » WHEN: 6:30-8:30 p.m. April 21. » WHERE: High Plains Library Building, 2650 29th St. » COST: Free to Spirit members; $10 for nonmembers. » DETAILS: Call (970) 392-2222 to register or email spirit. of.women@bannerhealth.com. For more, go to www.bannerhealth. com/NCMCspirit.


March 30, 2011

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How to

 

By Alison Johnson

Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

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ven youngish joints can feel creaky and painful without proper care. Luckily, lifestyle changes can help you stay active longer. “With an average life expectancy of more than 70 years, it’s more important than ever for us to protect our bodies,” says Dr. Kevin Bonner, an orthopedic surgeon who practices at Sentara Leigh Hospital in Norfolk, Va. Here are some tips: Stay fit. Strong muscles help keep joints stable and

LiveWell Weld County is helping to

LiveWell County choice is helping makeWeld the healthiest the to for our residents creating: makeeasiest the healthiest choicebythe easiest for our residents by creating:

• Active Community Environments ounty is helping to • Access to Healthy Foods est choice the Ͳ Active Community Environments • Farm to School Programs sidents by creating: Ͳ • Worksite Access to Healthy Foods Wellness

Ͳ Farm to School Programs mmunity Environments Healthy Foods Ͳ Worksite Wellness chool Programs Wellness

LiveWell is a supporter of Weld County school district healthy eating and active living initiatives!

LiveWellisasupporterof

lisasupporterof Weld County Department of WeldCountyschooldistrict untyschooldistrict Public Health and Environment. (970) 304-6470. healthyeatingandactiveliving tingandactiveliving nitiatives! initiatives!

decrease stress on cartilage, or connective tissue. Vary workouts to include both cardiovascular and strengthtraining. Maintain a healthy weight. Every extra pound puts six to seven times that amount of pressure on your knees. That can destroy cartilage and result in painful bone-on-bone contact. Focus on posture. Slouching while sitting or standing leads to uneven weight distribution that can strain ligaments and muscles, according to the

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keep your joints healthy for life Mayo Clinic. Avoid damaging activities. People at high risk for arthritis may want to limit high-impact exercises (moves where both feet leave the ground at once). Former athletes who have suffered knee ligament tears, for example, may benefit more from low-impact workouts such as swimming and biking. If you’re experiencing knee pain, also avoid deep squats and lunges. Don’t overdo exercise. Never increase workout lengths by more than 10 percent per week. If

you run 10 miles one week, don’t try to do 20 the next — make it 11. Learn proper form. Consult a coach or trainer at least once, particularly with activities requiring repetitive motions such as tennis, golf and weight lifting. Don’t skip your warm-up. Tight muscles around a joint increase injury risk. Stretch after workouts, too. Seek treatment. Don’t wait too long to consult a doctor about chronic joint pain or declining range of motion.

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March 30, 2011

YOUTH SPORTS

PLAYING IT SAFE ■ Doctor explains that today’s concussion

could also lead to problems down the line

By Sara Quale Banner Health public relations specialist

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hen doctors and coaches pull an athlete from an activity because of suspected head trauma, they aren’t doing so to be mean. They aren’t overreacting. And, by no means are they benching an athlete because they fear legal action from the parents if health complications arise. Doctors and coaches follow evidence-based guidelines for concussions to protect the health of young athletes today and in the future. “The biggest problem I face is angry parents,” said Banner Health neurologist Jeffrey Siegel, M.D., about treating children who have suffered head injuries in sports. “For most families, this could be the child’s ticket to college. That’s huge.” Siegel, who practices at North Colorado Neurology in Greeley, said by failing to properly address the athlete���s injury, parents could sacrifice their children’s health. Guidelines from the American Association of Neurology follow a grading scale to determine the severity of a concussion. In Grade 1, the youngster shows confusion, but no loss of consciousness. Confusion or other symptoms resolve in less than 15 minutes. “In Grade 1, the child is dinged and just confused,” Siegel said. “If it lasts more than 15 minutes, you go to Grade 2.” Grade 2 symptoms might include inability to concentrate or amnesia. If this lasts more than an hour, the athlete should be taken to receive

Details A concussion is a brain injury that results in a temporary disruption of normal brain function. It occurs when the brain is violently rocked back and forth or twisted inside the skull as a result of a blow to the head or body. An athlete doesn’t have to lose consciousness to suffer a concussion. Estimates indicate that more than 140,000 U.S. high school athletes suffer a concussion each year. Source: National Federation of State High School Associations

medical attention. In Grade 3, the athlete loses consciousness for any period of time. Siegel said mental status testing can be easy to do and easily learned through courses. The Colorado High School Activities Association requires coaches to take online

training that addresses what symptoms to look for and deciding when a student is ready to return to play. The importance of following these guidelines is crucial, Siegel said. “Kids don’t recognize the danger they are in, and it’s our responsibility as adults to do what we can” to prevent long-term damage. “It’s an athlete’s death that makes the newspapers. More common, however, is when an athlete sustains small, multiple injuries which accumulate and degrade the intelligence and function of that person. “We don’t know a critical number, but at some point, it becomes a little bit too much, and there’s going to be damage. It could be subtle or obvious. Kids don’t understand the repercussions,” Siegel said. “They

Getty Images

don’t care about what they might be like when they’re 30 years old and trying to hold a career and a family together.” Evidence shows a relationship between the number and frequency of concussions and the development of dementia later in life, he said. The research also shows a relationship between concussions and academic performance and performance on neurological testing. “Is that a good trade off ? You win a trophy, but then you might not get that promotion as readily, or you might have marital difficulties,” Siegel said. He has seen patients with injuries from many sports: soccer, basketball, horse riding, skiing, boxing and football. He advocates reasonable precautions for activities such as using bike or ski helmets. Also, coaches and parents should be more aware of the symptoms of a concussion and act accordingly. Getty Images


March 30, 2011 ■

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PAW THERAPY STUDIES SHOW PETS CAN REDUCE STRESS, CHOLESTEROL, OBESITY

By Drs. Kay Judge and Maxine Barish-Wreden McClatchy Newspapers

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ooking for a holistic way to reduce stress, cholesterol and obesity? Get a pet. Statistics show that 62 percent of American households own a pet. According to a national survey, most pet owners say companionship, love, company and affection are the No. 1 benefits to owning a pet. We know that pets make good companions and decrease loneliness, but numerous studies have shown other profound health benefits of owning a pet: Pets help recovery from heart attacks. A National Institutes of Health study of 421 adults found that dog owners had a better one-year survival after a heart attack, compared to those who did not own dogs. Pets help us calm down. A study of 240 married couples showed that pet owners had lower heart rates and blood pressure as compared to those without pets. Pets help reduce stress better than our human companions. Pet owners had less stress and quicker recovery from stress when they were with their pets as compared to when they were with their spouse or friend. Pet owners have less obesity. A study looking at 2,000 adults found that pet owners who walked their dogs had less rates of obesity and

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Pets can make people healthier, studies have shown. The benefits of pet ownership range from increased mobility and quicker recoveries to less weight and less stress.

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were more physically active than those without pets. Pet owners have better mobility in their golden years. Another NIH study looking at 2,500 adults aged 71-82 showed that adults who regularly walked their dogs had more mobility inside the house than non-pet owners. Pets increase opportunities for socialization. Many studies have shown that walking a dog leads to more conversations and socialization. Pets can help your cholesterol. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that owning a pet can decrease cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure. Pets can help comfort children. Child psychologists have found that pets can be very comforting to children and help them develop empathy. They have also been found to help autistic children with socialization. So for those of you with pets, continue to enjoy the hidden health benefits of your furry friends. And for those of you thinking of getting one — do so. Pet ownership may be a path to your good health.

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Drs. Kay Judge and Maxine Barish-Wreden are medical directors of Sutter Downtown Integrative Medicine program. Have a question related to alternative medicine? Email them on their website, www.adrenalinesacbee. com.


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March 30, 2011

Styling makes healthier food taste better By Charles Stuart Platkin www.dietdetective.com

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research study appearing in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that if other foods were presented in McDonald’s wrappers, young children actually liked them better than when the same foods

were presented without the wrapper (e.g., hamburger to hamburger). In another study that appeared in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, the researchers found that when escalloped potatoes or stuffed shells offered in a college cafeteria looked dry, the students didn’t select them as often, indicating that the appearance of food influ-

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ences food choice. Makes sense — who wants to eat dry-looking food? Another study, conducted by Gil Morrot and colleagues and reported in the journal Brain and Language, set up a wine tasting for 54 undergraduates from the faculty of Oenology of the University of Bordeaux. When the researchers artificially colored white wine with an odorless

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dye to look red, the panel of soon-to-be wine connoisseurs described its aroma as that of red wine. And finally, a study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that the color of a drink can influence how you think it tastes. In fact, the researchers found that color had more of an influence on perception of taste than either quality or price information. When presented with two cups of the same Tropicana orange juice, one of which had been darkened with food coloring, the members of the researcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sample group perceived differences in taste that did not exist. However, when given two cups of orange juice that were the same color, one of which had been sweetened with sugar, the same people failed to perceive taste differences. The problem is that when most people start to cook healthier, the food looks bland â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and if a food looks uninteresting, there is a high likelihood that it will be perceived as tasting uninteresting. Here are a few tips from top food stylists for making healthier foods look more appealing.

Garnish

Here are some garnishing suggestions from Sarah Thompson, food stylist for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Taste of Home Cookbook, Cooks who Care Edition.â&#x20AC;? Bundle matchstick-cut veggies such as carrots, red and yellow peppers and zucchini together; wrap them with a strip of green onion and carefully tie it into a knot. Then steam the bundles in a skillet with a little chicken broth, water or wine. Sprinkle pomegranate seeds over salad greens (savory) or yogurt (sweet) for a great shot of color and added sweet-tartness. Fresh currants offer a delicate touch and a pop of color, and bright orange kumquats,

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whole or cut in half, make a nice garnish for both entrees and desserts. Fresh herbs are a garnishing staple. In sprigs or minced, for either sweet or savory recipes, herbs are a go-to garnish that makes everything look more presentable. Celery leaves are a quick and economical garnish when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a time crunch!

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Add color

When planning your meal, think about the colors of the various components. When the food on your plate is all one color â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particularly if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s white or beige â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it will look a lot less appealing. Add a punch of eyepopping color with red, yellow and green peppers, red and orange beets, yellow and green winter and summer squashes. Carrots also come in yellow, purple and orange, and string beans can be purple, yellow or green. Tomatoes come in a variety of shapes, colors and sizes. All of these enhance the visual palette of the plate, says Jean Galton, a Seattle chef and food stylist, (jeangalton.com). Also, use a sprig of fresh dill or parsley on your plate. Or hollow out a sweet red, green, yellow or orange bell pepper as a container for a veggie dip. When steaming/blanching vegetables, it is always important to undercook them slightly, and plunge them into ice cold water to stop the cooking process and keep the beautiful, natural color of the vegetable intact. Overcooked vegetables will be gray, dull and soggy looking, says Pam Sorin, a food stylist and recipe developer located in New York.

Shape and texture

Consider the textures and colors of various grains and beans (polenta, farro, buckwheat, quinoa and the entire variety of dried beans), as well as seeds (sesame, poppy, pumpkin, flax). Try rice and

soba noodles, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget whole-grain pastas extruded in interesting shapes. Make sure to add these to your plate, says Galton.

Plating

You often hear chefs talk about the importance of how they â&#x20AC;&#x153;plateâ&#x20AC;? their food. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just throw your food on a plate and serve it. Even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re eating alone, arrange your plate attractively, and never use paper plates. Even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having a frozen dinner, make sure to put the food on a plate. Plain white china makes food look more attractive, because the colors of the food arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fighting with the pattern on the plate. When serving chicken or turkey breasts or boneless pork chops, cut them at a slight angle into an odd number of slices and fan them out on a serving platter or individual plates, says Thompson. By doing this you fill the plate, making the portion look larger.

Make it flat

Flattening boneless, skinless chicken breasts makes them larger, making you feel like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re eating a heartier portion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not, says Thompson. It also makes them thinner, which reduces cooking time. Filled chicken breasts, when sliced and arranged on your dinner plate, make for an elegant presentation, she adds.

Give it a spray

Food stylists often brush food with oil before shooting to make it look juicier. However, too much oil adds calories, so give your food a little spritz of cooking spray instead. Charles Stuart Platkin, Ph.D, is a nutrition and public health advocate and founder of DietDetective.com. Sign up for the free Diet Detective newsletter at www.dietdetective.com


March 30, 2011

THRIVEnc

COCONUT CRAZE

■ More products

are popping up

By Douglas Brown The Denver Post

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he symbolism has meant something to East Indians for thousands of years. And, increasingly, it resonates for Westerners. Coconuts are the new “in” food, touted by natural-foods enthusiasts and chased by entrepreneurs looking for a big payday. The fruit’s appeal rests, in part, on this versatility. A single coconut produces water, nectar, flesh, milk and even textile fiber. That translates into a broad slate of products. And in contrast

Numbers

■ One tablespoon of coconut oil contains 120 calories and 14 grams of fat, 12.5 grams of which are saturated. A tablespoon of butter, by comparison, contains 102 calories and 11.5 grams of fat; 7.3 of those grams are saturated. ■ Coconut milk doesn’t pack quite the wallop of oil, but consume it in moderation: a quarter-cup has 240 calories and 14.5 grams of fat, with 12.5 grams of the fat saturated.

to another natural substance that gets transformed into a wide variety of products — petroleum — coconuts are viewed as healthy. But are they? It depends.

Coconut water comes from young, green coconuts and contains a winning combination of electrolytes, sodium and potassium. It is very healthy. “It’s an effective drink for rehydration that doesn’t bring in the added sugars and the additives,” said Dani Little, dietitian for the Whole Foods Market on Pearl Street in Boulder. Coconut oil and milk, though, are receiving mixed reviews. Coconut fat is saturated, like the fat in lard and butter. The healthiest fats, those found in olive and canola oils, contain more monounsaturated fats, which do not raise LDL cholesterol and might even help lower it. Doctors and dietitians have warned people away from cholesterol-boosting satu-

rated fats for years. Coconut fats are not an exception. “I’ve had clients who have added coconut oil to shakes and things like that, and their cholesterol has gone up significantly,” said Jessica Crandall, a Denver dietitian. In addition, coconut fats are high in Lauric acid, which many believe acts as an antimicrobial, helping prevent viruses, fungi and parasites. Even so, Little, a coconut enthusiast, doesn’t recommend loading up on coconut fats. Instead of buying oils or supplements, just use the whole coconut. “If you focus on coconut oil, you lose out on the fiber and you are focusing on a concentrated source of calories,” Little said. “It’s the whole coconut that needs to be talked about.”

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1931 65th Ave., Suite A Greeley, Colorado 970-351-0900

(970) 351-0400 www.bennersharp.com

Nutrition Services director Jeremy West and nutrition coordinator Kara Goff, RD have been with District 6 for less than a year, but they, along with their nutrition team, have been in makeover mode from start, working to raise the quality of food served in nearly 30 cafeterias. “We started our own revolution. It’s time to fight back against childhood obesity.” West said. Goff points to the “menu makeover” that began at the end of 2009, resulting in new and improved menus, with more healthy choices at all levels. Among those improvements are increasing the overall nutritional integrity of menus, with lower fat and higher fiber content, a greater variety of fresh fruits and vegetables offered every day, fresher and less-processed food items. Goff said the next steps include working to add more items that are made from scratch rather than offering as much processed food, and constantly looking for ways to offer healthful foods that students can be excited about eating.

Adding more fresh, locally grown food

Other improvements in food quality come from a variety of state and local programs. One is Colorado School’s Harvest of the Month program, which features a fresh produce item each month and includes a student-education component as well as ways of incorporating the food in meals throughout the month. Another established effort is the Farm to School program. Over the last two years, the partnership has grown to support local farmers by purchasing directly from them – a program that benefits everyone, both by supporting the local economy and by giving students the freshest food possible.

What makes a healthy meal?

West and Goff set a goal of reducing the percent of total calories from fat in District 6 meals. Schools are required to limit fat calories to 35 percent of the total, but with the recent menu makeover, District 6 meals top out at 30 percent, maximum. That is a significant number when one considers that the district is on track to serve more than 2.5 million meals this school year at 27 sites.

With fresh deli offerings and salads mixed in, elementary students have three meal options for lunch each day. “Some of the feedback we’ve gotten is that they don’t want that kind of food, but it varies from school to school,” she said. “Some schools are really excited about it.” She said she is confident that, over time, increasing numbers of students will learn to embrace the healthiest foods offered. Dr. Hatch

3400 W. 16th St. Suite 8-E Greeley

It’s time to fight back against childhood obesity!

Educating students and parents about healthy habits Practicing in Weld County for over 25 years

Sidney Benner, DDS Julie Sharp, DDS

Food Revolution

4401 Union Street Johnstown, Colorado 970-443-0925

That may be the greatest challenge facing school meal staff: Educating students on making good food choices. Parental involvement and support, especially in a time of reduced budgets for classroom initiatives, is key in getting the word out and really teaching students about nutrition. “Parents have got to be at the forefront,” Goff said. Along with additional nutritional improvements, West said menus in the cafeterias next school year will include eye-catching images as well as nutrition information about the food so parents of young students, as well as older students themselves, can identify healthy choices before the students get in line. For the complete article and additional information, please log onto www.greeleyschools.org and click on the news feature “Food Revolution”


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TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY Acupuncture

phyllis hAmAr, l.A.c.

Master of Science, Traditional Chinese Medicine NCCAOM Board Certified 710 11th Ave., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80631 970-539-0324

WestlAke FAmily physiciAns, pc 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Richard Budensiek, DO; Janis McCall, MD; Frank Morgan, MD; Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Angela Mill, MD Website: www.bannerhealth.com

Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s/skilled cAre

Bonell Good sAmAritAn 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

GrAce pointe

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 www.gracepointegreeley.com

meAdoWVieW oF Greeley

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Web Site: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

Assisted liVinG

Bonell Good sAmAritAn 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 352-6082 Fax: (970) 356-7970 www.good-sam.com

GrAce pointe

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 www.gracepointegreeley.com

meAdoWVieW oF Greeley

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Web Site: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

the BridGe Assisted liVinG 4750 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)339-0022

AudioloGy

cArdiAc VAsculAr surGery

Alpine All ABout heArinG

1124 E. Elizabeth Street, #E-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524 Phone: (970)221-3372 Fax: (970)493-9237 3820 N. Grant Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970)461-0225 Fax: (970)593-0670 Web Site: www.allabouthearing.com Professionals: Renita Boesiger, M. A., CCC-A Rachel White, M. A., CCC-A Cheryl Hadlock, M. S., CCC-A

AudioloGy AssociAtes

cBp spine center

1180 Main Street, Suite 7 Windsor, CO Phone: (970)686-9117 Fax: (970)686-5441 Website: www.windsorspinecenter.com Professionals: Dr. Jason W. Haas Dr. Sandra Haas

mirAcle-eAr

peAkVieW medicAl center 5881 W. 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)313-2745 Fax: (970)313-2744 Professional: Dice, Noel G., AuD

unc AudioloGy clinic

Gunter Hall, Room 0330 Greeley, CO 80639 Phone: (970)351-2012/TTY Fax: (970)351-1601 Web Site: www.unco.edu/NHS/asls/clinic.htm Professionals: Diane Erdbruegger, Au.D., CCC-A; Sonie Harris, M.A., CCC-A Jennifer Weber, Au.D., CCC-A

BAlAnce

liFe cAre center oF GreeleyAscent 4800 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-6400 Professionals: Cozette Seaver, PT; Leslie Vail, PT

1800 15th Street, #310 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 392-0900 Professionals: James H. Beckmann, MD; Harold L. Chapel, MD; John Drury, MD; Lin-Wang Dong, MD; Cynthia L. Gryboski, MD; Cecilia Hirsch, MD; Paul G. Hurst, MD; Brian Lyle, MD; Randall C. Marsh, MD; Arnold Pfahnl, MD; James E. Quillen, MD; Gary A. Rath, MD; Ahmad Shihabi, MD;

chiroprActic

2528 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)352-2881 Professionals: Robert M. Traynor, Ed. D. F-AAA; Karen Swope, M. A. CCC-A 2404 17th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-6620 749 S. Lemay Avenue, Suite A1 Fort Collins, CO 80524 (970)221-5225

cArdioVAsculAr institute (ncmc)

cArdiAc, thorAcic & VAsculAr surGery (ncmc) 1800 15th Street, Suite 340 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4593 Fax: (970)378-4391 Professionals: Lyons, Maurice I. Jr. DO Richards, Kenneth M. MD Tullis, Gene E. MD

cArdioloGy

corporAte heAlth

Greeley medicAl clinic pc 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2471 Fax: (970)350-2418 Professionals: John Charbonneau, MD Thomas Lynch, MD Raymond Van Den Hoven, MD

dentistry

Greeley dentAl heAlth 1600 23rd Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-4329 www.greeleydentalhealth.com Professionals: Randy C. Hatch, DDS Charles W. Johnson, DDS

sidney Benner, d.d.s. Julie shArp, d.d.s. 3400 W. 16th Street, Suite 8-E Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-0400 www.bennersharp.com

roBert kron, dmd scott WilliAms, dmd 3535 W. 12th Street, Suite B Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-6095 www.drkron.com

dentistry - hyGene

AABsolutely smiles

1135 N. Lincoln Avenue, Suite 4 Loveland, CO 80537 Phone: (970)622-0970 Fax: (970)622-0971 www.aabsolutelysmiles.com

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2011 dentistry - pediAtric

pediAtric dentAl Group

2003 46th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-4600 www.pediatricdentalspecialties.com Professionals: David Strange, DDS, MS Malcolm Strange, DDS, MS Courtney College, DDS, MS Justin Cathers, DDS, MS Gary Belanger, DDS

dermAtoloGy

peAkVieW medicAl center 5881 W. 16th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2734 Fax: (970)313-2733 Professionals: Mary A. Blatner, MD

medicAl clinic At centerrA pc 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970) 619-6558 Fax: (970) 619-6092 Professionals: Michelle D. Wis, MD

eAr, nose & throAt

Alpine eAr, nose & throAt 1120 E. Elizabeth Street, Suite F-101 Ft. Collins, CO 3820 N. Grant Avenue Loveland, CO Phone: (970)221-1177 Professionals: Andrea Biegnski, P.A.C. Chris Eriksen, M.D., Maria Chand, M.D., Marvin Childers, M.D., Sarvjit Gill, M.D., Meg Ricci, PA-C, Matt Robertson, M.D. David Zacheis, M.D.

north colorAdo eAr, nose, & throAt 2528 West 16th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-4646 Professionals: Dr. Keith Peterson, ENT Specialist; Dr. Thomas Peterson, ENT Specialist

endocrinoloGy

endocrinoloGy clinic (ncmc) 1801 15th Street, Ste 200 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4676 Fax: (970)-378-4315 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Nirmala Kumar, MD


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TRiBUNE MEDiCALDiRECTORY DiRECTORY TRiBUNE MEDiCAL Family practice medicine

Family physicians oF Greeley, llp-central 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley ,CO Phone: (970) 356-2520 Professionals: Joanna H. Branum, M.D.; Ann T. Colgan, M.D.; Douglas A. Magnuson, M.D.; Lori A. Ripley, M.D.; Andrew P. Stoddard, M.D.; D. Craig Wilson, M.D.

Family physicians oF Greeley, llp-cottonwood 2420 W. 16th Street Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970) 353-7668 Professionals: Christopher T. Kennedy, M.D.; Daniel P. Pflieger, M.D.; Mark D. Young, M.D.; Stacey L. Garber, M.D. Amy E. Mattox, M.D.

Family physicians oF Greeley, llp-west 6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 101 Greeley ,CO Phone: (970) 378-8000 Professionals: Daniel R. Clang, D.O.; Tamara S. Clang, D.O.; R. Scott Haskins, M.D.; Mathew L. Martinez, M.D.; Chima C. Nwizu, M.D.; Michelle K. Paczosa, D.O.; Jeffery E. Peterson, M.D.; Kyle B. Waugh, M.D.; Charles I. Zucker, M.D.

westlaKe Family physicians, pc 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Richard Budensiek, D.O.; Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Janis McCall, MD; Angela Mills, MD Frank Morgan, MD; David Pols, D.O. www.bannerhealth.com

FUneral services

allnUtt & resthaven FUneral services 702 13th Street, Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 352-3366 650 W. Drake Road, Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970) 482-3208 8426 S. College Avenue, Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970) 667-0202 2100 N. Lincoln, Loveland, CO Phone: (970) 667-1121 1302 Graves Avenue, Estes Park, CO Phone: (970) 586-3101

GastroenteroloGy

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 Website: www.gracepointegreeley.com

meadowview oF Greeley

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Website: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

independent assisted livinG w/services

3620 W. 10th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)356-6964

toUchstone home health dowGin, thomas a., md. centers For GastroenteroloGy 7251 W. 20th St., Bldg J Greeley, CO Phone: (970)207-9773 3702 Timberline Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970)207-9773 2555 E. 13th Street, Suite 220 Loveland, CO Phone: (970)669-5432 Website: www.digestive-health.net

5312 W. 9th St Drive, Suite 120 Greeley CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-3922 Fax: (970) 381-8113

hospice

hospice oF northern colorado Administration Office 2726 W. 11th Street Road Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)352-8487 Fax: (970)475-0037

1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2438 Fax: (970)350-2473 Professionals: Alessi, Grace MD Berntsen, Mark F. MD Cash, Robert L. MD Christiansen, Dana L. MD Currie, James B. MD Ebens, John B. MD Loecke, Steven W. MD Lopez, William Jr. MD Rademacher, Donald R. MD Randle, Michael T. MD Reinhardt, Marcus R. MD Thompson, Keith S. MD Tryggestad, David I. MD Zenk, Daniel R.MD

massaGe therapy

healinG toUch massaGe @ center For women’s health

1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professional: Becci Payne, Certified Massage Therapist

3527 W. 12th Street Suite 104, Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 302-5559 Email: (970) Nswanson33@gmail.com

2105 Clubhouse Drive Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 330-5655 Fax: (970) 330-7146 Web Site: www.rvna.info Professionals: Crystal Day, CEO

Greeley medical clinic pc

2928 W. 10th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-8181 Fax: (970)351-0281 Professionals: Gregory D. Denzel, DO

Bells rUnninG/walKinG

rehaBilitation and visitinG nUrse association

2010 2011

neXt care

health and Fitness

healinG helpers, llc

2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970)203-7180 Fax: (970)203-7105 Professionals: Pamela Levine, MD

5881 W. 16th Street Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2700 Fax: (970)313-2720 Professionals: Scott A. Corliss, MD Joseph Corona, MD James W. Ley, MD William J. Oligmueller, MD Brian K. Schmalhorst, MD

1800 15th St., Suite 320 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4475 Fax: (970)378-4429 Professionals: Mark Rosenblatt, MD Ahmed M. Sherif, MD Yazan Abu Qwaider, MD

Grace pointe

6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 207 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)378-1409

medical clinic at centerra pc

peaKview medical center

north colorado GastroenteroloGy (ncmc)

independent assisted livinG

carinG hearts home healthcare

6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 208 Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-9061

2928 W. 10th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)351-8181 Fax: (970)351-0281 Professionals: Gregory Denzel, DO

1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Professionals: Steven Kading, MD Phone: (970)350-2740 Fax: (970)352-3719 Peter C. Witt, MD Phone: (970)350-2440 Fax: (970)392-4708

home health care

Kenneth m. olds

neXt care

Greeley medcial clinic pc

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medical eqUipment & sUpplies

Banner home medical eqUipment (ncmc) Bonell Good samaritan 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

FoX rUn senior livinG 1720 60th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-7773 Fax: (970)330-9708 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

inFectioUs disease

Breen, john F., md (ncmc) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-6071 Fax: (970)350-6702

internal medicine

Banner internal medicine 2010 16th Street, Suite B Greeley, CO 80631 Professional: Steven Kalt, MD. www.bannerhealth.com

Phone: (970)506-6420

paUl home oXyGen 3483-A West 10th Greeley, CO Phone: (970)356-3131

midwiFery care

center For women’s health 1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professionals: Marie Foose, CNM; Janelle Komorowski, CNM Krista O’Leary, CNM Karen Voderberg, CNM

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TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY NEUROLOGY

WEstLakE FaMiLY PhYsiCiaNs, PC 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Richard Budensiek, D.O.; Janis McCall, MD; Angela Mills, MD Frank Morgan, MD; David Pols, D.O. www.bannerhealth.com

ONCOLOGY

CaNCER iNstitUtE (NCMC) 1800 15th Street, Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-6680 Toll Free: (866) 357-9276 Fax: (970)350-6610 Professionals: Elizabeth Ceilley, MD Brian Fuller, MD

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC CENtENNiaL NEUROLOGY Dr. David Ewing 7251 W. 20th Street, Unit C Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-3876

NCMC NEUROLOGY CLiNiC

1800 15th Street, Suite 100B Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-5612 Fax: (970) 350-5619 Professionals: Siegel, Jeffery, MD Shaffer, William, MD; Hayes, Todd DO

NURsiNG hOME REhabiLitatiON

CENtENNiaL hEaLth CaRE CENtER 1637 29th Ave. Place Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-8181 Fax: (970) 356-3278

ObstEtRiCs & GYNECOLOGY

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC PC 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2403 Fax: (970)392-4708 Professionals: Burket, Charles R. MD Colberg, Craig S. MD Kiser, Rick E., MD

CENtER FOR WOMEN’s hEaLth 1715 61st Ave. Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professionals: Stewart Abbot, MD; Marie Foose, CNM; Janelle Wahlman, CNM; Krista O’Leary, CNM Bea Bachenberg, WHCNP; Kecia Doll, Licensed Esthetician; Becci Payne, Certified Massage Therapist

1800 15th St. Greeley, CO 80631 Professionals: Thomas R. Lininger, MD Phone: (970)378-4170 Fax: (970)378-4171 Douglas J. Kemme, MD Phone: (970)353-6722 Fax: (970)353-6434 Michael D. Stone, MD Phone: (970)378-4170 Fax: (970)378-4171

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC LOvELaNd 2050 N. Boise Ave. Loveland, Co, 80538 Professionals: Samuel A. Shelanski MD Phone: (970)667-7870 Fax: (970)667-4510

ORthOdONtiCs

GREELEY ORthOdONtiC CENtER 2021 Clubhouse Dr., Suite 110 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 330-2500 Fax: (970) 330-2548 E-Mail: gocpc@doctork.com Website: www.doctork.com Professionals: Dr. Gary J. Kloberdanz

ORthOdONtiC assOCiatEs OF GREELEY, PC

3400 W. 16thSt., Bldg 4-V Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-5900 Website: www.dredgren.com Professionals: Burdett R. Edgren, DDS, MS; Bradford N. Edgren, DDS, MS

ORaL sURGERY

NiChOLas, kENtON C. dds GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2458 Fax: (970)392--4715

ORthOPEdiCs

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC PC 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2427 Fax: (970)350-2421 Professionals: Grossnickle, Mark D. MD Hunter, Brett P. MD Seiler, Steven MD Sides, Steven MD Snyder, Joshua MD

MOUNtaiN vista ORthOPaEdiCs 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 101 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)348-0020 Fax: (970)348-0044 Web Site: www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Randy M. Bussey, MD Daniel Heaston, MD Thomas Pazik, MD Shelly Remley, PA-C Kelly R. Sanderford, MD Steven Sides, MD Linda Young, MD

PEdiatRiCs

PEakviEW MEdiCaL CENtER 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2700 Fax: (970)313-2727 Professionals: Amy Driscoll, MD Meshelle M. Kolanz, MD Chris Moore, MD Robert L. Pedersen, MD Joseph Ryan, MD

PEdiatRiC REhabiLitatiON

baNNER REhabiLitatiON CENtER 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)350-6160 Fax: (970)378-3858

PERsONaL REsPONsE sERviCE

baNNER LiFE LiNE (NCMC) 2010 16th Street, Suite C Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: 1-877-493-8109 (970) 378-4743

PhYsiCaL thERaPY

hOPE thERaPY CENtER (Formerly North Colorado Therapy Center) 2780 28th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)339-0011 Website: www.GCIinc.org Professionals: Chris Denham, PT; Kryste Haas, OT; Kathie Hertzke, PTA; Moni Kohlhoff, PT; Alex Luksik, PTA; Jeanne Rabe, PT; Melissa Richardson, PT; Howard Belon, PhD, Clinical Psychologist

PEakviEW MEdiCaL CENtER 5881 W. 16th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 313-2775 Fax: (970) 313-2777 Professionals: Kirk Henderson Ann Hurst, PT Lindsay Paulson, PT M. Elissa Marshall, OT Ola Simonsson PC-A

POdiatRY

FOOt & aNkLE CENtER OF NORthERN COLORadO P.C.

1931 65th Ave., Suite A Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 351-0900 Fax: (970) 351-0940 Web Site: www. footandanklecolorado.com Professionals: Daniel J. Hatch, D.P.M. Mike D. Vaardahl, D.P.M. 1440 N. Boise Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970) 278-1440 Professionals: Peter D. Schultz, D.P.M.

GREELEY FOOt & aNkLE 2000 16th Street, Suite 3 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-4815 Fax: (970)352-5130 Professionals: Dr. Jean Masterson

PULMONaRY/CRitiCaL CaRE

NORth COLORadO PULMONaRY (NCMC) 2010 16th Street, Ste A Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)392-2026 Fax: (970)392-2028 Professionals: David Fitzgerald, DO Kelli R. Janata, DO Robert J. Janata, DO

PROsthEtiCs & ORthOtiCs

haNGER PROsthEtiCs & ORthOtiCs

7251 West 20th Street, Building M Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-9449 Fax: (970)330-4217 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue, Suite 2100 North Medical Office Building Loveland CO 80538 Phone: (970) 619-6585 Fax (970) 619-6591 Website: www.hanger.com Professinal: Ben Struzenberg, CPO Michelle West, Mastectomy Fitter

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2011 RadiOLOGY

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC PC 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-2423

REhabiLitatiON

asCENt at LiFE CaRE CENtER 4800 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-6400 Website: www.lcca.com Professionals: Annie Bennett Leslie Vail

baNNER REhabiLitatiON Phone: (970)350-6160

CbP sPiNE CENtER

1180 Main Street, Suite 7 Windsor, CO Phone: (970)686-9117 Fax: (970)686-5441 Website: www.windsorspinecenter.com Professionals: Dr. Jason W. Haas Dr. Sandra Haas

PEakviEW MEdiCaL CENtER 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2775 Fax: (970)313-2777

RhEUMatOLOGY

GREELEY MEdiCaL CLiNiC/ LOvELaNd 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Professionals: James Levine, DO Phone: (970)350-2433 Fax: (970)392-4768 Garvin C.. Murray, MD Phone: (970)461-1880 Fax: (970)593-9731 J. Stephen Thompson, MD Phone: (970)461-1880 Fax: (970)593-9731

skiN CaRE

kECias skiN CaRE @ CENtER FOR WOMEN’s hEaLth 1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professinal: Kecia Doll, Licensed Esthetician


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TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY Skilled care/rehab

NOrTh cOlOradO SPOrTS MediciNe 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)392-2496

SPeech laNGuaGe PaThOlOGy

baNNer rehabiliTaTiON ceNTer 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)350-6160 Fax: (970)378-3858

SurGery

SurGery weSTerN STaTeS burN ceNTer (NcMc) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-6607 Fax: (970)350-6306 Professionals: Gail Cockrell, MD Cleon W. Goodwin, MD BURN

SurGical aSSOciaTeS Of Greeley Pc (NcMc) 1800 15th St. Suite 210 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)352-8216 Toll Free: 1-888-842-4141 Professionals: Lisa Burton, M.D.; Michael Harkabus, M.D.; Jason Ogren, M.D.; Samuel Saltz, D.O.; Robert Vickerman, M.D.

urGeNT care

Greeley Medical cliNic 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Professionals: Troy D. Bracker, MD Phone: (970)350-2427 Fax: (970)350-2421 Grauerholz, Brent D. MD Phone: (970)350-2425 Fax: (970)350-2447 Major, James C. MD Phone: (970)350-2425 Fax: (970)350-2447

bONell GOOd SaMariTaN 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352- 6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Website: www.good-sam.com

Grace POiNTe

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 Website: www.gracepointegreeley.com

SPeech aNd laNGuaGe

uNc SPeech laNGuaGe PaThOlOGy cliNic

Gunter Hall, Room 0330 Greeley, CO 80639 Phone: (970)351-2012/TTY Fax: (970)351-1601 Web Site: www.unco.edu/NHS/asls/clinic.htm Professionals: Lynne Jackowiak, M.S., CCC-SLP Julie Hanks, Ed.D Patty Walton, M.A., CCC-SLP Mark Guiberson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

SPOrTS MediciNe

MOuNTaiN ViSTa OrThOPaedicS 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 101 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)348-0020 Fax: (970)348-0044 Web Site: www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Randy M. Bussey, MD Daniel Heaston, MD Thomas Pazik, MD Shelly Remley, PA-C Kelly R. Sanderford, MD Steven Sides, MD Linda Young, MD

SuMMiTView urGeNT care bariaTric SurGery (NcMc)

1800 15th Street, Suite 200 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4433 866-569-5926 Fax: (970)378-4440 Professionals: Michael W. Johnell, MD

Greeley Medical cliNic/ lOVelaNd 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Professionals: Steven M. Dubs, MD Phone: (970)350-2426 Fax: (970)350-2452 Lesley A. Fraser, MD Phone: (970)350-2426 Fax: (970)350-2452 Joseph Livengood, MD Phone: (970)203-7250 Fax: (970)619-6094 Michael E. Peetz, MD Phone: (970)350-2426 Fax: (970)350-2452

2001 70th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)378-4155 Fax: (970)378-4151 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Thomas Harms, MD Amy E. Shenkenberg, MD Linda Young, MD

urOlOGy

Greeley Medical cliNic 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-2491 Fax: (970)350-2492 Professionals: Gary R, Goodman, MD Stephen Henderson, MD

MOuNTaiN ViSTa urOlOGy 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 106 Greeley, CO 80634 Professionals: James Wolach, MD Curtis Crylen, MD www.bannerhealth.com

VeiNS

VeiN cliNic (NcMc)

1800 15th Street, Suite 340 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4593 Fax: (970)378-4591 Professionals: Maurice I. Lyons Jr., DO Kenneth M. Richards, MD Gene E. Tullis, MD

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THRIVEnc

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March 30, 2011

VISIT THE ALL NEW

EHRLICH SUBARU

2.9%APR UP TO 72 MOS. 1.9%APR UP TO 36 MOS. **

*

ON ALL NEW 2010 & 2011 SUBARU MODELS

2010 SUBARU IMPREZA

2.9%* 1.9%**

2.5i

UP TO 72 MOS. UP TO 36 MOS.

157

$

$595 $0 $157 $595

Down Payment Security Deposit First Months Lease Payment Acquisition fee

OR

$18,220 MSRP - $1,111 Ehrlich Discount

$17,109

2011 SUBARU FORESTER

UP TO 32 MPG

2.5x ALLOY WHEEL VALUE PACKAGE

UP TO 72 MOS. UP TO 36 MOS.

157 $2995 $0 $157 $595

PER MO. LEASE/36 MOS. 10,000 miles per year.

$3747 Total Due At Lease Signing

$3995 $0 $184 $595

OR

$22,420 MSRP - $2,066 Ehrlich Discount

$20,354 TO FINANCE

BDA-01 FROM FACTORY ALLOCATION

PER MO. LEASE/36 MOS. 10,000 miles per year.

Down Payment Security Deposit First Months Lease Payment Acquisition fee

OR

$24,220 MSRP - $1,610 Ehrlich Discount

$22,610 TO FINANCE

$4774 Total Due At Lease Signing

2011 SUBARU LEGACY

0.9%

UP TO 37 MPG

[1]

157

$

BFA-21 From Factory Allocation

Down Payment Security Deposit First Months Lease Payment Acquisition fee

184

2.5i

2.9%* 1.9%**

$

2.9%* 1.9%**

$ TO FINANCE

$1347 Total Due At Lease Signing

UP TO 34 MPG

UP TO 72 MOS. UP TO 36 MOS.

AJD-11 From Factory Allocation

PER MO. LEASE/36 MOS. 10,000 miles per year.

2011 SUBARU OUTBACK

$1295 $0 $157 $595

UP TO 63 MOS.

BAA-01 From Factory Allocation

PER MO. LEASE/36 MOS. 10,000 miles per year.

Down Payment Security Deposit First Months Lease Payment Acquisition fee

OR

$20,720 MSRP - $1,469 Ehrlich Discount

$19,251 TO FINANCE

$2047 Total Due At Lease Signing 8TH AVENUE

2.5i

UP TO 31 MPG

*W.A.C. See dealer for complete details. *2.9% APR for up to 72 months, availabe on all new 2010 and 2011 Subaru Models. Cost of financing for 2.9% for 72 months is $15.15 per $1,000 financed. **1.9% APR up to 36 months available on all new 2010 and 2011 Subaru Models. Cost of financing for 1.9% for 36 months is $28.62 per $1,000 financed. [1] 0.9% APR for up to 63 months available on all 2011 Subaru Legacy models. Cost of financing for 0.9% for 63 months is $16.26 per $1,000 financed. Subject to vehicle insurance and vehicle availability. No down payment required. Subaru Impreza, Outback, Legacy and Forester are registered trademarks. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All sale prices are good day of publication only. All offers include all rebates, incentives plus tax, tag, and license with approved credit. Photos for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Color and equipment my vary. Offer ends 3/31/11. See dealer for complete details.

Ehrlich Motors, Inc. 8th Avenue & Hwy 34 Bypass – Greeley www.ehrlichsubaru.com • 970.353.7707 • 877.444.0390

HIGHWAY 34 BYP A

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Thrive March 30, 2011