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July 2013

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» NORTHERN COLORADO WELLNESS

PLUS...

STAND UP FOR BETTER HEALTH

Posture pointers and pitfalls Page 7 Walking device helps people get back in step. Page 8

Colorado companies encourage employees to get up and move at work after studies show sitting for long periods can be problematic. Page 6.

» INSIDE: SEAT BELTS SAVE LIVES • CAFFEINE NOT JUST FOR ENERGY DRINKS • JULY HEALTH EVENTS


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Ask the Expert:

Hip Replacement

I need a total hip replacement but I’m concerned about the long healing time. Are there alternatives? There is a relatively new approach to total hip surgery called Anterior Total Hip Arthroplasty, available at North Colorado Medical Center.

Potential Patient benefits include: Surgery is performed through the front of the hip instead of the side, which requires shorter, less-invasive incisions that don’t cut the muscle. That typically makes it easier for your body to heal. Patients may benefit from a quicker recovery time and shorter hospital stay so you can get back to doing what you love even sooner. A smaller incision means patients will have less scarring.

Now is a great time to learn more about your options. If you have any questions, contact Dr. Hale today.

Where

Experts Work Best.

Riley Hale, M.d. orthopedic surgeon

Banner Health Clinic specializing in Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery 5890 W. 13th St. Suite 101, Greeley Appointments: (970) 348-0020

To find a Banner Health physician in your area, visit www.BannerHealth.com/BMG Accepting Kaiser Permanente Members /BannerHealth

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June 26, 2013


June 26, 2013

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SEAT BELTS 1 in 8 women SAVE LIVES will have breast cancer.

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s your life worth three seconds? That’s about how long it takes to put on your safety belts. A three-second investment can save your life. Regular seat belt use is the single most effective way to prevent serious injuries and save people from dying in motor vehicles. The National Safety Council states seat belt use has been increasing and averages 88 percent nationally, but there are groups less likely to wear them including: teens, commercial drivers, men in rural areas, pick-up truck drivers, people driving at night, and people who have been drinking. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports, “Seat belts are the single most effective traffic safety device for preventing death and injury.” Wearing a seat belt can reduce the risk of crash injuries by 50 percent. Air bags plus seat belts provide the greatest protection for adults. Seat belts are designed to keep the driver and passengers inside the vehicle, where there is “room to live.” Colorado’s seat belt law declares belts are mandatory for adult drivers and all front-seat passengers. The two exceptions to the law are driving a vehicle manufactured before 1968, when seat belts became

federally required, and passengers with a physical or psychological disability holding a medical statement explaining the disability. Not buckling up is a secondary violation. Adult drivers can only be cited in Colorado for not Lyn wearing a TAUSAN seat belt DRIVE SMART if they’ve been stopped for another reason. Seat belt rules are more stringent for teen drivers. All occupants of a vehicle must wear these restraints. Driving without a belt is a primary offense — teens can be pulled over and ticketed for not buckling up, and they are responsible for the safety of their passengers. Over the Memorial Day weekend holiday period, law enforcement agencies across the nation delivered the message “Click It or Ticket,” a nationwide campaign from the National Highway Safety Administration. Since the campaign started in Colorado in 2002, seat belt use in Colorado has increased from 72 percent to 82.9 percent, and unrestrained deaths have declined by 56 percent. What is your reason for not wearing a seat belt?

» “I’m only going to the shopping center.” Actually, this is the best time to wear a safety belt because 80 percent of traffic fatalities occur within 25 miles of home and while driving under 40 mph. » “I won’t be in an accident: I’m a good driver.” Your good driving record will certainly help you avoid accidents. But even if you are a good driver, another driver may hit you. » “I’ll just brace myself.” Even if you had the split-second timing to do this, the force of the impact would shatter the arm or leg you used to brace yourself. Tips for parents and caregivers: » Before you drive, wait until everyone is buckled up. » Make sure your children are properly buckled up in the appropriate seat belt, booster seat or car seat. » Have all children, ages 12 and under, sit in the back seat. Safety belts save lives. But they can only work if you use them properly every time. Lyn Tausan is a retired school administrator and resides in Greeley with her husband. She is the marketing/public relations specialist for DRIVE SMART Weld County.

YOU COULD BE ONE. GET SCREENED.

Survival rates top 98% when detected early. Make your appointment today. 970.760.0694 | pvhs.org/breastcaregmc

Greeley Medical Clinic

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Just in case you missed a day...

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Open 7 Days A Week; Extended Hours

2928 W. 10 th St., Greeley, CO 80634

1-866-467-5230

NextCareColorado.com Visit website for additional locations and hours:

June 26, 2013

Waist size competes with BMI for health risk measure By Harry Jackson Jr. St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Waist-to-height ratio may be

Call Us & Skip The Waiting Room!

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a more accurate measure of cardiovascular health risk than the current standard, the body mass index, a St. Louis expert says. He’s confident that the waist-to-height ratio may soon eclipse the BMI as a measure of risk for lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular disease, heart attack, stroke and diabetes. Not so fast, says another expert: While the height-weight ratio has value, it needs to mature a bit to be more precise. The ratio says waistlines should be no more than half of height, said Dr. Mario Morales, medical director of the SSM Weight-Loss Institute at DePaul Health Center. For example, a 6-foot (72 inches) person should maintain a waistline of 36 inches, he said. Growing past that can lead to health risks, he said. Recent studies show risks that developed from the 50 percent point grow with the waistlines, he said, to the point that people whose waistlines reach 80 percent of their height shortened their life spans by 17 years. The latest research that excited Morales, a bariatric surgeon, was delivered in May at the 19th Congress on Obesity in Lyon, France. Researchers there told European media flatly: “Keeping the waist circumference to less than half of height can help increase life expectancy for every person in the world.” The European researchers suggested using the waist-to-height ratio as a screening tool to predict health risks. The study analyzed the health of more than 300,000 people and found the ratio was better able to predict high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attacks and strokes than BMI. The new measure is “much more sensitive to (health risks) than BMI,” because weightto-height ratio takes into account “where the patients hold their weight — apple shape, pear shape,” Morales said. “Fat that’s behind the abdominal wall is not just cells; it’s called metabolic reactive fat. It creates (chemicals) that cause inflammation. Inflammation results in scar formation and can cause malfunction of the organs.” So organs are exposed to “adverse hormones and inflammation chemicals that cause diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease — those

» BMI Cut points for body mass index are: » Normal: 18.5 to 25 » Overweight: 25 to 30 » Moderately obese: 30 to 35 » Severely obese: 35 to 40 » Very severely obese: 40 and over

types of things,” Morales said. Carrying weight in other parts of the body is not so dangerous, he said. “If you carry weight in your hips or up around your chest, it’s not so significant,” he said. But, “Weight in the central region is metabolically reactive and causes metabolic syndrome.” And the BMI doesn’t address that, he said. Instead, the BMI measures the ratio of height to weight and nothing else. The resulting numbers categorize people as normal weight, overweight, obese and morbidly obese. Another weight-loss expert wasn’t so excited. He called the measure promising, but “young.” “Waist to height ratio may be a better predictor of cardiometabolic risk — cardiovascular disease and diabetes — than a body mass index assessment,” said Dr. Samuel Klein, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at Washington University. But, “the relationship between waist to height ratio and disease risk is a continuum. The problem is that we do not know what are the optimal ‘cut points’ (categorized measures) on this continuum that will best identify people at increased risk. However the BMI is more precise.” The BMI was developed in about 1850 in Belgium by researchers seeking a way to categorize degrees of weight in people. In the 1990s it became a popular tool for doctors and insurance companies to gauge health risks. However, the BMI has shortcomings. It was found to be useless to the point of humorous for athletes whose weight is due to muscle mass rather than body fat. The most commonly used example is Arnold Schwartzenegger’s BMI was 30.8 during his peak years, which would categorize him as obese. Waistline circumference has long been a measure of metabolic syndrome. In addition, Morales said. The weight-toheight ratio is consistent for all groups regardless of fitness, ethnicity, gender or age, he said.


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HEALTH EVENTS FOR JULY « CPR for Health Care Providers (Initial), 5-8:30

p.m. July 1 at the North Colorado Medical Center Longs Room on the second floor. This class is designed for licensed and non-licensed health care providers. Topics covered include: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, airway obstruction and rescue breathing for adult, children and infants. The certification is valid for two years. Cost is $55. Register by noon two days prior to the event by calling (970) 350-6633. Please call one week in advance if you are unable to attend the class. Your registration will be refunded less a $10 service charge. If you are absent from the class, you will be charged a $10 service fee.

« Body Check ... What you need to know: Head to

Toe, by appointment July 2 and 16 at Summit View Medical Commons, 2001 70th Ave. Head-to-toe health screening includes health fair panel (fasting blood work, please fast 10-12 hours), sleep questionnaire, lung function test, body composition, weight and body mass index, hip and waist measurements, health education with a wellness specialist, EKG with results read by a board-certified cardiologist, bone density screening, peripheral arterial disease, education about peripheral vascular disease, stroke prevention and osteoporosis prevention, ankle brachial index, ultrasound of the carotid vessels and ultrasound of the aorta. Screenings are $175, payment is due at time of service. To schedule an appointment, call (970) 350-6070.

« Breast Cancer Support Group, 5:30-7 p.m. July 4 at

NCMC Institute Conference Room. For more information, call (970) 350-6567.

« Chair Yoga, 9-9:45 a.m. Mondays July 8-Aug. 12 at

NCMC. Primarily from sitting in a chair, we focus on gentle movements coordinated with breathing exercises to facilitate greater range of motion, flexibility and relaxation. Cost is $48 for six weeks. To register, call (970) 350-6633.

« Yoga Basics, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Mondays July 8-Aug.

12 at NCMC. Yoga Basics is an introduction to the foundational poses in a beginning yoga practice. This class will focus on careful physical alignment for the creation of a safe practice. This class is best suited for those with no physical limitations. The cost is $48 for six weeks. To register, call (970) 350-6633.

« Yoga Flow, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Mondays July 8-Aug.

12 and Wednesdays July 10-Aug. 12 at NCMC. Yoga Flow teaches the student to build skills into flowing

sequences with a focus on combining breath with movement. This class is challenging and dynamic for those with no physical limitations. Cost is $48 for six weeks. To register, call (970) 350-6633.

« Safe Sitter — Windsor, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. July 9 and

31 at the Windsor Recreation Center, 250 11th St. in Windsor. Safe Sitter is a one-day, six-hour curriculum designed for 11- to 13-year-olds. Participants learn care of the choking infant and child, babysitting as a business, success on the job, child care essentials, safety for the sitter, preventing injuries, injury and behavior management and preventing problem behavior. Register by noon two days prior by calling (970) 674-3500.

« Greeley’s Diabetes Information Group/Support

Group, 6:30-7:30 p.m. July 9 at the NCMC Cardiac Kitchen. For people with diabetes, their family, friends, caregivers or anyone with an interest in diabetes. This month’s topic is Spice it Up! Cooking Demonstration with Stephanie Tarry Yoo MS, RD. For more information, call (970) 392-2344.

« Pre-diabetes Classes, Series 1 July 9, 16 and 23.

Learn the difference between pre-diabetes and diabetes, how to prevent type 2 diabetes and how to create a lifelong plan to keep blood sugars in the normal range. The 3-class session is $30. One support person may join each participant free of charge. For more information, call (970) 392-2344.

« Blood Tests, 7-8:45 a.m. July 10 and 24 at the NCMC

Union Colony Room, in Area C on the ground floor. Wellness Services offers low-cost blood screenings open to community members; some immunizations are also available upon request and availability. Appointments are preferred. Please fast 12 hours prior to blood draw. Cost varies and payment is due at time of service. To schedule an appointment, call (970) 350-6633.

« Gentle Yoga, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays July

10-Aug. 14. In Gentle Yoga, the postures are presented in an easy to follow, accessible manner with plenty of time for modifications and focus on breath work. This is an excellent class for seniors, those with chronic illness or injuries, those newer to yoga or students wanting a gentle practice. Cost is $48 for six weeks. To register, call (970) 350-6633.

« Aging Well: Healthier Living, 9-11:30 a.m.

Thursdays July 11-Aug. 15 at NCMC. Weld County Area

Agency on Aging offers Healthier Living classes for people living with chronic conditions. There is no cost, but donations are accepted. For more information or to sign up, call (970) 346-6950 ext. 6117.

« Spirit Girls ... and Moms Too! Growing Up Healthy

and Happy, 6:30-8:30 p.m. July 15 at NCMC Auditorium, 1801 16th St. (enter through Door 6). The better you prepare your daughter for those upcoming changes, physical and emotional, the easier her transition to womanhood will be. Join us for a visit with Banner Health Clinic pediatricians and gynecologists for a discussion of normal puberty-related events ... and the opportunity to ask questions in a relaxed setting! There will also be treats and activities to enjoy for moms and daughters ages approximately 8-12. This event is free for Spirit members and $10 for non-members. All girls are free. Call (970) 392-2222 to reserve your space. For more information, visit www.BannerHealth.com/NCMCspirit.

« Heartsaver First Aid, 4-6:30 p.m. July 17 at the

Family FunPlex. This is a contract class with the City of Greeley Leisure Services. It is taught by the American Heart Association certified health care professionals. This First Aid class provides participants with an understanding of first aid basics, medical emergencies, injury emergencies and environmental emergencies. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a Heartsaver First Aid course completion card. The certification is valid for two years. The cost is CPR: $48, First Aid: $45, Combo: $88. For more information or to register, call (970) 350-9401.

« Heartsaver CPR with AED, 7-9 p.m. July 17 at the

Family FunPlex. This is a contract class with the City of Greeley Leisure Services. It is taught by American Heart Association certified health care professionals and covers adult and infant/child CPR, obstructed airway, the Heimlich maneuver, the use of a barrier device and AED hands-on training. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a Heartsaver course completion card. The certification is valid for two years. The cost is CPR: $48, First Aid: $45, Combo: $88. Register by noon two days prior by calling (970) 350-9401.

« Man to Man: Prostate Cancer Support Group,

5:30-7 p.m. July 18 at NCMC Cancer Institute Lobby. For more information, call (970) 350-6567.

« Heartsaver CPR with AED — Windsor, 6-8 p.m. July

18 at the Windsor Recreation Center, 250 11th St. in Windsor. Taught by the American Heart Association certified health care professionals, this class covers adult and infant/child CPR, obstructed airway, Heimlich maneuver, and the use of a barrier device. Upon completion of the course, participants will receive a Heartsaver course completion card. The certification is valid for two years. Cost is $48. Register by noon two days prior by calling (970) 674-3500.

« Safe Sitter — Greeley, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. June 23 at the

Family FunPlex. This is a contract class with the City of Greeley Leisure Services. Safe Sitter is a one-day, six-hour curriculum designed for 11- to 13-year-olds. Participants learn care of the choking infant and child, babysitting as a business, success on the job, child care essentials, safety for the sitter, preventing injuries, injury and behavior management and preventing problem behavior. Registration closes at noon two days prior. For more information or to register, call (970) 350-9400.

« Walk with a Doc, July 20 at Sanborn Park, 2031 28th Ave. on the west side of the park. An informal five minute health talk will be followed by a 30-minute walk and healthy snacks. For more information, visit www. WalkwithaDoc.org.

« Cooking Classes: Let’s Grill, 6-7:30 p.m. July 23 at

the NCMC Cardiac Rehab Kitchen. These courses are taught by a registered dietician and are a great way to modify your cooking habits and learn about heart healthy cooking. Recipes and samples are included. Class is $10. To register, call (970) 350-6633.

« Pre-diabetes Classes, Series 2 July 30, Aug. 6 and

13. Learn the difference between pre-diabetes and diabetes, how to prevent type 2 diabetes and how to create a lifelong plan to keep blood sugars in the normal range. The three-class session is $30. One support person may join each participant free of charge. For more information, call (970) 392-2344.

« Diabetes and Pregnancy education, call for

time and date information. Individual and group options are available for women with type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes to teach skills needed to care for themselves during pregnancy. Topics include: healthy eating, being active, blood glucose monitoring, medications, problem solving, healthy coping and reducing risks. The goal is to help you and your baby stay healthy. $10. For more information, call (970) 392-2344.


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June 26, 2013

STAND UP FOR YOUR

Colorado companies encourage employees to ge By Bethany Morris | gtreporters@greeleytribune.com

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hen Frank Ross began having back and hip problems while sitting for long hours in his office, he built his own solution — a desk that allows him to stand while he works. Ross, the pastor at West Greeley Baptist Church, 3251 22nd St., built his desk — which can hold two computers, his books and anything else he needs — in 2004. He said he’s seen an improvement in his health since. “I noticed my hip kept getting stuck when I would sit down for long periods of time,” Ross said. “When I stand my back and hip don’t bother me.”

Recently, medical research has begun to confirm the suspicion that Ross and many others have had about the connection between standing and improved health. A study published in Archives of Internal Medicine by public health researchers in Australia found that prolonged sitting in front of a computer monitor — 11 hours or more — significantly increases the risk of dying earlier. Another study published by the American Journal of Epidemiology determined that people who spend six hours sitting are 20 percent more likely to develop chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and breast and colon cancer, than those who sit for half of that time. In another study, conducted over a 13-year period at Louisiana’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center, scientists found that 54 percent of the people who sat all day long were more prone to fatal heart attacks. Further research detailed in the October 2010 British Journal of Sports Medicine suggests that prolonged sitting results in adverse metabolic and health effects, even if they meet the recommendation of 30 minutes of physical activity on most days of the week. “I think every kid at school should have a desk that allows them to stand up rather than sit,” said James O. Hill, Executive Director of the Anschutz Health and Wellness Center in Aurora. “I know (stand-up desks) cost money, but in the scheme of

things, the benefit you’re going to get in preventing disease would be well worth the cost.” Hill said employers are increasingly taking responsibility for getting workers out of their seats. Employees are adjusting their work habits, including routinely getting up and moving around — and installing desks that allow them to stand up for at least a good part of the day. In Colorado, many companies have joined the movement. This fall, for example, the Denver Chamber of Commerce will replace its stationary desks with moveable ones and get rid of outdated straight-backed chairs to make way for rotating chairs with lumbar support. On a recent outing to a merchant specializing in ergonomic workplace furniture, about a dozen Denver Chamber employees — most of them in their early 30s — moved continuously around a conference desk in comfortable swivel chairs. In one corner, employee Lori Troge walked a slow, steady pace while working on her computer at a treadmill desk. Another desk moves up and down on a hydraulic pump at the touch of a button so that no matter how tall or short, anyone can stand and work. “We know that it is going to be expensive, but we really consider this an investment in our employees’ long-term health,” said Kate Horle, the organization’s director of communications and marketing. Hill, of the Anschutz Health and Well-

KIM ROBERTS, A RECEPTIONIST with the Denver Metro Chamber of Comm stand, rather than sit, at work. The Chamber recently joined a growing trend in Colora ment for employees. ness Center, said he has recently consulted with several other Colorado companies about improving employee productivity through exercise. “More and more, management is adopting a new attitude that ‘If you work here,

you have to take care of yourself,’ ” he said. Injury Prevention Specialist at Banner Health, Teresa Boynton said she encourages her employees to get up and move around the office periodically throughout the day. Her office has also started provid-


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et up and move at work » Physical activity

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two hours and 30 minutes of exercise every week of moderate aerobic activity and two days a week devoted to muscle strengthening for the average adult. Or one hour and 15 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity every week and two or more days a week of muscle strengthening activities per week. For more go, www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/adults.html

GABRIELLE PFAFFLIN/Colorado Public News

merce, tests out a desk that allows her to ado to install healthier workspace equip-

ing adjustable keyboard trays, which allow employees the option of adjusting the height to a sitting or standing position. “I try to emphasize the importance of exercise to my employees,” Boynton said. “I encourage them to get up and walk around

every 30 minutes or so and also to incorporate walking or standing in their breaks.” Getting a stand-up desk or adjustable keyboard doesn’t mean that you’ll be standing for an eight-hour workday. Having the option to stand for part of the day and sit down for the rest is an important tool to stay healthy; moderation is key, Boynton said. “It’s important to have the ability to alternate between sitting and standing,” she said. “Incorporating the two into your work are important in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.” Being healthy doesn’t necessarily mean you have to spend money on an adjustable desk or keyboard tray. Simple solutions such as moving your printer across the room, opting to take the stairs rather than the elevator, getting up to get an extra cup of coffee or standing up and doing toes raises at your desk can add months to a lifetime, experts say. Ross, at West Greeley Baptist Church, said he stands the majority of his workday. “I’d say I spend about 75 to 80 percent of my time standing now,” Ross said. “Not only has it helped my health, it’s helped me prepare for my sermons, which I stand for the whole time.” Colorado Public News contributed to this report.

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POSTURE POINTERS Improve your body alignment By Danielle Braff Chicago Tribune

We’ve been told to stand up straight as long as we’ve been able to stand, but sometimes it’s harder than it seems. We know why we should do it: Good posture looks good, feels good and makes us look slimmer. On the flip side, studies have linked poor posture with lower self-esteem, depression and back pain. But, sometimes, posture pointers are confusing. Remember when we were all supposed to use Pilates balls instead of office chairs? Well, claims that doing so improved posture were recently disputed by researchers at the University of Waterloo in Ontario. They found that it didn’t help — or hurt — posture. But there are still some things you can do to help your stance, as well as some things you can avoid to keep it from getting worse. HELPS

Reposition your monitor Your monitor should be 1 to 2 feet away from your face, and your eyes should be level with the top of the monitor, said Janice Novak, author of “Posture, Get It Straight! Look Ten Years Younger, Ten Pounds Thinner and Feel Better Than Ever.” This will prevent your head from leaning forward and away from your shoulders. Lumbar rolls Place a lumbar roll behind the small of your back when you’re sitting in a chair, according to Dr. Richard Guyer,

orthopedic surgeon and cofounder of the Texas Back Institute. “It helps to maintain the normal curvature in the back when sitting,” he said. Reposition yourself in your car while driving Move your seat close enough to the pedals so that your knees are bent. A 90-degree angle would be too bent, and anything more than 130 degrees would be too straight. (Make sure your body is at least 13 inches away from the steering wheel in case your air bag deploys.) Your lower back should be against the back of the seat. Sit in an upright or slightly reclining position. Adjust the headrest so your head is actually resting against it. This position places your head directly over your spine and allows your neck and upper back muscles to relax while you drive, Novak said. Finally, when holding the steering wheel, your elbows should be bent at 120 degrees. Strengthen your core muscles through exercise Do three sets of basic and side planks daily, holding each pose for 30 seconds, said Dr. Levi Harrison, orthopedic surgeon in Los Angeles and author of “The Art of Fitness: A Journey to Self Enhancement.” Start in a pushup position with your arms directly under your shoulders (you may bend your arms if necessary) for the center plank. Keep your head aligned with your neck. After 30 seconds, turn to one

side by lifting your left arm and stacking your body over your right leg, keeping your right arm extended on the ground. You may bend your right arm if necessary. Then switch sides. HURTS

High heels Heels higher than 1 inch increase your sway backward, which can lead to lower back discomfort, Novak said. Your foot slides to the front of the shoe, which puts too much pressure on the ball of the foot and your toes. High heels also shorten the muscles and tendons on the back of your ankle, and stretch and weaken the muscles on the front of your ankle, which can lead to shin splints. Heels on shoes also get in the way of the natural stride, which is to place your heel down first, then roll through the ball of your foot. If you must wear heels, don’t wear them for longer than four hours at a time. Ottomans When you’re resting your legs in a straight extension you’re placing stress on your lower back, said Mary Ann Wilmarth, chief of physical therapy at Harvard University. Sitting this way can stress your sciatic nerve and may put you in a slouched position without supporting your back. A better alternative would be to rest with both knees bent. Soft couches You should not be able to sink into a couch, Wilmarth said. “It needs to be firm enough to give you support.” If your couch doesn’t support your lower back, you can use extra pillows to assist it.


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June 26, 2013

WALKING DEVICE HELPS PEOPLE GET BACK IN STEP

By Alysa Hullett The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — Carl Simmons regu-

larly used to run 5K races. Now the 76-year-old stroke survivor just wants to be able to keep up with his wife on a walk. Through help from Seattle-based Cadence Biomedical’s walking device, Simmons is hopeful. The Lynnwood, Wash., retiree is one of several dozen patients using the Kickstart Kinetic Orthosis since the device’s September 2012 debut. Intended for those with mobility impairment resulting from strokes, spinal-cord injuries, traumatic brain injury or ALS, Kickstart, a wearable mechanical device that uses kinetic energy to help improve people’s gait, is even helping people who have been “stuck in wheelchairs for decades,” CEO Brian Glaister said. Five years ago, Simmons ran farther than most men his age; he chose to work at his air-conditioning-andheating job at a time many would have retired. But joint failure led to knee-replacement surgery. Then came a stroke that crippled his right side. When he walked, “trusty cane” in hand, his right leg dragged on the ground. He trudged along slowly. “I’m always bringing up the rear,” Simmons said. Upon being fitted for the fivepound Kickstart device, Simmons said he could immediately feel the difference. The Kickstart resembles a leg brace and was inspired by stretchy horse tendons that store energy, allowing the animals to run all day and not get tired, Glaister said. Springs connected to pulleys attach at the ankle and hip flexor and create tension, propelling the opposite leg forward with each step.

MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS

CARL SIMMONS, OF LYNNWOOD, tries out the Kickstart walking device after being

fitted with it in April at the Center for Prosthetics and Orthotics in Seattle. Simmons, who had a stroke, hopes to go dancing again with his wife, Peg.

It takes 1,000 steps a day to recover from a stroke. If you’re not able to take those steps, or not able to take them properly, then you’re kinda out of luck.”

— BRIAN GLAISTER, Kickstart Kinetic Orthosis CEO

After hearing about the device from a friend, Simmons visited a physician to see whether he was a good fit. The doctor wrote Simmons a prescription for the device. Sarco Precision manufactures the Kickstart components and Independent Tech Service in Sumner, Wash., assembles and customizes them. Cadence Biomedical, born out of Glaister’s basement, was co-founded in 2007 by Glaister and former col-

league Jason Shoen. Previously, the pair worked on a project at the Veterans Affairs Center of Excellence for Limb Loss Prevention and Prosthetic Engineering in Seattle. But when people asked when the pricey robotic limbs they were developing would be available for inhome use, Glaister said he had to say “probably never.” As a result, the conversation shifted toward affordable technol-

ogy that people could actually use, Glaister said. In 2010, the pair built the first Kickstart prototype. Free of motors and batteries, the Kickstart competes mainly with products ranging from an inexpensive ankle brace to the exoskeleton, a robot assistive-walking device that can cost up to $100,000, he said. While the exoskeleton is available for in-office physical-therapy sessions, Glaister contends that a few therapy visits are not enough to properly retrain the muscles. Chie Kawahara, vice president of product management at Cadence, said exoskeleton technology is necessary for people who are paralyzed

or who can’t walk on their own. Meanwhile, Kickstart is intended for people who need extra assistance to walk normally. “It takes 1,000 steps a day to recover from a stroke,” Glaister said. “If you’re not able to take those steps, or not able to take them properly, then you’re kinda out of luck.” Orthotist Julie Schaar of Seattle’s Center for Prosthetics Orthotics, who custom-fit the device for Simmons, agreed that stroke patients who “aren’t supported in the right way develop poor gait habits.” Operating out of a small office in Seattle, Cadence Biomedical has five full-time and three part-time employees. It has raised $1.7 million from investors, and $600,000 in grants from the U.S. Department of Defense and National Institutes of Health. So far, private insurance users have paid up to $1,000 for the device. Cadence is currently working to raise the slight Medicare reimbursement, as patients have paid out-ofpocket costs of $5,000 to $6,000. War veterans are completely covered for the device. With the overarching goal of helping people walk, the Cadence team is working on another version of Kickstart for use in physical-therapy sessions and a product to provide sensory feedback for those who have lost limbs. Three weeks after Simmons’ introduction to Kickstart, he said he’s “never felt better.” Walking to the mailbox is a little easier; trekking up stairs is a little less daunting. And he’s catching up with his wife, Peg. Now, he hopes to get out on his boat more and eventually start ballroom dancing again. He said he just wants to be able “to do all the normal things that couples do.”


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CAFFEINE NOT JUST IN ENERGY DRINKS ANYMORE By Marie McCullough

prove alertness. Caffeinated coffee, studies suggest, reduces the risk of gallstones, Pa r k i n s o n’s disease, diabetes, and

The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — If you were

unaware caffeine was creeping into foods until last month, when Wrigley was blasted for putting the stimulant in a new gum, here’s the latest buzz. The growing list of socalled energy foods includes such famous names as FritoLay’s Cracker Jack’D. There’s also Jelly Belly Extreme Sport Beans, Hershey’s Ice Breakers Energy mints, and Kraft Foods MiO Energy liquid water enhancer. Caffeine can now be consumed in waffles, maple syrup, cookies, gums, gummi bears, popcorn, marshmallows, hot sauce, jerky — and more — made by small Internet entrepreneurs. Even the Food and Drug Administration was only vaguely aware of this trend. For one thing, these are novelty and niche products that aren’t on grocers’ shelves yet. For another, manufacturers don’t have to tell the agency when they add the habit-forming, potentially toxic chemical to foods — not even candy and snacks likely to appeal to children. All the makers have to do is list caffeine as an ingredient on the label. The total amount? They needn’t say. As caffeinated foods come on the market, “we’ve got no heads-up about them,” said Michael R. Taylor, deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine at FDA. Wrigley’s Alert gum was the tipping point. Calling it “one more unfortunate example,” Taylor said the FDA would investigate the safety of caffeine in foods, particularly the effects on children and teens. He anticipates a crackdown. A regulatory buzzkill won’t be quick or easy. So-called energy foods reflect cultural, commercial, and consumer factors, just like two other

MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS

MANY PRODUCTS MARKETED AS “energy” foods,

such as these Wired Waffles, contain caffeine which finds itself sneaking into more and more edibles. public health betes noires — caffeinated energy drinks and sugary sodas. Although Wrigley promptly said it would “pause” production of its Alert gum “out of respect” for the FDA, other companies are showing no such restraint. “Until we’re able to marshal the (scientific) evidence to take regulatory action, it’s the decision of these companies whether they should be marketing these products,” Taylor said. Along with reams of research on coffee, the FDA and its advisers will no doubt review data on a newer source of zip: energy drinks. A tsunami of brands flooded the U.S. market after Red Bull’s 1997 debut, with many sold as dietary supplements, a barely regulated category. This year, projections are that $19 billion worth of energy drinks will be glugged, mostly by adolescents and young adults. In moderate amounts, caffeine can ward off drowsiness and im-

suicide. But moderation is not the mantra of energy drinks and shots, or of its main customers — young males. With names like Full Throttle, Monster, Rockstar, and Hardcore Energize Bullet, these quaffs typically have two to seven times as much caffeine as a can of cola. Colas are the only foods with an FDA caffeine limit — 71 milligrams in a 12-ounce can — although most brands have far less. In comparison, a 5-ounce cup of coffee has about twice as much on average, or 115 milligrams. Studies have linked energydrink consumption to inadequate sleep, obesity, bad grades, depression, risky behavior such as unsafe sex, and “toxic jock identity” (basically, belligerence). “Caffeine-loaded energy drinks have now crossed the line from beverages to drugs delivered as tasty syrups,” said a 2010 editorial

in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Despite such pointed (some would say overwrought) warnings, only a subgenre of energy drinks has been reined in. After reports of deaths and hospitalizations linked to caffeinated alcoholic drinks, the FDA in 2010 sent warning letters to the makers. The buzzed boozes, or at least the caffeine in them, vanished. One reason caffeine is so lightly regulated is that it is “Generally Recognized As Safe” (GRAS) by experts when consumed normally, which for many years meant in coffee or cola. The FDA allows manufacturers to determine whether a new food ingredient, or a new use of an old ingredient, is generally safe. “What we’ve seen, first with energy drinks, is caffeine moving into other products” besides coffee, Taylor said. “Manufacturers are adding higher levels of caffeine, and it’s being marketed in a different way.” Overdoing caffeine has always been relatively common, and can cause j-j-jitters, restlessness, insomnia, headaches, and heart palpitations. Overdosing is not common. Still, caffeine-related problems such as heart arrhythmias, seizures, and inhalation of vomit are growing full throttle. Energydrink-related emergency-room visits doubled from 10,068 in 2007 to 20,783 in 2011, according to a national public health surveillance system. At least 16 deaths have been linked to the beverages since 2004. In March 18 physicians and researchers sent the FDA a letter that concluded the caffeine levels in energy drinks are not safe under the GRAS standards. That echoed the American Academy of Pediatrics, which in 2011 said the scientific evidence showed “caffeine and other stimu-

lant substances contained in energy drinks have no place in the diet of children and adolescents.” Beverage makers say the alarms are unfounded and unfair. Some food makers, meanwhile, say they have striven to keep their caffeinated products away from youths. For example, Jelly Belly said its Extreme Sport Beans was “a sports performance product, not a snack or traditional candy. It is sold alongside sports nutrition and is not intended for use by children or pregnant women.” Wrigley said “we took great strides” to ensure that Alert gum was marketed “in a safe and responsible way to consumers 25 years old and over.” But Mars Corp., which owns Wrigley, made no adults-only claim for Snickers Charged, a wired version of the traditional candy bar that was sold as a “limited edition” in 2008. Nor did Nestle in 2009 when it temporarily sold Butterfinger Buzz. Caffeinated foods are so new no one tracks them separately. Euromonitor International, a market research firm, reported sales of foods touted as “energy boosting” hit $1.6 billion in 2012, up $500 million from 2008. But most of these foods are cereal-based snack bars, some fortified with vitamins and protein, not caffeine. Experts doubt the FDA will outright ban added caffeine in foods, but even if it does, regulation may be the mother of invention. Chris Bogdan, who cofounded Get Up and Go Caffeinated Baked Goods (brownies, cookies, muffins) in Ann Arbor, Mich., less than a year ago, is already braced for tougher rules. “It’s something we’re prepared to work around,” he said. “There are other stimulants you can put in food. We have alternatives. We have backup plans — and we have to.”


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THRIVENC

TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY ACUPUNCTURE

ASSISTED LIVING

PHYLLIS HAMAR, L.A.C.

BONELL GOOD SAMARITAN

Master of Science, Traditional Chinese Medicine NCCAOM Board Certified 710 11th Ave., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80631 970-539-0324

708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 352-6082 Fax: (970) 356-7970 www.good-sam.com

WESTLAKE FAMILY PHYSICIANS, PC

GRACE POINTE

5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Richard Budensiek, DO; Janis McCall, MD; Frank Morgan, MD; Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Angela Mill, MD Website: www.bannerhealth.com

ALLERGY AND ASTHMA

COLORADO ALERGY & ASTHMA CENTERS, P.C. 7251 W. 20th Street, Bldg N, Ste 1 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-3907

1136 E. Stuart St, Bldg 3, Ste 3200 Ft. Collins, CO 80525 Phone: (970) 221-1681 4700 E. Bromley Ln., Ste 207 Brighton, CO 80601 Phone: (303) 654-1234 www.coloradoallergy.com Professionals: Dr. Daniel Laszlo Dr. John James

NORTHERN COLORADO ALLERGY & ASTHMA

Greeley Phone: (970) 330-5391 Loveland Phone: (970) 663-0144 Ft. Collins Phone: (970) 221-2370 www.NCAAC.com Professionals: Dr. Vel Kailasam, MD Krishna C. Murthy, MD Loran Clement, MD Michael Martucci, MD

ALZHEIMER’S/SKILLED CARE

BONELL GOOD SAMARITAN

708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

GRACE POINTE

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 www.gracepointegreeley.com

MEADOWVIEW OF GREELEY

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Web Site: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

BALANCE

LIFE CARE CENTER OF GREELEY- ASCENT 4800 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-6400 Professionals: Cozette Seaver, PT; Leslie Vail, PT

CARDIAC VASCULAR SURGERY

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 www.gracepointegreeley.com

MEADOWVIEW OF GREELEY

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Web Site: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

(970) 350-6953 Missy Jensen, FNP-C

DENTISTRY

4750 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)339-0022

ASCENT FAMILY DENTAL Scott Williams, DMD 3535 W. 12th Street, Suite B Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-6095 www.dentalgreeley.com

AUDIOLOGY

ALPINE ALL ABOUT HEARING

AUDIOLOGY ASSOCIATES

2528 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)352-2881 Professionals: Robert M. Traynor, Ed. D. F-AAA; Karen Swope, M. A. CCC-A

MIRACLE-EAR

2404 17th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-6620 749 S. Lemay Avenue, Suite A1 Fort Collins, CO 80524 (970)221-5225

UNC AUDIOLOGY CLINIC

Gunter Hall, Room 0330 Greeley, CO 80639 Phone: (970)351-2012/TTY Fax: (970)351-1601 Web Site: www.unco.edu/NHS/asls/clinic.htm Professionals: Diane Erdbruegger, Au.D., CCC-A; Erinn Jimmerson, M.A., CCC-A Jennifer Weber, Au.D., CCC-A

1800 15th Street, #310 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 392-0900 Professionals: James H. Beckmann, MD; Harold L. Chapel, MD; John Drury, MD; Lin-Wang Dong, MD; Cynthia L. Gryboski, MD; Cecilia Hirsch, MD; Paul G. Hurst, MD; Brian Lyle, MD; Randall C. Marsh, MD; Arnold Pfahnl, MD; James E. Quillen, MD; Gary A. Rath, MD; Shane Rowan, MD; Ahmad Shihabi, MD;

HEART FAILURE CLINIC (NCMC)

THE BRIDGE ASSISTED LIVING

1124 E. Elizabeth Street, #E-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524 Phone: (970)221-3372 Fax: (970)493-9237 3820 N. Grant Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970)461-0225 Fax: (970)593-0670 Web Site: www.allabouthearing.com Professionals: Renita Boesiger, M. A., CCC-A Rachel White, M. A., CCC-A Cheryl Hadlock, M. S., CCC-A

CARDIOVASCULAR INSTITUTE (NCMC)

GREELEY DENTAL HEALTH

CARDIAC, THORACIC & VASCULAR SURGERY (NCMC) 1800 15th Street, Suite 340 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4593 Fax: (970)378-4391 Professionals: Lyons, Maurice I. Jr. DO Richards, Kenneth M. MD Tullis, Gene E. MD

CARDIOLOGY

1600 23rd Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-4329 www.greeleydentalhealth.com Professionals: Randy C. Hatch, DDS Charles W. Johnson, DDS

JULIE KAVANAUGH, D.D.S. 3400 W. 16th Street, Suite 8-E Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-0400 www.drjuliekav.com

ENDOCRINOLOGY

ENDOCRINOLOGY CLINIC (NCMC) 1801 15th Street, Ste 200 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4676 Fax: (970)-378-4315 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Nirmala Kumar, MD

FAMILY PRACTICE MEDICINE

BANNER HEALTH CLINIC 1300 Main Street Windsor, CO 80550 Phone: 970-686-5646 Fax: 970-686-5118 Providers: Jonathan Kary, M.D. Trina Kessinger, M.D. Anthony Doft, M.D.

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June 26, 2013

2013 FAMILY PHYSICIANS OF GREELEY, LLP-CENTRAL 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley ,CO Phone: (970) 356-2520 Professionals: Joanna H. Branum, M.D.; Ann T. Colgan, M.D.; Jennifer D. Dawson, D.O.; Douglas A. Magnuson, M.D.; Lori A. Ripley, M.D.; Andrew P. Stoddard, M.D.; D. Craig Wilson, M.D.

FAMILY PHYSICIANS OF GREELEY, LLP-COTTONWOOD 2420 W. 16th Street Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970) 353-7668 Professionals: Christopher T. Kennedy, M.D.; Daniel P. Pflieger, M.D.; Mark D. Young, M.D.; Stacey L. Garber, M.D. Amy E. Mattox, M.D.

FAMILY PHYSICIANS OF GREELEY, LLP-WEST 6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 101 Greeley ,CO Phone: (970) 378-8000 Professionals: Daniel R. Clang, D.O.; Tamara S. Clang, D.O.; R. Scott Haskins, M.D.; Mathew L. Martinez, M.D.; Chima C. Nwizu, M.D.; Michelle K. Paczosa, D.O.; Jeffery E. Peterson, M.D.; Kyle B. Waugh, M.D.; Charles I. Zucker, M.D.

KENNETH M. OLDS

6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 208 Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-9061

WESTLAKE FAMILY PHYSICIANS, PC 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Richard Budensiek, D.O.; Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Janis McCall, MD; Angela Mills, MD Frank Morgan, MD; David Pols, D.O. www.bannerhealth.com

FUNERAL SERVICES

ALLNUTT & RESTHAVEN FUNERAL SERVICES 702 13th Street, Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 352-3366 650 W. Drake Road, Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970) 482-3208 8426 S. College Avenue, Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970) 667-0202 2100 N. Lincoln, Loveland, CO Phone: (970) 667-1121 1302 Graves Avenue, Estes Park, CO Phone: (970) 586-3101


June 26, 2013

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THRIVENC

TRiBUNE MEDiCALDiRECTORY DiRECTORY TRiBUNE MEDiCAL GASTROENTEROLOGY

REHABILITATION AND VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION 2105 Clubhouse Drive Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 330-5655 Fax: (970) 330-7146 Web Site: www.rvna.info Professionals: Crystal Day, CEO

HOSPICE

HOSPICE OF NORTHERN COLORADO Administration Office 2726 W. 11th Street Road Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)352-8487 Fax: (970)475-0037

PATHWAYS HOSPICE

305 Carpenter Road Ft. Collins, CO 80550 Phone: (970)663-3500 Fax: (970)292-1085 Web Site: www.pathways-care.org

INDEPENDENT ASSISTED LIVING

DOWGIN, THOMAS A., MD. CENTERS FOR GASTROENTEROLOGY 7251 W. 20th St., Bldg J Greeley, CO Phone: (970)207-9773 3702 Timberline Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970)207-9773 2555 E. 13th Street, Suite 220 Loveland, CO Phone: (970)669-5432 Website: www.digestive-health.net

GRACE POINTE

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 Website: www.gracepointegreeley.com

MEADOWVIEW OF GREELEY

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Website: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

INDEPENDENT ASSISTED LIVING W/SERVICES

NORTH COLORADO GASTROENTEROLOGY (NCMC)

STUDIO Z FITNESS

3483 W. 10th Street, Unit A Greeley, CO 313-6924 or 388-7956

WORK OUT WEST

CARING HEARTS HOME HEALTHCARE 6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 207 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)378-1409

INFECTIOUS DISEASE

BREEN, JOHN F., MD (NCMC) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-6071 Fax: (970)350-6702

INTERNAL MEDICINE

BANNER HEALTH CLINIC 2010 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-5660 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Giovanna Garcia, MD Steven Kalt, MD

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES

BANNER HOME MEDICAL EQUIPMENT (NCMC) Phone: (970)506-6420

MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

NCMC - BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

Susan Goodrich, LCSW Banner Health Clinic-Loveland Pediatrics Loveland Pediatrics Loveland CO Banner Health Clinic- Windsor 1300 Main Street Windsor CO, 80550 Renee Rogers, LMFT Banner Health Clinic 1300 Main Street Windsor, CO 80550 Banner Health Clinic 303 Colland Drive, Fossil Creek Fort Collins, CO 80525

MIDWIFERY CARE

CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH 1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professionals: Marie Foose, CNM; Krista O’Leary, CNM Brenda Bridges, CNM

NEPHROLOGY

GREELEY MEDICAL CLINIC 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-2438 Professionals: Donal Rademacher, MD

NEUROLOGY

Dr Patricia Al-Adsani, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Banner Health Clinic-Internal Medicine 2010 16th Street, Suite C Greeley, CO 80631 Banner Health Clinic- Windsor 1300 Main Street Windsor, CO 80550

BONELL GOOD SAMARITAN 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

Elise Pugh, LPC Banner Health Clinic Westlake 5623 W 19th St Greeley CO 80631 Banner Health Clinic 1300 Main Street Windsor, CO 80550

2010 2013 NURSING HOME REHABILITATION

CENTENNIAL HEALTH CARE CENTER 1637 29th Ave. Place Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-8181 Fax: (970) 356-3278

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY

CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH 1715 61st Ave. Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professionals: Stewart Abbot, MD; Michael Plotnick, MD; Marie Foose, CNM; Krista O’Leary, CNM; Karen Vorderberg, CNM; Bea Bachenberg, WHCNP; Kecia Doll, Licensed Esthetician;

WESTLAKE FAMILY PHYSICIANS, PC 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Richard Budensiek, D.O.; Janis McCall, MD; Angela Mills, MD Frank Morgan, MD; David Pols, D.O. www.bannerhealth.com

ONCOLOGY & HEMATOLOGY

CANCER INSTITUTE (NCMC) 1800 15th Street, Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-6680 Toll Free: (866) 357-9276 Fax: (970)350-6610 Professionals: Elizabeth Ceilley, MD Brian Fuller, MD Kerry Williams-Wuch, MD Ariel Soriano, MD

OPTOMETRY

FOX HILL VISION CLINIC

2001 46th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 (970) 330-7070 Professionals: Dr. Nancy Smith, OD Dr. Tarry Harvey, OD Website: www.foxhillvision.com

Stephanie Carroll, LCSW, CACIII Banner Health Clinic 1300 Main Street Windsor, CO 80550 Banner Health Clinic Fossil Creek 303 Colland Dr Fort Collins, CO 80525

HEALTH AND FITNESS

HOME HEALTH CARE

1720 60th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-7773 Fax: (970)330-9708 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

Shawn Crawford, LPC Banner Health Clinic 222 Johnstown Center Drive Johnstown, CO 80534 Banner Health Clinic-Internal Medicine 2010 16th Street, Suite C Greeley, CO 80631

2010 16th Street, Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4475 Fax: (970)378-4429 Professionals: Mark Rosenblatt, MD Ahmed M. Sherif, MD Yazan Abu Qwaider, MD

Health & Recreation Campus 5701 W. 20th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: 970-330-9691 www.workoutwest.com

FOX RUN SENIOR LIVING

ORTHODONTICS

CENTENNIAL NEUROLOGY Dr. David Ewing 7251 W. 20th Street, Unit C Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-3876

NCMC NEUROLOGY CLINIC 1800 15th Street, Suite 100B Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-5612 Fax: (970) 350-5619 Professionals: Jeffery Siegel, MD William Shaffer, MD; Todd Hayes, DO Christy Young, MD

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GREELEY ORTHODONTIC CENTER 2021 Clubhouse Dr., Suite 110 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 330-2500 Fax: (970) 330-2548 E-Mail: gocpc@doctork.com Website: www.doctork.com Professionals: Dr. Gary J. Kloberdanz

ORTHODONTIC ASSOCIATES OF GREELEY, PC

Professionals: Bradford N. Edgren, DDS, MS 3400 W. 16thSt., Bldg 4-V Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-5900 Website: www.drbradsmiles.com

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THRIVENC

TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY ORTHOPEDICS

MOUNTAIN VISTA ORTHOPAEDICS

5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 101 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)348-0020 Fax: (970)348-0044 Web Site: www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Randy M. Bussey, MD Daniel Heaston, MD Thomas Pazik, MD Shelly Remley, PA-C Kelly R. Sanderford, MD Steven Sides, MD Linda Young, MD

PEDIATRICS

BANNER HEALTH CLINIC 6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 201 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)350-5828 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Amanda Harding, MD James Sando, MD

PEDIATRIC REHABILITATION

BANNER REHABILITATION CENTER 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)350-6160 Fax: (970)378-3858

PERSONAL RESPONSE SERVICE

BANNER LIFE LINE (NCMC) 2010 16th Street, Suite C Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: 1-877-493-8109 (970) 378-4743

PHYSICAL THERAPY

HOPE THERAPY CENTER (Formerly North Colorado Therapy Center) 2780 28th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)339-0011 Website: www.GCIinc.org Professionals: Chris Denham, PT; Kryste Haas, OT; Kathie Hertzke, PTA; Moni Kohlhoff, PT; Alex Luksik, PTA; Jeanne Rabe, PT; Howard Belon, PhD, Clinical Psychologist

NORTHERN COLORADO REHABILITATION HOSPITAL 4401 Union Street Johnstown, CO 80534 Phone: (970) 619-3400 Website: NCRH@ernesthealth.com

PODIATRY

FOOT & ANKLE CENTER OF NORTHERN COLORADO P.C. 1931 65th Ave., Suite A Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 351-0900 Fax: (970) 351-0940

4401 Union Street Johnstown, CO 80534 Phone: (970) 443-0925 Web Site: www.footandanklecolorado.com Professionals: Daniel J. Hatch, D.P.M. Mike D. Vaardahl, D.P.M.

PULMONARY/CRITICAL CARE

NORTH COLORADO PULMONARY (NCMC) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)392-2026 Professionals: Kelli Janata, DO Robert Janata, DO David Fitzgerlad, DO Michael Shedd, MD Danielle Dial, NP

NORTHERN COLORADO REHABILITATION HOSPITAL 4401 Union Street Johnstown, CO 80534 Phone: (970) 619-3400 Website: NCRH@ernesthealth.com

PEAKVIEW MEDICAL CENTER 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2775 Fax: (970)313-2777

SKIN CARE

KECIAS SKIN CARE @ CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH 1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professinal: Kecia Doll, Licensed Esthetician

SKILLED CARE/REHAB

CERTIFIED PROSTHETICS & ORTHOTICS, LLC (GREELEY LOCATION)

4800 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-6400 Website: www.lcca.com Professionals: Annie Bennett Leslie Vail

BANNER REHABILITATION Phone: (970)350-6160

1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)392-2496

SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY

BANNER REHABILITATION CENTER 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)350-6160 Fax: (970)378-3858

UNC SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY CLINIC

HANGER PROSTHETICS & ORTHOTICS

ASCENT AT LIFE CARE CENTER

NORTH COLORADO SPORTS MEDICINE

4401 Union Street Johnstown, CO 80534 Phone: (970) 619-3400 Website: NCRH@ernesthealth.com

1620 25th Avenue, Suite A Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: 970-356-2123 Fax: 970-352-4943

REHABILITATION

5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 101 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)348-0020 Fax: (970)348-0044 Web Site: www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Randy M. Bussey, MD Daniel Heaston, MD Thomas Pazik, MD Shelly Remley, PA-C Kelly R. Sanderford, MD Steven Sides, MD Linda Young, MD

NORTHERN COLORADO REHABILITATION HOSPITAL

PROSTHETICS & ORTHOTICS

7251 West 20th Street, Building M Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-9449 Fax: (970)330-4217 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue, Suite 2100 North Medical Office Building Loveland CO 80538 Phone: (970) 619-6585 Fax (970) 619-6591 Website: www.hanger.com Professinal: Ben Struzenberg, CPO Michelle West, Mastectomy Fitter

SPORTS MEDICINE

MOUNTAIN VISTA ORTHOPAEDICS

Gunter Hall, Room 0330 Greeley, CO 80639 Phone: (970)351-2012/TTY Fax: (970)351-1601 Web Site: www.unco.edu/NHS/asls/clinic.htm Professionals: Lynne Jackowiak, M.S., CCC-SLP Julie Hanks, Ed.D Patty Walton, M.A., CCC-SLP

BONELL GOOD SAMARITAN 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352- 6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Website: www.good-sam.com

GRACE POINTE

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 Website: www.gracepointegreeley.com

SURGERY GENERAL & TRAUMA

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2013 BARIATRIC SURGERY (NCMC) 1800 15th Street, Suite 200 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4433 866-569-5926 Fax: (970)378-4440 Professionals: Michael W. Johnell, MD

SURGERY WESTERN STATES BURN CENTER (NCMC) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-6607 Fax: (970)350-6306 Professionals: Gail Cockrell, MD Cleon W. Goodwin, MD BURN

SURGICAL ASSOCIATES OF GREELEY PC (NCMC) 1800 15th St. Suite 210 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)352-8216 Toll Free: 1-888-842-4141 Professionals: Lisa Burton, M.D.; Michael Harkabus, M.D.; Jason Ogren, M.D.; Samuel Saltz, D.O.; Robert Vickerman, M.D.

URGENT CARE

SUMMITVIEW URGENT CARE 2001 70th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)378-4155 Fax: (970)378-4151 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Thomas Harms, MD Amy E. Shenkenberg, MD Linda Young, MD

UROLOGY

MOUNTAIN VISTA UROLOGY 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 106 Greeley, CO 80634 Professionals: James Wolach, MD Curtis Crylen, MD www.bannerhealth.com

VEINS

VEIN CLINIC (NCMC)

1800 15th Street, Suite 340 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4593 Fax: (970)378-4591 Professionals: Maurice I. Lyons Jr., DO Kenneth M. Richards, MD Gene E. Tullis, MD


July 2013 Thrive