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July 2012

THRiVE » NORTHERN COLORADO WELLNESS

BEAT THE HEAT Find out the best ways to keep cool and stay safe from the sun this summer. Page 6

» INSIDE: BIKERS: RIDE DEFENSIVELY • SOCIAL MEDIA CONNECT THE AILING • JULY EVENTS


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Ask the Expert:

Breastfeeding

,DPSUHJQDQWZLWKP\¿UVWFKLOG,VEUHDVWIHHGLQJLPSRUWDQW" Breastfeeding isn’t always easy, but there are many benefits to mothers and babies. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends mothers breastfeed exclusively IRUWKH¿UVWVL[PRQWKVDQGFRQWLQXHIRUWKHUHPDLQGHURIWKH¿UVW\HDUZLWKWKH addition of solid foods. The antibodies present in breast milk help protect against illnesses and lower the risk of developing allergies, asthma, dental cavities, and obesity later in life. Breastfeeding releases prolactin, a hormone for milk production that helps lessen mothers’ stress levels and increase relaxation. North Colorado Medical Center has certified lactation consultants in Greeley, Windsor, and Johnstown who can assist you with questions and concerns. For more information, please call (970) 392-BABY (2229).

Where

Experts Work Best.

Lari Frazee, D.O.

Pediatrician Banner Health Clinic Specializing in Pediatrics Appointments – (970) 350-5828

B N

Banner Medical Group North Colorado Medical Center www.BannerHealth.com/COexperts

7RÂżQGD%DQQHU+HDOWKSK\VLFLDQLQ\RXUDUHDYLVLWZZZEDQQHUKHDOWKFRP&2GRF Connect with us:

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HEALTH EVENTS FOR JULY « Northern Colorado’s Larg-

est Date Night, July 21. Spirit of Women encourages you and your partner to enjoy an evening that will help you focus on the health benefits of finding joy in our relationships. A variety of local businesses will be involved in helping couples plan a great date. It will be a fun night that is easy to plan and practically free ... or as expensive as you want! Details can be found at www.bannerhealth.

com/NCMCspirit. There you can find date themes, questions, fun ideas, participating businesses specials and more.

« WomenHeart of Weld

County, 6-7:30 p.m. July 18 at North Colorado Medical Center Cardiac Kitchen, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. Is there an app for that? The use of technology for a hearthealthy lifestyle. For more information on WomenHeart of Weld County, call Janea

Fowler at (970) 631-6364.

« Be Well with Diabetes,

9-11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, July 18-Aug. 22 at North Colorado Powell Room. A diabetes self-management class. Call (970) 392-2344 for more information.

« Blood Tests, 7-8:45 a.m. July

11 and 25, North Colorado Medical Center, Union Colony Room, Area C on the ground floor, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. Wellness Services offers lowcost blood screenings open to community members. Some immunizations are also available upon request and availability. Participants need

to fast for 12 hours before the blood draw. To make an appointment, call (970) 350-6633.

« Body Check Head To Toe,

July 3 and 17 at the Summit View Medical Commons, 2001 70th Ave. in Greeley. Head-totoe health screenings include blood work, sleep questionnaire, lung function test, body composition, hip and waist measurements, health education, EKG with results, bone density, peripheral arterial disease screenings, ultrasound of carotid vessels and ultrasound of aorta, $175. To schedule an appointment, call (970) 350-6070.

A Good Relationship Equals Trust

« CPR for health care provid-

ers, 5-8:30 p.m. July 16 at North Colorado Medical Center, Longs Room, second floor, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. This class is designed for licensed and nonlicensed health care providers. Topics covered include cardiopulmonary resuscitation, airway obstruction and rescue breathing for adult, children and infants. The certification is valid for two years. Cost: $50. To register, call (970) 350-6633.

« Cooking Class: Veggin’ Out, 6-7:15 p.m. July 11 at North Colorado Medical Center, Cardiac Rehab Kitchen, 1801

16th St. in Greeley. Explore vegetarian meal options as a way to increase your plantbased foods and decrease your cholesterol level. Taught by Mary Branom, R.D. Cost: $10. To register, call (970) 350-6633.

« Kids Cooking Class: Fruits

and Veggies Your Way, 10-11:30 a.m. July 17 at North Colorado Medical Center, Cardiac Rehab Kitchen, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. This class will teach how to make fruits and veggies both tasty and fun — your way! Taught by Stephanie Tarry Yoo, R.D.

Turn to Events on P.4

Nationally recognized hospice care, right here in Weld County

New Patients Welcome! We Accept Most Insurances ~ CareCredit Financing

greeleydentalhealth.com

Practicing in Weld County for over 25 years

Dr. Hatch

Comprehensive Exams Periodic Exams Preventive Cleanings Cosmetic Bleaching

Non-Surgical Periodontal (Gum) Therapy Tooth Colored Composite Restorations

Dr. Randy Hatch • Dr. Charles Johnson

1600 23RD AVENUE, SUITE 200 GREELEY, CO • 970.353.4329 MON - THURS 8-5 • FRI - APPOINTMENT ONLY • SAT CLOSED

Dr. Vaardahl

Bunions Foot & Ankle Surgery Ankle Sprains Arthritic Foot Care Hammertoes Office Surgery Available Warts Children’s Foot Disorders Laser Surgery Diabetic Foot & Ulcer Care Arthroscopy of Foot & Ankle

Our services include home visits by our experienced and compassionate nurses, social workers and chaplains, based on your wishes. Dr. David Allen, our full-time Medical Director, works with our team to make certain your loved ones receive the best possible care during their last months of life.

2 Locations to Serve You!

1931 65th Ave., Suite A Greeley, Colorado 970-351-0900 4401 Union Street Johnstown, Colorado 970-443-0925

www.pathways-care.org 305 Carpenter Road, Fort Collins, CO 80525 970.663.3500 1580 Main Street, Suite 2, Windsor, CO 80550 970.674.9988


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MORE JULY HEALTH EVENTS Events

environmental emergencies. Participants will receive a Heartsaver First Aid course completion card. The certification is valid for two years. To register, call (970) 350-9401.

from P.3

« Heartsaver CPR with AED,

7-9 p.m. July 19 at Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave. in Greeley. The class is taught by American Heart Association certified health care professionals and covers adult and infant/child CPR, obstructed airway, the Heimlich maneuver, the use of a barrier device, and AED hands-on training. Participants will receive a Heartsaver course completion card. The certification is valid for two years. To register, call (970) 350-9401.

« Heartsaver CPR with AED

— Windsor, 6-8 p.m. July 26 at the Windsor Recreation Center, 250 11th St. in Windsor. The class is taught by American Heart Association certified health care professionals and covers adult and infant/child CPR, obstructed airway, the Heimlich maneuver, the use of a barrier device, and AED hands-on training. Participants will receive a Heartsaver course completion card. The certification is valid wellness for two years. To register, call (970) 674-3500.

«

« Heartsaver First Aid, 4-6:30

p.m. July 19 Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave. in Greeley. This class provides participants with an understanding of first aid basics, medical emergencies, injury emergencies and

«

Safe Sitter Greeley, 9 a.m.-3

p.m. July 31 at the Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave. in Greeley. Safe Sitter is a oneday, six-hour curriculum designed for 11- to 13-year-olds. Participants learn care of the choking infant and child, baby-sitting as a business, success on the job, child care essentials, safety for the sitter, preventing injuries, injury and behavior management, and preventing problem behavior. To register, call (970) 350-9401. Registration closes at noon two days prior to the class.

care essentials, safety for the sitter, preventing injuries, injury and behavior management, and preventing problem behavior. Call (970) 674-3500 to register.

« Heart Score Screening, 1

and 2 p.m. Mondays-Fridays at North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. This is a noninvasive test that measures the amount of calcified plaque in the arteries. The Heart Score program includes a 10-minute consultation with a wellness specialist, focusing on cardiac risk factor education, identification of nonmodifiable and modifiable risks, and lifestyle behavior change options. To make an appointment, call (970) 350-6070. Cost: $199.

Safe Sitter Windsor, 9 a.m.3 p.m. July 23 at the Windsor Recreation Center, 250 11th St. in Windsor. Safe Sitter is a one-day, six-hour curriculum designed for 11- to 13-yearolds. Participants learn care of the choking infant and child, baby-sitting as a business, success on the job, child

«

PAD Screening (Peripheral Vascular Disease), 1-3 p.m. July 3 and 17 at Summit View

Loving Care in a Home Like Setting

• Medicaid Available Scott R.

WILLIAMS D.M.D.

Come Visit us during National Hospice and Palliative Care Month

970.590.1997

p.m. Mondays through July 9 at North Colorado Medical Center, Colonial Room, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. Recommended for those recovering from surgery or chronic illness. This gentle movement support group uses chairs and mats only, no standing poses. The focus is on gentle movements coordinated with breathing exercises to facilitate a greater range of motion, flexibility and relaxation. The instructor will address the full spectrum of students’ needs by using a personalized approach. The instructor will also teach modifications of all poses so students can learn a safe and effective way to practice yoga. Cost: $48 for six weeks. To register, call (970) 350-6633.

We Invite You

To Be Valued! We’ll treat your smile like it’s our own!

• • • • •

Little or No wait time Friendly Staff New Technology Family friendly We value our clients!

p.m. July 10 at North Colorado Medical Center in the Colonial Room, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. Community Wellness: Programs offered and diabetes resources available. Free. Details: (970) 392-2344.

« Diabetes and Pregnancy,

Offered weekly at North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. Cost: $10. Call (970) 392-2344 to schedule an appointment.

« Prediabetes Class, classes

are three days at North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St. in Greeley. Cost: $30 Participants will learn how to prevent type 2 diabetes and how to develop lifelong plan to help keep your blood sugars in the normal range. To register, call (970) 392-2344.

« Keep Pace: Lung Disease

Management, Education and Updates, 6:30-7:30 p.m. July 26 or 10-11 a.m. July 27 at North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St. in Greeley.

« Cancer Support Group, 5:307 p.m. Tuesdays at North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St. in Greeley.

« Breast Cancer Support

Group, 5:30-7 p.m. July 5 at North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St. in Greeley.

« Man-to-Man Prostate Can-

cer Support Group, 5:30-7 p.m. July 19 at North Colorado Medical Center, 1801 16th St. in Greeley.

more

ways to get results.

Accepting New Patients

Faithfully serving our community for 15 years

CONTACT HELEN FREESE OR JERRY CHRISTIAN

« Restorative Yoga, 5:15-6:15

« Diabetes Support Group, 7

• All the comforts of home, with the care you deserve • Traditional Care and Memory Care

wellness

Medical Commons, 2001 70th Ave. in Greeley. Cost: $100.

3535 12th St.

Assisted Living www.beehivehomesofnortherncolorado.com

970.351.6095

dentalgreeley.com To advertise, call 970.352.0211


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■■‘SPLIT-FLOW’ MODEL

NCMC WORKS TO SPEED UP PROCESS IN EMERGENCY DEPT. By Sara Quale For The Tribune

With an eye on reducing the wait for patients to see a provider at North Colorado Medical Center’s Emergency Department, employees are implementing a new patient “split-flow” model. The process was scheduled to begin June 26 and has been recognized as being implemented in hospitals across the country to reduce emergency department wait times and shorten the length of time patients spend in the emergency department. The steps in the patient flow model of a person’s visit to the emergency department are:

» Arrival and registration » Triage or evaluation by a nurse » Assessment with a nurse and health care provider » Results of the visit, which may include treatment and then discharge home or admission to the hospital. When something inhibits this flow, patients wait longer. By examining their process, NCMC staff identified areas where they can avoid roadblocks and provide a better experience for patients. NCMC’s Emergency Department sees approximately 150 patients each day. The department has 41 beds. Emergencies

by nature follow no schedule, and the seriousness of each case differs. What staff wants to avoid is having patient beds occupied by less critical patients awaiting discharge while patients whose injuries or illnesses may be more serious have to wait. Regardless of process changes, NCMC still will provide immediate care to the most critical cases as determined by the triage nurse and to anyone who shows symptoms of a heart attack or something similar. The hope is that ultimately patients’ length of stay in the Emergency Department — from registration to discharge home or admission to the hospital — will be

shorter. The new flow model will have a couple of changes to help patients see a provider faster. The registration and triage by a nurse will remain the same. After triage, the patient will go in one of two directions — if the illness or injury is more critical, the patient will go to that area. Patients whose illness or injury is less serious will be sent to an intake room where a nurse and a provider will do a joint assessment. This means one less time a patient has to tell his or her story. If the patient needs a procedure or medical imaging, he or she will be taken to those areas. Then, to wait for test results, instructions

and discharge, the patient will go to a results-pending area similar to a sub-waiting room. When the provider is available, he or she will meet with the patient in a private area to review results and any further actions that may be required. In this sub-waiting area, only the patient and one guest are allowed. Freeing up the patient beds by having people wait in the resultspending area will allow more patients to be seen in a timely manner — especially those whose illness or injury may be more serious. Sara Quale is a public relations specialist for Banner Health.

BIKERS, BE AWARE: RIDE DEFENSIVELY McClatchy Newspapers

When Julie Philbrook leads a seminar on bicycle safety, she can count on encountering some people who don’t think they need to listen because they’re good bikers. “You might be a very good rider,” responds the trauma prevention specialist at Hennepin County (Minn.) Medical Center. “But what are you going to do when the driver of a car makes a mistake? You can get hurt through no fault of your own.” Although bicycles have become a year-round form of transportation, usage spikes in the summer. And so does the number of accidents. Not

only are there more riders, but — as opposed to the serious bikers who keep pedaling all winter — warm weather attracts casual cyclists, many of whom are not as knowledgeable about the laws and procedures in place to enhance safety. “A lot of people do not ride safely,” said Dorian Grilley, executive director of the Bicycle Alliance of Minnesota. “The vast majority of people are not confident riding on the street. Bikers fare best when they act as and are treated as drivers of vehicles, and that means following the rules of the road.” Despite the cliché about never forgetting how to ride

a bike, Grilley’s group is convinced that an occasional refresher course can save lives. It sponsors a series of such classes, including one titled Traffic Skills 101 (www. bikemn.org). In addition to learning the laws, he recommends following three basic guidelines: “Be predictable. Be visible. Be courteous.” No matter how experienced a biker is, Philbrook adamantly recommends wearing a helmet. “We can fix most other injuries, including broken bones,” she said. “But we can’t fix brain injuries.” Here are some other safety

tips gleaned from the experts: » Make yourself visible. Wear bright clothing during the day and a reflective vest at night. Lights also are required at night. Lamps mounted on helmets are gaining favor because, unlike a bike light that points only straight ahead, helmet lights can be directed wherever a biker wants. » Pretend that you’re invisible. Assume that drivers don’t see you, which means approaching every encounter from the perspective that you will have to avoid the vehicle rather than expecting the driver to avoid you. And don’t think that just because you’re riding in a designated bike

lane that you can quit worrying about cars. » Signal your turns. Don’t expect drivers to anticipate where you’re going. And remember that a bicycle can change directions much faster than a car, so give drivers ample warning. » Ride with the traffic. Drivers don’t anticipate fastmoving traffic coming at them from the other direction, so they’re not going to be looking for you. » Leave the headphones and earbuds at home. Sounds provide valuable information about what’s going on around you, including vehicles that are approaching from behind.

» Learn the laws in your state. » Always wear a helmet, and make sure it fits properly. It should be snug and ride flat on the head in line with the eyebrows. “Don’t push it back like a cap or you’re exposing the front of your head” to an impact, Philbrook said. And don’t be vain about putting it on. When bicyclists tell her they don’t want to wear a helmet because it messes up their hair, Philbrook has a standard response. “When you come into the emergency room after a crash, we won’t mess up your hair,” she promises. “We’ll just shave it off.”


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June 27, 2012 n

Keep cool and stay safe from the sun these summer months

S

By DARIAN WARDEN gtreporters@greeleytribune.com

hooting down slides and sprinting across the playground in his Spiderman shoes, Jordan Angel Hernandez-Bickel, 4, was sweating by the time he reached his mom, Maria Vargas. Vargas and Jordan spent part of a warm June afternoon playing on the playground at Christa McAuliffe Elementary School, 600 51st Ave. in Greeley. Vargas said she and Jordan often go swimming and eat lots of ice cream to stay cool during the hot summer days. To stay hydrated, they drink lots of water and smoothies. Kelly Imus, health education specialist with the Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment, offered advice on staying safe in the summer sun. Imus said health concerns such as the skin’s exposure to the sun, dehydration, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke are the most common problems associated with exposure to the summer sun, and they also are among the most overlooked. SKIN AND THE SUN

PHOTOS BY ROBERT R. DENTON/For The Tribune

STEPHANIE YOUNG, 6, RUNS through a water fountain at the Island Grove Splash

Park on June 7 in Greeley. The park provides free relief from the hot weather from 1-3 p.m. daily.

Brimming with people, the indoor pool at the Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave. in Greeley, features a waterslide, lazy river, water features and multiple pools to swim in. Jenny Schow, a special education teacher at John Evans Middle School, was there with her two boys, John, 11, and Isaiah, 8. “It’s nice not to have to slather on sunscreen,” Schow said about the boys swimming at the indoor pool. But if you are outdoors, Imus said using sunscreen, wearing lighter, looser-fitting clothes, and remembering that you live at a high elevation are important. It’s easier to get sunburned, and it doesn’t necessarily have to be hot or sunny to get one. You can still get a sunburn when it’s cloudy or, lately, smoky, she said. Also, don’t forget your eyes, she said. The sun can also damage them. Wear a hat or sunglasses. And for all of those who lay out in an attempt to attain a bronzed tan, Imus said it’s

Teresa Sanchez took her grandchildren, Jessica, 9, and Jon, 8, swimming at Centennial Pool, 2301 Reservoir Road in Greeley. Sanchez sat in the shade with a water bottle and Pedialyte. She felt dehydrated and knew she needed to replenish her body’s nutrients. Imus said dehydration is a common problem during the hot months. She said it is best to drink plain water but unsweetened fruit juices are fine, too. And to drink even when you aren’t thirsty. Your body’s thirst mechanism can sometimes be muted. However, alcohol and drinks with high

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»»The heat is on Kelly Imus, health education specialist with the Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment, offered these tips about how to stay safe when it’s hot outside: » Apply sunscreen at least 30 minutes prior to going out in the sun and reapply according to the label. » Make sure your sunscreen is waterproof if you are going to be in water. » Wear a hat. » Avoid sunburns. They keep the body temperature high, which puts you at greater risk for heat stroke. » If you are trying to get a tan using oil with a low SPF, wear a regular SPF under the oil. » Don’t use the oven to cook if possible. » Never leave infants, children or pets in the car. It is much hotter inside the car than it is outside. » Stay hydrated. Water is the best choice. » Those exercising in the heat are at a higher risk for dehydration than others. They should drink two to four, 16- to 32-ounce drinks every hour.

A person may experience cramps or a heat rash. “If you don’t have an air conditioner, get out to the mall, the movies, library, anything for a small portion of the day,” Imus said. Imus said to call the health department, (970) 304-6410 if you are unable to find transportation to an air-conditioned area and they will assist you.

particularly important to wear sunscreen. Imus said to apply sunscreen 30 minutes before heading outdoors, and to reapply it according to the label on the bottle. If you are going to be in the water, make sure your sunscreen is waterproof. “You pay for the decisions you make as a kid,” she said. “You look in the mirror and wonder where those crow’s feet came from.” DEHYDRATION

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BEAT THE HEAT n

HEAT STROKE

PEOPLE PLAY IN THE water at Windsor Lake on June 7. The public beach attracted many people before a summer concert at Boardwalk Park.

from.”

You pay for the decisions you make as a kid. You look in the mirror and wonder where those crow’s feet came Kelly Imus

health education specialist with the Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment, on exposing your skin to the sun

sugar content should be avoided. Schow sat and watched her boys swim at the Family FunPlex and drank from her

water bottle. “I never leave the house without a water bottle,” Schow said.

HEAT EXHAUSTION

Sanchez said she takes the kids to Centennial about every other day, where the kids get to meet friends and family. “I like to have fun. I like the slide the best,” said Jessica, pointing to the little slide. But another health concern caused by sun exposure is heat exhaustion. This occurs over a period of several days spent in the heat and is marked by weakness and dizziness.

The most serious illness related to sun exposure is heat stroke. Infants, children, the elderly, those who are overweight and on certain medications are at higher risk for heat stroke than others. Heat stroke occurs when a person’s body temperature rises. Warning signs that you may have heat stroke are red, hot, dry skin but no sweat. Becoming nauseous, dizzy and developing a headache are also indicators. Imus said anyone who thinks they may be suffering from heat stroke should call 911. If someone displays signs of heat stroke, it is best to get them indoors and into air conditioning. A cold shower or bath will help. To prevent the risk of heat stroke, spend part of the day inside and avoid planning outdoor activities for the middle and hottest part of the day.


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June 27, 2012

June 27, 2012 n

Keep cool and stay safe from the sun these summer months

S

By DARIAN WARDEN gtreporters@greeleytribune.com

hooting down slides and sprinting across the playground in his Spiderman shoes, Jordan Angel Hernandez-Bickel, 4, was sweating by the time he reached his mom, Maria Vargas. Vargas and Jordan spent part of a warm June afternoon playing on the playground at Christa McAuliffe Elementary School, 600 51st Ave. in Greeley. Vargas said she and Jordan often go swimming and eat lots of ice cream to stay cool during the hot summer days. To stay hydrated, they drink lots of water and smoothies. Kelly Imus, health education specialist with the Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment, offered advice on staying safe in the summer sun. Imus said health concerns such as the skin’s exposure to the sun, dehydration, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke are the most common problems associated with exposure to the summer sun, and they also are among the most overlooked. SKIN AND THE SUN

PHOTOS BY ROBERT R. DENTON/For The Tribune

STEPHANIE YOUNG, 6, RUNS through a water fountain at the Island Grove Splash

Park on June 7 in Greeley. The park provides free relief from the hot weather from 1-3 p.m. daily.

Brimming with people, the indoor pool at the Family FunPlex, 1501 65th Ave. in Greeley, features a waterslide, lazy river, water features and multiple pools to swim in. Jenny Schow, a special education teacher at John Evans Middle School, was there with her two boys, John, 11, and Isaiah, 8. “It’s nice not to have to slather on sunscreen,” Schow said about the boys swimming at the indoor pool. But if you are outdoors, Imus said using sunscreen, wearing lighter, looser-fitting clothes, and remembering that you live at a high elevation are important. It’s easier to get sunburned, and it doesn’t necessarily have to be hot or sunny to get one. You can still get a sunburn when it’s cloudy or, lately, smoky, she said. Also, don’t forget your eyes, she said. The sun can also damage them. Wear a hat or sunglasses. And for all of those who lay out in an attempt to attain a bronzed tan, Imus said it’s

Teresa Sanchez took her grandchildren, Jessica, 9, and Jon, 8, swimming at Centennial Pool, 2301 Reservoir Road in Greeley. Sanchez sat in the shade with a water bottle and Pedialyte. She felt dehydrated and knew she needed to replenish her body’s nutrients. Imus said dehydration is a common problem during the hot months. She said it is best to drink plain water but unsweetened fruit juices are fine, too. And to drink even when you aren’t thirsty. Your body’s thirst mechanism can sometimes be muted. However, alcohol and drinks with high

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»»The heat is on Kelly Imus, health education specialist with the Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment, offered these tips about how to stay safe when it’s hot outside: » Apply sunscreen at least 30 minutes prior to going out in the sun and reapply according to the label. » Make sure your sunscreen is waterproof if you are going to be in water. » Wear a hat. » Avoid sunburns. They keep the body temperature high, which puts you at greater risk for heat stroke. » If you are trying to get a tan using oil with a low SPF, wear a regular SPF under the oil. » Don’t use the oven to cook if possible. » Never leave infants, children or pets in the car. It is much hotter inside the car than it is outside. » Stay hydrated. Water is the best choice. » Those exercising in the heat are at a higher risk for dehydration than others. They should drink two to four, 16- to 32-ounce drinks every hour.

A person may experience cramps or a heat rash. “If you don’t have an air conditioner, get out to the mall, the movies, library, anything for a small portion of the day,” Imus said. Imus said to call the health department, (970) 304-6410 if you are unable to find transportation to an air-conditioned area and they will assist you.

particularly important to wear sunscreen. Imus said to apply sunscreen 30 minutes before heading outdoors, and to reapply it according to the label on the bottle. If you are going to be in the water, make sure your sunscreen is waterproof. “You pay for the decisions you make as a kid,” she said. “You look in the mirror and wonder where those crow’s feet came from.” DEHYDRATION

HEALTH

THRIVEnc

BEAT THE HEAT n

HEAT STROKE

PEOPLE PLAY IN THE water at Windsor Lake on June 7. The public beach attracted many people before a summer concert at Boardwalk Park.

from.”

You pay for the decisions you make as a kid. You look in the mirror and wonder where those crow’s feet came Kelly Imus

health education specialist with the Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment, on exposing your skin to the sun

sugar content should be avoided. Schow sat and watched her boys swim at the Family FunPlex and drank from her

water bottle. “I never leave the house without a water bottle,” Schow said.

HEAT EXHAUSTION

Sanchez said she takes the kids to Centennial about every other day, where the kids get to meet friends and family. “I like to have fun. I like the slide the best,” said Jessica, pointing to the little slide. But another health concern caused by sun exposure is heat exhaustion. This occurs over a period of several days spent in the heat and is marked by weakness and dizziness.

The most serious illness related to sun exposure is heat stroke. Infants, children, the elderly, those who are overweight and on certain medications are at higher risk for heat stroke than others. Heat stroke occurs when a person’s body temperature rises. Warning signs that you may have heat stroke are red, hot, dry skin but no sweat. Becoming nauseous, dizzy and developing a headache are also indicators. Imus said anyone who thinks they may be suffering from heat stroke should call 911. If someone displays signs of heat stroke, it is best to get them indoors and into air conditioning. A cold shower or bath will help. To prevent the risk of heat stroke, spend part of the day inside and avoid planning outdoor activities for the middle and hottest part of the day.


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SOCIAL MEDIA A GODSEND FOR PEOPLE WITH RARE DISEASES

Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Deb McGarry

had just delivered the eulogy at her grandmother’s funeral when pain shot through her chest. A wave of nausea followed. “Something is wrong,” McGarry whispered to her husband as an arm went numb and the lump in her throat turned to panic. McGarry, a mother of two from Naperville, Ill., suffered a heart attack a few hours later in an emergency room. She was diagnosed with a rare coronary condition that can affect otherwise healthy young women and is often fatal. Stricken in January 2011, McGarry left the hospital after five days feeling isolated and confused. Finding information about the ailment — “spontaneous coronary artery dissection,” or SCAD — was difficult and doctors were unable to help, she said. McGarry eventually discovered a thriving online community that provided details about her condition and, more important, encouragement. With a few clicks of a mouse, she was able to plug into a wealth of information and support. From places as far away as New Zealand, Australia and the United Kingdom, these survivors are part of patientdriven revolution in the world of rare diseases who mobilize through social networks, experts say. “With rare diseases, you can’t walk in to your doctor’s office and find the support

For The Tribune

With rare diseases, you can’t walk in to your doctor’s office and find the support and information you need. It’s absolutely amazing to be able to get on your computer and find people who are experiencing the same thing as you.”

Deb McGarry

diagnosed with rare coronary condition and information you need,” said McGarry, 39. “It’s absolutely amazing to be able to get on your computer and find people who are experiencing the same thing as you.” Experts caution that the Internet is a double-edged sword. Although people find support, they also can be scammed and seduced into believing information that isn’t true - especially on sites that aren’t sponsored by hospitals or a medical institution. Thanks to efforts by McGarry and the on-line network of SCAD survivors,

doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have launched the first large-scale research project to learn more about the disease. The study is breaking new ground by using social media to recruit SCAD patients from around the world, doctors say. The plan is to input each individual’s medical history into a database in hopes of identifying patterns. The Mayo Clinic also will create a bio-bank of blood samples from patients with SCAD, along with samples from their parents and chil-

dren. The hope is that it may lead to answers about the role genetics plays in the disease, said Dr. Sharonne Hayes, director of Mayo Clinic Women’s Heart Clinic. The methods used could have applications for many other rare diseases, she said. “This goes far beyond SCAD,” Hayes said. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection begins with an unexplained tear inside the artery wall. The loose tissue folds over, blocking blood flow and leading to clots, arterial blockage and often a heart attack. According to Mayo Clinic doctors, little research has been done on the disease, which has no cure or standard treatment. So far, doctors can’t say with much certainty what causes the condition, whether it is likely to recur or if it can be passed

along genetically. For many, not knowing such crucial details can be as debilitating as the physical symptoms, patients said. In McGarry’s case, when she arrived at the emergency room almost two years ago, doctors could find nothing wrong with her, she said. But an hour later, surrounded by friends and family, McGarry suffered a heart attack. Doctors implanted two stents to open up the artery, then sent her home several days later with more questions than answers, she said. “I was freaking out; I immediately got online,” said McGarry, recalling the anxiety she felt as she entered the search terms into a web browser for the first time. According to the National Institutes of Health, a rare disease is one that affects fewer than 200,000. The institute tracks roughly 7,000 diseases considered rare and coordinates and supports research, according to the NIH website. A 2011 study by the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that one in five Americans uses the Internet to find people with similar health concerns. “We have this ancient instinct to find other people who share our same problems so we can solve them together,” said the project’s associate director, Susannah Fox. With the Internet “it’s faster and easier, but it’s that same old wish.” For patients and those who care for them, social networks

can offer solace from what can be a lonely battle for survival, Fox said. At the same time, patients who organize themselves in cyberspace can offer new opportunities for researchers. “The real magic happens when someone with a great idea is able to connect with one of these patient groups who stand ready and willing to help,” Fox said. In the Information Age, the consumer adage, “buyer beware,” still applies. “It’s really patient beware,” said Stefanie Putkowski, a nurse with the National Organization of Rare Diseases, or NORD. Nearly 30 million Americans suffer from rare diseases, according to NORD, a nonprofit group that aims to help patients and their caregivers through education, research and other services. Putkowski polices the many online organizations and message boards the organization sponsors under the name “NORD Nurse.” Although she believes the web is a key ingredient in medical innovation and treating a myriad of rare diseases, the Internet can also be a dangerous place where misinformation prevails and scammers prey on the vulnerable, she said. “If you are desperate and not savvy, you can spend your money and waste it, and you can get hurt,” said Putkowski. “But if it’s a good organization, it can be a lifesaver. Short of getting a treatment or a cure, at least you are not alone.”


June 27, 2012 n

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TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY Acupuncture

phyllis hAmAr, l.A.c.

Master of Science, Traditional Chinese Medicine NCCAOM Board Certified 710 11th Ave., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80631 970-539-0324

WestlAke FAmily physiciAns, pc 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Richard Budensiek, DO; Janis McCall, MD; Frank Morgan, MD; Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Angela Mill, MD Website: www.bannerhealth.com

Alzheimer’s/skilled cAre

AudioloGy

Alpine All ABout heArinG

1124 E. Elizabeth Street, #E-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524 Phone: (970)221-3372 Fax: (970)493-9237 3820 N. Grant Avenue Loveland, CO 80538 Phone: (970)461-0225 Fax: (970)593-0670 Web Site: www.allabouthearing.com Professionals: Renita Boesiger, M. A., CCC-A Rachel White, M. A., CCC-A Cheryl Hadlock, M. S., CCC-A

unc AudioloGy clinic

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Web Site: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

Assisted liVinG

Bonell Good sAmAritAn 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 352-6082 Fax: (970) 356-7970 www.good-sam.com

GrAce pointe

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 www.gracepointegreeley.com

meAdoWVieW oF Greeley

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Web Site: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

the BridGe Assisted liVinG 4750 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)339-0022

Gunter Hall, Room 0330 Greeley, CO 80639 Phone: (970)351-2012/TTY Fax: (970)351-1601 Web Site: www.unco.edu/NHS/asls/clinic.htm Professionals: Diane Erdbruegger, Au.D., CCC-A; Sonie Harris, M.A., CCC-A Jennifer Weber, Au.D., CCC-A

BAlAnce

liFe cAre center oF Greeley- Ascent 4800 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-6400 Professionals: Cozette Seaver, PT; Leslie Vail, PT

cArdiAc VAsculAr surGery

dentistry - hyGene

AABsolutely smiles

1135 N. Lincoln Avenue, Suite 4 Loveland, CO 80537 Phone: (970)622-0970 Fax: (970)622-0971 www.aabsolutelysmiles.com

dentistry - pediAtric

pediAtric dentAl Group

2003 46th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-4600 www.pediatricdentalspecialties.com Professionals: David Strange, DDS, MS Malcolm Strange, DDS, MS Courtney College, DDS, MS Justin Cathers, DDS, MS Gary Belanger, DDS

eAr, nose & throAt

mirAcle-eAr

GrAce pointe

meAdoWVieW oF Greeley

cArdioloGy

2528 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)352-2881 Professionals: Robert M. Traynor, Ed. D. F-AAA; Karen Swope, M. A. CCC-A

708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 www.gracepointegreeley.com

1800 15th Street, Suite 340 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4593 Fax: (970)378-4391 Professionals: Lyons, Maurice I. Jr. DO Richards, Kenneth M. MD Tullis, Gene E. MD

AudioloGy AssociAtes

2404 17th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-6620 749 S. Lemay Avenue, Suite A1 Fort Collins, CO 80524 (970)221-5225

Bonell Good sAmAritAn

cArdiAc, thorAcic & VAsculAr surGery (ncmc)

Alpine eAr, nose & throAt

cArdioVAsculAr institute (ncmc) 1800 15th Street, #310 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 392-0900 Professionals: James H. Beckmann, MD; Harold L. Chapel, MD; John Drury, MD; Lin-Wang Dong, MD; Cynthia L. Gryboski, MD; Cecilia Hirsch, MD; Paul G. Hurst, MD; Brian Lyle, MD; Randall C. Marsh, MD; Arnold Pfahnl, MD; James E. Quillen, MD; Gary A. Rath, MD; Ahmad Shihabi, MD;

dentistry

Ascent FAmily dentAl Scott Williams, DMD 3535 W. 12th Street, Suite B Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-6095 www.dentalgreeley.com

Greeley dentAl heAlth 1600 23rd Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-4329 www.greeleydentalhealth.com Professionals: Randy C. Hatch, DDS Charles W. Johnson, DDS

Julie kAVAnAuGh, d.d.s. 3400 W. 16th Street, Suite 8-E Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-0400 www.drjuliekav.com

1120 E. Elizabeth Street, Suite F-101 Ft. Collins, CO 3820 N. Grant Avenue Loveland, CO Phone: (970)221-1177 Professionals: Andrea Biegnski, P.A.C. Chris Eriksen, M.D., Maria Chand, M.D., Marvin Childers, M.D., Sarvjit Gill, M.D., Meg Ricci, PA-C, Matt Robertson, M.D. David Zacheis, M.D.

endocrinoloGy

endocrinoloGy clinic (ncmc) 1801 15th Street, Ste 200 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4676 Fax: (970)-378-4315 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Nirmala Kumar, MD

FAmily prActice medicine

FAmily physiciAns oF Greeley, llp-centrAl 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley ,CO Phone: (970) 356-2520 Professionals: Joanna H. Branum, M.D.; Ann T. Colgan, M.D.; Jennifer D. Dawson, D.O.; Douglas A. Magnuson, M.D.; Lori A. Ripley, M.D.; Andrew P. Stoddard, M.D.; D. Craig Wilson, M.D.

FAmily physiciAns oF Greeley, llp-cottonWood 2420 W. 16th Street Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970) 353-7668 Professionals: Christopher T. Kennedy, M.D.; Daniel P. Pflieger, M.D.; Mark D. Young, M.D.; Stacey L. Garber, M.D. Amy E. Mattox, M.D.

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2012 FAmily physiciAns oF Greeley, llp-West 6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 101 Greeley ,CO Phone: (970) 378-8000 Professionals: Daniel R. Clang, D.O.; Tamara S. Clang, D.O.; R. Scott Haskins, M.D.; Mathew L. Martinez, M.D.; Chima C. Nwizu, M.D.; Michelle K. Paczosa, D.O.; Jeffery E. Peterson, M.D.; Kyle B. Waugh, M.D.; Charles I. Zucker, M.D.

kenneth m. olds

6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 208 Greeley ,CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-9061

medicAl Arts prActice

1300 Main Street Loveland, CO 80550 Phone: (970)686-5646 Fax: (970)686-5118 Professionals: Lance Barker, DO Jonathan Kary, MD Trina Kessinger, MD pharmacy on site - open to the public.

neXt cAre

2928 W. 10th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)351-8181 Fax: (970)351-0281 Professionals: Gregory Denzel, DO

WestlAke FAmily physiciAns, pc 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Richard Budensiek, D.O.; Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Janis McCall, MD; Angela Mills, MD Frank Morgan, MD; David Pols, D.O. www.bannerhealth.com

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TRiBUNE MEDiCALDiRECTORY DiRECTORY TRiBUNE MEDiCAL FUNERAL SERVICES

ALLNUtt & RESthAVEN FUNERAL SERVICES 702 13th Street, Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 352-3366 650 W. Drake Road, Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970) 482-3208 8426 S. College Avenue, Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970) 667-0202 2100 N. Lincoln, Loveland, CO Phone: (970) 667-1121 1302 Graves Avenue, Estes Park, CO Phone: (970) 586-3101

gAStRoENtERoLogy

hEALth AND FItNESS

INDEpENDENt ASSIStED LIVINg w/SERVICES

bANNER homE mEDICAL  EqUIpmENt (NCmC)

woRK oUt wESt

Health & Recreation Campus 5701 W. 20th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: 970-330-9691 www.workoutwest.com

Phone: (970)506-6420

mENtAL hEALth SERVICES

NCmC - bEhAVIoRAL hEALth

928 12th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Professionals: Cheryl Giambrone, LPC Elise Pugh, LPC Shawn Crawford, LPC Laura Grotenhuis, LPC Tia Lewis, LPC Renée Rogers, LMFT Cleopatra Songa, LCSW, CACIII Susan Goodrich, LCSW Dr Michael Fuller, Adult Psychiatry Dr. Amy Laurent, Adult Psychiatry Dr Nicholle Peralta, Adult Psychiatry Dr Patricia Al-Adsani, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Jose Vasquez, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

homE hEALth CARE

CARINg hEARtS homE hEALthCARE 6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 207 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)378-1409

REhAbILItAtIoN AND VISItINg NURSE ASSoCIAtIoN 2105 Clubhouse Drive Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 330-5655 Fax: (970) 330-7146 Web Site: www.rvna.info Professionals: Crystal Day, CEO

mIDwIFERy CARE

hoSpICE

hoSpICE oF NoRthERN CoLoRADo Administration Office 2726 W. 11th Street Road Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)352-8487 Fax: (970)475-0037

pAthwAyS hoSpICE

305 Carpenter Road Ft. Collins, CO 80550 Phone: (970)663-3500 Fax: (970)292-1085 Web Site: www.pathways-care.org

INDEpENDENt ASSIStED LIVINg

DowgIN, thomAS A., mD. CENtERS FoR gAStRoENtERoLogy 7251 W. 20th St., Bldg J Greeley, CO Phone: (970)207-9773 3702 Timberline Ft. Collins, CO Phone: (970)207-9773 2555 E. 13th Street, Suite 220 Loveland, CO Phone: (970)669-5432 Website: www.digestive-health.net

NoRth CoLoRADo gAStRoENtERoLogy (NCmC) 2010 16th Street, Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4475 Fax: (970)378-4429 Professionals: Mark Rosenblatt, MD Ahmed M. Sherif, MD Yazan Abu Qwaider, MD

gRACE poINtE

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 Website: www.gracepointegreeley.com

mEADowVIEw oF gREELEy

5300 29th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-6800 Website: www.meadowviewofgreeley.com

mEDICAL EqUIpmENt & SUppLIES

boNELL gooD SAmARItAN 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352-6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

FoX RUN SENIoR LIVINg 1720 60th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)353-7773 Fax: (970)330-9708 Web Site: www.good-sam.com

INFECtIoUS DISEASE

bREEN, johN F., mD (NCmC) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-6071 Fax: (970)350-6702

CENtER FoR womEN’S hEALth 1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professionals: Marie Foose, CNM; Michael Plotnick, MD Krista O’Leary, CNM Karen Vorderberg, CNM

NEphRoLogy

gREELEy mEDICAL CLINIC 1900 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-2438 Professionals: Donal Rademacher, MD

NEURoLogy

INtERNAL mEDICINE 2010 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-5660 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Giovanna Garcia, MD Steven Kalt, MD

NEXt CARE

2928 W. 10th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)351-8181 Fax: (970)351-0281 Professionals: Gregory D. Denzel, DO

mASSAgE thERApy

1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professional: Becci Payne, Certified Massage Therapist

CENtENNIAL NEURoLogy Dr. David Ewing 7251 W. 20th Street, Unit C Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-3876

June 27, 2012

2010 2012 NCmC NEURoLogy CLINIC

1800 15th Street, Suite 100B Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-5612 Fax: (970) 350-5619 Professionals: Siegel, Jeffery, MD Shaffer, William, MD; Hayes, Todd DO

NURSINg homE REhAbILItAtIoN

CENtENNIAL hEALth CARE CENtER 1637 29th Ave. Place Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-8181 Fax: (970) 356-3278

obStEtRICS & gyNECoLogy

CENtER FoR womEN’S hEALth 1715 61st Ave. Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professionals: Stewart Abbot, MD; Marie Foose, CNM; Michael Plotnick, MD; Krista O’Leary, CNM; Karen Vorderberg, CNM; Bea Bachenberg, WHCNP; Kecia Doll, Licensed Esthetician; Becci Payne, Certified Massage Therapist

wEStLAKE FAmILy phySICIANS, pC 5623 W. 19th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970) 353-9011 Fax: (970) 353-9135 Professionals: Jacqueline Bearden, MD; Richard Budensiek, D.O.; Janis McCall, MD; Angela Mills, MD Frank Morgan, MD; David Pols, D.O. www.bannerhealth.com

oNCoLogy & hEmALoLogy

CANCER INStItUtE (NCmC) 1800 15th Street, Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970) 350-6680 Toll Free: (866) 357-9276 Fax: (970)350-6610 Professionals: Elizabeth Ceilley, MD Brian Fuller, MD

bANNER hEALth CLINIC

hEALINg toUCh mASSAgE @ CENtER FoR womEN’S hEALth

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June 27, 2012 n

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THRIVEnc

TRiBUNE MEDiCAL DiRECTORY orthodontics

Greeley orthodontic center 2021 Clubhouse Dr., Suite 110 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 330-2500 Fax: (970) 330-2548 E-Mail: gocpc@doctork.com Website: www.doctork.com Professionals: Dr. Gary J. Kloberdanz

orthodontic AssociAtes of Greeley, Pc

3400 W. 16thSt., Bldg 4-V Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 356-5900 Website: www.dredgren.com Professionals: Burdett R. Edgren, DDS, MS; Bradford N. Edgren, DDS, MS

orthoPedics

MountAin VistA orthoPAedics 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 101 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)348-0020 Fax: (970)348-0044 Web Site: www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Randy M. Bussey, MD Daniel Heaston, MD Thomas Pazik, MD Shelly Remley, PA-C Kelly R. Sanderford, MD Steven Sides, MD Linda Young, MD

PediAtrics

BAnner heAlth clinic 6801 W. 20th Street, Suite 201 Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)350-5828 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Amanda Harding, MD James Sando, MD

PediAtric rehABilitAtion

BAnner rehABilitAtion center 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)350-6160 Fax: (970)378-3858

PersonAl resPonse serVice

BAnner life line (ncMc) 2010 16th Street, Suite C Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: 1-877-493-8109 (970) 378-4743

PhysicAl therAPy

hoPe therAPy center (Formerly North Colorado Therapy Center) 2780 28th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)339-0011 Website: www.GCIinc.org Professionals: Chris Denham, PT; Kryste Haas, OT; Kathie Hertzke, PTA; Moni Kohlhoff, PT; Alex Luksik, PTA; Jeanne Rabe, PT; Howard Belon, PhD, Clinical Psychologist

PodiAtry

foot & Ankle center of northern colorAdo P.c.

1931 65th Ave., Suite A Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 351-0900 Fax: (970) 351-0940 4401 Union Street Johnstown, CO 80534 Phone: (970) 443-0925 Web Site: www.footandanklecolorado.com Professionals: Daniel J. Hatch, D.P.M. Mike D. Vaardahl, D.P.M.

rehABilitAtion

Ascent At life cAre center 4800 25th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-6400 Website: www.lcca.com Professionals: Annie Bennett Leslie Vail

BAnner rehABilitAtion Phone: (970)350-6160

PeAkView MedicAl center 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)313-2775 Fax: (970)313-2777

skin cAre

keciAs skin cAre @ center for woMen’s heAlth 1715 61st Avenue Greeley, CO Phone: (970)336-1500 Professinal: Kecia Doll, Licensed Esthetician

skilled cAre/rehAB

Gunter Hall, Room 0330 Greeley, CO 80639 Phone: (970)351-2012/TTY Fax: (970)351-1601 Web Site: www.unco.edu/NHS/asls/clinic.htm Professionals: Lynne Jackowiak, M.S., CCC-SLP Julie Hanks, Ed.D Patty Walton, M.A., CCC-SLP Mark Guiberson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

sPorts Medicine

MountAin VistA orthoPAedics 5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 101 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)348-0020 Fax: (970)348-0044 Web Site: www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Randy M. Bussey, MD Daniel Heaston, MD Thomas Pazik, MD Shelly Remley, PA-C Kelly R. Sanderford, MD Steven Sides, MD Linda Young, MD

north colorAdo sPorts Medicine 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)392-2496

PulMonAry/criticAl cAre

north colorAdo PulMonAry (ncMc)

sPeech lAnGuAGe PAtholoGy

BAnner rehABilitAtion center

2010 16th Street, Ste A Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)392-2026 Fax: (970)392-2028 Professionals: David Fitzgerald, DO Kelli R. Janata, DO Robert J. Janata, DO

1801 16th Street Greeley, CO Phone: (970)350-6160 Fax: (970)378-3858

surGery GenerAl & trAuMA

2012 BAriAtric surGery (ncMc) 1800 15th Street, Suite 200 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4433 866-569-5926 Fax: (970)378-4440 Professionals: Michael W. Johnell, MD

surGery western stAtes Burn center (ncMc) 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)350-6607 Fax: (970)350-6306 Professionals: Gail Cockrell, MD Cleon W. Goodwin, MD BURN

surGicAl AssociAtes of Greeley Pc (ncMc) 1800 15th St. Suite 210 Greeley, CO Phone: (970)352-8216 Toll Free: 1-888-842-4141 Professionals: Lisa Burton, M.D.; Michael Harkabus, M.D.; Jason Ogren, M.D.; Samuel Saltz, D.O.; Robert Vickerman, M.D.

urGent cAre

suMMitView urGent cAre 2001 70th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)378-4155 Fax: (970)378-4151 www.bannerhealth.com Professionals: Thomas Harms, MD Amy E. Shenkenberg, MD Linda Young, MD

uroloGy

MountAin VistA uroloGy

Prosthetics & orthotics

5890 W. 13th Street, Suite 106 Greeley, CO 80634 Professionals: James Wolach, MD Curtis Crylen, MD www.bannerhealth.com

hAnGer Prosthetics & orthotics

7251 West 20th Street, Building M Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970)330-9449 Fax: (970)330-4217 2500 Rocky Mountain Avenue, Suite 2100 North Medical Office Building Loveland CO 80538 Phone: (970) 619-6585 Fax (970) 619-6591 Website: www.hanger.com Professinal: Ben Struzenberg, CPO Michelle West, Mastectomy Fitter

sPeech And lAnGuAGe

unc sPeech lAnGuAGe PAtholoGy clinic

Veins

Bonell Good sAMAritAn 708 22nd Street Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)352- 6082 Fax: (970)356-7970 Website: www.good-sam.com

GrAce Pointe

1919 68th Avenue Greeley, CO 80634 Phone: (970) 304-1919 Website: www.gracepointegreeley.com

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Vein clinic (ncMc)

1800 15th Street, Suite 340 Greeley, CO 80631 Phone: (970)378-4593 Fax: (970)378-4591 Professionals: Maurice I. Lyons Jr., DO Kenneth M. Richards, MD Gene E. Tullis, MD

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June 27, 2012

CELEBRATE. COMMUNITY. HERITAGE.

SATURDAY, JULY 14, 2012

GREELEY

FEST 2012

Family Fun Plex Tw i n R i v e r s P a r k A m p h i t h e a t r e G r e e l e y, C o l o r a d o

Enter

TODAY! GREELEY

Show off your GRILL skills! Teams, fire up your grills for the Grill Off Showdown in four categories: • Burgers • Signature Sauce

• Steak • Cooks Choice

Register your amateur team. Compete for prizes, bragging rights and the title. Prizes: Beef Chief title with $150 cash & $150 gift certificate to Kenny’s sponsored by: & category winners.

$75/Team covers all four categories! Register by July 6

Apply TODAY!

Calling All ARTISTS!

Calling all family friendly performers. The stage is YOURS, Greeley! What is your talent? Are you a: • Garage Band • Dancer • Group

• Singer • Comedian

Show us what you can do. Entertain us! 30 minute performance. 15 minutes between acts. Limited performance slots available.

This is your exhibit, Greeley! Enter your original creations in the showcase: • Painting • Photography • Drawing

• Graphics • Sculpture • Mixed Media

Prizes: People’s Choice, Heritage Award and Best of the Fest.

sponsored by:

$10/Entry

Register by July 3

Apply by July 5 No Charge, No Prizes

REGISTER TODAY!

APPLY TODAY!

ENTER TODAY!

• Download Application • greeleytribune.com/beef-fest2012

• Download Application • greeleytribune.com/beef-fest2012

• Download Application • greeleytribune.com/beef-fest2012

Double blind judging panel will sample and score.

Free Public Performances 12-5 • Bring chair/blanket

Event Producer Emily V Tilton

I

970.392.4450

Greeley Beef Fest

I

Public Viewing 11am-7pm Public Voting Closes at 4pm

etilton@greeleytribune.com

July 2012 Thrive  

July 2012 issue of The Tribune's health tab

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