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CHICORY BREAD PUDDING 6 JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2013

WINTER FRUIT 10

CARIBBEAN CHEFS 16

Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID Permit No. 400 Laguna Beach CA


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Delivering Top Quality, Locally Grown, Safe Produce from the Farm to your Table

We listen to our customers and address their wants and needs, everyday.

37 SUCCESFUL YEARS IN FOODSERVICE! 714.696.3037 www.familytreeproduce.com

Family Tree Produce is proud to be a partner in this groundbreaking industry-wide sustainability and local produce initiative. for safe, sustainable produce


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FROM THE EDITOR

T E R I’S TAK E

CONTENT F E AT U R E 1 4 CARNIVAL

Photo by Sarah Ruiz

s a magazine editor/publisher I’ve been a part of the hospitality industry for many years. I’m familiar with the challenges common to any business, but it’s been a very long time since I’ve been hands-on in a restaurant and I forget how demanding the work is, physically and mentally. My hat’s off to those who show up every day cleaning, prepping, transporting and doing it all with such cheerful equanimity. As a publicist for a busy restaurant, I find myself helping out in all sorts of ways (pouring wine, delivering food, developing events, taking reservations) besides writing press releases. We know it’s not as easy as it looks. I’m experiencing newfound appreciation for those of you that do it well, day-in and day-out. In this issue we travel to New Orleans, the Caribbean and Rio for Carnival. Enjoy the flavors and flair of the celebration and discover some local venues where you can experience the food. Sounds like a good time to plan a vacation. Cheers!

A

MORE THAN CHEFS

17

Whether in Brazil, the Caribbean or New

Out of the kitchen and into the writer’s

}

FRONT OF HOUSE PERSONALITIES Corky’s Kitchen and Bakery is a great

Orleans, the music and food are hot.

place for home-style comfort food.

18

INSIDE 4 THE BEET

Content

BACK OF HOUSE Cuban empanadas from the heart.

19

Find out who’s hot and acknowledge the

BEVERAGES Hot trends for 2013 wines.

philanthropy of this generous industry

5

BOOKS 50 Best Plants on the Planet

THE BIZ 1 0 TRENDS Fruit this season offers juicy flavor, nutrition and menu value.

16

CHEF PERSONALITIES

D E PA RT M E N T S 6 SWEET SPOT 6 PRODUCE PICK OF THE MONTH 7 SPICE RACK 8 BAKING RACK 8 CHEESE PICK OF THE MONTH 1 2 SUR LE MENU

These Caribbean chefs know their way around a kitchen on the islands or For the continuation of these articles,

mainland.

recipes and more, visit www.great-taste.net

On The Cover Enjoy this delicious dish at the Ralph Brennan's Jazz Kitchen in Downtown Disney; Double Chocolate Bread Pudding—made with French bread, heavy cream, chocolate chips and chocolate sauces; recipe on page 13. Find even more appetizing Mardi Gras dishes from around Southern California Sur Le Menu on page 12. Photo and recipe courtesy Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen.

GABRIEL CALIENDO

KATIE AVERILL

Corporate Executive Chef

Chef/Proprietor

Lazy Dog Cafe

Eat Street

chair, these talented chefs share their

expertise with us as

our Culinary Advisors.

JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2013 | great taste

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THE

BEET

THE

BEET

INSIDE

ust opened is Orange County’s Blackmarket Bakery’s second retail location at The CAMP in Costa Mesa. Chef/Owner Rachel Klemek has made a name for herself since opening her first bakery in 2004 by producing delectable confections and baked goods with quality, whole ingredients—butter, flour, sugar and eggs. Her incredible cakes, rich pastries and fresh breads (see photo) are just a few of the items that showcase her inspired approach to baking and passion for her craft. The new 1800-square-foot location will feature indoor and outdoor seating where families can enjoy Apricot Ginger Scones; Blackstrap Betty molasses cookies; buttercream cakes such as Uber Coconut; Marche Noir Cabernet brownies; and the decadent Black Widow dark chocolate ganache tarts. The new bakery will also sell hot-pressed sandwiches, Kéan Coffee, brioche buns, oatmeal stout rolls, shortbreads, bars, cobblers, open-faced ice cream sandwiches, and confections such as pomegranate marshmallows. Alessandro Pirozzi, owner and executive chef of Alessá Laguna Beach and Mare Culinary Lounge, announced that he will focus his time and attention solely on his Laguna Beach locations, Alessá Laguna Beach and Mare Culinary Lounge and on the development of several new concepts being launched in Orange County later this year. Pirozzi’s association with the Cucina Alessá restaurants in Huntington Beach and Newport Beach was officially severed December 29, 2012. Pirozzi's restaurants have earned many distinguished honors and awards, as well as the devotion of regular guests. Recognition of his work includes “Best Celebrity Chef Restaurants in Orange County,” “Chef of the Year” by Riviera magazine and a “Best New Restaurant” commendation by Orange Coast magazine.

J

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INSIDE

SINCE 2000

PUBLISHER/CHIEF EDITOR/PROPRIETOR Teri Williams

EDITORIAL Chief Editor Teri Williams Contributors Marcela Aguayo Chef Katie Averill Chef Gabriel Caliendo Tiffany Haslacker Suzanna Hoang Chris Kern Linda Mensinga

ART Art Direction/Design Lisa Brink lisa@designsmorgasbord.com

PHOTO Photography Editor Michael Rutt michaelrutt@earthlink.net

ADVERTISING Advertising Sales 714-960-0534 21851 Newland St #217 Huntington Beach, CA 92646 714-960-0534 fax 714-475-5869 teri@great-taste.net

BOOKS

BOOKS

ow can you get the most bang for your nutritional buck? Cathy Thomas and Melissa’s have done the homework for you in this new guide Melissa’s 50 Best Plants on the Planet: The Most Nutrient-Dense Fruits and Vegetables, in 150 Delicious Recipes. Author Cathy Thomas, 20-year veteran food columnist at the Orange County Register, writes about food, recipes, trends and chefs in this her third collaboration with Melissa’s. While some of the ingredients are hard to find, most are available everywhere. Like to know which vegetable lowers blood pressure? Boosts your metabolism? Protects your cells from carcinogenic elements? Find all this and more. Get recipes for Endive Boats and Grilled Cactus and Pepper Jack Sandwiches, and purchase this and other great titles, visit great-taste.net.

H

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INSIDE

SWEET SPOT

PRODUCE

Individual Chicory Coffee Bread Pudding with Bourbon Anglaise

PICK

OF THE MONTH

by Suzanna Hoang IN A CELEBRATORY SEASON THAT PRECEDES

scalding on low-medium heat, to steep and infuse

THE FASTING OF LENT, Mardi Gras centers around

the coffee flavor.

rich, comfort food and vivid parading of color and joy.

In a large bowl, whisk all ingredients in Set 2.

The French began using chicory, a root from the

When milk mixture is heated, temper into egg

endive plant, as a coffee substitute beginning as

mixture. Strain out coffee. Soak bread with mixture,

early as Napolean’s 19th century ban against the

pressing slightly so bread is completely moistened.

Cara Cara Pink Navel Orange THE MEDIUM SIZED CARA CARA PINK

British naval trade. Now, especially in New Orleans,

Portion into ramekins, pressing lightly. Pour any

this robust, woodsy, ground root is still consumed

residual cream mixture over top of each. Place

ADDITION to salads and adds an exotic tinge

but as a matter of preference and nostalgia over

ramekins on a rimmed baking sheet. Blanket the top

of sweetness to cooked sauces. Sometimes

necessity. Here, infused into a luscious bread

with a sheet of foil. Pour hot water halfway up the

referred to simply as the pink navel orange,

pudding, it will keep you warm as the crisp weather

sides of the pan and bake for 35-40 minutes.

lingers. BREAD PUDDING

Milk

1 1/4 C

Heavy Cream

MAKES

A

VIBRANT

Cara Cara is Italian for “dear” or “beloved.” Hailing from the Hacienda de Cara Cara in

until firm and browned around the edges, and a

Venezuela (hence the name), the pink navel

knife insert yields no milky residue.

was discovered there growing on a Washington orange tree in 1976. In the early 1980s the

BOURBON ANGLAISE

2C

ORANGE

Remove foil, then continue baking for 25 minutes

Yields 8 ramekins (SET 1)

NAVEL

Yields 3 cups

seedless orange began appearing in specialty markets throughout California. Rumored to originate from a mutation rather than a true

1/2 C

Sugar

2C

Whole milk

1/4 C

Café Du Monde Coffee & Chicory

6

Large egg yolks

marked by its pulp—a pink to ruby shade

grounds, or your favorite

1/4 C

Sugar

produced by the presence of lycopene (found

1/2 t

Vanilla

in tomatoes). With less acid than most navel

1T

Bourbon

(SET 2) 4

Whole Eggs

Place milk in a sauce pan and scald over medium

cross between citrus species, the Cara Cara is

oranges, the flavor profile has undertones of cherry and raspberry. Cara Cara pink navel

1

Egg yolk

heat. Place yolks, sugar, and vanilla in a medium

oranges are available from December through

1/2 t

Vanilla

bowl and whisk together. When milk is hot, temper

March.

1/2 C

Sugar

into yolk mixture. Pour back into sauce pan and

The produce hunter has developed close

whisk constantly over low heat until mixture is thick

relationships with family farmers who are

1 1/2 Lb (approx. 1 1/2 baguettes) French bread or

enough to coat the back of a spoon. Stir in bourbon.

committed

your favorite soft bread, cut into 1” cubes

Refrigerate with a sheet of plastic placed directly

personable production, and propagation and

Preheat oven to 375F.

onto the surface of the sauce, 1 to 2 hours.

Place ingredients in Set 1 in a sauce pot, gently

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www.great-taste.net | JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2013

Serve bread pudding warm with cool anglaise.

to

sustainable

agriculture,

promotion of produce with exceptional flavor. www.theproducehunter.com.


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INSIDE

The Spice Rack by Chef Gabriel Caliendo

CAJUN & CREOLE NA’ LEANS, AKA NEW ORLEANS, IS WELL

Louisiana and were more rural than the Creoles.

KNOWN FOR HAVING EXCELLENT FOOD, exciting

Comparatively poor, they lived off the land and had

to markets and imported ingredients. Many were

nightlife and an exuberant culture. Culinary

access to little more than local ingredients. They

also wealthy with servants and chefs, making

enthusiasts of the region are quick to correct

were of French decent, but after being exiled from

Creole cooking much more refined and less

visitors on the misuse of the terms Cajun vs.

Acadia, present day Nova Scotia, Canada, they

pungent than Cajun. Creole seasoning blends are

Creole. What the difference? Let’s find out in this

settled in Louisiana. They were first known as

based on herbs and garlic, with a little peppery

Mardi Gras edition of Spice Rack.

“Acadians” and later as “Cajuns.”

heat. The Creole version of gumbo is like soup with

also German, Italian and African. They had access

You may ask, what’s the big deal? How much

As far as the food goes, the Cajun profile is

difference can there be between the two cultures

spicier than Creole with seasoning blends built on

In my visits to Na’ leans I’ve had the pleasure of

and cuisines? Well, it is more than seasonings or

peppers. They used many swamp origin ingredients

tasting the differences between Cajun and Creole

food we are discussing here. The two are steeped

such as, turtle, alligator and crawfish. Perhaps the

cooking. The unfortunate abuse of the term Cajun

in history and culture, and although they share

most famous dish of the region is gumbo: Cajun

has distorted most of our views of this cuisine. Take

many similarities, the people of the region keep

gumbo is thick and stew-like, based on a dark roux.

some time to find a few recipes from each and cook

CREOLE: The Creole people settled in New

them. It’s great food, mostly based on French

them distinct from each other.

a tomato base.

CAJUN: The Cajun people of the region primarily

Orleans: city folk. They were a melting pot of

techniques. Have a little carnival of your own and

lived in the southwest section of swamps in

nationalities, primarily French and Spanish, but

don’t forget the beads!

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

HELPING OUR CUSTOMERS SUCCEED Food Safety Variety Quality Cost Control

The Fresh Produce Specialists Call Toll-Free: 1-800-252-9165 www.FreshPoint.com www.TheProduceHunter.com 155 North Orange Avenue, City of Industry, CA 91744

JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2013 | great taste

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INSIDE

Cheese Pick of the Month

THE BAKING

RACK by Chef Katie Averill

BAKING SODA OR BAKING POWDER— WHAT REALLY IS THE DIFFERENCE? MANY OF US FALL INTO THE CATEGORY OF HAVING LEARNED IN CULINARY SCHOOL WHAT THE DIFFERENCE IS BETWEEN BAKING SODA AND BAKING POWDER. For those who didn’t attend culinary school I won’t get into the heavy science of it, but I will

BELLWETHER FARM CARMODY

explain the practical aspects one should know. The most important difference is that baking soda is single acting and baking powder is

THE MILD TEMPERATURES OF SONOMA COUNTY MAKE FOR SWEET MILK. the Jersey cows of the

double acting. Baking soda begins leavening

Bellwether farm located on the Sonoma County coast supply the Bellwether family with rich milk that

as soon as water is added and needs nothing

is high in fat and protein—favorable qualities for dairy production. It is from this very milk that the

else. Baking powder starts reacting once water

Bellwether family was able to create an original cheese—Carmody—named after the road that runs

and heat are introduced. On a functional level,

adjacent to the farm. The inspiration behind the cheese was a trip the Bellwethers took to Italy, where

this means if you have a muffin batter that

they gained insider access to a local gorgonzola maker’s ripening room. To make the cheese, they used

needs to be made ahead of time and baked

their pecorino recipe (hard, dry Italian cheese made of ewe’s milk) as the base, adjusted the flavor and

later, it must surely include baking powder or

texture profiles, and eventually developed the ideal blend to highlight the buttery flavor found in Jersey

the batter will lose all its “oomph” as it sits

milk. The smooth-textured, gold-shaded Carmody is aged for at least six weeks. Carmody cheese is a

waiting. Recipes with strictly baking soda need

true Bellwether original. For more information on Bellwether and their cheeses, please contact your FreshPoint representative.

to be baked right after mixing! If timing requires making ahead of time, then baking powder is key. Secondly, having reached a place where I can create my own baking recipes, it is important to know that baking soda is a base and contains no acid while baking powder is both base and acid. In order for chemical leavening to occur, base and acid MUST be present. This means recipes with baking soda need to have an additional acidic ingredient such as chocolate, banana or lemon. This information will come in handy whether you write your own recipes or are just starting to tweak them. Katie@EatStreetCulinary.com www.eatstreetculinary.com

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www.great-taste.net | JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2013


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INSIDE

(562) 948-4408 ‡ Meat Processing And Packing ‡ Delivery Across Southern California ‡ USDA Inspected Facility ‡ Serving Restaurants From Quick Service to Fine Dining

Purveyor Of Quality Meats To Quality Establishments Daniels Western Meat Packers is a family-owned company that provides fresh products to a variety of establishments from From Quick Service to Fine Dining. That’s why our motto is, “Small enough to know you, large enough to serve you.”

5220 Van Norman Road Pico Rivera CA 90660 www.danielsmeat.com

JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2013 | great taste

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TRENDS

Winter Fruits

by Linda Mensinga

cotta. “We are experimenting with pomegranate for our new winter flavor.” Pomegranate, with jewel-like crimson seeds called arils, adds a refreshing pop to salads and the juice brings a unique flavor to syrups and sauces. “Pomegranates are high in antioxidants, helping to neutralize free radicals and prevent premature aging. They are also a heart healthy fruit, helping reduce "bad" LDL cholesterol and lower blood pressure,” Raya Belna says. Currently a private chef, Belna teaches classes and organizes sustainable events and plant-based dinners. She recently opened Wildcraft elixir bar as a pop-up in Orange County, serving organic smoothies, cold pressed juices and gourmet raw foods. She shares her recipe for Quinoa Pomegranate Salad (see Great-Taste.net for recipe). Another winter fruit, “Persimmons are super low in calories, with only about 70 calories per 100 grams, a sweet treat without the guilt. Similar to green tea, they are also rich in phytochemicals and catechins that help fight disease, inflammation and viruses. Catechins are anti-oxidants believed to help prevent and heal cancer as well as fight free radicals that can lead to premature aging,” Belna explains. (See Great-Taste.net for RAW Carob Persimmon Pie recipe.) Ever popular grapes are good for skin, heart, and other illnesses during winter with high amounts of anti oxidants, vitamins A, B1, B2 and potassium. Julie Lucido of Sunlight Grapes suggests new ways to enjoy them. “Roast the grapes in the oven with extra virgin olive oil and fresh herbs and top with sea salt. These go great with goat cheese and charred romaine, served ‘salsa’ style. They THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF CITRUS, PRIMARILY VITAMIN C AND FIBER, ARE

make a fun alternative for bruschetta or a savory salad topping.”

WELL KNOWN. OTHER WINTER FRUIT—GRAPES, PEARS, POMEGRANATES,

The almost forgotten quince may be considered an heirloom fruit according to

PERSIMMONS AND PASSION FRUIT OFFER OTHER IMPORTANT NUTRIENTS.

the Produce Hunter. Shaped like a pear but rounder, the color turns from yellow

Fruit brings a sweet, tart, tangy, crunchy, juicy or creamy texture and flavor

to a coppery orange. Hard until cooked, quince cooked with sugar is the basis for

element that can balance and complement a dish. Salads, entrees, sauces and

dulce de membrillo, a candy or hard paste served sliced on toast and with cheese

desserts are all perfect places for seasonal fruit. Cactus pears, or prickly pears, are popular in Latin cultures and go well in fruit

in Spain, Portugal and South America. Visit Great-Taste.net for a Quince Date Chutney recipe from the Produce Hunter. Perfect with Indian dishes, lamb, duck,

salads and smoothies—peeled with the thorns removed. High in fiber, this winter

pork or sharp cheeses, the Produce Hunter recommends pineapple quince for the

fruit provides potassium, magnesium, calcium and vitamin C. Melissa’s Produce

recipe.

carries green and red cactus pears. Chef Marco Zapien who leads the kitchen in his family restaurant Zapien’s

Slipping fruit into salads can add a lot of flavor and interest to an otherwise everyday salad. The Harvest Chopped Salad at True Food Kitchen has squash,

Salsa Grill and Taqueria is also Corporate Chef in charge of Sports &

apple, pomegranate, walnut, goat cheese & balsamic vinaigrette. Their Open

Entertainment venues at Melissa’s. In his recipe for grilled cactus leaves and

Faced Moroccan Chicken Salad features jìcama, grape, cashew and yogurt.

garlic shrimp salad (see Great-Taste.net for recipe), diced cactus pears make a

The Pear & Gorgonzola Salad at Greek Town Grill in Costa Mesa has candied

juicy appearance. “Cactus and cactus fruit are not often paired, but they

walnuts and mixed greens drizzled with balsamic dressing. Pears offer fiber and

definitely could be. I love the combination because the fruit has such a beautiful

vitamin K, which help prevent blood clotting, a cause of stroke and heart disease.

color and adds a little sweetness and texture to the dish. The nopales adds a

Tavern on 2 Gastropub in Long Beach adds expression to their flat bread with

texture similar to that of maybe a green bean. The fruit’s texture is a little bit like

pears. Maytag Blue Cheese, Pear and Walnut Flat Bread is served with

a kiwi,” Zapien says. Chef Ida Rodriguez, also of Melissa’s, shares a recipe for passion fruit sauce

caramelized onion, Maytag blue cheese, arugula, toasted walnuts and fresh pears with a white balsamic and sage reduction.

over chicken and rice (see Great-Taste.net for recipe), that uses pineapple and

Chef Kiel Anderson makes blue cheese pear tarts at the Watermarc in Laguna

lime juice to add a clear note of fruity tang to the chicken. Passion fruit has

Beach (see Great-Taste.net for recipe). “Our warm blue cheese and pear tarts are

purple skin that wrinkles when ripe. Rich in flavor and acidic, the juice adds

something we offer a seasonal basis,” he says. “We like to use Bosc pears, which

aroma when mixed with other juices.

are winter pears with a skin from light yellow to brown and a firm white flesh,

Passion fruit panna cotta happens to be Melody Brandon’s favorite dessert from the Sweet and Saucy Shop. Brandon, co-owner and pastry chef, is also cake designer for both the Newport Beach and Long Beach locations. “I love the subtle tartness of passion fruit. It has enough fruity kick to it, but isn't too tart so it is a crowd pleaser,” she says. Passion fruit adds balance to the rich, creamy panna

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www.great-taste.net | JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2013

perfect for cooking or baking. The pears give balance to the blue cheese tart by cutting the rich, creamy gorgonzola with a light and crisp bite.” “Enjoy the tart with a nice glass of port to cap off a winter meal.” Don’t let the season pass by without trying your own hand with some fruit. Your guests will thank you and since you’re purchasing in season, so will your bottom line.


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TRENDS

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SUR LE MENU

Carnival

T

he flavors of Carnival beckon all year long, not just during the season. Luckily, you can fulfill every craving without airfare. The bold flavors of New Orleans are a treat even without parades and dancing, although several locations offer live music. The origins of these dishes come from Africa, the Caribbean, France, Spain, and other parts of Europe. Whether it’s gumbo, Cajun chicken, Creole jambalaya, fried okra or beignets you’ve got an appetite for, you’ll find delicious versions of typical dishes right here in Southern California, Sur Le Menu!

The Gumbo Pot - Los Angeles Alligator Tail Filet: rolled in cornmeal & fried ...........................................$11.75 Roe - Long Beach Badass Bisque: crustaceans, cognac, Old Bay... ............................................$4.95 Beachcomber - Newport Beach Beach Beignets: French style pastry treats served with powdered sugar, vanilla bean ice cream and warm Ghirardelli chocolate sauce (pictured above)....................$9.95 Jazz Kitchen - Downtown Disney, Anaheim Bourbon Street Sampler: popcorn calamari, coconut shrimp, Louisiana meat pies, crispy Parmesan artichoke hearts, three dipping sauces, Serves two or four...$8.50 K’ya Bistro - Laguna Beach Cajun Shrimp: potato, blue cheese slaw and tomato ...................................$7.50 Café Orleans - Anaheim Chicken Gumbo Crêpe: sautéed chicken, Andouille sausage, Tasso ham, and Creole gumbo sauce ..............................$18.49 The Gumbo Pot - Los Angeles Clinton's Crazy Special: fried catfish with a side of grits and cornbread ..........$11.75 New Orleans Cajun Café – Hermosa Beach

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www.great-taste.net | JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2013

Crawfish Ettouffe (ay-too-fay): crawfish tail meat smothered in a red creole sauce with vegetables, garlic, and herbs. Served over your choice of steamed white rice or angel hair pasta ...................................$21.95

Cedar Creek Inn - Various Locations Monte Cristo Sandwich: turkey, ham and Swiss cheese on egg bread, dipped in a light batter and grilled; with raspberry preserves and fresh fruit ....................$10

Memphis at the Santora - Santa Ana Cornmeal Fried Catfish: Hoppin’ John, mustard greens, hush puppies, roasted jalapeño tartar sauce ........................$17

Shuck Oyster Bar - Costa Mesa Oyster Po' Boy ..................................$15

Iva Lee’s - San Clemente Fried Okra in a cast iron skillet ...........$4 Blue Bayou - Disneyland, Anaheim Isla-Cruces Crab Cakes: succulent pan-seared Crab Cakes, topped with lobster beurre blanc and mango slaw. With Blue Bayou potatoes and seasonal vegetables ..................................$33.99 TAPS - Brea & Corona Jerome and Jose's Jambalaya: Family friends Jerome and Jose brought this recipe from Louisiana. Shrimp, chicken, Andouille sausage and smoked ham simmered in a secret tomato cayenne broth. Served with dirty rice and slivered green onions ...$16.99 JACKShrimp - Newport Beach Mardi Gras Pasta: yellow squash and zucchini in a fire roasted tomato cream sauce over penne with Parmesan cheese .................Lunch $11/Dinner $15

Uncle Darrow’s - Marina Del Rey Red Beans & Rice: A Creole Classic! Red beans simmered in a spicy sauce. Served over freshly steamed rice ................$7.99 Iva Lee’s - San Clemente Roasted Red Snapper: ham-hock red wine sauce, cheesy grits and braised collard greens .........................................$16.50 Iva Lee’s - San Clemente Sasparilla Braised Short Ribs: parsnip purée and mixed winter vegetables .........$18.50 JACKShrimp - Newport Beach Shrimp Po' Boy: Cajun gulf shrimp on a French baguette with coleslaw, Dijon, mayo and romaine lettuce ..........................$12 Jazz Kitchen - Downtown Disney, Anaheim Southern Fried Chicken: Tasso-herb-bread crusted mac & cheese, bacon braised turnip greens, lemon-pepper gravy ......$22


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SUR LE MENU

Chocolate Bread Pudding with Two Chocolate Sauces & Almond Bark

COVER RECIPE BY RALPH BRENNAN’S JAZZ KITCHEN

BREAD PUDDING

(Discard the scraped bean pod or add it to

1/4 cup sugar. Let the pudding sit at room

Serves: 8 very generous servings or 12 standard

granulated or powdered sugar to make vanilla

temperature for 45 minutes. Meanwhile,

1 piece New Orleans-style French bread - day

sugar.)

preheat the oven to 300°F.

old, about 23 inches long and weighing about

Bring the cream mixture to a simmer over

7½ to 8 ounces, cut into 1/2-inch cubes with

medium-high heat, whisking constantly until

crust on

the sugar dissolves, then whisking

the pudding until a toothpick inserted in the

occasionally.

center comes out almost clean and the

3C

Heavy cream

1/2 C

Whole milk

1 3/4 C

Sugar - divided

cooking until the chocolate is melted, about

1

2-inch-long piece vanilla bean

two minutes more, whisking frequently and

3 1/2 C

Semi-sweet chocolate chips

being sure to scrape the pan bottom clean as

8

Eggs - large

you whisk. Remove from heat.

Add the chocolate chips and continue

In a large mixing bowl, lightly whisk the

Once the pudding has rested 45 minutes, seal the baking dish with aluminum foil. Bake

pudding looks solidified with no puddles of liquid on the surface, approximately two hours. Once done, it will also start developing a few small, shallow cracks on top and there will be an irresistible smell of chocolate emanating from the oven.

Chocolate sauce

eggs until frothy. Very slowly add the chocolate

[recipe on www.great-taste.net]

mixture to the eggs, whisking constantly so

it sit for 15 minutes at room temperature

White chocolate sauce

the eggs don’t curdle. Pour this custard

before serving.

[recipe on www.great-taste.net]

mixture over the bread. Let the custard sit

8 to 12 pieces Almond bark - for garnish

until cool enough for you to put your hands in

8 to 12 equal-size rectangles and place on

[recipe on www.great-taste.net]

it, about 10 minutes.

heated dessert plates. Drizzle 2 to 3

Once the custard is cool enough, toss the

Remove the pudding from the oven and let

Serving Suggestion: Cut the pudding into

tablespoons of the chocolate sauce on one

Scatter the bread cubes in a 9-by-13-inch

bread cubes with your hands, squeezing the

glass baking dish. Set aside.

cubes in the liquid to make sure all are well

amount of white chocolate sauce over the

saturated. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

other half of the pudding. Position a piece of

In a heavy 3-quart saucepan, combine the

half of each portion of pudding and the same

cream, milk, and 1 1/2 cups sugar. Cut the

About 3 hours before baking the pudding,

almond bark upright in the center of each

piece of vanilla bean in half lengthwise, and

remove the pan of pudding from the

serving for garnish. Refrigerate any leftover

scrape the tiny beans into the cream mixture.

refrigerator, and evenly sprinkle the top with

pudding and sauces.

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F E AT U R E : L ’ E N T R E´ E

Left: Olinda, a city on Brazil’s northeastern Atlantic coast, hosts revelers parading as giant folkloric puppets made of papier-mâché. Right: King Cake

Carnival Feasting and Merrymaking

by Linda Mensinga

At these parties everyone is truly welcome

round the globe Carnival is celebrated with costumes, colorful parades, don’tstop-‘til-you-drop music and dancing in annual extravaganzas. As the exuberant, joyous revelry takes fuel, each country satisfies hunger and thirst in distinctive ways. Feasting is an integral part of the merriment and certain dishes are made for the occasion. Carnival made its first appearance in 13th century Venice, as a Catholic adaptation of a pagan festival with lavish costumes and balls. As a time to indulge in rich foods and entertainment before the 40 days of Lenten fasting and prayer, the pleasurable tradition spread easily to other Catholic countries. French and Spanish colonists brought Carnival to the New World where it was imitated and adopted by African slaves and other settlers. Food is still an integral part of the celebration with a medley of ingredients and cooking styles.

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BRAZIL The first ever Carnival in Brazil is said (by Embratur, the Brazilian Tourism Board) to have taken place in Rio de Janeiro in 1641, when John IV of Portugal was crowned. In order to celebrate his coronation and the start of the Lenten season, parties were thrown on the streets of Rio.

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F E AT U R E : L ’ E N T R E´ E Since then throughout the country, participants prepare for the festival for months by writing music, practicing dances, and designing floats and flashy, sequined outfits. Samba, which originated in Bahia based on African rhythms, has become the national music of Brazil. Dancers from Samba schools practice to compete during the parades held most notably in São Paulo and Rio de Janiero. Papier-mâché puppets, massive floats, and trucks on which singers and bands perform are additional parts of the parade/street party bacchanal. Held during February at the peak of southern hemisphere summer, mineral water and sodas keep revelers hydrated. Caipirinhas, Brazil’s national cocktail made with cachaça, sugar and lime, are also popular. Street food venders sell pastries and bolos (muffins and pies) with many different fillings (from fruit to fish and beef, served salty, sweet or extra-spicy). Typical Brazilian dishes such as acarajé (black eyed pea fritters filled with shrimp and onions), and pão de queijo (cheese rolls made with tapioca flour) are offered in the streets of Brazil during carnival. Festival-goers feast on a variety of meat such as sausage, grilled meat, and meat on skewers. Partiers may also relish the country's most famous dish, feijoada, a hearty stew of beans, beef and pork. Since it is a heavy dish, it is usually eaten after the parades or at a time when people know they can rest after eating it. Tip from Embratur: Tickets for Carnival events in cities other than Rio are less expensive but offer an equally colorful and spirited experience. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO Almost all of the Caribbean islands celebrate Carnival and one of the most popular held on Trinidad and Tobago. The extravagant fête, beginning right after Christmas and lasting to the Tuesday preceding Ash Wednesday, includes steel pan (steel drum) and calypso competitions, along with parades and dancing. Islanders spend months designing ornate costumes and elaborate floats. Trinidad native Amrod Phillip adds, “Members of the community come together and strive to make

the prettiest floats. Some have been making floats for years but there are also first timers who join the fun. Most floats are pulled. Big trucks are decorated and carry steel pan bands,” Phillip says. “The towns in Trinidad have their own carnivals that eventually come together in Port of Spain. The finalists of the steel pan competitions also end up in the Port of Spain and the crowds follow for one massive celebration.” Masquerading and dancing down the road all day burns calories. Eating and socializing, as elsewhere, are a major part of Carnival and the food is a mixture of the cultures that settled on the island. Indian indentured workers brought in after slavery was abolished added chutneys, curries and flatbreads. Roti, doubles, pigeon peas and rice, and fried chicken make the menu during Carnival according to Phillip. Roti, East Indian in origin, are wraps filled with goat curry, pork, chicken curry, shrimp or vegetables. Doubles, the most popular street food during carnival, are sandwiches filled with chickpeas topped with spicy chutneys. People also like, “Candies made with coconut and sesame seeds.” Another favorite at Carnival is pigfoot souse, or pickled pig feet. For beverages, “Carib lager (the hallmark lager of Trinidad) is very popular. If you are cool or want to be, you have a Carib in your hand! Mauby (made from the bark of a tree) is Trinidad’s version of Kool-aid.” Know before you go! Phillip and other SoCal Trinidadians get their street food fix at Caribbean Treehouse Restaurant in Inglewood where roti, doubles, curried goat, chicken and shrimp are served. Tip: Carnival events on Trinidad and Tobago are free to onlookers and participants alike. NEW ORLEANS “While most parts of the country spend January, February, and March recovering from the decadence of the holidays, New Orleanians are still eating, celebrating, and living life to the max. Mardi Gras translates to Fat Tuesday and is taken literally by the people of New Orleans. So it’s ALL about consuming the best of food and drink that are emblematic of the city. You really feel you’ve not got a care in the world when you are taking part in the celebration,” says Bruno

Duarte, special events manager for Ralph Brennan's Jazz Kitchen about the country’s largest and most extravagant street party. King Cake is the most typical Mardi Gras treat. Iced in purple for justice, green for faith and gold for power, king cake is more a cinnamon sweet bread than cake, shaped like a braid or a crown. “As a bonus, a tiny plastic baby (or a coin or dried bean) is hidden in the cake; whoever gets the piece with the prize gets to host the next king cake party and supply the king cake,” says Duarte. “Parades are the most well known activity of Mardi Gras. Starting with Krewe Du Vieux, which this year rolls on January 19th, parades will happen straight through until Mardi Gras day (Feb. 2, 2012). These parades are typically made up of 20+ beautiful and elaborate floats. The streets along the parade route shut down and thousands of people will line up on either side of the roads to catch beads and other throws.” Krewe associations organize parades and balls. The oldest, Comus, dates back to 1857. Zulu, one of the largest krewes, draws crowds to its parade to catch a Zulu coconut, an actual coconut painted gold or black. Mardi Gras was brought to Louisiana by the French and is celebrated on Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday. Rachel Salas of Iva Lee’s Restaurant in San Clemente explains, “It’s a time to feast and enjoy oneself before having to fast and do penance. Our $40 set menu will list items such as fried green tomato salad with remoulade, vinaigrette and goat cheese; pan fried catfish with cheesy grits, hamhock and collard greens; duck confit etouffee; and pecan & caramel bread pudding. “And live music, of course.” Ralph Brennan’s Jazz Kitchen in Downtown Disney is another place to get a taste of the atmosphere and fun of Mardi Gras without airfare. The restaurant will serve special New Orleans entrees all day by Executive Chef Darrin Finkel—red beans & rice, gumbo, Creole jambalaya (recipe on www.great-taste.net) and famous New Orleans beignets. In addition, “Kenny Sara and the Sounds of New Orleans will be on stage playing Mardi Gras favorites. Get your beads and napkins ready to start a parade when they start playing ‘Saints Go Marching In’,” says Duarte. Laissez les bons temps rouler!

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THE BIZ: CHEF PERSONALITIES

integrity of traditional dishes. If you don’t have sea legs, don’t fret. The Big Apple boasts renowned Jamaican chef Nigel Spence. He strives to bring the flavors of his native land straight from the beach onto the plates at his restaurant. He established Ripe Restaurant in 2003 with the intention of providing New Yorkers with an outlet for their Caribbean intrigue. Initially, his menu highlighted his award winning jerk chicken but as his food gained notoriety for its authenticity, he decided to take a chance in the back of the house and send more out of the kitchen. The result featured dishes like curried goat and fried codfish—meals that those removed from the sunny beaches of their Jamaican homeland yearn for. If you do have sea legs and find yourself in San Juan, you’d be doing yourself a disservice if you didn’t stop by Pikayo. Celebrity chef, author and Puerto Rican cuisine enthusiast are all terms synonymous with Chef Wilo Benet. Known for his flagship restaurant, Pikayo, located in the

Caribbean Flavor These chefs satisfy Caribbean intrigue. by Tiffany Haslacker

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Meet Caribbean chefs who are committed to infusing the beauty of their culture within their meals by pairing authentic ingredients with loyalty toward the integrity of traditional dishes.

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f you head out on a culinary quest that

pristine Puerto Rican Museum of Art, Benet

spans the globe, no region will incite

ensures that every bite of his Puerto Rican

your senses like the fusion of Chinese,

creations possess the spirit of the lively people.

African, European, and East Indian

Benet has been featured on Bizarre Foods with

cuisine of the Caribbean. Due to this

Andrew Zimmerman and served as a guest judge

collage of ethnic influences, Caribbean

on the season four finale of Top Chef. It’s no

cuisine exemplifies the food of truly diverse

wonder he is esteemed at home and in the

nations. Behind the face of this diversity lie

states; his Bistec Encebollado—beef tenderloin,

chefs who are committed to infusing the beauty

thinly sliced with sautéed onions and Pikayo

of their culture within their meals by pairing

fries—will have you considering permanent

authentic ingredients with loyalty toward the

residence in the rich port.


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THE BIZ: FRONT OF THE HOUSE PERSONALITIES SECTIO N

Owners Michael and Jennifer Towles found their niche

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Corky’s Kitchen & Bakery

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EXCEL INSUR SURE SERVIANCE CES

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M A K E C O N TA C T

Corky’s Corona 3811 Bedford Canyon Road #108 Corona, CA 92883 Open 24 hours, 7 days a week For additional locations visit: www.corkyskitchenandbakery.com HOW MANY RESTAURANTS DO YOU CURRENTLY OWN? Seven. WHEN DID YOU OPEN YOUR FIRST RESTAURANT? February, 1999. RESTAURANT CONCEPT: Full service family restaurant & bakery serving homestyle comfort food 24 hours a day 7 days a week! WHAT’S THE MOST SIGNIFICANT CHANGE IN THE RESTAURANT CLIMATE? Customers trying to find bang for their buck, most families go out to eat, but they’re looking for affordable options.

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hosen by readers of Inland Empire magazine as a “best spot for a meal under $10,” Corky's Kitchen & Bakery is a full service restaurant and bakery operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week with Inland Empire locations in Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Eastvale and Corona. Named after Michael’s late grandmother, the country themed restaurants serve family favorites reminiscent of grandma’s good cooking,

especially if your grandma is from Oklahoma or anywhere comfort and generous portions are defining characteristics. Dishes such as pot pie, meatloaf, macaroni and cheese, fried chicken, pork chops and pot roast are made fresh daily as are the tasty cakes, pies, muffins and cookies. Even those with Paul Bunyan appetites will never go away hungry and most guests end up with a “little something left to take home.”

FAVORITE COCKTAIL: Margarita. FAVORITE BEER: Coors Light, Hangar 24. FAVORITE WINE: Pinot Noir. FAVORITE DESSERT: Creme brulee. FAVORITE MENU ITEM TO RECOMMEND: Meatloaf sandwich.

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THE BIZ: BACK OF THE HOUSE

Guava & Cream Cheese Empanadas Culinary mission accomplished

by Mercedes Ibarra with Marcela Aguayo, photo by Marcela Aguayo Inspired by and adapted from Cocina al Minuto: Selecciones de Recetas Favoritas, published by Ediciones Cubamerica

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lot of my mother's cooking inspired by one was cookbook—Cocina al Minuto: Selecciones de Recetas Favoritas—selections of favorite recipes—the CubanAmerican kitchen bible. It has recipes for almost everything Cuban and also some “American” food like lobster bisque and guacamole. However, I recommend sticking to the Cuban recipes. Only Cubans would think a guacamole recipe should automatically include pineapples, or that “arroz frito,” fried rice, is a Cuban dish. For a while I’d wanted to recreate some of my favorite childhood foods. Then one day I walked into Borders and there it was, on the bottom shelf of the international cuisine bookcase—the Cuban-American kitchen bible itself! It became a mission to perfect my empanadas. I have a mixed reaction to spending hours on trays and trays of empanadas only to watch them disappear in five minutes. I timed it once for the record— 48 empanadas gone in five minutes. However, the moment my brother-in-law imitated a chorus of angels singing and raised an empanada to the “heavens,” I knew I had made it as an empanada expert. The recipe below is the original from Cocina al Minuto, with additional tips from my years of empanada education. GUAVA & CREAM CHEESE EMPANADAS Makes 12 PASTRY DOUGH 1 1/2 C Flour 1/2 t Salt 1T Sugar 4T Shortening

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1 3T 1 pack 8 oz

Egg Dry cooking wine Guava paste Cream cheese Oil - as needed to deep fry Powdered sugar for sprinkling on empanadas (optional) *Cuban music in the background 1. Sift the flour, salt and sugar. Add the shortening and cut it with a pastry dough blender until it turns into a crumbly texture. Dig a hole into the flour in the middle of the bowl. Pour the beaten egg and wine into the center. Mix the egg and wine mixture in a circular motion into the surrounding flour until it is all unified. 2. Roll the dough as thinly as possible. Cut about a 1/4 inch slice of guava paste and an equal slice of cream cheese and place them in the center of the half closest to you. Fold the back half over the filling and seal the dough by pressing down on the border. Trim the ends, take a fork to the border to create a crinkled seal. Place the finished empanada on a floured surface. 3. Heat cooking oil until it is about 375 degrees and fry the empanadas (don't crowd them) until they are golden brown. Best served immediately. Optional: Sometimes I make meat filled empanadas along with these. To differentiate them, I sprinkle powdered sugar over the sweet ones. *Mercedes recommends Homenaje a los Santos by Celia Cruz, anthology Cuba: I Am Time by various artists, and anything from the Buena Vista Social Club to set the mood. Please visit Great-Taste.net for complete article and for an additional Caribbean recipe—Pastelon, plantain lasagna.


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THE BIZ: BEVERAGES

Hot Trends in Wine for 2013 by Chris Kern Chris Kern is the founder of online wine shop ForgottenGrapes.com, and the creator and host of live culinary competitions Sunday Night Chef Fights (sundaynightcheffights.com).

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he Mayans were wrong! We made it out alive! Hooray! So now that we’re done sweating out that silly little prediction, we can get back to more important things—namely wine. As America’s Uncommon Wine Expert, it’s my job to not only have a finger on the current pulse of the wine-drinking public, but also to have another finger lodged firmly in the future to pick up on trends in the making. It can be a lot harder than it looks. That being said, it’s still one of the most fun parts of my job. And I want to let you in on a few of the trends we’ll be seeing in the wine world—good and bad— this year. Here’s a look at what I think will be some of the hottest trends in wine for 2013. The U.S. is hot, Europe not so much. The story behind the 2012 harvest is virtually the flip-side of 2011: the U.S. enjoyed a brilliantly warm, dry summer and fall leading to some of the best crops yet, while Europe was terrorized with late frosts, cooler-than-normal temperatures and constant summer rain along with harvest time hail, making 2012 one of the worst years on record for grape crops on the continent. While we won’t see the effects on reds for another couple of years, expect prices on European whites released in 2013 to jump dramatically due to scarcity of quality fruit. For the next half-decade: if you see 2012 on the label, make sure it says “Made in the U.S.A.” MOSCATO MADNESS Apparently Americans can’t get enough of this sweet Italian bubbly. Recent reports have moscato and other muscat-based wines surpassing sauvignon blanc as the second-most-widely purchased white wine in the U.S; moscatos also make up four of the top-ten most-searched wines on Winesearcher.com. As a wine professional, you want to keep your list and portfolio stocked with the best, brightest, newest and unusual but also keep a case of moscato

handy, because invariably someone is going to ask for it. CHENIN BLANC As shown above, Americans are pulling away from the oaky, buttery chardonnays and uber-tart sauvignon blancs that dominated wine lists for the past few decades and are looking for something different. Those that aren’t finding refuge in moscato will be turning to drier, crisper chenin blancs instead. Hearty, abundant, and versatile, today’s chenins are more elegant and refined than the high-volume “chablis” jug wines produced in the 1970s and 1980s. Keep an eye out for crisp, tart minerally vouvrays from the Loire, lush and tropical chenins from South Africa, and a new breed of elegant, dry chenins from Mendocino and Santa Barbara counties. CELEBRITY WINES A trend that started innocuously decades ago with Fess Parker, Raymond Burr, and Francis Ford Coppola has today spiraled out of control with a tsunami of A-, C-, and D-list talent putting their names on wines without any attachment to the vineyards or product. In a world of wine “superstores” and crowded shelves where labels and branding have become even more important in selling wine, this is a most unfortunate by-product. Music lovers can buy wines from Dave Matthews, Fergie, and Tool’s Maynard James Keenan. Sports fans can purchase wines from Mike Ditka, Keyshawn Johnson, Jeff Gordon, and Lionel Messi. Actors like Drew Barrymore, Richard Gere, and Dan Ackroyd are “producing” their own wines. Heck, even some of the Real Housewives are taking advantage of their fifteen minutes to sell pinot grigio to you. You’d think this madness would have to end sometime, but as more wines flood the market, expect to see enterprising winemakers and entrepreneurs partnering with celebrities and “celebrities” to sell wines to the unsuspecting masses who care more about a brush with fame than taste and quality.

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Great Taste Magazine 2013 Jan/Feb - www.great-taste.net