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FarmLead co-founders Alain Goubau (left) and Brennan Turner have created a platform that is transforming how grain is bought and sold. PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

Grain-trading app tops in its field Startup that is changing how crops are marketed lands millions in new VC funding Farm boys-turned-entrepreneurs Alain Goubau and Brennan Turner bring disruptive technology to a traditional industry > PAGES 10-11

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Brokering growth

INFLUENCERS

Inside Ottawa’s galas, fundraisers and networking events

Nancy-lee Glover is carrying on a 50-year tradition of family business success that began with her mother

OBJ.social PAGES 12-15

> WOMEN IN BUSINESS SECTION: PAGES 4-7

March 27, 2017 Vol. 20, NO. 11

For daily business news visit obj.ca

Tech in spotlight

Experts break down what the new federal budget will mean for local businesses — and why tech firms could be big winners. > PAGES 8-9

FarmLead co-founders Alain Goubau (left) and Brennan Turner have created a platform that is transforming how grain is bought and sold. PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

Grain-trading app tops in its field Startup that is changing how crops are marketed lands millions in new VC funding Farm boys-turned-entrepreneurs Alain Goubau and Brennan Turner bring disruptive technology to a traditional industry > PAGES 10-11

Furnished suites in Ottawa like no other. We offer fully furnished suites equipped with all the conveniences you expect in a home, plus unmatched amenities and services to provide you with an endless array of possibilities.

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS 2017 Custom broker’s secrets of the trade Nancy-lee Glover’s family-owned company has thrived for five decades – proving her mother’s decision to go into the custom brokerage business was a wise one BY DAVID SALI david@obj.ca

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ancy-lee Glover still remembers her reaction when her mom told the family she was buying a business. “It was like, ‘What are you doing? Don’t you have enough to do, Mom?’” Ms. Glover says with a laugh, recalling that day back in 1966. The teenaged Nancy-lee could be forgiven for being a little skeptical of her mom’s decision to become an entrepreneur. A mother of eight, Lenore Glover already had a lot on her plate. Suddenly, she was the owner and sole employee of a customs brokerage house she purchased from a husband-and-wife team who’d decided to retire. Today, Nancy-lee would heartily agree her mom really did know best. Fifty-one years later, the firm that became known as Glover Customs Brokers is still going strong, long after most of its original clients called it quits. Rare for an enterprise with that kind of longevity, Glover Customs Brokers has been run by a woman the entire time. “I don’t think you ever set out to think that the business will be 50 years old,” says Ms. Glover, who began working for the company in the late 1970s and took over as CEO when her mother retired in

the mid-1990s. “It just happens.” It wasn’t always smooth sailing, particularly early on. Lenore invested her salary back into the business that first year, and a year later her husband died. “It was fortuitous that she went back to work,” Ms. Glover says. “There wasn’t a lot of insurance money or anything that was going to carry her through. At the time, she was 48. So she would’ve had a tough time had she not had the business. Not only that, she still was a great mom, put her kids first, was the Girl Guide leader, supported my brother at his baseball games. She was really there for all of us.” Through hard work and determination, Lenore Glover built up a loyal clientele and gradually added more staff. Even still, it wasn’t easy for a woman executive in the male-dominated world of business, her daughter says. “I can remember having to go to the bank with my mother,” she recalls. “They didn’t want to extend her enough credit to take care of (the business). They didn’t want to give her more credit because she was a woman. There was a real skepticism about whether women could make it in business. “They wanted a co-signer. My dad had passed away. I think I had to cosign. It wasn’t a great amount of money, either.” Other things were different, too. Five decades ago, electric typewriters and

Nancy-lee Glover carries on the family tradition her mother started in 1966, when she bought the Ottawa firm that became Glover Customs Brokers. PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

Celebrate the next generation of Canadian innovators May 17, 2017 at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS 2017 adding machines were the height of technology. Pens, pencils and carbon paper were the norm. Photocopiers? They were the stuff of science fiction. “Back then, people were more patient,” says Ms. Glover, who now owns the six-employee firm with her sister Stephanie, who is not involved in the dayto-day operations. “Things took longer. It was a different time.” She remembers touring the National Research Council as a university student and seeing a computer that filled an entire room but “probably didn’t do what a PC or a laptop does today. It’s absolutely amazing.” Technology really didn’t evolve much until the 1980s, when the firm purchased its first computer – a product of nowdefunct Altos Computer Systems – for the equivalent of $55,000 in today’s money. “All it could do was prepare our customs entries, and it had an accounting function,” Ms. Glover says with a smile. “I’m sure it wasn’t as powerful as your phone, if you think about it.” Forms that were once written by hand are now filed with the click of a mouse. Technology has allowed the business to process shipments at border crossings anywhere in Canada almost instantly.

“I can remember having to go to the bank with my mother. They didn’t want to extend her enough credit to take care of (the business). They didn’t want to give her more credit because she was a woman. There was a real skepticism about whether women could make it in business.” – GLOVER CUSTOMS BROKERS CEO NANCY-LEE GLOVER, WHOSE MOTHER LENORE STARTED THE BUSINESS IN 1966

Ms. Glover won’t name specific clients, saying only that they range from multimillion-dollar organizations that ship goods to and from other countries every day to small mom-and-pop outfits that might need her company’s services fewer than a dozen times a year. Over the years, the firm’s mix of customers has expanded to reflect the changes in Ottawa’s economy, with more high-tech companies on the books these days. Glover has also diversified into consulting, providing guidance on customs regulations to clients in Canada and the United States. Ms. Glover won’t disclose revenues, but proudly says the company has turned a profit in all but one of its 50 years of existence. In 1999, she was named one of the

country’s top 100 businesswomen in Canadian Business magazine’s first-ever ranking of top women entrepreneurs based on gross revenues. “At that time, it was a big surprise to know that there were women who had successful, long-term businesses with reasonable revenues,” she says. “If you look at (today’s list), you go, ‘Holy mackerel. Billion-dollar businesses.’” Asked what accomplishments give her the most satisfaction, Ms. Glover pauses to reflect. “I’m always proud when we get a challenge that we haven’t come up against before and manage to get the client or ourselves through it,” she says. “I get my particular satisfaction in any day from whether I can do something for a

client that goes their way, that helps them out. It isn’t the transactional stuff that gives you your greatest satisfaction – it’s the fact that you’ve got a client who is moving up in the world in international trade and becoming known themselves.” Happily married to her second husband, Richard, Ms. Glover has no children. She says she’s doubtful the Glover name will remain on the office door after she decides to put away her briefcase for good – but she does have 21 nieces and nephews, she adds with a chuckle, so “you never know.” For now, she says, she has no plans to step away. “I still enjoy it,” Ms. Glover says. “I still like the challenges. I like coming in to work every day.”

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS 2017 Engineering a change in attitude toward STEM Telecom giant Ciena offers teen girls hands-on experience with network technology in hope of inspiring a new generation of female tech specialists BY DAVID SALI david@obj.ca

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arie Fiala believes she has a solution to Ottawa’s chronic shortage of tech talent that doesn’t require looking beyond Canada’s borders for qualified engineers and programmers. A marketing expert at tech giant Ciena’s west-end campus, Ms. Fiala says Canada has an abundant and often overlooked resource that could go a long way toward eliminating the problem: a female population that historically has been drastically underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. “Why not tap into half the Canadian population and educate them?” she says.

“We’ve got that talent right here.” She knows the statistics on women in STEM fields, and they’re not encouraging. In 2014, women accounted for just a quarter of the total number of students enrolled in Canadian post-secondary mathematics, computer and information sciences programs. In engineering and related technologies, the figure was even lower – a mere 19 per cent of university and college students in those fields were women. A year ago, a group of Ciena’s Ottawa workers came up with an idea to encourage more females to enter fields of study related to technology that have traditionally been dominated by men. They organized an event last June called “Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day,” inviting about two dozen girls in Grades 6, 7 and 8 at various local

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middle schools – many of them daughters of Ciena employees – to tour the company’s Carling Avenue labs and gain handson experience at tasks such as building electronic circuits. “We wanted to reach out to girls when they’re still young and get them inspired and interested in STEM-related subjects,” says organizer May Lee, a director of project management at Ciena who started at the company as a software developer. “That’s an age group where their interests start to solidify. We also wanted to reach out to them before they started selecting courses in high school.” The company has since hosted two more similar events, partnering with D.A. Moodie Intermediate School for a day-long session in mid-November that attracted more than 30 girls from that school and

Students at a Ciena session. PHOTO PROVIDED

others and another in February that drew more than two dozen students, mostly from All Saints Catholic High School in Kanata. Organizers say the girls’ reaction is almost universally positive. In surveys after the events, more than 90 per cent of participants said the sessions increased their interest in studying STEM fields. “When we bring the (circuit) kits up, a lot of the girls will say, ‘My brother has this kit,’” says Michelle Gardiner, an R&D hardware program manager at Ciena and another one of the organizers. “But it’s something that they’ve never thought (about), or even their parents have never thought to have them play with it. And as soon as they get their hands on it, they are so excited about it. We need to do more to encourage girls, inspire them to look at engineering or STEM-related topics.


I had one girl even say she always thought engineering was too hard for her. But then after spending a day at Ciena, it was something that really excited her. It changed her mind.” Ms. Lee, who has a bachelor of commerce degree from Concordia University with a major in business technology management, says girls are subtly encouraged from the time they are toddlers to conform to gender stereotypes that steer them away from science-related fields. “The toys we buy for girls are dolls,” she says. “And yet for boys, we buy them construction kits.”

“We need to do more to encourage girls, inspire them to look at engineering or STEM-related topics. I had one girl even say she always thought engineering was too hard for her. But then after spending a day at Ciena, it was something that really excited her.” – MICHELLE GARDINER, R&D HARDWARE PROGRAM MANAGER AT CIENA

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As an example to prove her point, she notes the electronic circuit kits used in Ciena’s sessions are readily available at stores around Ottawa, yet most participants had never tried them before. “These are kits that we bought from a toy store. They’re not difficult to find. And yet the girls, it’s their first exposure for them to play with these type of kits.” The program’s success has inspired the company to introduce it at other locations as well. Similar events are being planned at Ciena offices in Montreal and Ireland and the firm recently hosted sessions at its facilities in Georgia and Mexico. Ms. Gardiner, who holds a degree in electronics engineering technology and has been working for Ciena since 2010, says she also hopes the sessions show adolescent girls they don’t have to be “computer geeks” to succeed in the tech world. “It doesn’t have to be the stereotypical gamer in the basement,” she says. “There’s kind of a preconception that if you’re not coding and hacking away, you don’t fit in to a high-tech environment. But that’s not true.”


COMMENTARY How Ottawa could benefit from the 2017 budget The federal government’s new innovation and skills plan could have payoffs for a range of local companies, tax experts Nick Korhonen and Gavin Miranda write

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INNOVATION CANADA The budget proposes to establish Innovation Canada, a new agency intended to serve as a one-stop shop for Canadian innovation programs. The government intends to review many of its current innovation programs that are administered by multiple departments and consolidate them under the umbrella of Innovation Canada. Innovation Canada would then serve as the single point of contact for business that are seeking government assistance with respect to their innovation projects. This should reduce the amount of red tape around government funding and simplify the process for Canadian businesses.

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EDITOR, PRINT CONTENT David Sali, 238-1818 ext. 269 david@greatriver.ca

he Liberal government’s second federal budget announced on March 22 put a clear spotlight on an area of special interest to many firms in the National Capital Region: innovation. According to the minister of finance, “with its strong focus on innovation, skills, partnerships and fairness, Budget 2017 takes the next steps in securing a more prosperous future for all Canadians.” While the budget was relatively quiet with respect to tax changes, the government offered some additional insight into its “innovation and skills plan,” with a focus on investment in skills training and measures to encourage innovation by Canadian businesses. Here are some of the highlights that will be of interest to Ottawa’s entrepreneurs:

INNOVATION SUPERCLUSTERS The budget pledges to invest up to $950 million over five years to assist in the establishment of innovation clusters. The document makes specific reference to the success of these clusters around the world and also cites the success of the Toronto-Waterloo corridor. By investing these funds, the government hopes to establish other clusters with “anchor” companies, postsecondary institutions and specialized talent in order to drive innovation and encourage growth. These funds will be available through a competition process which

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is intended to be launched in 2017. The focus of this investment will be on “highly innovative industries such as advanced manufacturing, agri-food, clean technology, digital technology, health/bio-sciences and clean resources, as well as infrastructure and transportation.” Given the historical success of the Kanata North Technology Park, this funding may provide a significant opportunity for Ottawa to become such a cluster, thereby attracting more talent and boosting the local economy. The

recent autonomous vehicle summit in Kanata highlighted the opportunities in the transportation sector, and hopefully Ottawa-based companies will be successful in obtaining this funding. VENTURE CAPITAL Budget 2017 proposes to provide the Business Development Bank of Canada with up to $400 million over three years for investment in late-stage venture capital. These funds will typically be available to young yet established businesses with existing sales in order

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to help the companies grow. To access these funds, Canadian firms will have to submit proposals to the government which will be evaluated on a number of factors. These factors include: the amount of private capital already secured, expected benefits for Canadian firms, the investment strategy for the funds and a plan for risk-sharing between the government and private sector. While no specific details are available at this time, the minister of innovation, science and economic development is in consultation with private sector experts and will announce further details in the near future. GOVERNMENT PROCUREMENT In response to the demands of Canadian businesses to have better access to government procurement opportunities, the budget proposes to launch a new program: Innovative Solutions Canada. Modelled after the U.S. Small Business Innovation Research Program, Innovative Solutions Canada proposes to allocate up to $50 million from federal departments and agencies towards early stage research and development, late-stage prototypes and other goods and services from

Canadian businesses. The government is also encouraging other Canadian jurisdictions to take part in this program in the future. This should provide easier access to government contracts for Ottawa’s early stage businesses. Of interest, the government has indicated it will make a specific effort to encourage procurement from companies led by women and other underrepresented groups in order to encourage inclusive growth. The government has also committed to sharing the results of the program. Although the budget is being touted as a “stay-the-course” plan from a tax perspective, it does clearly propose several programs and initiatives to encourage innovation and growth in Canada, recognizing that in order to remain competitive in today’s global economy, Canada needs to drive innovation. However, while innovation is the first step, we should not lose sight of ensuring that the commercialization of that innovation is what will drive Canada forward on the global stage. Nick Korhonen is senior manager of taxation services and Gavin Miranda is a regional tax leader in the Ottawa office of MNP LLP.

How is the city’s business climate?

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usinesses in Ottawa have a new way of making their voices heard while making the nation’s capital an even better place to do business. The Ottawa Business Growth Survey taps into the insights of the city’s corporate leaders to chart trends, opportunities and challenges in Ottawa’s business community. It’s the largest and most comprehensive study of Ottawaarea businesses. Now in its third year, the Ottawa Business Growth Survey is a quick eightminute questionnaire that helps identify how the Ottawa economy is performing

through the Business Confidence Index measurement. Visit http://bit.ly/OBGS-2017 to take the survey. By participating, you can help local decision-makers set economic development priorities and create a comprehensive picture of Ottawa’s business climate. The Ottawa Business Growth Survey is a joint project led by Abacus Data, Avison Young, Gowling WLG, RBC, Welch LLP, the Ottawa Chamber of Commerce and Ottawa Business Journal. The full report will be available June 6.

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TECHNOLOGY

Alain Goubau (left) and Brennan Turner founded FarmLead to provide farmers with an alternative to traditional methods of selling their crops. PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

Online grain marketplace sowing seeds of growth MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

Ottawa-based FarmLead lands $6.5M financing round for app that allows buyers and sellers of crops to directly negotiate their own deals

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BY DAVID SALI david@obj.ca

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arm boys at heart, pro hockey player-turned-entrepreneur Brennan Turner and business partner Alain Goubau surveyed the agricultural landscape a few years back and saw a growth opportunity of a whole new kind. After spending much of their lives on family farms – Mr. Turner at a 40,000-

acre grain-growing operation near Foam Lake, Sask., and Mr. Goubau on a dairy and cash crop enterprise in eastern Ontario – they’d seen how much technology had changed the way staples such as wheat and corn were produced. Yet the process of actually getting those products to market was still amazingly antiquated, they thought. “When I’m getting off a combine at 10 o’clock at night, nobody from the grain company is answering my phone call,” says Mr. Turner, who spent plenty of

evenings harvesting crops on the prairies growing up. “We wanted to develop a platform that was going to allow for grain trade to happen any time, anywhere, with potentially anyone.” The result is FarmLead, an online marketplace that allows buyers and sellers of grain to connect via computer or mobile device and negotiate their own terms of sale. By setting up a free account, buyers or sellers can post offers, sort and browse offers by location, grain type

and other categories and take part in the back-and-forth of negotiations – all on a secure app. FarmLead charges both parties a flat commission fee per metric tonne sold, but the company says it’s more than 50 per cent less than traditional brokers charge. “We’re changing the way that grain gets marketed,” says Mr. Turner, a former defenceman in the Ottawa Senators minor-league system who brings an athlete’s intensity to his business career.


“At the end of the day, we want to have farmers be better at selling their grain and making sure they’re getting the best possible price. Right now, commodity prices are very depressed. Margins are tight. And every single dollar per metric tonne more that we can get for that farmer through the farming marketplace, that’s why we really exist.” Founded in late 2014, the fledgling firm is based out of Invest Ottawa’s new headquarters in the Innovation Centre at Bayview Yards. Now at 19 employees, the company expects to double its headcount within a year, thanks in large part to a multimillion-dollar infusion of venture capital announced earlier this month. Monsanto Growth Ventures, the investment arm of agriculture biotechnology firm Monsanto, led the $6.5-million US Series-A round. Avrio Ventures, MaRS Investment Accelerator Fund and Serra Ventures also contributed to the round. Mr. Turner says much of the cash will go toward setting up and staffing a new sales office in Chicago, a city the company identifies as a key access point to U.S. grain regulators. He says cracking the lucrative American market will be among FarmLead’s top priorities over the next couple of years.

“When I’m getting off a combine at 10 o’clock at night, nobody from the grain company is answering my phone call. We wanted to develop a platform that was going to allow for grain trade to happen any time, anywhere, with potentially anyone.” – FARMLEAD CO-FOUNDER BRENNAN TURNER

“We’re already there,” he says. “We just haven’t really been aggressively pursuing it in terms of dollars spent.” So far, Mr. Turner says, more than 4,000 farmers have joined the platform, using it to trade 1.4 million tonnes of grain. The number of transactions has been growing by about 10 per cent a month, a rate he’d like to see double over the next year. The average transaction is worth about $70,000, and the firm is on track for six-figure revenues in 2017, Mr. Turner says. While farmers “tend to be a little bit risk-averse,” once they use the app most customers are quickly convinced of its advantages over traditional grain-trading methods, he adds.

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“We’ve embraced Ottawa,” Mr. Turner says. “It’s been a great city to us.” It also helped that the 6-foot-3 former blueliner – who won a Calder Cup championship in 2011 as part of the Senators’ American Hockey League affiliate in Binghamton, N.Y. – was already somewhat familiar with the capital from his playing days. Fittingly, he uses a sports comparison when describing his business philosophy. “We don’t want anyone else to beat us. I use too many hockey analogies for our tech team, but they eventually get it,” Mr. Turner says with a laugh. “Let’s work towards where the puck is going to be, not where it’s been. We are the leader right now. Let’s continue to be a leader. Let’s continue to innovate.”

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“I pick up the phone, I talk to one person,” Mr. Turner explains. “I post on FarmLead, I’m talking to dozens of verified buyers all at the same time. When you have more options to potentially sell to, the likelihood you get a better price is going to increase. How do you sell a vehicle? How do you sell a house? You’re going to advertise it. We’ve given that mechanism to a (grain) producer for the first time ever. No one has ever done this before.” The company moved into Invest Ottawa’s offices in July 2015, partly to tap into the region’s wealth of tech talent and also because its founders felt the city would make a strategic home base in their effort to penetrate the Ontario market.


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Stories and photos by Caroline Phillips

in North American professional sports and certainly the most difficult to win,” NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly told the crowd in his remarks. “Tonight we celebrate that trophy and its glorious history.” There is and always has been a strong historical bond between hockey and this city, Mr. Daly noted. “Ice hockey has been played in and around Ottawa, since at least the 1880s.” While previous Ottawa clubs have won the trophy, our modern-day Senators Shawn Rivers, Mike Bossy and Paul Coffey. Maxime Pedneaud-Jobin, Mike Bossy and Jim Watson. Kevin O’Shea and Ray Charron with Stanley. franchise is still chasing its first sip from the coveted champagne vessel. CELEBRATION Mr. Lafleur remembers winning his first of five Stanley Cups with the Montreal Canadiens in 1973. “It was a dream come true,” he told OBJ.social. Mr. Bossy, who won four consecutive championships as a key member of the great New York Islanders dynasty of 198083, described the Cup as the pinnacle of what hockey represents. “It’s a pretty amazing trophy to win,” said the 60-year-old native of Montreal, XXXXXXXXXX who racked up a record nine straight 50goal seasons and remains the only player in NHL history to score Stanley Cup-winning goals in back-to-back years (1982 and ’83). While most towns have to cheer through “I’m happy that I won it, and happy that I to early summer to get the Stanley Cup, was able to participate in all those Stanley Ottawa just had to wait for it to celebrate Cups that I did, with my teammates.” a milestone birthday. The iconic piece of Mr. Coffey also won four Cups – three hockey hardware hit the nation’s capital with the Edmonton Oilers and another with recently as part of a four-day celebration of the Pittsburgh Penguins – and described Inset, former NHLers Guy Lafleur and Jim Kyte share a laugh; the March 15 event featured NHL alumni (from left) the Cup’s 125th anniversary. each win as more rewarding than the last. A crowd of close to 200 gathered at the Rick Smith, Paul Coffey, Bernie Parent, Mike Bossy, Frank Mahovlich, Dave Keon and Guy Lafleur. “It’s such a hard championship to win Canadian Museum of History on March 15 that you appreciate it more and more the for a special evening with hockey legends the NHL, as did his brother, Jamie Rivers, Ottawa Gatineau Hotel Association and older you get and the longer you’re in your Mike Bossy, Paul Coffey, Dave Keon, Guy who won the Presidents’ Trophy with the board co-chair of Ottawa 2017, which is career,” he said. Lafleur, Frank Mahovlich, Bernie Parent Detroit Red Wings. involved in a series of Stanley Cup tributes. However, there’s no fifth championship and Rick Smith, all of whom played on “Our family was close (to a Cup Attendees cozied up to the Cup for a on the horizon for Mr. Coffey, who retired teams that won one or more Stanley Cups. championship) but not that close,” said photo as well as to meet the hockey hall of in 2001 and remains second only to Ray The Cup made quite an entrance, Mr. Rivers. “It’s a really hard, almost famers and tour the museum’s new Hockey Bourque among NHL defencemen in allreceiving fanfare from the trumpet-playing unattainable trophy to win.” in Canada – More Than Just a Game time scoring. Governor General’s Foot Guards. Other NHL alumni in attendance exhibit. “Not for me, unfortunately,” he said, Shawn Rivers, president of Anish included Fred Barrett, Jim Kyte, Kent The Stanley Cup, originally known as before adding with a smile, “Unless you Branding and Gunn Media, watched in awe Manderville and Doug Smith. the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup, was start an old-timers’ league.” as the Holy Grail of hockey was carried into Gatineau Mayor Maxime Pedneauddonated by Lord Stanley of Preston, the the Grand Hall. Jobin and his Ottawa counterpart, Jim sixth governor general of Canada, to be FOR MORE ON THE EVENT, CHECK “Seeing it always gives me chills; I Watson, were there. So were Liberal MP awarded to Canada’s top-ranking amateur OUT CAROLINE PHILLIPS’ VIDEO think because we all grew up with it as Stéphane Lauzon (Argenteuil-La Petite hockey club, back on March 18, 1892. AT OBJ.CA Canadians,” said Mr. Rivers, who played in Nation) and Steve Ball, president of the “It’s the oldest and most revered trophy

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

Stanley Cup lands in Ottawa for 125th anniversary celebrations

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Gail and John Lindsay.

Marc Lepine and Kenton Leier.

Mark Roundell, Neil Leslie, Tom Bryan and Tom Burrow.

Deirdre Freiheit and Ryan Kilger.

Jim Foster, Emile Foster and Adam Smith.

FUNDRAISER

‘EYE-OPENING’ FUNDRAISER RAISES $68K FOR SHEPHERDS OF GOOD HOPE

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to serving the needs of the poor and homeless in Ottawa. SOGH does have a soup kitchen, on Murray Street, but it also offers shelter for men and women, runs food, grocery and clothing programs, and operates five supportive living facilities with 24/7 support. It’s developed innovative ways to help its clients, such as its managed alcohol program. On hand was SOGH president and CEO Deirdre Freiheit, as well as the chair of its foundation board, Ryan Kilger, a lawyer with Vincent Dagenais Gibson. Also seen were such returning supporters as John Lindsay from presenting sponsor BMO and John Laframboise, general manager of Kelly Funeral Homes. “We certainly like the cause but we really enjoy the event,” said Mr. Laframboise. “Over the years, it’s really developed into something that people are looking forward to. There’s a great variety of wonderful foods and delicious flavours that you just can’t do at home.” Attendees needing to digest between food stations could peruse the silent auction tables or bid on such live auction prizes as dinner for two with legendary RedBlacks quarterback Henry Burris and his wife, Nicole, at Sutherland Restaurant, Bar and Coffee House (it sold for $2,000) as well as donated dinners, that also brought in big bucks, to be prepared by such Ottawa chefs as Marc Lepine, Brianna Kim and Warren Sutherland.

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

Like many people, Brynn McMahon thought the Shepherds of Good Hope charity was little more than a soup kitchen when she started attending A Taste for Hope. And, like many people, she was keen to go because of the delicious selection of culinary offerings that she was able to try. “Initially, it just started with me being obsessed with food,” the senior financial analyst at Halogen Software joked at this year’s benefit, held March 22 inside the Horticulture Building at Lansdowne Park. “Since then, it’s been an eyeopening experience.” Ms. McMahon’s husband, Mark McMahon, is the manager of Imperial Coffee and Services, which is one of the many sponsors. She initially tagged along to A Taste for Hope because of his involvement, but then started learning about the cause. She decided to join the board of its foundation and currently serves as treasurer. “It’s been both enlightening and rewarding,” she told OBJ.social of her experience. The fifth annual fundraiser featured 18 food venues, including Atelier, The Whalesbone, Les Fougères and The Westin hotel, to name but a few, as well as alcoholic beverage stations. Tickets were $150, with a $100 tax receipt. The evening drew a sold-out crowd of about 450 and raised roughly $68,000 for programs and services offered at Shepherds of Good Hope, the largest non-profit organization dedicated


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Mathieu Fleury, Adam O’Connor and Treasa Carolan.

Larry O’Brien and Jim Watson.

Larry Kelly and Brian Kilrea.

FUNDRAISER

Ottawa Irish-Canadians celebrate St. Patrick’s Week with Bruyère fundraiser If anybody should have been dancing a happy jig at the Irish Canadian Saint Patrick’s Week Luncheon it should have been Vito Di Muccio, who was able to bust a few moves at the Heart & Crown Irish Pub in the ByWard Market. The 83-year-old Mr. Di Muccio suffered a stroke in October and is eternally grateful to the staff at Bruyère Continuing Care for helping him to walk and talk again through its rehabilitation

program. “Bruyère was a lifesaver,” he said at the annual business-networking luncheon organized by the local IrishCanadian business community in support of the Bruyère Foundation. Mr. Di Muccio said he’s also thrilled to be getting his opera voice back. He even belted out some of Schubert’s Ave Maria for OBJ.social to hear. At the event were prominent Irishborn businessmen Larry Bradley

and Pat Kelly, owners of the Heart & Crown Irish Pubs and Bradley Kelly Construction. Attendees also included hockey legend Brian Kilrea, businessman and former mayor Larry O’Brien, and former Ottawa Rough Rider-turned-investment executive Whit Tucker. It was surprising to run into lawyer Lawrence Greenspon, who joked that the “green” in Greenspon makes him half-Irish. He was hanging

out with organizers of the Fight for the Cure charity boxing event for cancer, sponsored by the Heart & Crown. Bobby Kerr, associate project manager for Brookfield Global Integrated Solutions, was back to chair the festive luncheon, which featured live music, Irish dancing, food and open bar. It was expected to raise between $25,000 and $30,000 for Bruyère and another charity back in Ireland. “Every penny we collect goes to the charities,” said Mr. Kerr, while noting that all the costs of hosting the $125-a-ticket luncheon are covered by the business sponsors. Organizers pushed back the start time this year until early afternoon, which was a smart move judging by the nearly 200 people who packed the pub. On hand were Peggy Taillon, president of the Bruyère Foundation, and its board chair, retired high-tech executive Fiona Gilfillan. Bruyère Continuing Care is a complex continuing care, rehabilitation and palliative health care centre and one of the largest of its kind in Canada. It is named after Mother Élisabeth Bruyère, who had a deep connection to the Irish immigrants: She cared for them when they were hit by a typhus epidemic in 1847.

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he Ottawa Business Growth Survey has drawn the same conclusion two years in a row – attracting skilled talent remains the top issue keeping local business leaders awake at night. In addition, 54 per cent of local tech talent needs are in management – dynamic individuals who can drive commercial success into global markets. That’s why the University of Ottawa’s Telfer School of Management continues to push the boundaries of excellence to attract the best students to its programs. Because if you want to produce

“Building a competitive workforce for the future is key to the economic priorities of the City of Ottawa and the Government of Canada.” a quality graduate ready to hit the ground running and add value to an organization, you need to start with a quality applicant. Quality goes beyond grades. Equally important is diversity – individuals with backgrounds and experiences that can enrich any organization looking to prosper in a globalized economy.

“Baby boomer retirement is leaving gaps in the labour force while Ontario is seeing a demographic decline in high school graduates,” said Alain Doucet, Assistant Dean, External Relations, at the Telfer School. “There is a war for talent and it begins on the campus. For the National Capital Region to have the new generation of leaders it

needs, we must work collaboratively with our alumni and the broader community.” How? Local organizations in the private and public sectors can continue to partner with Telfer for internships, coop placements, mentorship and class projects. Beyond this, Telfer is actively building its financial capacity to offer scholarships. As post-secondary institutions become increasingly competitive about enrolment, scholarships have emerged as a vital tool to attract the best and brightest. “Building a competitive workforce for the future is key to

the economic priorities of the City of Ottawa and the Government of Canada,” Doucet added. “With your help, we can do our part by providing the best possible experience for students

and making them job ready in support of the local economy.” To learn more about how you can support Telfer, please visit myTelfer.ca/ whatmatters.


Got an inside scoop? Contact Caroline Phillips @CarolinePhil

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The 310 attendees included heads of diplomatic missions, such as Cuban Ambassador Julio Garmendía Peña and his wife, Miraly González González. Among those from the business community were Kelly Santini law partner Larry Kelly, who chaired the $10-million fundraising campaign for the new St. Pat’s building, and Heart & Crown Irish Pubs co-owner and long-time supporter Pat Kelly. Veteran event planner Sandy Ouellette, who teaches in the event management program at Algonquin College, was back to chair the gala. It showcased Cuban music and dancing and offered the opportunity to outbid fellow gala-goers on a limo ride over to the official residence in Rockcliffe Park of Irish Ambassador Jim Kelly and his wife, Anne Martin, for a gourmet dinner for eight. Also on the auction block was a sevennight trip for two to Cuba, donated by Sunwing Vacations. Back to emcee the gala was St. Pat’s supporter Michael O’Byrne from CTV Ottawa News. The facility was home for many years to his grandmother, who lived to a ripe old age. “It was a wonderful, wonderful place for her to spend those last 20 years,” Mr. O’Byrne told the room.

Saturday, April 8 at 12:30 PM

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It was a night of panama hats, mojito cocktails and Cuban cigars (the chocolate kind) at the St. Patrick’s Home of Ottawa Foundation’s fourth annual signature soirée held March 9 at the Ottawa Conference and Event Centre. The evening, A Night at the Tropicana, re-created the colourful and nostalgic feel of the world-famous cabaret and club in Havana, Cuba. “In its time, the Tropicana was regarded as one of the largest and most beautiful nightclubs in the world,” Jan Kaminski, president of presenting sponsor Colonnade Investments and board chair of the St. Patrick’s Home of Ottawa Foundation, said while welcoming supporters of the 288-bed, long-term, 24-hour care facility located on Riverside Drive. “It had everything: classic architecture, exotic grounds, live music, dining, dancing, gambling, celebrities, showgirls and mobsters. In some ways, it’s the antithesis of St. Pat’s Home and in some ways it’s exactly like it,” he joked. The evening raised $100,000 toward the purchase of priority medical equipment for St. Pat’s. Founded two years before Confederation, it’s one of the oldest homes for the aged in Ontario.

Tuesday, April 4 at 7:30 PM

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ST. PATRICK’S HOME DRAWS ON CUBAN INFLUENCES AT TROPICANA NIGHT


TOURISM A FESTIVAL TO REMEMBER Some of the major events taking place at the Lansdowne Park Tulip Gallery, one of the main venues for the 65th Canadian Tulip Festival:

The 65th edition of the Canadian Tulip Festival runs from May 12-22 at several venues across the city. PHOTO COURTESY CANADIAN TULIP FESTIVAL

After 65 years, tulip fest still a blooming attraction Iconic celebration of Dutch gift to Canada welcomes back former director with new events to mark historic anniversary BY DAVID SALI david@obj.ca

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

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welve years after he last headed up the Canadian Tulip Festival, Michel Gauthier is back at the helm – with what he says is an even deeper understanding of the event’s importance to Ottawa. “What I realized is that in fact the Canadian Tulip Festival is probably one of Canada’s biggest garden tourism attractions,” says the garden festival veteran, who went on to organize other festivals and become executive director of the Canadian Garden Council, which manages industry events across the country. “I said, ‘You know what? Maybe it’s time that I come back.’ Here I am.” Mr. Gauthier, whose first go-round as festival director lasted from 1992 to 2005, chose a particularly momentous year to make his comeback. This marks the 65th edition of an event that was first held in 1953, an anniversary that neatly coincides with Canada’s 150th birthday. The Canadian Tulip Festival draws 650,000 visitors a year, Mr. Gauthier says, making it the country’s second-biggest

“Even conventions say, ‘Hey, let’s have our meeting in Ottawa for the Tulip Festival.’ It’s that type of impact that this event has generated. This is a true flagship for Canada when it comes to garden tourism.” – CANADIAN TULIP FESTIVAL DIRECTOR MICHEL GAUTHIER

garden tourism attraction after Victoria’s Butchart Gardens. Ottawa’s hotel occupancy rate in the month of May is the highest of any major Canadian city, he adds, thanks in large part to the annual celebration that was first organized by famed photographer Malak Karsh and the Ottawa Board of Trade. “For 65 years, this tulip has been a symbol of Ottawa, the capital,” Mr. Gauthier says, noting the festival now attracts tourists from as far away as China and Japan, who collectively pump more than $80 million into the city’s economy. “Even conventions say, ‘Hey, let’s have our meeting in Ottawa for the Tulip Festival.’ It’s that type of impact

that this event has generated. This is a true flagship for Canada when it comes to garden tourism.” ART INSTALLATIONS This year’s event, which runs from May 12 to 22, will be spread out at several venues. The signature attraction will be a “Garden Promenade” featuring millions of tulips stretching from Rideau Hall to the Central Experimental Farm to Parliament Hill. “The capital doesn’t have that (one) big garden, but we have a lot of beautiful gardens, thanks to the National Capital Commission and the efforts of others,” Mr. Gauthier notes.

• Tulip Reflection, featuring 65 tulip bouquets by local floral designers; • Homage to Malak Karsh, a photographic exhibition; • Tulip Art Gallery, 65 works of art in multiple mediums by Canadian artists; • The Friendship Village, featuring some of the Festival’s tulip friendship countries; • Vintage Military Displays, a tribute to our veterans; • The Friendship Stage, presenting varied music and entertainment including children’s performers and representative acts from the Festival’s Tulip Friendship countries; • Art and floral workshops presented by experts; • Glebe Tulip Plaza, organized in collaboration with the Glebe BIA providing animation, pageantry and merchant programs along Bank Street and throughout Lansdowne Park; • Opening night tribute to festival’s founders (May 12) • Mother’s Day dutch brunch for Bruyère Foundation (May 14) • International friendship floral celebration (May 18) • Swing dance night (May 19) • 65th anniversary Tulipmania fireworks (May 21)

Festival organizers are also working with the ByWard Market BIA to create a series of art installations in the Market. The centrepiece will be a stylized tulip “wrap” around the city-owned parking garage on Clarence Street by American pop artist BeX, who also designed the festival’s “One Tulip One Canada” flag. Other attractions will include a collection of more than 250,000 tulips at Commissioners Park near Dow’s Lake and an exhibition of photographs from Mr. Karsh at Lansdowne Park. Originally created to celebrate the Dutch royal family’s gift of 100,000 tulips to Ottawa as a thank-you for sheltering Princess Juliana and her three daughters during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands in World War II, the Canadian Tulip Festival has come to represent our country’s values of tolerance and respect for others, Mr. Gauthier says. “When you look at Ottawa, what are the symbols of Ottawa? Between the Peace Tower and the Rideau Canal and the tulips, those are great symbols of our capital.”


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The Ottawa residents’ guide to making the most of 2017 An exciting tourism year for the nation’s capital begins with us

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the resources we have at OttawaTourism.ca to learn about all the amazing events and to make plans – get to know your city all over again.” OttawaTourism.ca is the best resource for residents and visitors alike to plan their 150th activities in the nation’s capital. Check out the online events calendar and download the easy-toprint PDF of all the signature events. There is even an availability calendar for local hotels – search dates and contact hotel staff to book rooms for your out-of-town guests.

activities that showcase the diversity of Canada’s vibrant music scene. Canadian and Indigenous Galleries opens at the National Gallery of Canada, June 15: Canada’s Masterpieces: Our Stories will feature a reenvisioned 45,000-square-foot gallery that will tell the story of art in Canada, interweaving Indigenous history and art. Canada Day Celebrations: July 1: This is what it’s all about, isn’t it? Be prepared for the biggest birthday bash this city has ever seen.

2017 HIGHLIGHTS Here is just a sampling of what you can enjoy in Ottawa this year:

VOLTA | Cirque du Soleil, Aug. 3-27: Cirque du Soleil presents a new show called VOLTA on the Zibi development site near the Portage Bridge. Canadian Pacific Women’s Open, Aug.21-27: Stars of the LPGA Tour will light up the nation’s capital. YOWttawa Concert, Summer: A large-scale, outdoor, ticketed musical event that will feature national and international artists. Headliners to be announced. Canada Science and Technology Museum reopening: Nov. 17: The museum celebrates its 50th anniversary and reopens after $80.5 million in building repairs and upgrades. There is of course more, much more, in addition

to regular draws like The Canadian Tulip Festival, Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend, TD Ottawa Jazz Festival and RBC Bluesfest. Check out the full lineup at www.ottawatourism.ca/ ottawa2017/ Residents can also take a more active role as an ambassador for their hometown with the new hospitality training tool, Ottawa Host 150. “You can get certified as an Ottawa Host 150 to beef up your hospitality training and customer service skills, which is not only great for your clients but also great for your CV,” said Van Kregten. “This is the year for Ottawa to shine as the proud capital of Canada’s birthday celebrations. Become a part of Ottawa’s tourism story.” To get certified, visit training.ottawa2017.ca. For more information, please visit www.ottawatourism.ca or follow on Twitter, @Ottawa_Tourism.

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JUNO Awards & Juno Week, March 27-April 2: Throughout the week, enjoy various musical performances, workshops and other

Interprovincial Picnic on the Bridge, July 2: Stretching between Ottawa and Gatineau, the Alexandra Bridge walkway will be covered with sod to create picnic spots overlooking Parliament Hill and the Ottawa River.

Canadian Track and Field Championships, July 6 to 9: A competition for the nation’s best Olympic and Paralympic athletes that also serves as selection trials for the national team.

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

fter years of preparation and planning, Ottawa is ready to host the world for Canada’s 150th birthday. You could say we already broke the ice to get this party started with Red Bull Crashed Ice a few weeks ago. That was just the beginning. 2017 is packed with amazing events and attractions intended to wow and entertain residents and tourists alike. Tourism is Ottawa’s thirdlargest economic generator. But while the 150th promises to draw more visitors to the region than ever before, residents do have a big part to play in the success of 2017. “You become part of the tourism story whenever you have friends and family coming to Ottawa,” said Jantine Van Kregten, Director of Communications, Ottawa Tourism. “This is the year to be a tourist in your own town. Take advantage of

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PROFILE 5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT KATHLEEN KEMP

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Kemp is the youngest individual to co-chair the United Way Ottawa community campaign. “It’s been an awesome experience,” she says. “I feel very fortunate to be able to fully understand the value that United Way has in the community.” While going to school and even as recently as last fall, she held down a part-time job in the office of Royal LePage Performance Realty and for realtor Patrick Morris. “They’re like family to me,” she says. She and her friends have done every special escape room in the city. “We’ve gotten out of all of them so far,” says Ms. Kemp, who found the most challenging one to be The Heist at the Canadian Museum of Nature.

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In her free time, she also enjoys classes at Pure Yoga, playing a variety of sports with the Ottawa Sport & Social Club and going to GoodLife Fitness.

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She’s a big fan of the Bachelor/ Bachelorette reality TV show.

A Telfer School of Management graduate, Kathleen Kemp now works at the Centre for Social Enterprise Development. PHOTO BY CAROLINE PHILLIPS

Social enterprises profit from Kemp’s passion Youngest-ever co-chair of United Way Ottawa’s community campaign finds inspiration in striving to make the capital a better place in which to live BY CAROLINE PHILLIPS MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

caroline@obj.ca

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t the young age of 23, Kathleen Kemp has learned to place her thumb on the scales of work-life balance. She puts in a normal 40-hour week at the Centre for Social Enterprise Development (CSED). But on top of her job with the non-profit organization, she’s co-chairing the community campaign for United Way Ottawa and is also hitting the books again to get another degree in retail management. Still, she says it’s an improvement from her days as a business student at

the University of Ottawa’s Telfer School of Management. For two years, she was president of the campus entrepreneurship organization Enactus uOttawa, which brings together student, academic and industry leaders to create community outreach projects and business ventures that aim to make the world a better place. ENACTUS CHAMPIONS Ms. Kemp and her team made uOttawa history when they were named champions at the Enactus Canada National Exposition in 2015. They went on to represent Canada on the global stage in Johannesburg, South Africa.

“I tell everybody I lost 10 years off my life doing Enactus because we spent 40 to 60 hours every week, on top of fulltime school and part-time jobs and all that stuff,” she says during an interview at the Innovation Centre at Bayview Yards, where her office is located. Her team came up with a solution to make Ottawa greener and cleaner by creating CigBins disposal units to keep cigarette butt waste off the streets and out of landfills. The social enterprise, which continues to operate, hires people with mental illness through a partnership with the non-profit agency Causeway. “I think everyone should play a role in developing their community,” says Ms.

Kemp, who’s been doing just that for a good chunk of her life. “People need to find inspiration in things that make them the most passionate and do those things, because they’re ultimately contributing to the community in their own way.” Ms. Kemp was born and raised in the affluent Toronto suburb of Oakville as the second-oldest of four children. Her father, Graham, worked at the University of Toronto, while her mother, Mary, was a chartered accountant. They’re now retired and live in Kingston. Ms. Kemp gives credit for her community involvement to her parents and to her teachers and principal at White Oaks Secondary School. The high school, where former astronaut


READ IT AND REAP: Chris Hadfield once had a locker, has an award-winning reputation for promoting a safe and accepting school environment. At White Oaks, Ms. Kemp took on leadership roles by working on antibullying projects and mental health awareness campaigns. She volunteered with Ontario Students Against Impaired Driving and was involved with a program that helped to integrate younger at-risk students. She also found time to coach softball and teach dance. In 2011, Ms. Kemp moved to the nation’s capital to study at the University of Ottawa, where she was fortunate enough to be taken under the wing of Stephen Daze, the Telfer School’s faculty adviser for Enactus uOttawa. “He provided some of the best advice I’ve ever received,” she says. “I look forward to having him as a mentor for the rest of my career.” To date, Ms. Kemp’s biggest success has been her team’s national win at Enactus. It was made particularly special because her father was there to watch at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. The demanding combination of her school work, part-time academic and office jobs, involvement with Enactus

OBJ’s insightful newspaper gives you business intelligence you can’t find anywhere else. GET OBJ DELIVERED TO YOUR OFFICE. EMAIL: SUBSCRIBE@OBJ.CA.

“I think everyone should play a role in developing their community. People need to find inspiration in things that make them the most passionate and do those things, because they’re ultimately contributing to the community in their own way.” – KATHLEEN KEMP, WHO NOW WORKS AS A DIRECTOR AT THE CENTRE FOR SOCIAL ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT

and running of CigBins did take a toll on her, however. “I think I hit a point where I probably realized that I wasn’t doing everything really great; I was just doing everything OK,” she says. EFFECTS OF BURNOUT By graduation, Ms. Kemp was feeling the effects of burnout. That, combined with a minor head injury, forced her to take some time off to relax and get a healthy dose of Netflix. “I think I’ve done a better job over the past year trying to balance my job with things that I like doing and to make time for myself,” she says.

“The world is not going to be over if you don’t work 95 hours a week, which I think is what I did.” After graduation, Ms. Kemp was hired by CSED as its director of social enterprise business development. The agency works with social entrepreneurs and non-profits to develop the social enterprise sector, which offers an alternative to relying on government funding or donations to deal with social problems. Instead, the sector aims to build enterprises that turn a profit by providing goods or services that address social or environmental issues. “My parents would have been pretty

happy for me to become an accountant or government worker,” Ms. Kemp concedes. “They don’t fully comprehend the non-profit sector and why I work in the non-profit sector, but I think they recognize that what I do is really cool and provides a lot of (community) benefits.” Looking ahead, Kemp sees herself getting back into running a business or becoming involved in community economic development work. “I think I will always be involved in something that supports the community,” she says. “But I also don’t want to be lumped into a bucket where I’m forever the social enterprise girl.”

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key solution, starting with a free assessment of a business’s lighting needs that produces a customized plan that contains details on upgrade options. Hydro Ottawa then provides a cost estimate for each option and calculates the applicable incentive of up to $2,000 toward the upgrade costs. The program includes installation, a clean-up of the work area and disposal of the old lighting equipment.

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to improve overall safety, or to reduce operating costs, it really has become an essential part of doing business. Energy efficient programs and incentives help make lighting upgrades quick and easy so businesses can focus on their day-to-day operations,” says Shane Labrash, Energy Coach at Hydro Ottawa. If you are a small business, you could be eligible for incentives up to $2,000 to upgrade your existing lighting with more efficient technology. Under the Small Business Lighting program, local businesses can replace outdated lighting systems with the latest LED technology. The Small Business Lighting program offers a turn-

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

ake a good look at the lights in your office, store, restaurant or business. Do you see energy-guzzling products such as incandescent lamps, halogen track lights, pot lights, or other inefficient systems? Investing in energy efficient LED lighting can improve in-store customer experiences, provide more attractive product displays, help employees more easily focus on tasks, and help you manage your operating costs. “Many of our business customers are realizing the importance of investing in new LED lighting technologies. Whether it’s to make their spaces more inviting, to make product displays more appealing,


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UPDATE HR LESSONS FROM THE KITCHEN: INSIDE FRASER CAFE ALIGNING HR STRATEGIES LEVERAGING DISRUPTIVE TALENT

Never saying farewell

Your resource for professional camaraderie and fresh insights.

Managing the reality of employee turnover

OTTAWA BUSINESS

JOURNAL

VOLUME 20 • ISSUE

2 • NOVEMBER 2016

THE HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONALS ASSOCIATION OTTAWA CHAPTER PUBLICATION

HR

THE BEST WAY TO REACH OTTAWA’S HUMAN RESOURCES PROFESSIONALS

UPDATE HR LESSONS FROM THE KITCHEN: INSIDE FRASER CAFE ALIGNING HR STRATEGIES

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

LEVERAGING DISRUPTIVE TALENT

OBJ.CA

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Never saying farewell

Managing the reality of employee turnover

OTTAWA BUSINESS JOURNAL

HR UPDATE

VOLUME 20 • ISSUE 2 • NOVEMBER 2016

CONTACT YOUR OBJ SALES REP TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT IN THE SPRING 2017 EDITION COMING ON MAY 8

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TECHNOLOGY Shopify makes room for 2,500 more Ottawa staff with Laurier Avenue expansion BY CRAIG LORD craig@obj.ca

A

lready approaching capacity at its Elgin Street headquarters, Shopify has signed a multi-year lease for 18 floors inside the office tower at 234 Laurier Ave. that will enable it to hire up to 2,500 additional employees. The Ottawa e-commerce giant will take over floors two through six of the former Export Development Canada building – which was most recently used by the Bank of Canada during renovations of its Wellington Street headquarters – this July. Shopify anticipates filling the remaining floors of the office tower in four-to-five floor increments in following years. In total, that adds up to about 325,000 square feet or roughly 70 per cent of the downtown office tower. Shopify’s building lease with Gillin

Engineering & Construction and Slate Asset Management will last at least 10 years, a company spokesperson says. Greg Scorsone, Shopify’s director of internal operations, says the company’s 150 Elgin St. headquarters still has “a little bit more room to grow in,” with 750 employees in a space capable of accommodating 1,100 individuals. He says the expansion to Laurier Avenue is about anticipating the impending growth. “We hire people so quickly that filling up has not ever been a problem,” he told OBJ. Shopify’s new space is located at the corner of Laurier Avenue and O’Connor Street, a couple of blocks away from the company’s current headquarters. Mr. Scorsone says the firm will have to do some renovations before employees are ready to move in early next year. “We definitely need to make it Shopifyish. We have a standard for how

we build our space and we want to continue that,” he says. Construction is also underway in Toronto on the King-Portland Centre, where Shopify will act as the anchor tenant. Ms. Scorsone says the development is on track to come online in the first quarter of 2019 and will feature a capacity of about 1,100 employees. Currently, the company’s Toronto presence stands at 300 employees. This compares with 170 employees in Kitchener-Waterloo, 90 in Montreal and 20 in San Francisco. Local employees are excited to mark the new Ottawa expansion, Mr. Scorsone says, adding the new building is a testament to the firm’s commitment to building a multibilliondollar company in the National Capital Region. “It’s a big commitment for us, and it’s a big commitment for Ottawa.”

The tower at 234 Laurier Ave. FILE PHOTO

O T TA W A’ S FASTEST

growing

Request For Standing Offer (RFSO) #29117-97566-S01 Rental of Miscellaneous Equipment 2017-2019

C O M PA N I E S 2017

Submissions for the 2017 Awards have begun! Is your company experiencing remarkable revenue growth? Together the Ottawa Business Journal and Ottawa Chamber of Commerce are once again looking for the fastest-growing companies in the region. No matter what industry you’re in – if you’re a startup or a seasoned player – your company may qualify.

Application deadline: Monday, April 10, 2017

supporting sponsor

All bid documents are available for download at the OCA’s website www.oca.ca, or pick-up at the Ottawa Construction Association office located at 196 Bronson Ave Ottawa ON K1R 6H4.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

partner

Neil Kitching Corporate Services / Supply Department Tel: (613) 580-2424 Ext: 13729 Fax: (613) 580-9695 Your submission related to this RFSO must be received by the City of Ottawa before the deadline which is 11 April 2017 NO LATER than 3:00 p.m. local time, at the following location:

21 OBJ.CA

Tickets are now available to salute this year’s top companies!

City of Ottawa Supply Management Division 100 Constellation Crescent 4th Floor, West Tower Nepean, Ontario K2G 6J8

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

lead sponsor

Please note that the Ottawa Construction Association (OCA) is the official distributor of the RFSO documents.

An email address is required to pick-up the bid documents at the OCA office.

For more information visit www.ottawachamber.ca produced and presented by

REQUIREMENT: The Fleet Services Division of the City of Ottawa is seeking offers from qualified suppliers to provide various types of machinery and equipment for rental to the City of Ottawa ‘on an as and when requested basis’ for the period May 2017 to May 2019. The rental of the equipment is for unplanned requirements and where City owned equipment is not available to perform the service.


THE LIST Company/Address/ Phone/Fax/Web

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

RANK

OBJ.CA

22

No. of licenced financial advisors and planners working locally

LARGEST FINANCIAL PLANNING COMPANIES

(RANKED BY NUMBER OF OF LOCAL LICENCED FINANCIAL ADVISORS AND PLANNERS)

Principals

Year established in Ottawa

No. of offices in Ottawa

Compensation model Financial services offered

1

RBC Royal Bank 90 Sparks St. Ottawa, ON K1P 5B4 1-800-463-3863 rbcroyalbank.com

107

Tina Sarellas regional president, Ontario north and east

1899

35

Combination of commission and salary

Accounts; investments (registered & non-registered); credit; mortgages; financial planning; credit cards; discount brokerage. RBC Wealth Management offers full service brokerage, estate and business succession planning, insurance and financial planning

2

Richardson GMP 300-343 Preston St. Ottawa, ON K1S 1N4 613-230-7735 richardsongmp.com

25

Patricia Carr branch administrator

2009

1

WND

Investment planning; wealth management; tax and estate planning; investment advice

3

Raymond James 750-45 O’Connor St. Ottawa, ON K1P 1A4 613-369-4600 raymondjames.com/ ottawacorporatebranch

20

Daniel MacInnis branch manager

2000

2

Commission

4

Gentry Capital 508-1900 City Park Dr. Gloucester, ON K1J 1A3 613-746-7200 / 613-746-7282 gentrycapital.ca

19

Steve Barban managing director and portfolio manager

2000

1

Portfolio management fees and feefor-service financial planning

5

Mandeville Private 610-1565 Carling Ave. Ottawa, ON K1Z 8R1 613-728-0101 michaelprittie.ca

8

Michael Prittie portfolio manager and senior financial advisor

2013

1

Combination of commission and salary

Full service; insurance; financial advice; taxes

6

John D. Landry Financial and Quadrus Investments* G2-160 Terence Matthews Cres. Kanata, ON K2M 0B2 613-271-0555 / 613-271-9551 jdlfinancial.ca

5

John D. Landry retirement and estate planner

1981

2

Combination of commission and salary

Financial planning; retirement planning; investment tax minimization; estate planning; portfolio analysis; insurance analysis

7

Craig & Taylor Associates and Insurance Agency Ltd. 504-1525 Carling Ave. Ottawa, ON K1Z 8R9 613-725-3414

3

Jennifer A. Martin president

1985

1

WND

7

Foundation Private Wealth Management 204-460 West Hunt Club Rd. Ottawa, ON K2E 0B8 613-228-8810 foundationpwm.com

3

Mark Sherboneau managing partner, wealth management

2010

1

Commission

Investments; insurance; financial planning; RRSPs; RESPs; TFSAs; non-registered investments; estate planning; corporate retirement planning

7

Future Financial Planning Group 201-370 Churchill Ave. Ottawa, ON K1Z 5C2 613-728-0589 futurefinancial.com/

3

Carl Eppstadt president, owner and financial planner

1984

1

Combination of commission and salary

Financial planning; investment planning; tax and estate planning; education planning; insurance and risk management; charitable giving; business succession planning

10

Snipper Financial Planning 150 Isabella St. Ottawa, ON K1S 1V7 613-236-8878 snipperfinancialplanning.com

1

Heather Snipper owner and financial planner

1988

1

Combination of commission and fee-for-service

Tax planning; investment planning; estate planning; retirement planning; cash flow management; risk management

10

Amira Mamhikoff Financial Planner Orleans, ON K4A 0T9 613-742-8585 ambfinancial.ca

1

Amira Mamhikoff Buffone certified financial planner

2005

1

Commission

10

Crain & Schooley Financial 7-471 Hazeldean Rd. Kanata, ON K2L 4B8 613-722-3444 crainschooley.on.ca

1

John M. McCavour senior vice-president

1953

2

Combination of commission and salary

10 11

Moore Financial 130-1101 prince of Wales Dr. Ottawa, ON K2C 2W7 613-725-1515

1

Jeremy D. Moore

1938

1

WND

Financial planning; insurance; investment; retirement and estate planning; group benefits; group retirement

Bank of Montreal* Capital Centre Branch 269 Laurier Ave. W. Ottawa, ON K1P 5J9 613-564-6416 / 613-564-6818 bmo.com

WND

Chris Booth vice-president of commercial banking

WND

13

WND

Retirement; major purchases; education savings; saving and investing; estate; managing debt

11

CIBC / CIBC Wood Gundy* 222 Queen St., 2nd floor Ottawa, ON K1P 5V9 613-564-4162 / 613-563-9600 cibc.com

WND

Steven Kim

WND

29

WND

Investment solutions; retirement planning; life and wealth protection; milestones and purchases; tax planning; charitable giving; stocks and bonds; mutual funds; insurance and annuities; alternative investments

11

Scotiabank Group* 119 Queen St. Ottawa, ON K1P 6L8 613-564-5194 / 613-564-7946 scotiabank.com

WND

Luigi Bastianelli director and market lead

WND

20

WND

Wealth planning; business transition planning; insurance solutions; family wealth advisory services

11

TD Canada Trust & TD Commercial Banking* 240-45 O’Connor St. Ottawa, ON K1P 1A4 613-783-6104 / 613-783-6617 td.com

WND

Doug Feasby vice-president

WND

46

WND

Investment strategies; banking and credit management; retirement planning; tax management; education funding; business succession planning; major purchases

Full-service investment firm; provides advice into issues challenges facing business owners, corpororate exutive retirees and families Full service investment firm with in-house portfolio management and CFP’s offering full range of services including taxes and insurance. Licensed to use Un-Commonsense Portfolio Management Model.

Financial services; retirement; investment planning; risk coverage strategies

Financial planning; insurance; investments; group benefits

Group RSPs; employee benefits and pensions

WND = Would not disclose. *Did not respond to 2017 survey – using data from previous years Should your company be on this list? If so, please send details to research@obj.ca This list is current as of March 23, 2017. © 2017 by Ottawa Business Journal. All rights reserved. This material may not be reproduced by any method in whole or in part without written permission by Ottawa Business Journal. While every attempt is made to ensure the thoroughness and accuracy of the list, omissions and errors sometimes occur. Please send any corrections or additions by e-mail to research@obj.ca. OBJ lists are primarily compiled using information provided voluntarily by the organizations named. Some firms that may qualify for the list are not included because the company either failed to respond to requests for information by press time, because the company declined to take part in the survey or because of space constraints. Categories are drawn up in attempt to gather information of relevance to the Ottawa market. Research by Patti Moran. Please send questions and comments to research@obj.ca.


FOR THE RECORD People on the move

Contracts

Heather J. Williams, a partner at Cavanagh Williams LLP, has become a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. Ms. Williams has been practising law in Ottawa for 25 years and is an alumna of the Common Law Section of the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa and the School of Journalism of Carleton University. Christopher McLeod has joined Mann Lawyers as head of the firm’s commercial litigation team. Mr. McLeod practised previously at Cassidy Levy Kent and Dentons.

Hats off The founding partners of the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group will be inducted into The Ottawa Sport Hall of Fame this summer. The OSEG founding partners are Roger Greenberg, Jeff Hunt, John Pugh, John Ruddy and Bill Shenkman.

and

Deloitte released the winners of the 2017 Canada’s Best Managed Companies awards program recognizing Canadian privately owned and managed companies that demonstrate exceptional business performance. There were five winning companies from Ottawa: Cowater International, Daltco Electric, Groupe Raymond, MDS Aero Support Corp. and Wills Transfer Ltd. Halogen Software, a provider of talent management solutions, has been named a visionary in Gartner’s recent Magic Quadrant for Talent Management Suites for the fourth year in a row. Halogen’s solutions include software, consulting services and content to help customers create a culture that inspires people to achieve higher levels of performance at work. The Ottawa International Airport was recognized by Airports Council International with a second-place finish in the category of best airport in North America, tied with El Paso and Tampa airports. The award recognizes the airport’s commitment to providing an excellent customer experience.

and

The following contains information about recent contracts, standing offers and supply arrangements awarded to local firms. Modis Canada Inc. 155 Queen St. Description: IT professional services Buyer: RCMP $12,547,339 Thales Canada Inc. 1 Chrysalis Way Description: Optical instruments, test equipment, components and accessories Buyer: DND $10,599,802 Coradix Technology Consulting Ltd. 151 Slater St. Description: IT professional services Buyer: RCMP $10,015,687 T.E.S. Contract Services Inc. 301 Moodie Dr. Description: IT professional services

Buyer: RCMP $3,622,418

$1,209,416

The AIM Group Inc. 130 Albert St. Description: Business transformation architect Buyer: Treasury Board of Canada $3,132,360

Advanced Business Interiors Inc. 2355 St. Laurent Blvd. Description: Work spaces – furniture Buyer: Employment and Social Development Canada $1,087,824

ADRM Technology Consulting Group Corp. 1052 St. Laurent Blvd. Description: IT professional services Buyer: RCMP $1,665,773

Frequentis Canada Ltd. 1400 Blair Pl. Description: Informatics Training Buyer: Fisheries and Oceans Canada $959,439

Emerion 368 Dalhousie St. Description: Project executives level 3 Buyer: PWGSC $1,290,019

Nisha Technologies Inc. 2150 Thurston Dr. Description: Ruggedized tablets Buyer: Fisheries and Oceans Canada $751,776

Samson & Associates Consultation Inc. 85 Victoria Description: Internal audit and IT and systems audit Buyer: Canada Border Services Agency

Channel Management International Inc. 121 York St. Description: Communications security equipment and components Buyer: DND

present: present:

Breakfast Series Breakfast Series Mayor’s Mayor’s A unique opportunity to enjoy breakfast His Worship Jim Watson A unique opportunity to enjoywith breakfast with HisMayor Worship Mayor Jim Watson and hear from and community leaders about issues critical to Ottawa. and business hear from business and community leaders about issues critical to Ottawa. Guest Speaker: Guest Speaker: Honourable Catherine McKenna Honourable Catherine McKenna Minister of Environment and Climate Change Minister of Environment and Climate Change Thursday, April 27, 2017 Thursday, April 27, 2017 Location: Ottawa City Hall Location: Ottawa City Hall Registration: 7:00 a.m. Registration: 7:00 a.m. Buffet Breakfast: a.m. Buffet7:30 Breakfast: 7:30 a.m. Presentation: 8:00 a.m. Presentation: 8:00 a.m.

Make your voice heard. Help make Ottawa the most innovative city and the BEST PLACE to do business by sharing your insights. The OBGS is an exclusive survey used to collect insights from Ottawa business leaders to understand local business trends, challenges and opportunities. Don’t miss your chance to have your say.

NDIVIDUALINDIVIDUAL TICKETS: TICKETS: $35.00 + HST (Ottawa Chamber Members) $35.00 + HST (Ottawa Chamber Members) $50.00 + HST (Non-Members) $50.00 + HST (Non-Members)

CORPORATE TABLES OFTABLES 8 WITH SIGNAGE: CORPORATE OF 8 WITH SIGNAGE: $245 + HST $245 (Ottawa Chamber Members) + HST (Ottawa Chamber Members) $350 + HST $350 (Non-Members) + HST (Non-Members)

Register online www.ottawachamber.ca Register online www.ottawachamber.ca

Event Sponsors:Event Sponsors:

23 OBJ.CA

Powered by Ottawa Business PoweredEvents by Ottawa Business Events

E-mail info@ottawabusinessevents.ca to receive weekly updates on all our events. E-mail info@ottawabusinessevents.ca to receive weekly updates on all our events.

The purpose of the survey is to understand local business trends, challenges and opportunities. All responses will be kept anonymous and only reported in aggregate. No confidential or financial information will be asked. Survey closes April 7th.

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 2017

Visit bit.ly/OBGS-2017


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Ottawa Business Journal March 27, 2017  

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