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HR UPDATE

ional camaraderie Your resource for profess and fresh insights.

RCE PROFESSIONALS THE HUMAN RESOU

ATION A CHAPTER PUBLIC ASSOCIATION OTTAW

HR

HR UPDATE

UPDATE

Your resource for professional camaraderie and fresh insights.

The blended workforce HOW TO COMBINE CONTRACTORS F AND FULL-TIME STAF TO BUILD AN AGILE ORGANIZATION AL

JOURN OTTAWA BUSINESS

VOLUME 21 • ISSUE

15 • NOVEMBER 6 2017

THE HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONALS ASSOCIATION OTTAWA CHAPTER PUBLICATION

HR

UPDATE

The blended workforce HOW TO COMBINE CONTRACTORS AND FULL-TIME STAFF TO BUILD AN AGILE ORGANIZATION OTTAWA BUSINESS JOURNAL

VOLUME 21 • ISSUE 15 • NOVEMBER 6 2017


Contributors wanted! For individuals interested in contributing, articles must be submitted via email to updatemagazine@ hrpaottawa.ca by no later than March 19, 2018.

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Ottawa’s CRG emPerform helps organizations revive the employee appraisal

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erformance appraisals aren’t dead, but they do need some serious attention,” said John Smith, Director of Enterprise Business Solutions for Corporate Renaissance Group (CRGroup). For more than 15 years, CRGroup’s performance management solution, CRG emPerform, has been living and breathing employee performance management by helping companies move away from the traditional, manual employee appraisal and automating their approach to this vital business process. We asked John about his take on the recent wave of companies looking to kill their appraisals and what is actually being done out there in the world of HR: The recent spotlight on appraisals isn’t news to emPerform. For years its team has worked with companies that have reached the same conclusion about their performance management processes: it just isn’t adding value. Modern companies simply do not have the luxury of waiting 12 months to check on employee progress, and new generations of employees are expecting feedback and direction on a much more frequent basis. That being said, appraisals are far from dead and even companies that claim to have “killed” them have simply reworked their perception, process, content and structure. “The reality on the ground is that

performance appraisals aren’t going anywhere,” John said. “They are still the best means of standardizing and reporting on job expectations, goals, achievements, development and potential. They also remain a critical element for determining merit and rewards. But we agree that the status quo has to die.”

They are still the best means of standardizing and reporting on job expectations, goals, achievements, development and potential. emPerform urges its clients to invest the time needed to evaluate and update their appraisals to ensure that people, process and content align with what employees need and expect, as well as what the business is trying to achieve. “We advise updating the content and frequency of appraisals,” John said. “Some of the easiest updates to make have to do with what’s being asked and ensuring goals, competencies, values, development plans and any other

John Smith explains how CRG emPerform is helping organizations revive and re-tool performance appraisals. evaluation criteria are not only specific to each employee, but are crystal clear in what’s expected and how progress is determined.” The trick after that is to modernize the process for employee feedback and check-ins so that it is timely and keeps performance top-of-mind throughout the year. A good place to start is by building a quarterly check-in process. During these meetings, managers and employees

can discuss progress related to goals and expectations along with observations and plans for the next quarter. “These meetings make it much easier for managers to stay on top of their teams, for employees to get the acknowledgement and feedback needed to develop and succeed, and for HR to feel confident that staff members are being evaluated fairly and consistently on relevant aspects of their roles,” John said.

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SAVE THE DATE

11 MENTORING 101 /27 /17

Looking to give back to the HR community by becoming a mentor? Searching for someone to help you progress in your career? Join us for an opportunity to spend an evening with Mentor City president Shawn Mintz, who will be in Ottawa to share how to use the Mentor City platform. TIME: 5:30 P.M. TO 9 P.M. LOCATION: SALA SAN MARCO (215 PRESTON ST.)

Welcome 2017-2018 BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT MELISSA BELLOCCHI-HULL PAST-PRESIDENT KEVIN BARWIN TREASURER CHERYL BANKS SECRETARY DAN PALAYEW COMMUNITY RELATIONS AND MARKETING SOLEY SOUCIE

to the fall 2017 issue of HR Update, a joint publication of the Ottawa Business Journal and the HRPA Ottawa Chapter. This publication can also be accessed as a virtual edition at www.obj.ca and www.hrpaottawa.ca. If you have any questions about this publication, please contact us via email at updatemagazine@hrpaottawa.ca.

For individuals interested in contributing, articles must be submitted via email to updatemagazine@hrpaottawa.ca by no later than March 19, 2018 to be considered for the next edition.

HRPA Ottawa Chapter kickoff

MEMBERSHIP ENGAGEMENT AIDA HADZIOMEROVIC MEMBERSHIP DEVELOPMENT ERIN TAILLEFER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MERSIHA MESIC MENTORING ANTHONY LAWLEY COMMUNICATIONS ANGELA ZIMMER CONTACT US HRPA OTTAWA CHAPTER, GENERAL INQUIRIES & ACCOUNTING PHONE: 613-224-6466

HRPA MEMBERS AND NON-MEMBERS ALIKE RECONNECTED ON SEPT. 14 AT LAGO BAR AND GRILL TO KICK OFF ANOTHER EXCITING YEAR OF PROGRAMMING. Photos by Mark Holleron

E-MAIL: infohr@hrpaottawa.ca WEBSITE: www.hrpa.ca/ HRPAChapterSites/Ottawa MEMBERSHIP CHANGES 150 Bloor Street West, Suite 200, Toronto, ON, M5S 2X9 PHONE: 416-923-2324 TOLL-FREE: 1-800-387-1311 FAX: 416-923-7264 EMAIL: info@hrpa.ca WEBSITE: www.hrpa.ca/Ottawa Join the HRPA Ottawa Chapter Group on LinkedIn @OttawaHRPA CHAIR: ANGELA ZIMMER EDITORIAL COMMITTEE: BRIGITTE LALONDE ERENDIRA PEREZ LARISSA VOLINETS SCHIEVEN PUBLICATION SUBMISSIONS: updatemagazine@hrpaottawa.ca CREATIVE DIRECTOR TANYA CONNOLLY-HOLMES GRAPHIC DESIGNERS REGAN VAN DUSEN CÉLINE HACHÉ-PAQUETTE SALES WENDY BAILY CARLO LOMBARD @OttawaHRPA • THE HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONALS ASSOCIATION OTTAWA CHAPTER PUBLICATION

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hrpaottawa on the go @OttawaHRPA

HRPA, Ottawa Chapter

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PRESIDENT’S UPDATE – MELISSA BELLOCCHI-HULL

Introducing the 2017-18 HRPA Ottawa board

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he Human Resources Professionals Association, Ottawa Chapter, provides leadership, assistance and education to those working in and studying the field of human resources. We have more than 1,800 members who come from diverse work backgrounds such as the public service, professional services, not-for-profit, hospitality, tourism, manufacturing and financial services sectors, among others. To assist in providing our members with networking and professional development opportunities, including volunteering and mentoring, we rely on the generosity of our sponsors and our volunteers. As we get set to enjoy another wonderful year, I would like to take a moment to introduce you to our 2017-18 board of directors. It is through their continued commitment to our chapter, and the hard work of our committee volunteers, that we continue to provide value for members. Like so many not-for-profit organizations, we rely solely on our chapter volunteers to play a role in offering a rewarding member experience. Our volunteers dedicate time from their busy schedules and lives to give back to our HR profession and make our chapter more vibrant. Without them, we would not be able to offer our array of programs, which includes mentoring, events, personal development and student outreach. Once again, we are very fortunate to

REACH OUT TO OUR TEAM:

MELISSA BELLOCCHI-HULL PRESIDENT. Photo by Mark Holleron

President: Melissa Bellocchi-Hull president@hrpaottawa.ca Past-president: Kevin Barwin pastpresident@hrpaottawa.ca Treasurer: Cheryl Banks treasurer@hrpaottawa.ca Secretary: Dan Palayew secretary@hrpaottawa.ca Director, community relations and marketing: Soley Soucie marketing@hrpaottawa.ca Director, membership engagement: Aida Hadziomerovic membership@hrpaottawa.ca or volunteer@hrpaottawa.ca Director, membership development: Erin Taillefer development@hrpaottawa.ca Director, professional development: Mersiha Mesic pd@hrpaottawa.ca

have many members come forward and give their time this year. Every volunteer hour dedicated to our chapter has an impact and we would not be able to function

Director, mentoring: Anthony Lawley mentoring@hrpaottawa.ca

without you! On behalf of the HRPA Ottawa Chapter board of directors, thank you and I look forward to a great year!

Director, communications: Angela Zimmer communications@hrpaottawa.ca

The designations business leaders trust SURVEY RESULTS SHOW 60% OF C-LEVEL EXECUTIVES PLACE MORE VALUE ON HR PROFESSIONALS WITH RECOGNIZED CERTIFICATIONS

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he world of business has become more volatile, fast-paced and ever-changing than we’ve ever seen before. The recent ousting of Uber’s CEO after allegations of a toxic culture, and the farreaching scandal of a Google employee’s anti-diversity manifesto are just two of many headlines that rocked the business world in recent months – and created huge reputational and business risks for those seemingly rock-solid companies. There’s no denying that we live in a VUCA (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous) world and that the pace of change is only accelerating. These kinds of business risks are only intensifying and increasing in complexity. And that’s where HR comes in.

they happen. HR is a critical and strategic part of your business, which is why it’s imperative that your HR professionals are designated. HR professionals are tasked with adding value to the organizations in which we operate. As a self-regulated profession in Ontario, we are also tasked with protecting the public. HR professionals must be a highly trusted, highly competent and rigorously knowledgeable bunch. And as trust, competence and knowledge are difficult things to quantify, there has to be some way of validating them. That is precisely why we need respected designations.

ADDING VALUE

In Canada (and beyond), the designation of note for the past few decades has been the Certified Human Resources Professional (the CHRP), offered through the Human Resources Professionals Association (HRPA).

HR professionals are the gatekeepers – the stewards of employment standards legislation, tasked with mitigating risk and eliminating scandalous headlines before 4 HR UPDATE FALL 2017

RESEARCH FINDINGS

More recently, two new tiers of HR designations offered by the HRPA have emerged: the Certified Human Resources Leader (CHRL), and the Certified Human Resources Executive (CHRE). These are the designations business leaders respect and value. Eight in 10 executives believe HR professionals contribute positively to business success, with 49 per cent saying they contribute very positively, according to a targeted national research survey of 200 C-level executives conducted by LegerWeb. Some other figures to consider: • Six in 10 would place more value on an HR professional who had any of HRPA’s three HR designations (CHRL, CHRE and CHRP); • 62 per cent of Ontario respondents said that HRPA’s designations enhance the contribution of human resources in the company; • 58 per cent said designations elevate the strategic position of HR in the company;

and • 74 per cent said designations enhance their view of the professional’s ability to find the right people for the right job. By the same token, the view of business leaders is that the HRPA is doing a good job regulating the profession. These results are quantifiable evidence that the CHRP, CHRL and CHRE designations are aligned with what the business community wants from HR. They are a resounding validation of the direction we have taken and the work done to advance the competency framework that supports our three-tier designation framework and our rigorous validation processes. The numbers are in. Designations and effective regulation matter – and you don’t have to take our word for it. Melissa Bellocchi-Hull is the chapter president of HRPA Ottawa.

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03 DINE & LEARN /22 LOCATION: OTTAWA MARRIOTT /18

Four ways to get your jack-out-of-the-box TOP TIPS FOR LIVING AUTHENTICALLY

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often hear people talk about themselves as if they are chameleons changing who they are to fit their surroundings, especially in the workplace. I’ve even heard, “I can’t be the real me at work.” Suppressing who you are and contemplating how others perceive you requires a considerable amount of energy. If we all had the confidence to be our authentic selves and live as “jacks-out-of-the box,” we could focus our minds and energy on the important things in life and become more productive. I’ll never forget sitting around the boardroom table brainstorming ideas to land a big advertising account. An idea immediately popped into my head, but I didn’t blurt it out because I thought I could do better. After 20 minutes, a colleague voiced my idea and everyone thought it was brilliant. I got tired of living as a jack-in-the-box, suppressing certain parts of myself at work, so I decided to make changes. I underwent coaching training and worked with a coach myself. The more authentic I am, the more powerful the ripple effect on those around me. Here are a few of my top tips for living authentically:

The next time you have a project or problem, experiment with shifting your perspective. Consider how the issue would be viewed by your child, favourite superhero or manager.

LIVE IN ALIGNMENT WITH YOUR VALUES When you identify what is important to you and get clear on what your top values are – be it fun, compassion, kindness or other principles – making decisions for your life is easier. Use your values as an internal authenticity compass to point you in the right direction. What are your top five values and how do they show up in your life?

PUT YOUR STRENGTHS TO WORK First, identify your strengths. What do you excel at? What energizes you? Consider an online strength assessment tool or ask others for input. Leverage and celebrate your strengths, as well as the strengths of others.

CHALLENGE YOUR PERSPECTIVE Changing your perspective can help you think differently and move you forward when you feel stuck. For example, take the earlier perspective of, “I can’t be the real me at work.” Instead, what if you operated from the standpoint of “I can’t not be the real me at work”? What would that look like? The next time you have a project or problem, experiment with shifting your perspective. Consider how the issue would be viewed by your child, favourite superhero or manager.

EXPAND YOUR COMFORT ZONE Stepping beyond your comfort zone will get you to start living as a jack-out-of-the box because that is where growth happens. Through the ladies group I organize, I’ve witnessed women tackle their fear of heights and meet new people. I see their confidence

grow when they stretch beyond their safe zones. What will your next comfort zone adventure be? Living as a jack-out-of-the box is freeing and has made me a more effective leader. It may not be easy, and it takes courage, but it is worth it and sometimes it takes only one person to lead the way for a family, circle of friends or a workplace. Courtney McLeod is a coach at Kick Ass Coaching.

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INTERESTED IN A CAREER IN HUMAN RESOURCES? Join the Human Resources Professional Association and find out how you can become certified! Visit www.hrpa.ca. QIRC-OBJ/HR Update Nov. 7 2016.qxp_Layout 1 2017-10-12 4:15 PM Page 1

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COVER STORY

GOING GIG: A BLENDED WORKFORCE BLUEPRINT FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION Engaging on-demand ‘free agents’ can deliver greater adaptability

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n 2016, General Motors CEO Mary Barra predicted that the auto industry will change more in the next five to 10 years than it has in the last 50. Meanwhile, an educational study a year earlier suggested that nearly two-thirds of students entering grade 4 today will be employed in jobs or industries that don’t currently exist. We read these headlines every day. None of this is news to anyone responsible for leading and renewing our organizations. Our people and our organizations need to be more agile, adaptable, experimental and resilient to shock. HR’s role is to help build an agile workforce in an adaptive organization. How can HR professionals accomplish that? DESIGNING FOR ADAPTABILITY The organizational design question is how can we continue to deliver shortterm performance while developing the adaptability to quickly respond to unknown conditions in the near future. The “employee workforce” concept is an industrial age design and the HR toolkit is still optimized around managing that type of workforce. It operates best when there is conformity of work, predictability of conditions and – at best – only slow, steady change. And yet the modern workplace is filled with contractors, consultants and freelancers. We’ve always used such “free agents” as an ad-hoc response to short-term needs. Evolving free agents into a functioning workforce platform promises huge gains in organizational adaptability. To deliver, we’ll need to operate differently and build new tools. The design goal is a blended workforce of full-time employees and on-demand

The design goal is a blended workforce of full-time employees and on-demand free agents, knowing when and where to use one versus the other, and knowing how to gracefully switch between them. free agents, knowing when and where to use one versus the other, and knowing how to gracefully switch between them. It is workforce design at its most essential, championed and facilitated by HR. To make this happen, here’s a pragmatic five-step blueprint that delivers short-term targeted performance improvements while laying a clear path to delivering much greater organizational adaptability.

1

PICK A PARTNER, PICK A TARGET First, select an internal business partner and together pick a well-defined performance target to focus on. In picking your internal partner, find one willing to experiment and driven to make serious performance gains. Choose a businesscritical target where your combined efforts matter.

2

PERFORMANCE-TUNE THE TARGET Within this bounded experiment, embrace the team and provide the latitude and tools to help them identify and remove the roadblocks holding back performance. Focus on this for two consecutive quarters

@OttawaHRPA • THE HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONALS ASSOCIATION OTTAWA CHAPTER PUBLICATION

and you’ll deliver an impressive and sustained performance boost. In delivering this performance improvement, leverage the goodwill produced to promote your long-term design strategy of an agile workforce in an adaptive organization.

3

SWEAT THE DATA, INSIGHTS AND TAKE INVENTORY Here is the real value of this approach. You now know a lot more about the inner workings of this part of the organization and what it takes – in terms of human and physical capital – to deliver the desired performance outcomes. Your targeted “turbocharging” activity has led to (a) greater clarity about linkage between performance and human and physical inputs; (b) establishing the baseline performance available with current resources; and (c) fresh thinking into performance scaling with employees (your “own” option) or free agents (the “rent” option). You’ve developed clear insights into how performance scales through human efforts, regardless of source. In short, you have the data to support informed “rent vs. own” decisions when seeking to scale performance.

4

RINSE AND REPEAT, REPEAT, REPEAT Now go and find another internal business partner and target another performance improvement, and run through the turbo-charging blueprint. And then do it again…and then do it again...and again…

5

SYSTEMATIZE WHAT YOU HAVE LEARNED By moving your turbo-charging efforts around the organization engaging different partners, you’re capturing a huge amount of data, team performance insights, work practices, work process improvements and the like. That’s all data for your new HR/ business system on workforce inputs and performance outcomes. Where does this lead you? You’ve now developed deep insights into effectively leveraging a free-agent workforce as a “performance scaling overlay” to your employee workforce. Additionally, you have a toolkit for helping the leadership design and implement powerful adaptive strategies. Let’s fast-forward a few years. Being able to rapidly engage – and disengage – highly qualified free agents within your blended workforce has now become a routine strategic response to your organization’s continual need for adaptability. Delivering a truly agile, blended workforce reinforces your value as a strategic partner in the organization by helping to develop the organizational adaptability these turbulent times demand. Tim Ragan is a performance engineer at Career Constructors. FALL 2017 HR UPDATE 7


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I MILLENNIALS AREN’T THE PROBLEM. WE ARE. Successful leaders bring out the best of each generation

ntergenerational conflict in the workplace is hardly a new concept. However, effectively leading the five different generations that currently make up today’s workforce is a different challenge altogether. Each bring their own unique life experiences, expectations and inherent biases. With the right leadership, this provides an organization with powerful benefits. Today’s successful leaders need to move beyond the stereotypes and clichés that so often typify these groups and bring out the best of each generation. The days of pinning conflict and poor results on myopic perspectives of demographic cohorts are over.

WHO’S WHO The five generations that make up the presentday workforce include: • Traditionalists (born between 1900 and 1945); • Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964); • Generation-X (born between 1965 and 1979); • Millennials (born between 1980 and 1999); and • Generation-Z (born after 2000) These five generations are bookended by Traditionalists, who widely shaped our modern workplace (although are now seen at the office in limited numbers), and Gen-Z, who have just started to join the workforce as teenagers. Meanwhile, Gen-X, the second largest cohort of workers – arguably in the prime of their careers – find themselves largely left out of the generational discussion. Occupying centre stage and dominating HR discussions is the ongoing battle between Millennials and Baby Boomers, both of whom

continue to receive the most attention, hype and media rhetoric. Millennials are now the largest group in the workforce and are set to comprise 50 per cent of all workers by 2020. They’re no longer just new grads in entry-level roles. They have become critical contributors who cannot be ignored, changed or fixed. Meanwhile, the Baby Boomer retirement exodus never materialized, with many choosing to remain in the workplace longer or return post-retirement for contract and project roles. With no mandatory retirement age, and the youngest boomer turning only 53 this year, Boomers will remain part of our multigenerational workforce for years to come.

DIVERSE WORKPLACE Individuals can control only themselves, and all age groups are responsible for seeing the best in others. Senior leaders and HR professionals attempting to position their organizations to effectively engage and lead all five generations should start by asking these powerful questions: • How capable and equipped are our leaders to adapt to a diverse workforce? • What do our people need to effectively navigate our systems, processes, and culture? • How do we leverage our millennial workforce as a competitive advantage? Intergenerational conflict is not new, but intentionally leading all five generations in our fast-paced, interconnected and competitive world will bring distinct advantages as organizations seek to drive their business. Jeff Lucier is the founder of Aspirant Leadership Coaching & Consulting. He can be reached at jefflucier@aspirant.ca.

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LOOKING TO NETWORK AND LEARN FROM OTHER PROFESSIONALS IN VARIOUS INDUSTRIES? HRPA Ottawa Chapter hosts a variety of events throughout the year. Visit www.hrpa.ca/HRPAChapters/Ottawa for details.

How to create a learning culture ®

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one are the days when an education lasted a whole career. The world of work is evolving quickly and organizations can’t expect to rely on outdated activities, hierarchies and processes to keep up. Here are a few sobering statistics that paint a picture of change in the workplace: • Skills acquired during formal education are rapidly out of date, with estimates that nearly 50 per cent of subject knowledge obtained during the first year of a four-year technical degree will become outdated by the time students graduate. • The World Economic Forum also reports that by 2020, more than a third of desired core skill sets of most occupations will be comprised of skills that are not considered crucial today. • According to Deloitte, 90 per cent of CEOs believe their company is facing disruptive change driven by digital technologies, and yet 70 per cent say that their organization lacks the skills required to adapt.

Combined with the disinterest inherent in today’s typically disengaged workforce, many organizations face an uphill battle. If we accept that teams need to be engaged and ready to adapt to changes as they occur, and that knowledge and skills face a continual decline towards obsoletion, learning is the obvious answer as to how organizations can keep their teams competitive.

CONDITIONS FOR ENGAGEMENT Leaders should not think of learning as a one-off event and instead work towards creating a learning culture – an environment focused on evaluating knowledge gaps, supporting skills acquisition, providing a space to practice new competencies on-the-job and embedding learning at the team level. These elements will create the conditions required for engagement and agility. Most importantly, embedding learning in daily operations will improve business outcomes. Organizations with a strong learning culture are better equipped to navigate the shifting business landscape. CEB identifies three elements to creating a productive learning culture: opportunity, capability and environment. Opportunity refers to resources and

materials. Content is ubiquitous. A quick search will reveal a myriad of online courses, articles, tutorials and resources to teach just about any skill you’d care to learn. To create opportunities, organizations must curate the resources that are relevant to their employees, and create a culture that views learning as a priority. Capability is related to the ability to learn effectively. Only 10 per cent of learning occurs in a formal educational setting, while 20 per cent occurs in peer-to-peer interactions and a staggering 70 per cent through practice and application. The role of organizations should be to create the conditions that allow employees to learn by doing. Learning environment considers the question of whether an organization’s culture allows people to ask others for help, to take the extra time required to look up answers, and to brainstorm solutions. Are team members supported by their managers in pursuit of new skills? Leaders at all levels of the organization should model learning to their teams. Teams should be building skills needed to face change as it arrives. Organizations need engaged, agile employees who can think strategically, collaborate effectively and engage with change. An effective learning culture will be a differentiating factor between the organizations that thrive, and those that get left behind. Sara Saddington is the Managing Editor for Actionable.co. She can be contacted at info@ claritigroup.ca.

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FALL 2017 HR UPDATE 9


THE CHANGING FACE OF LEGAL LEADERSHIP IN OTTAWA Law firms are looking beyond traditional candidates to bring entrepreneurial mindset, fresh perspectives to profession steeped in history

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he legal profession is about to undergo unprecedented change, and law firms are working hard to stay ahead of the curve. For Nelligan O’Brien Payne LLP, that meant looking outside the profession when recruiting its chief operating officer. Instead of going the traditional route of hiring a lawyer to oversee the firm’s Ottawa office, the company brought in top talent from the tech sector. And, for a profession that is steeped in history, it was seen as an incredibly bold move. “I bring a new perspective – a different set of eyes to any problem or any issue,” explains Mia Hempey, Nelligan O’Brien Payne’s chief operating officer. “I was really impressed by how innovative the firm was to see the value of bringing a business person into the role who had no legal industry experience.” At 48, Hempey is one of the youngest members of the firm’s executive team, and she brings with her a keen ability to navigate disruptive change and empowers others to embrace it. In the legal sector, that change means updating the billable hour structure to make it more client-focused, breaking down the silos that exist between the legal team and support staff, succession planning and embracing new technology. “Lawyers are professionally trained to analyze risks, so they look at all the risks that are possible in every situation,” Ms. Hempey says. “Whereas I come with an entrepreneurial background, and I look at the probability of risk. I can make a timely decision with limited information, and once I make that decision I throw my energy into making it a success.” One of her biggest priorities for the next year is working to incorporate millennials and their working style into the environment. “You really have to take a different approach to managing millennials. They want to understand the purpose and why

you are asking them to do something,” she says. “It may take a little more time and patience to explain and provide the detail they require, but it’s worth it.” MOVING BEYOND HIERARCHICAL SYSTEMS Down the street at another law firm, McMillan LLP is also revamping its team. As part of a national initiative to reflect a younger demographic, the company appointed 40-year-old Martin Thompson as its office management partner in January 2016. “Certainly it can be a bit stressful being in this position at a young age, but I very much welcomed the challenge,” Mr. Thompson says. “For this role, listening skills are very important, and I have always been a proponent of listening when people are talking, as opposed to just preparing to speak.” Mr. Thompson sees the composition of the office transforming, moving away from the traditional hierarchical system to a more horizontal management style that is focused on collaboration and teamwork. “You need to be able to connect with everyone on the team,” he says. “And understand and respect the unique role each person plays and how it all works together.” One of the biggest challenges facing Mr. Thompson is the constant struggle to find that perfect balance between his work and his home life. With two young daughters, he has made it a priority to schedule dedicated family time so he can be there for the girls’ dance recitals and ski lessons. “It’s tough to set those boundaries, especially when you are connected pretty much all the time,” Mr. Thompson says. “You really need to carve out that time so that you can be fully present. It’s required some discipline, but the benefits are significant.”

MIA HEMPEY IS THE CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER OF NELLIGAN O’BRIEN PAYNE. Photo by Mark Holleron

MARTIN THOMPSON IS THE OFFICE MANAGEMENT PARTNER AT MCMILLAN LLP. Photo by Mark Holleron

“I come with an entrepreneurial background, and I look at the probability of risk.” MIA HEMPEY, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER, NELLIGAN O’BRIEN PAYNE

– By Shannon Bain

Bill 148: The role of HR professionals

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n February 2015, Ontario’s labour minister initiated the Changing Workplaces Review to consider the broader issues affecting the workplace and assess how the current labour and employment law framework addresses these trends and issues. In response, Ontario introduced Bill 148, the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act on June 1, 2017. The role of HR professionals as advisors,

10 HR UPDATE FALL 2017

educators and advocates will become even more prominent as the landscape evolves in light of Bill 148’s proposed changes. As business partners, HR professionals will play an important role in ensuring that employee handbooks, policy manuals and collective agreements reflect the new provisions of Bill 148, together with the proposed changes to the Employment Standards Act and the Labour Relations Act.

These changes will affect pay and benefits, scheduling rules and statutory leave provisions in addition to providing for specific penalties for the misclassification of employees as independent contractors, among other important changes. If we are to remain ahead of the coming changes, we will need to open a dialogue within our organizations with employees, leaders and unions. Outside our organizations,

we will need to establish links with other worker advocacy groups and employment standards officers. The goal is to develop highlevel educational materials based on the new legislation, aimed at creating better workplaces in Ontario by making the act easy to access, understand and administer. Karen Brownrigg is the founder and CEO of iHR Advisory Services.

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HRPAOTTAWA.CA

THE WORKPLACE IS CHANGING. HERE’S HOW YOUR COMPENSATION STRATEGY NEEDS TO EVOLVE. N

PENSIO

Organizations can capitalize on workforce trends to improve talent retention

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cross Canada, firms are looking to become more competitive. Mercer’s recent 2017/2018 Compensation Planning Survey found that salary increases are largely holding steady, with a national average salary increase of 2.5 per cent in 2018; up slightly from 2.4 per cent in 2017. The survey also found that top performers are receiving significantly larger increases – up to 1.8 times higher than those average performers will receive. In other words, employers are beginning to make tentative first steps towards growth by making strategic investments in top talent. It is important to ensure that employers get that investment right. If your organization is looking to improve its retention of top employees, or ensure it is armed with the people it needs to succeed in the workplace of the future, compensation planning decisions cannot be made in a vacuum. Compensation and rewards plans must be built as part of a broader, future-oriented talent strategy. And that means looking at the

trends transforming the global workplace. At Mercer, our 2017 Global Talent Trends study identified four trends that employers need to be mindful of when building their talent strategies: GROWTH BY DESIGN An increasingly robust economy is boosting business confidence from coast to coast; businesses are increasingly willing to reorient their organizations to grow and thrive. For 46 per cent of organizations polled in Canada, this means altering job evaluation methods in response to the changing workplace. A SHIFT IN WHAT WE VALUE There is an increased focus this year on the contractual aspects of the employment equation: pay competitiveness, benefits and job security. Employees want to understand how their rewards are being calculated, and the vast majority – 97 per cent of those polled in Canada – say they want to be recognized and rewarded for a wider range of contributions.

A WORKPLACE FOR ME Companies are moving beyond segmented pay and benefits to a more nuanced value proposition – one that responds to individual interests and is brought alive through technology. This is especially evident in trends such as flexible working. Companies looking to keep the talent they require should look to invest not only in pay and benefits, but also in a culture that supports flexibility, and the technology to make that flexibility real. THE QUEST FOR INSIGHT As the workplace becomes more digital, the amount of data produced by organizations will increase exponentially. Companies that invest in the analytics necessary to derive workplace

insights from this data are armed with the tools needed to make better – and more strategic – decisions. The organization of the future is an organization that intends to grow, and is willing to make the changes necessary to achieve that growth. It understands employee preference and the power of personalization. And it uses all the data at its disposal to ensure executives can make the best, most well-informed decisions possible. Cynthia MacFarlane is a principal in Mercer’s Ottawa career practice, specializing in total rewards, classification strategy, human resources strategy and performance management.

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Using a hybrid approach to grow your own leaders HOW TO EFFECTIVELY CREATE A LEADERSHIP PIPELINE USING TALENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

L 50 % than the Canadian national average.

ess than one-third of the world’s entire workforce is fully engaged when they come to work. Ineffective leadership has proven to be a key contributor to both low engagement and low productivity in the workplace – so much so that Gallup’s 2014 State of the American Workplace report estimated that disengaged employees cost the U.S. economy approximately $550 billion per year in lost productivity. Of that, an average $86 billion is lost annually as a result of disengaged leadership.

A LEADERSHIP SHORTFALL The leadership shortage is one of the biggest barriers to the growth, prosperity and sustainability of organizations. In fact, developing new leaders is the top talent challenge facing organizations worldwide, with 86 per cent of companies rating it “urgent” or “important.” This leadership talent challenge becomes even more pressing as aging leaders retire and millennials assume leadership roles. Millennials will be our future leaders, yet many organizations are not adequately preparing them. These organizations are choosing not to invest in their current millennial workforce because of their proclivity to “job-hop.” According to Stephen Burnett, professor of management and strategy at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, millennials’ loyalty is something a company must earn. It is understood that millennials job-hop when they see that they won’t be able to fulfill their career goals with their current employer. Once they see the organization is making an investment in them, for many, their trust and loyalty will follow.

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The key to retaining and engaging your millennial workforce is to provide them with the professional development and stretch assignments they need to advance their career. According to a 2015 Mercer survey, “more than three-quarters (78 per cent) of employees report they would stay with their current employer if they knew their career path.” These conditions actually pose a tremendous opportunity for organizations that choose to focus on growing their own leaders. Organizations that invest in their workforce have a competitive advantage over those that choose to do nothing or to recruit leaders from outside. This advantage comes from developing quality talent, retaining engaged employees and developing aspiring leaders Talent development programs that include leadership development

The key to retaining and engaging your millennial workforce is to provide them with the professional development and stretch assignments they need to advance their career. programming create a leadership pipeline with a pool of strong internal candidates who know and trust your organization. View these developmental efforts as parallel to your efforts to attract and retain customer loyalty. Treat your employees like your customers, and you will gain their loyalty.

OFF-THE-SHELF, CUSTOM CONTENT OR…? Investing in talent development and, ultimately, in leadership development will keep your people engaged, productive and loyal as well as feeding your leadership pipeline into the future. The question then becomes whether you should buy off-the-shelf leadership development courseware or customize the content. The biggest advantage of customization is that you get exactly what you want. The courses are customized to your organization, values and culture. The downside is cost. They can be quite expensive and may

require more internal resources if the development takes place in house. Off-the-shelf content is typically less expensive, but the courses are not customized to your organization. There is no real opportunity to shape loyalty by exploring the values and culture upon which the organization is built. However, there is a third alternative: a hybrid approach that involves selecting offthe-shelf courseware content that is then customized to reflect your organization. A hybrid leadership development program captures the best of both worlds: It retains the main benefits of a custom solution, but comes at a lower cost. Adopting a hybrid approach to developing quality leaders from within your organization will become your secret recipe for retaining engaged employees, developing aspiring leaders and staying competitive in the marketplace. Alexandra Salamis is a leadership coach and organizational consultant with more than 25 years’ experience.

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BECOME A VOLUNTEER WITH HRPA OTTAWA CHAPTER! Volunteers are integral to HRPA’s success. Current volunteer opportunities with HRPA Ottawa Chapter include:​​ • • •

Professional development / networking committee chair; Keep in Touch committee member; and Mentoring committee member

CHRP members who volunteer with HRPA are eligible for CPD hours. Apply to become a volunteer at ivolunteer.hrpa.ca/home.

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HRPA Ottawa Photo Gallery Check out additional photos from our recent events. hrpaottawa.ca

COVER STORY HR LESSONS FROM ASSENT COMPLIANCE CEO ANDREW WAITMAN

WHO WILL BE Ottawa company is cultivating a culture where employees are empowered and engaged REPLACED BY M A ROBOT? any of us transition into different careers, but it’s rare to go from being one of Canada’s most successful venture capitalists to a high-growth CEO. Even more rare is to do it twice. Andrew Waitman is the CEO of Assent Compliance, an Ottawa-based firm that specializes in software that ensures multinational firms and their suppliers are following an ever-growing list of government regulations on everything from human rights to health and safety standards. The company’s revenues increased at a compound growth rateman of 121 s theannual barriers between andper cent over themachine past three years and the teamhow has continue to dissolve, grown from todone moreand thanwho 275does employees work25 gets it will in less than three years. More recently, Assent continue to change dramatically. To prepare made byrevolution, landing a $40-million for thisheadlines significant business and series-B equity HR leaders needinvestment. to understand how to Spendtechnology some timetoatreplace Assentor and one sees leverage complement thathuman the company is cultivating culture the workforce in order toa improve where employees are empowered and also productivity and business results. They engaged. wantto tomanage talk less the about how of need to beThey prepared impact they gotassociated here but rather discuss where they of change with the changing nature are going. work and the workforce. We recently caught up with Andrew Waitman at the cafe where he often hosts his

“Coffee with the CEO” sessions, near Assent’s Ottawa office. We wanted to learn from one of the city’s successful CEOs about the influence of HR on his career.

Q: YOU WERE INSTRUMENTAL IN BUILDING A STRATEGIC HR TEAM AT BOTH YOUR LAST COMPANY, PYTHIAN, AND ASSENT. WHAT IS THE STRATEGIC VALUE OF HR?

What business and HR leaders need to know

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HOW CAN A: MyTECHNOLOGY first CEO role was in a services AFFECT business in JOBS which your people are your

product. Youhas need take to care of people so Technology theto ability have a positive they take impact oncare jobsof in your threecustomers. ways, eachSecond, of which we operate in a highly competitive, highprovide potential costs savings as well as functioning knowledge employee work opportunities to better leverage human environment in which the best-of-the-best, workers. world-class folks have optionality … they have choices. Without proactive, thoughtful REPLACING HUMAN WORKERS and first strategic attention to peoplecan initiatives, The way that organizations use programs, leadership (employees) technology to improveand the culture, outcome of a will seekjob work environments that genuinely specific function is by completely replacing care about (their staff ).

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MENTORING 101 Looking to give back to the HR community by becoming a mentor? Searching for someone to help you progress in your career? Join us for an opportunity to spend an evening with Mentor City president Shawn Mintz, who will be in Ottawa to share how to use the Mentor City platform. TIME: 5:30 P.M. TO 9 P.M. LOCATION: SALA SAN MARCO (215 PRESTON ST.)

“You need to take care of people so they take care of your customers.” Q: AS A VENTURE CAPITALIST, YOU HELPED A LOT OF COMPANIES SUCCEED. YOU ALSO SAW MANY COMPANIES FAIL. WHAT INFLUENCE DID HR HAVE IN THE COMPANIES THAT SUCCEEDED?

Q: WHAT TRAITS DO YOU LOOK FOR WHEN HIRING TOP TALENT FOR YOUR TEAM? A: I seek talent that’s quick, clever and

curious, who are coachable and who are selfdriven, self-aware, exercise self-control and are ambitious and have a winning mentality. Folks who have a strong work ethic who know how to make a difference in any context in which they get involved.

Q: WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE JOB INTERVIEW QUESTION? A: How would your current team lead/

Q: WHAT IS ONE THING THAT EVERY COMPANY CAN DO TODAY TO SHOW THEIR EMPLOYEES THAT THEY ARE VALUED? A: Cupcakes! Kidding. Be transparent.

Communicate. Communicate. Keep communicating. Encourage communication, collaboration and cooperation toward coherence. Heidi Hauver is the CHRO and managing partner of Keynote HR.

manager describe you?

Q: HOW DO YOU STAY CONNECTED WITH YOUR EMPLOYEES? A: Walking around. Coffee-with-the CEO. Being curious.

“HOW WOULD YOUR CURRENT MANAGER DESCRIBE YOU?” IS A FAVOURITE INTERVIEW QUESTION OF ASSENT COMPLIANCE CEO ANDREW WAITMAN.

A: In the early stages of a company, HR plays a critical role in the impute of a company. Just as sales account executives and business development reps can have a profound impact on the success of outbound sales and prospective customer engagement, HR can plan, coach and create the right conditions for new employee engagement including onboarding, setting expectations and handling issues post-start with check-ins and working with managers for fit and contentment.

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Q: WHEN DID YOU HIRE YOUR FIRST HR PROFESSIONAL AT ASSENT? A: It was the very first hire by me at Assent,

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which was then very small (less than 15 people). The person was an HR generalist who assisted me with a myriad of hiring that was required.

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TOP 20 What was your best and worst subjects in school? Computer programming and French

and when you want for a surprisingly cost-effective price. When are you most productive? 10 p.m.

What was your first job? Paperboy

What is the best thing about being a CEO? I get to meet amazing people who love what they do.

What’s the best advice you ever took? Don’t sweat the small stuff.

What is the most challenging thing about being a CEO? Judging what’s important (right) now.

What tip you would share with new graduates? Read a book on artificial intelligence.

What is one word that describes your leadership style? Curiosity. Lifelong learning

What book are you reading? Master Algorithm

Do you have whiteboards in your office? Writing on walls is expensive. Of course.

What’s your favourite quote? All things in moderation (Aristotle) What is one thing that surprises you about business? How much luck / serendipity plays a role

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Describe an experience that has influenced you the most as a leader Knowing when to move on. Name a CEO that inspires you. Jeff Bezos

What motivates you? Life is short ... and there is so much juice in life to experience.

If you weren’t a CEO, what would you be? Venture capitalist

When was the last time you worked a 40-hour work week? Never.

Name an organization that you always make time for. Anyone teaching the next generation

What is the best (most recent) feedback you received from one of your employees? “Thanks for paying for our yoga classes.”

Favorite app? Kindle

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www.pmctraining.com FALL 2017 HR UPDATE 15


The employee benefit you’ve been overlooking THE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN ABOUT FUNERAL PLANNING IS VALUABLE FOR ALL EMPLOYEES

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mployers who care about their employees’ welfare as they transition into retirement often seek to assist them by providing valuable information on post-retirement matters such as pension and benefits, financial matters, retirement options and long-term care considerations. Rarely, however, do employers include education on funeral planning. Most people will retire, some will face disabilities and possibly need long-term care, but every one of us is guaranteed to eventually die. Ironically, despite this inescapable eventuality, very few people take the opportunity to plan on how they would like to be remembered and the great majority are unaware of all their options. The opportunity to learn about funeral planning options and considerations is actually a benefit to all employees, as many have to assist with elderly family members and some simply like to plan ahead. Planning in advance is something everyone can do on their own, from start to finish, as is editing as necessary. To be clear, planning does not require signing up with a funeral home and pre-paying.

PLANNING AND OPTIONS Most people would agree that life’s greatest moments are worth celebrating. Births, graduations, awards, achievements, anniversaries, birthdays and retirements are often marked by some special event to commemorate the occasion.

remembering it for years with fond memories. Imagine creating those same memories for loved ones, friends and family at one’s funeral. There is power and connection in a meaningful, personalized commemorative funeral event that helps people grieve and heal in a healthy way. The key to creating a memorable commemoration of life is planning – in advance. Employees who are planning their retirement, or looking after elderly persons, should plan for this eventuality too. Without advance knowledge of the deceased’s wishes,

Providing employees with funeral planning education and resources is a great value add to their total rewards that completes the retirement benefits offerings Yet, when it comes to death – the final chapter of each person’s very unique life – the ubiquitous traditional funeral whitewashes the life of the deceased rather than commemorating a distinctive life. Sadly, this is overwhelmingly due to lack of awareness regarding planning and options. Everyone has a unique life story, their own personal and eclectic collection of experiences, adventures, personality traits, tastes, accomplishments, interests, cherished memories and more. A great event has people

the abruptness of a death curtails the time that loved ones have to plan and research options, of which there are many. If cremation is selected – the preference for two-thirds of Canadians – the options are almost limitless to create a meaningful and memorable celebration of life. Without advance knowledge of the deceased’s wishes, loved ones face the stressful situation of hastily making many decisions (up to 100!) within the span of a couple of days, often picking from a limited

menu of options offered by a funeral home, and second-guessing themselves in the process and afterwards. Providing employees with useful information to help them plan how they would like their life commemorated has many significant benefits on both practical and emotional levels. These include: • The ability to create the memorable experience they would like for their family, friends and loved ones to laugh, cry, grieve and say a final goodbye; • The opportunity to ease the burden on loved ones by making the decisions in advance and thereby eliminate emotional decisions, second-guessing and pressure; • Peace of mind knowing that their wishes are articulated and that money will be spent according to those wishes, likely saving thousands of dollars that might otherwise be spent under pressure and emotional duress. For employers, providing employees with funeral planning education and resources is a great value add to their total rewards that completes the retirement benefits offering and complements other wellness benefits. Given the reality of today’s demographics, employees will appreciate this unique, and thoughtful, benefit. Irene Lis is the founder of Aligned People Strategies and vice-president of HR Consulting at Stratford Managers. She can be reached at irene@ylc.care.

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How leaders can teach resilience STEPS TO BUILDING MENTAL TOUGHNESS

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y first job in sales at a small Canadian printing company more than 20 years ago was far from easy or glamorous. I sold printers out of a van and had to meet a daily quota of at least 30 cold calls. This entailed lugging a printer from my van into prospective customers’ offices to provide demonstrations and free trials. I was tempted to hand back the keys to my van and pack it in many times, but I stuck it out for a year – a lifetime in that role. Along the way I discovered I had a trait that has served me well throughout my career and positioned me to be an effective corporate leader: resilience. Persevering in the face of adversity is critical to getting ahead. It has the power to take us farther than IQ, education or experience alone. It’s applicable across all roles and all lines of business in every industry around the world. And yet, we don’t spend nearly enough time developing resilience in our workforce. While some people seem to be born with thicker skins, for most of us resilience is a skill that we need to learn and practise.

RESILIENCY TRAINING American psychologist Dr. Martin Seligman has spent the last 30 years studying resiliency to understand why some people rebound after a setback and why others fall into a state of learned helplessness. He and his team at the University of Pennsylvania created the Penn Resiliency

Program. They train businesses in resiliency and reduce the number of those who struggle in adversity and increase the number of those who grow. Corporate leaders must first help employees build mental toughness. This requires recognizing their emotional response to failure is based solely on their own beliefs about what it means to fail.

Resilience is a skill that we need to learn and practise. If they believe failure means not getting something right on the first try, they’ll stop trying. Being mentally tough means you know this moment is temporary and you have the emotional sophistication to shake off negative thoughts and try again. Next, employees need to learn to recognize their unique strengths and how they make a positive contribution to the project or the organization. This helps to give employees the confidence to innovate and push forward, even after temporary

setbacks. The last step is about changing the way we communicate and respond to our colleagues. Responding in an active and constructive way versus a passive or dismissive way will help them become more resilient. Think about the manager that merely says, “Good work,” in a performance review versus the one that praises specific achievements, their value and a worker’s personal growth. Employees of the second type of manager will rebound much quicker from a setback because they have an active and engaged relationship and can see their value.

EQUIPPING EMPLOYEES Studies have shown that resilient people are happier and have higher life satisfaction. In the workplace, resilient people experience less stress and are able to grow in their careers from what they have learned from their challenges or setbacks. They take less time off, are more productive and can adapt more quickly to change. The rapidly expanding global market is transforming the way we work and confronting organizations with an

unprecedented pace of change. Change can be a force of good, pushing individuals to learn and develop and drive organizations to evolve and grow. It can also become overwhelming for employees and businesses, if they are ill-prepared. As leaders we need to focus on equipping our employees with the resilience and the mental agility to adapt and thrive in this ever-changing world. We all want to be happy, productive and successful, while delivering incredible value to our customers and the people with whom we work. Our success is not guaranteed and our failures don’t need to define our careers. It’s our optimism and resilience that will help us respond positively to challenging situations and will give us the opportunity to dream big and push forward. As leaders, we can help create resilient employees who can steer through change, pressure, uncertainty and ambiguity and have the coping strategies to manage stress, overcome setbacks and continue to innovate. Ernie Philip is senior vice-president of document outsourcing services at Xerox Canada.

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FALL 2017 HR UPDATE 17


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ACCOMMODATING EMPLOYEES’ CHILDCARE REQUIREMENTS In leading case, court finds that customs inspector can’t be forced to work rotating shifts because of parental obligations

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oth the federal Canadian Human Rights Act, and the Ontario Human Rights Code impose a legal duty on employers to refrain from engaging in discrimination on the basis of “family status.” While the Ontario legislation prescribes a definition of family status – “being in a parent and child relationship” – the federal legislation is silent. Nonetheless, in the leading case of Canada (Attorney General) v. Johnstone, the Federal Court of Appeal held that employers have a duty to accommodate “childcare obligations” as a component of their duty to accommodate an employee’s “family status.” Here’s a brief summary of the facts in that case. Ms. Johnstone worked for the Canada Border Services Agency as a customs agent at Toronto Pearson International Airport, as did her husband. CBSA employees worked varying and rotating shifts. In January 2003, following the birth of her first child, Ms. Johnstone requested accommodation by way of a fixed daytime shift schedule that coincided with the childcare available to her. CBSA was unwilling to provide Ms. Johnstone with fixed shifts on the basis of an unofficial policy that said the she would have to work varying shifts, unless she had a legitimate reason for accommodation. After confirming that “family status”

includes childcare obligations, the Federal Court of Appeal added the following caveats: It is also important not to trivialize human rights legislation by extending human rights protection to personal family choices, such as participation of children in dance classes, sports events like hockey tournaments, and similar voluntary activities. The childcare obligations that are contemplated under family status should be those that have immutable or constructively immutable characteristics, such as those that form an integral component of the legal relationship between a parent and a child. Put another way, the parental obligations whose fulfillment is protected by the Canadian Human Rights Act are those whose non-fulfillment engages the parent’s legal responsibility to the child. At its most basic, accommodation of family status requires employers to accommodate parental obligations that engage the parent’s legal responsibility for the child, such as childcare obligations, as opposed to personal choices. Although the Johnstone case concerned childcare obligations, cases concerning the obligation to provide care to a parent are not unprecedented and only likely to increase. In the case of Misetich v. Value Village Stores Inc., the employee claimed discrimination on

the basis of her need to provide eldercare. Like all requests for accommodation, employers must pause and consider all the possible ways by which the employee’s care obligations could potentially be accommodated. If the employer can implement one of the possible accommodations, without causing undue hardship on the employer

– considering the cost, any outside sources of funding and aby health and safety requirements – then such accommodation must be provided lest a complaint of discrimination be raised. Sean Bawden is a partner with the law firm Kelly Santini LLP, specializing in employment law and civil litigation.

An HR guide to travel safety and security QUESTIONS TO ASK PRIOR TO DEPARTURE

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he risks associated with travel continue to increase. Much of that time is spent with employees. So let’s help managers make the most of their everyday conversations. Extreme weather events, such as this year’s hurricanes that wreaked havoc across Texas, Florida and several Caribbean countries, occur with seemingly greater frequency. Meanwhile, domestic and international terrorist attacks have sent violent shockwaves through otherwise peaceful cities. But despite these recent events, the vast majority of travel will be safe, uneventful and, hopefully, an amazing experience. Nonetheless, it is important to take the time to plan. Imagine a simple scenario where you have arrived for work in a town with which you are not familiar. Your plane lands, you clear customs and then head to the reception area to meet your arranged driver. Unbeknownst to you, the driver was in a motor vehicle accident while en route and does not arrive. 18 HR UPDATE FALL 2017

Does your organization have a travel security program? What will you do? It is important to take the time to research and plan for these eventualities before they happen, and not at the moment they appear.

PRE-TRAVEL QUESTIONS While not an exhaustive list, here are a few simple questions you should always ask yourself before you travel:

• Does my cell phone work where I’m travelling? If not, what is my plan to stay in touch? • If there is a problem with my hotel, do I have a backup in mind that is convenient to my travel (close to meetings, or in a safe neighbourhood)? • If my driver does not show up, or there are no taxis, do I have contact information for an alternate? • Have I researched the local holidays (which can cause local businesses to close for several straight days) and current political environment? Have I been following the local news so that I get a sense of what is happening where I’m travelling? • Where is the nearest medical facility that can provide me with adequate care should I need it? These common sense tips, and the time taken to plan in advance, will promote safer and more secure travel. But what about the organization’s responsibilities? Consider the following questions:

• Does your organization have a travel security program? • Have you been briefed on safety dos and don’ts? • How will your organization respond if there is a safety or security incident while you’re travelling? • Can your organization locate you if phone service goes down? There is a great deal of information that can be provided for each of these questions. It is important that you know what your organization expects of you and what you should expect of your organization. At a minimum, check the Travel Advice and Advisories page published by Global Affairs Canada Whatever the situation, you are the one most responsible for your own safety. Advance planning can greatly enhance your personal security while travelling. Bill Danielsen is chief security officer and manager of administrative services at the International Development Research Centre.

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HRPA Designations Speak For Themselves Canadian businesses agree*

86% of jobs “prefer or require” CHRP, CHRL, or CHRE **

74%

of businesses believe a designation from HRPA enhances their view of HR’s ability to find the right people for the right job *

58% of businesses believe a designation from HRPA changes the strategic positioning of HR in the organization *

Businesses need HRPA designated professionals. HRPA equips HR professionals to take businesses to peak performance thanks to CHRP, CHRL and CHRE designations. Businesses can trust they’ve got the right person to help lead their organization forward. Hire the professionals who will lead your business forward. hrpa.ca * March 2017 national LegerWeb survey of 250 C-level business executives, accurate +/- 6.2%, 19 times out of 20 ** 2016 annual average of 2,200 Hire Authority job postings

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FALL 2017 HR UPDATE 19


HR UPDATE

ional camaraderie Your resource for profess and fresh insights.

RCE PROFESSIONALS THE HUMAN RESOU

ATION A CHAPTER PUBLIC ASSOCIATION OTTAW

HR

HR UPDATE

UPDATE

Your resource for professional camaraderie and fresh insights.

The blended workforce HOW TO COMBINE CONTRACTORS F AND FULL-TIME STAF TO BUILD AN AGILE ORGANIZATION AL

JOURN OTTAWA BUSINESS

VOLUME 21 • ISSUE

15 • NOVEMBER 6 2017

THE LABOUR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW EXPERTS Emond Harnden is trusted, not simply as advisors, but as an integrated member of our clients’ HR departments and senior management teams. We are devoted exclusively to advising management on labour relations and employment matters. It’s a forward-thinking approach to labour law.

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20 HR UPDATE FALL 2017

THE HUMAN RESOURCE PROFESSIONALS ASSOCIATION OTTAWA CHAPTER PUBLICATION •

@OttawaHRPA

HR Update November 6, 2017  
HR Update November 6, 2017  

The Human Resource Professionals Association Ottawa chapter publication