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THIS ISSUE: Get Out the Vote / Polarized Congress / Tax Update / Oil Mist & Vapor

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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012 NTMA.ORG

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TECHNOLOGY . BUSINESS . EDUCATION . EVENTS . DIRECTORY

Inside: SHARING YOUR MISSION AND VISION GETTING EMPLOYEES ENGAGED AND COMMITTED TO A PURPOSE

50 POLICIES IMPROVE U.S COMPETITIVENESS LEARN ABOUT RECOMMENDATIONS ORGANIZED AROUND THE ‘4Ts’ OF TECHNOLOGY, TAX, TRADE AND TALENT

COMPOSITE MACHINING TOOLS AND METHODS MAKE NEW IN-ROADS TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE AND RESULTS

THE PN SPECIAL REPORT

STAY SHARP / IN YOUR CHANGING BUSINESS CLIMATE /

BOOST SHORT-TERM RECOVERY AND LONG-TERM PROSPERITY

YOUR GUIDE TO EVERY NTMA CHAPTER MEMBER IN:

THE COMPETITIVENESS ISSUE

CLEVELAND, MICHIANA AND NORTHWESTERN PENNSYLVANIA beginning on p.22


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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012 VOLUME 1 • ISSUE 6

Contents 12 16 21

Features

Departments

50 POLICIES TO IMPROVE U.S. MANUFACTURING COMPETITIVENESS

03 Executives’ Letter

Learn about recommendations organized around federal policies regarding the “4Ts” of technology, tax, trade, and talent, as well as policies to increase access to capital, reform regulations, and better assess U.S. traded sector competitiveness.

04 People Power 06 Policy Matters

SUCCESSFUL COMPOSITE MACHINING NEEDS TOOLS AND METHODS TO SUIT EACH APPLICATION

08 Tax Facts 10 Shop Floor 22 Cleveland Chapter Info

A new generation of cutting tools dedicated for composite machining, especially hole-making are making new in-roads to improve performance and results.

24 NW PA Chapter Info

SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE

26 Michiana Chapter Info

OIL MIST & VAPOR In order to know the proper solution to this common problem, it is imperative that we understand the nature of the problem and how it is being created.

OUR MISSION:

“WE JOIN TOGETHER AS MEMBERS OF THE GREAT LAKES REGION PRECISION CUSTOM MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY TO ACHIEVE BUSINESS SUCCESS IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY THROUGH ADVOCACY, ADVICE, NETWORKING, INFORMATION, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.”

The NTMA Great Lakes Region Magazine Featuring Cleveland, Michiana and NW Pennsylvania

PrecisionNews

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & EDITOR Chris Mignella Phone: 602.388.5752 • Fax: 480.970.8501 Email: ExecutiveDirector@arizonatooling.org

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ATMA Safety Team, Jason Duffner, John Guzik, Margaret Jacoby, Michele Nash-Hoff, PN Editors & Sandvik Coromant ADVISORY BOARD Chris Mignella, Tami Adams, Renee Neuendorf, Kelly Schneider

Precision News is published bi-monthly by the Arizona Tooling & Machining Association (ATMA). Opinions expressed are those of the authors or persons quoted and not necessarily those of ATMA or NTMA. While efforts to ensure accuracy are exercised, ATMA assumes no liability for the information contained in either editorial or advertising content. ATMA assumes no responsibility or liability for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. Reproduction in whole or part without the expressed written consent from ATMA is prohibited. Precision News is the registered trade name of this publication. Copyright ©2012 by ATMA. All rights reserved.

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First Word EXECUTIVES’ LETTER

GET OUT THE VOTE! The Cleveland, Northwestern PA, and Michiana Chapters Thank You for your support throughout the first year of Precision News, Great Lakes Edition. We hope you have found the magazine to provide valuable information that has enhanced your business. One of the featured articles each issue is a political advocacy update from NTMA's One Voice. In October, One Voice launched its Get out The Vote (GoTV) efforts to register manufacturers around the country and encourage them to vote on November 6. Manufacturers and their families account for 7% of the voting age population – a crucial number in a Presidential election which may be decided by only 1 or 2 percentage points. The manufacturing GoTV program coincides with the release of the new One Voice website, filled with resources for manufacturers on registering to vote, Congressional voting scorecards, and information on how to schedule a visit with your elected officials.

With this year’s energetic election, a lot is on the line for manufacturers.

With this year’s energetic election, a lot is on the line for manufacturers. On January 1, 2013, $5.4 trillion in tax increases begin, $1.2 trillion in defense and domestic budget cuts start due to sequestration, and Congress still has to act on bills to help fill the 600,000 skilled manufacturing jobs still open. One Voice members have testified before Congress on tax reform, high fuel prices and energy policy, regulations, and continue to lead the way for small and medium sized manufacturing on workforce development. Visit www.metalworkingadvocate.com to learn more about One Voice positions on important policy to strengthen manufacturing in America. If you are not already receiving updates from One Voice, subscribe through the site to stay up to date on the latest from our nation's capital through the Washington Wire, Action Alerts, and Weekly News Clips. Check out the Resources section for more information on how members of Congress score on the One Voice priorities list and how to register to vote. One Voice is the leading resource for small and medium sized businesses manufacturing in America and the joint federal advocacy program founded by the National Tooling and Machining Association and the Precision Metalforming Association. As the leading voice for small and medium sized manufacturers, One Voice identifies specific issues which have the greatest impact on manufacturing in America. The Associations are constantly working with their member companies to determine which issues are most important to them. At One Voice, the members decide what is important and arms the One Voice lobbying team in Washington with the tools they need to represent the industry on Capitol Hill and with the Administration.

TAMI ADAMS Northwestern PA Chapter 814.720.0094

RENEE NEUENDORF Cleveland Chapter 440.360.0131

KELLY SCHNEIDER Michiana Chapter 574.220.9111

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People Power INFORMATION FOR ACTION

Sharing the Mission and Vision…Getting All Employees Engaged and Committed

by MARGARET JACOBY, SPHR

Many companies go through the strategic planning process and develop Mission and Vision Statements to articulate the purpose of the business. A lot of work and thought goes into crafting the documents. Once the work is done, the beautiful notebook is placed on a shelf in the President’s office and proceeds to gather dust.

Why bother with this process if the results (the Mission and Vision Statements) are “shelved” and not shared? It is critical to share the mission and vision of the company with all employees. When employees understand the mission and vision, it becomes ingrained in the work environment and amazing things begin to happen. Loyalty to the company mission does not come easily. The loyalty must be built one employee at a time, much like building trust. The loyalty is easy to tear down and the challenge is to build it and maintain it. How to communicate those values:

• Post the Mission and Vision statements in the employee manual • Have professionally made copies and post them in the break room, the reception area and in places employees frequent within the workspace • Be sure they are articulated in brochures, job vacancy postings, job applications • Include them on your Intranet or your website, social media pages, etc. • Include discussion of the mission with new hires as part of the on-boarding process As organizations progress over time, their missions and visions can change. Periodically, ask your staff to share their ideas about where the organization is going. Tape easel paper on walls and ask for new vision/mission statements. Brainstorm new ideas with the employees. When employee ideas are valued, they are more committed to aligning their personal success with that of the organization. As noted in the accompanying article, make sure that the “quiet voices” of your organization are encouraged to participate when brainstorming for new ideas. They may tend to hold back, but you certainly want their input. After all, they’re driven by logic and reflection and they are concerned about quality, so they certainly should be heard.

MARGARET JACOBY is the president of MJ Management Solutions, Inc. She can be reached at margaret@mjms.net Learn more at: www.mjms.net

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Policy Matters BECOME A VOICE FOR CHANGE

Congress is Polarized…And it’s Getting Worse! by JOHN GUZIK

THANKS IN LARGE PART TO PARTISAN BATTLES, this has been the most unproductive Congress ever! Until you look at the last Congress who was slightly more productive, yet anemic. Congressional approval ratings are at an all time low, with the Country’s approval of their lawmakers remaining at about 13% for nearly two years. Yet, election after election we continue to see few major changes in the political make-up of the House and Senate. Some argue it is not the general election in November that is most important, but rather the primary elections. Primaries typically take place in the spring and summer when voter interest is low. Turn out for the primaries often consist of the voters who are in political extremes, selecting the most liberal and conservative candidates on the ballot. This year, the situation will get worse thanks to the mandatory redistricting following the decennial U.S. Census. State legislatures across the country have crafted new

Congressional District lines for all 435 Members of Congress. In most cases, the new district lines were drawn to consolidate both the Republican and Democrat vote, protecting incumbents and eliminating s wing districts. Ten years ago, just after the previous Census, 159 of the 435 districts in Congress were considered swing seats – districts that were rated between plus 5 Democrat to plus 5 Republican. Today after the 2010 Census there are only 99 districts considered swing seats. And, as the election approaches only 62 of the 99 are truly competitive. What we are seeing is the continued and accelerated extinction of conservative Democrats and moderate Republicans in Congress. We see it in Arizona, where the more conservative Republican Congressman David Schweikert defeated the more moderate Republican, Congressman Ben Quayle. In Pennsylvania there were two examples of a more

moderate Democrat Congressman going down in defeat against a more liberal Democrat. Just two years ago, there were 47 self described “Blue Dogs”, conservative Democrats in Congress. Today there are only 26 Blue Dogs serving in the House of Representatives, with several retiring this year. Comparatively, the Congressional Progressive Caucus – a group of the most liberal Democrats in Congress – currently has a membership of 76. The same trend can be seen within the Republican Party. After Republicans gained control of Congress in the 2010 elections, the conservative Republican Study Committee saw their membership balloon to 164 members in the House. The moderate Republican Main Street Partnership, however, currently only totals 43 members. These extremes lead to more polarization in Congress, with members unwilling to work across the aisle with their colleagues as they risk repercussions from the

fyi: Congressional approval ratings are at an all time low, with the Country’s approval of their lawmakers remaining at about 13% for nearly two years. - Recent polling data

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+ ONE ONLY NEEDS TO LOOK AT THE CONGRESSIONAL VOTES FOR THE TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM (TARP), THE CONTROVERSIAL “FINANCIAL SERVICES BAILOUT” LEGISLATION. OF THE 66 REPUBLICANS WHO VOTED FOR THE BILL, 32 OF THEM WILL NOT SERVE IN THE NEXT CONGRESS EITHER DUE TO LOSING IN A PRIMARY OR RETIREMENT.

electorate – well not really the entire electorate, just the primary voters. We are seeing it first-hand in our meetings on Capitol Hill. Members of Congress lament how liberal or conservative their new districts have become. These Members often mention how next year they will most likely not be able to vote for X piece of legislation because of the make-up of the new district. One only needs to look at the Congressional votes for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), the controversial “Financial Services

We all need to remember, if Members of Congress do not hear from us, you can be assured they will hear from those who oppose us.

Bailout” legislation. Of the 66 Republicans who voted for the bill, 32 of them will not serve in the next Congress either due to losing in a primary or retirement. The final House vote in 2010 on the health care legislation is another example. Of the 32 Democrats who broke with their party to vote against the bill, only 8 are in contention for a seat in the 113th Congress. We do not believe this trend is healthy but it reinforces why it is so important for manufacturers to get to know their Member of Congress by hosting a plant tour, a CEO Roundtable or responding to our Action Alerts.

JOHN GUZIK is a founding partner of the Franklin Partnership with over 20 years of Capitol Hill and campaign experience. Previously, John served as Chief of Staff for Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp. He also works closely with the Senate Finance Committee on health care, tax, trade, and many other issues Learn more at: www.franklinpartnership.com

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Tax Facts LEARNING AND LOOKING AHEAD

Federal Tax Update for Manufacturers by JASON DUFFNER

As we look to turn the calendar and welcome 2013, manufacturers are facing an uncertain economy, a potential reduction in government spending that will further impact the economy, and unprecedented changes and uncertainty in the tax law. As the political stalemate continues and there is increasing clarity that a compromise will not be reached in Congress, what happens to the tax law on January 1, 2013 and why should manufacturers care? While our political leaders squabble, our business leaders must plan for what is coming and act accordingly. Given the uncertainty ahead, this can be difficult. The following are some of the more significant tax changes affecting manufacturers.

installment sale should consider the potential benefit of electing out of the installment sale and recognize the entire gain in 2012. Owners might also consider deferring the sale of loss securities until 2013 to maximize the benefit of the loss.

TAX RATES Individual Income Taxes The majority of privately owned manufacturers in the United States are taxed as flow through entities (S Corporations, Partnerships, or Sole Proprietors) and any increases to the individual income tax rates or newly imposed taxes will decrease available cash flow for operations in an already tight economy. Beginning January 1, 2013, there’s a mix of expiring tax provisions and newly enacted taxes to be imposed for the first time, both of which increase tax rates.

Dividend Income Another nasty tax increase is on dividend income. Currently qualified dividends are taxed at the capital gains rates, but come 2013 the dividend rates jump back to the ordinary income rates. For high income taxpayers, that could result in a 39.6% income tax plus the new 3.8% investment income surtax discussed below.

Assuming no compromise is made, on January 1, 2013, the graduated individual income tax rates on ordinary income jump from 35% for high income tax payers to 39.6%. Even individual taxpayers in the lower income tax brackets will see a minimum increase of 5%. The rate increases are due to expiring provisions dating back to tax legislation passed during the Bush administration nearly a decade ago. Capital Gains The tax rates on capital gains are also set to increase from 15% to 20% and will be as high as 23.8% when considering the newly enacted surtax on investment income for high income taxpayers discussed below. Owners of manufacturing companies who sold their business in 2012 and utilized an

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Due to this potential significant increase in tax rates, Manufacturers who are taxed as corporations or S corporations which were previously taxed as corporations should consider a plan to accelerate dividends into 2012. Health Care Reform Surtax And then there are the new surtaxes which are being imposed for the first time. For high income individuals, there are additional taxes set to take effect that were enacted with the health care reform legislation (“Affordable Care Act”) from March, 2010. The first is a 0.9% surtax on earned income for single taxpayers earning greater than $200,000 ($250,000 for married couples). The second is a 3.8% surtax on “net investment income” for single taxpayers with adjusted gross income of greater than $200,000 or married couples with adjusted gross income greater than $250,000. “Net investment income” includes more than traditional investment income and encompasses income from

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passive business and rental activities. (Although the dollar limits are the same, note that the 0.9% surtax threshold is based upon earned income and the 3.8% surtax is based upon “modified” adjusted gross income.) Excise Tax on Medical Device Manufacturers There’s one more new tax that manufacturers of medical devices need to be aware of. Beginning January 1, 2013, a 2.3% excise tax on the sale of any taxable medical device will be imposed on the manufacturer. A taxable medical device refers to any device defined in Sec. 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act which is intended for humans. There is a retail exemption which exempts any medical device which is generally purchased by the general public at retail for individual use such as eyeglasses, contact lenses, hearing aids, etc. FIXED ASSETS The annual limit for Sec. 179 expensing and qualified property additions drops from $139,000 to $25,000. Bonus depreciation, currently set at 50% in 2012 for new shorter-lived property, expires. For manufacturers considering purchases of new or used equipment in the first quarter of 2013, making those purchases and placing them into service prior to January 1, 2013 would accelerate the depreciation of the property. A number of bills submitted in Congress have proposed to increase the Sec. 179 expense levels for 2013 or extend 100% bonus depreciation to 2012 and 50% bonus depreciation for 2013, but at the time of writing, none has passed Congress.


.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .fyi: .................................. Taxpayers need to stay informed and develop a flexible tax plan for the end of 2012 because the only certain thing is the tax law is going to change. - Author

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT CREDIT At the time of writing, Congress still had not extended the R&D Credit for 2012. Senate Bill 3521, The Family and Business Tax Cut Certainty Act of 2012, proposes to extend the R&D Credit through the end of 2013. ESTATE TAXES Is the equity value of your business and other assets greater than $1 million? If so, your estate could potentially be subject to tax beginning January 1, 2013. The current exemption of $5 million per person will drop to $1 million while the top estate rate will increase from 35% to 55%. With so many new taxpayers potentially subject to the estate tax, owners of manufacturing businesses should establish a succession plan and implement an estate plan prior to the end of the year. For those who did not have time to implement an estate plan during 2012, continue to monitor this area of tax law as some Congressional compromise may occur later in 2013. PARTING THOUGHTS How long will Congress go before coming to some compromise? It appears it will likely not address the majority of the expiring tax provisions until the post-election lame-duck session. It will need to address a temporary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tax Extendersâ&#x20AC;? bill currently pending Senate and House approval. Taxpayers need to stay informed and develop a flexible tax plan for the end of 2012 because the only certain thing is the tax law is going to change. Keep in mind, every taxpayer situation is unique and you should consult your personal tax advisor regarding 2012 year-end tax planning.

JASON DUFFNER is a Partner in the Manufacturing and Distribution group of CliftonLarsonAllen. Jason can be reached at 888.529.2648 or jason.duffner@cliftonlarsonallen.com Learn more at: www.cliftonlarsonallen.com


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Shop Floor NEWS FROM THE FRONT LINES

Do your employees receive the proper training to operate a forklift safely? Guidelines on training for Powered Industrial Trucks from THE ATMA SAFETY TEAM

Each year, more than 20,000 injuries related to powered industrial trucks (PITs), or forklifts, occur in U.S. workplaces. Many employees are injured when lift trucks are unintentionally driven off loading docks or fall between docks and an unsecured trailer. Other common injuries are caused when employees are struck by an industrial truck or fall from elevated pallets or tines. Most incidents also involve property damage, including damage to overhead sprinklers, racking, pipes, walls, and fyi: machinery. According to OSHA, Most employee most employee injuries and injuries and property property damage can be damage can be attributed attributed to lack of safe to lack of safe operating operating procedures, lack of procedures. safety rule enforcement, and - OSHA insufficient or inadequate training. OSHA rules are designed to prevent such injuries. Operator Training 29 CFR 1910.178(l) Employees must successfully complete a training program before operating a PIT. All operator training and evaluation must be conducted by persons who have the knowledge, training, and experience to train PIT operators and evaluate their competence. Training should consist of a combination of formal instruction (e.g., lecture, discussion, interactive computer learning, videotape, written material), Practical training (demonstrations performed by the trainer and practical exercises performed by the trainee), and evaluation of the operator's performance in the workplace.

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Refresher training: Refresher training and an evaluation of the effectiveness of that training must be provided when the employee operates the vehicle in an unsafe manner, has been involved in an accident or near-miss incident, is assigned to drive a different kind of truck, or there are changes in workplace conditions that could affect safe operation of the truck. An evaluation of each industrial truck operatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance must be conducted at least every 3 years. Duplication of training: If an operator has been previously trained and has been evaluated and found competent to operate the truck safely, additional training is not required. Certification: The employer must certify that each operator has been trained and evaluated. The written certification record must include the name of the operator, the date of the training, the date of the evaluation, and the identity of the person(s) performing the training or evaluation.

Learn more at: www.osha.gov or www.atma.org


A full service machine tool distributor representing some of the finest machine tool lines available.

MACHINE SALES (new & used)

MANUFACTURING/ ENGINEERING ASSISTANCE We provide turnkey solutions and service the machine tools we sell. JBM partners with our customers to develop complete Manufacturing Solutions to meet their individual needs. Our engineers are factory trained to keep abreast of the latest technology of machine tools so that we can provide installations, training and Preventative Maintenance programs quickly and efficiently. Additionally, we strive to provide 24 hour response to our customers. PROUD MEMBERS of the National Tooling & Machining Association and our local Northwestern Pennsylvania Chapter.

86+Z\Â&#x2021;&RFKUDQWRQ3$ Toll Free: 877.526.6224 www.jbmtechnologies.com

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Feature Story // PrecisionNews

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A PrecisionNews SPECIAL REPORT

ITIF Report Details 50 Policies to Improve

U.S. Manufacturing Competitiveness Recently, the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) released a report titled, “Fifty Ways to Leave Your Competitiveness Woes Behind: A National Traded Sector Competitiveness Strategy,” by Stephen Ezell and Robert Atkinson in which they stated, “A comprehensive strategy aimed at strengthening U.S. establishments competing in global markets is needed for the United States to boost short-term recovery and long-term prosperity...”

BY MICHELE NASH-HOFF

“THE UNITED STATES IS INCREASINGLY ISOLATED in its belief that countries don’t compete with one another and that only firms compete” said ITIF Senior Analyst Stephen Ezell, co-author of the report. “Our traded sector establishments are up against competitors that are aided in countless ways by their governments. It’s time to level the playing field.” The report, presents 50 federal-level policy recommendations to help restore U.S. traded sector competitiveness, along with 13 state-level recommendations. The recommendations are organized around federal policies regarding the “4Ts” of technology, tax, trade, and talent, as well as policies to increase access to capital, reform regulations, and better assess U.S. traded sector competitiveness.

A nation’s traded sector includes industries such as manufacturing, software, engineering and design services, music, movies, video games, farming, and mining, which compete in international marketplaces and whose output is sold at least in part to nonresidents of the nation. They are the core engine of U.S. economic growth and face unique challenges. Because these industries face competition in the global market that non-traded, local-serving industries (retail trade or personal services) do not, their success is riskier. “The health of U.S. traded sector enterprises in industries such as semiconductors, software, machine tools, or automobiles-all far more exposed to global competition than local-serving firms and industries-cannot be taken for granted.” continued on next page

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A PrecisionNews SPECIAL REPORT

ITIF Report Details 50 Policies to Improve U.S. Manufacturing Competitiveness continued from page 13

IF A COMPANY LIKE BOEING LOSES MARKET SHARE TO AIRBUS, thousands of domestic jobs at Boeing, its suppliers, and the companies at which their employees spend money will be lost. In contrast, a local grocery store may compete for business with other supermarkets, but it is not threatened by international competition. If Safeway loses market share to Wal-Mart, the jobs remain in the United States. Ezell and Atkinson state, “The fact that the U.S. traded sector has not created a single net new job in 20 years is a core reason for the current U.S. economic malaise.” They cite the research of Nobel Prize-winning economist Michael Spence, who has demonstrated that “from 1990 until the Great Recession started in 2007, the U.S. achieved virtually no growth in traded sector jobs. The malaise has been a downright decline in manufacturing, as the United States lost nearly one-third of its manufacturing workforce in the previous decade, saw on net over 66,000 manufacturing establishments close, accrued a trade deficit in manufactured products of over $4 trillion, and experienced a decline in manufacturing output of 11 percent at a time when U.S. GDP increased by 11 percent (when measured properly).” Ezell and Atkinson corroborate what I have written previously “every lost manufacturing job has meant the loss of an additional two to three jobs throughout the rest of the economy. The 32 percent loss of manufacturing jobs was a central cause of the country's anemic overall job performance during the previous decade, when the U.S. economy produced, on net, no new jobs....at the rate of growth in manufacturing jobs that occurred in 2011, it would take until at least 2020 for employment to return to where the economy was in terms of manufacturing jobs at the end of 2007.” The reasons why the authors emphasize the importance of manufacturing as a “traded sector” are: • It will be difficult for the U.S. to balance its foreign trade without a robust manufacturing sector because manufacturing accounts for 86 percent of U.S. goods exports and 60 percent of total U.S. exports. • Manufacturing remains a key source of jobs that both pay well. • Each manufacturing job supports as an average of 2.9 other jobs in the economy. • The average wages in U.S. high technology are 86 percent higher than the average of other private sector wages.

• Manufacturing employs 63 percent of domestic scientists and engineers. • U.S. manufacturing firms demonstrate almost three times the rate of innovation as U.S. services firms. • Manufacturing is vital to U.S. national security and defense. They contend that “the engines of a nation’s competitiveness are in fact not mom and pop small businesses, but rather firms in traded sectors, high-growth entrepreneurial companies, and U.S.-headquartered multinational corporations. Although such firms comprise far less than 1 percent of U.S. companies, they account for about 19 percent of private-sector jobs, 25 percent of private-sector wages, 48 percent of goods exports, and 74 percent of nonpublic R&D investment. And, since 1990, they have been responsible for 41 percent of the nation’s increase in private labor productivity.” The report notes that traded sector businesses improve the local economy in three ways: Traded sector businesses bring money into a region by selling to people and businesses outside the region. They help keep local money at home through import substitution, which occurs when local residents and businesses purchase locally produced products instead of importing goods and services. They improve economic equity since “their productivity and market size tends to lead them to offer higher wage levels” and jobs at traded sector companies help anchor a region’s middle class employment base by providing stable, living wage jobs for residents.” While the authors believe all 50 recommendations are needed, they believe the 10 most critical recommendations are:

• Manufacturing, R&D, and innovation go hand-in-hand. • The manufacturing sector accounts for 72 percent of all private sector R&D spending.

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• Create a network of 25 “Engineering and Manufacturing Institutes” performing applied R&D across a range of advanced technologies.


Technology, Tax, Trade, and Talent • Lower the effective U. S. corporate tax rate - As of April 1, 2012 (when Japan lowered its corporate tax rate), the United States took the mantle of having the highest statutory corporate tax rate at almost 39 percent (when state and federal rates are combined) of any OECD nation. • Combat foreign currency manipulation • Support the designation of at least 20 U.S. “manufacturing universities.’

• Better support and align trade promotion programs to boost U.S. exports.

• Increase funding for the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP).

• Better promote reshoring.

• Increase R&D tax credit generosity and make the R&D tax credit permanent.

I also support their recommendation that Congress should broaden the R&D tax credit’s scope to make it clear that process R&D (R&D to develop better ways of making things) qualifies for the tax incentive and that Congress should expand the R&D credit to allow expenditures on employee training to count as qualified expenditures.

• Institute an investment tax credit on purchases of new capital equipment and software. • Develop a national trade strategy and increase funding for U.S. trade policymaking and enforcement agencies. • Fully fund a nationwide manufacturing skills standards initiative. • Expand high-skill immigration, particularly which focuses on the traded sector.

With regard to trade enforcement, they recommend that the U. S. “exclude mercantilist countries from the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP)” because “the top 20 GSP-beneficiary countries Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, Thailand, Turkey, and Venezuela-are on the U.S. Trade Representative’s Special 301 Watch List (which documents countries that fail to adequately protect U.S. companies’ or individuals’ intellectual property rights).”

• Transform Fannie Mae into an industrial bank. • Require the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) to incorporate a “competitiveness screen” in its review of federal regulations. Only two of their top 10 recommendations made the list of the most critical recommendations in the second edition of my book: # 4 and #10. However, I support all of their other top 10 recommendations, as well as many of their other 40 recommendations, especially the following:

I believe that enacting legislation to address foreign currency manipulation by China in particular should be in their top 10 recommendations. I also recommend that we enact legislation to establish either a Natural Strategic Tariff as recommended by economist Ian Fletcher in his book Free Trade Doesn’t Work: What Should Replace It and Why, or a Balanced Trade Restoration Act to authorize sale of Import Certificates using either the Warren Buffet plan or the Richmans plan (as explained in their book Trading Away our Future). continued on page 20

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/// A New Challenge In Machining Machining composite materials is completely different to conventional machining of metals. What is more, machining one type of composite is usually different to machining another. In this respect they are not unified at all and, furthermore, the range of composite materials is broader than that of metals. Implications for machine shops involved in manufacturing using these materials are considerable and need a re-assessment of tools, methods, set-up and in some cases even machinery and fixturing. It is quite likely then, that every new composite material entering the factory doors needs a new approach because the material consistency of metals as regards machining is not there.

Feature Story // PrecisionNews

The cutting action in composite materials is different to that of metals. The cutting edge does not generate a chip through shearing as with the majority of metals, it breaks off the composite material to be removed, often cutting the matrix material while fracturing the reinforcement fibers. The general principle of machining composites is with sharp cutting edges having sufficient clearance giving a clean cut and minimized tendency for the tool rubbing against the workpiece. Tool wear needs to be minimized as geometrical changes to the edge rapidly lead excessive heat generation, edge breakdown and component-quality problems. Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have poor heat dissipation and, as there are no chips as with metal, heat is not removed as effectively from the cutting zone. This means that temperature considerations should be made both as regards effect on the tool material and the workpiece material. FROM THE PN EDITORS & SANDVIK COROMANT

needs tools and methods to suit each application A GROWING NUMBER OF MODERN PRODUCTS NEED NEW MATERIALS WITH COMBINATIONS OF PROPERTIES THAT CANNOT BE FULFILLED BY SINGLE MATERIALS OR CONVENTIONAL ALLOYS. AMBITIONS ARE HIGH AS REGARDS WHAT CAN BE ATTAINED AND MANY CAN ONLY BE MET BY COMPOSITE MATERIALS. BUT WITH THE SUCCESS OF THESE AS CONSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS COMES NEW DEMANDS ON MACHINING CAPABILITY AND WHERE VARIATION IN MACHINABILITY ADDS TO THE CHALLENGE. A NEW GENERATION OF CUTTING TOOLS DEDICATED FOR COMPOSITE MACHINING, ESPECIALLY HOLE-MAKING, ARE MAKING NEW IN-ROADS TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE AND RESULTS.

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Both the reinforcement fibers and the matrix of a composite material can be very abrasive on cutting tools, making toollife a major issue. Cutting forces are another issue in composite machining as pressure on components and the effects of the cutting edge on finish and accuracy are primary concerns. Workpieces are often susceptible to the effects of forces as many are thin, slender or stacked. /// Composite Machining is Application Specific Establishing of individual processes for applications is the corner-stone of successful composite machining performance, security and results. The most frequently used machining processes are hole-making, surface machining and edging and trimming. Drilling CFRP materials, CFRP with aluminum stacks and CFRP with titanium stacks are common operations in CNC machines, in positive feed machines and performed by robots. Milling of edges on finished components or face milling of contact and assembly points of carbon fiber materials are common on 5-axis CNC-machines and in PKM machines. Drilling dominates as an operation in composites. It is challenging because the material at entry as well as the exit of the hole can both splinter and even split into separate layers (delamination). To achieve the required surface finish often needs extra efforts by way of obtaining satisfactory cutting


action between fiber layers and the matrix, partly because of the way CFRP materials vary in this respect. As impact resistance and heat resistance improve for composites as design materials, machining usually needs more attention and a new solution. Some carbon fiber materials are very good at standing up to heat demands and are therefore used close to turbine engines but this makes the material even more challenging with extensive abrasion wear mechanism acting on the cutting edges of the drill.

Cutting tools need to be easy-cutting, generating minimal cutting forces. Various tool geometries are needed to arrive at the best solution due to the varied character of composite materials. As regards tool material, diamond-coated carbide drills are used in applications where stability is lower through the mobile machines used typically in airplane assembly. Diamond-like coating is also an alternative for when the carbon fiber is stacked with aluminum as diamond coated tools are often not favorable in these conditions.

Making a hole to high quality demands is becoming more challenging as composite materials develop to satisfy demands from new aircraft designs. Hole-quality demands are high and the degree of automation is also increasing with a trend of also eliminating secondary operations. Also, stacked materials are becoming more common as the volume of carbon fiber increases, making surface finish, tolerance and material evacuation tricky with added challenges on the cutting tool capability and for the right method to be in place.

Diamond-tipped (PCD) drills and milling cutters have the best tool-life as diamond stands up to the wear of various carbon fiber materials and stacked materials - including titanium. In milling applications, diamond-tipped inserts is most common. While diamond-coated solid carbide tools can be utilized for trimming carbon fiber components, but usually with shorter tool-life. Material removal rate is important, but often not the main factor. The quality of a hole, combined with satisfactory tool-life and tool cost will affect productivity more when it comes to composite machining. The finish achieved in one operation can reduce or eliminate secondary operations and tool-life contributes to reduced machine down time.

Drilling CFRP materials can often be solved in a relatively straightforward way but when combined with a layer of titanium, the entry from composite to titanium needs adjusted cutting data and for the titanium chips to be formed and handled so as not to affect the surface of the composite material. The cutting tool also needs to be capable of machining both types of these very different materials. Cutting data for composite materials vary and may also depend upon the capability of the machine to be used. In drilling, cutting speeds of 100 to 200m/min are common with small feed rates, typically 0.02 to 0.06mm/rev. The most common diameters involved in composite drilling are 3 to 12.7mm. Solutions are application-specific and may include one of the CoroDrill geometries selected or adapted to the material. The PCD drills with vein-design (sintered PCD) cutting edges include a double-facet geometry to minimize delamination tendencies at hole entries and exits. Drilling fiber-rich CFRP-materials needs a geometry that will reduce splintering such as the new E-type geometry on 854 drills, with similarities to geometry used for aluminum. Three drill geometries have been developed to date for making holes where quality is particularly high in various types of CFRP materials. These are suitable for both cemented carbide drills and PCD-tipped drills. Resin-rich materials will often demand a steeper helix-angle on the drill to reduce the risk for delamination and splintering. To get started and assess machinability, a medium speed, typically involving a spindle speed of about 2000 rpm for a small to medium tool, and a low feed rate should be applied. In this way, the machining properties can be observed in order to adjust cutting data further or even the choice of a different tool geometry and grade. Surface finish demands are increasing and are typically in the region of Ra 1.6 microns and these, along with cpk values, will also affect the choice of both geometry and grade. As with hole-surface quality, demands on flat machined surfaces are high for composite components, demanding innovative approaches with modern indexable insert tooling. The CoroMill tool family includes cutters such as the 590 face mill and the 390 end mill with polycrystalline diamond tipped or coated inserts that are especially effective as regards high-fiber-content composites. Edging and trimming have carbide or diamond inserts or solid carbide cutters for effectively achieving quality results.

/// On-going Activities Provide Soutions Apart from developing cutting tools that will lift performance in composite machining, the development of optimum processes is high on the agenda at Sandvik Coromant in this area and a range of new drills and milling cutters have recently been developed to improve competitiveness. Carbide drills have been designed with a carbon coating (diamond-like coating) or true diamond coating suitable for a number of applications. Three drill geometries have been developed to date for making high quality holes in various CFRP materials. These are suitable for use on both carbide and PCD tipped drills. For milling, edging and trimming, there have for some time been available end mills and face mills with diamond inserts that are excellent for composite machining. The Tailor Made family of carbide drills with various geometries and grades is being extended for specific customer demands with fast delivery and application support. These are engineered product solutions for drilling and milling. Vein-PCD drills as well as brazed PCD drills, countersink tools and reamers are designed and produced to application demands. Also, brazed PCD cutters are available with varied flute designs. Examples of improvements include achieving better surface finish by applying the most suitable geometry in the best way. This can entail transporting dust and chips from stacked materials while also further reducing splintering and delamination tendencies. To succeed in the continually evolving world of composite machining, dedicated cutting tools for the type of material in use is one essential, but not sufficient, step on the way. Establishing the right parameters for the operations at hand and achieving the correct set-up are decisive to becoming competitive. continued on page 18

OPPOSITE: CoroDrill 452 provides reduced delamination

and burr formation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; defects witnessed frequently when holemaking in composites with less effective cutting tool technology.

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continued from page 17

needs tools and method to suit each application /// The Composite Material A composite is when two materials, each with different individual characteristics, are combined to form a material with a certain property. Materials with unique properties have always been needed, properties that cannot be met by one material alone. Composite materials is not a modern science, they were, for example, made centuries ago through forging irons with different properties into a combination material having a sought-after property. Today, they are artificially manufactured materials composed of a matrix with dispersed phases. Such is the case with the silicon nitride ceramics â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a composite tool material â&#x20AC;&#x201C; where whiskers provide added strength and stiffness. Another example is the composite-filling material in machine tool bases for dampening using granite in a resin. The main development area for composites today is as structural materials for aerospace, automotive, wind-power and numerous other applications. For airframes, they are especially developed to add stiffness, strength and durability to structures. Composites have excellent strength to weight ratio and can be formed into complicated shapes. In comparison to aluminum, carbon fiber composites (CFRP) typically have more than fourteen times the tensile strength; nineteen times lower thermal expansion; five times greater stiffness and yet weigh only half as much. But they are also much more challenging to machine. In the composite material, fibers, whiskers, particles or woven material are dispersed in a matrix where they add stiffness and strength. Structural composites are made up of laminates or sandwich layers. A laminar composite has stacked sheets cemented together in a way that the strength orientation varies with successive layers. The main matrix materials are organic material, metal and ceramic and the reinforcement may be continuous or discontinuous material of carbon or some inorganic material. Carbon fiber, aramid fiber (typically Kevlar) and carbon-aramid fiber reinforced-plastic composite materials are common airframe materials. The fibers are bonded in the matrix material such as an epoxy resin but also metallic. Applications for composites are growing rapidly and subsequently the development of materials. Especially the carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) is a rapidly developing composite material where new properties can be evolved. This is a very widely used material today and to a growing extent subjected to machining. The plastic matrix is the most commonly used, re-enforced with carbon-fiber and may also be stacked with a metal, such as titanium or aluminum, for some applications. CFRP composite materials provide very advantageous strength-to-weight ratio, a specific modulus, corrosion resistance and fatigue resistance and consequently provide considerable benefits for the airline industry, not only in the form of lighter airplanes needing less fuel but also lower maintenance.

SANDVIK COROMANT is the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading supplier of tools, tooling solutions and know-how to the metalworking industry. They can be contacted at: 1.800.SANDVIK or 1.800.726.384. Learn more at: www.sandvik.coromant.com

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NTMA STAR CHAPTERS Many thanks and encouragement is owed these NTMA Chapter Executive Directors for their ongoing endeavors to grow your association and to provide you, our members, the tools needed to support your businesses! TAMI ADAMS

RENEE NEUENDORF

KELLY SCHNEIDER

Northwestern PA Chapter 814.720.0094

Cleveland Chapter 440.360.0131

Michiana Chapter 574.220.9111

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Feature Story // PrecisionNews

A PrecisionNews SPECIAL REPORT

ITIF Report Details 50 Policies to Improve

U.S. Manufacturing Competitiveness continued from page 15

The U.S. has a trade deficit with nearly every single one of the countries with which it has a trade agreement. I completely disagree with their recommendation to “Forge new trade agreements, including a high-standard Trans-Pacific Partnership and Trans-Atlantic Partnership.” As documented by Alan Uke in his book, Buying Back America, the U. S. has a trade deficit with nearly every single one of the countries with which it has a trade agreement. In fact, the U. S. has a trade deficit with 66 countries, the most egregious being the $278 billion deficit with China. Remember the touted benefits of NAFTA with Canada and Mexico? Well, in 2010, we had a trade deficit with Canada of $28 billion and $66 billion with Mexico. Do we want to increase our current trade deficit by adding more trading partners? Additionally, the report articulates four key themes that the authors believe should be viewed as essential components of a U.S. traded sector competitiveness strategy. They recommend that the following key themes must be embraced by U.S. policymakers if the United States is to restore its traded sector competitiveness (summarized): • The federal government must place strategic focus on its traded sectors, because it simply can’t rely entirely on its non-traded sectors to sustainably power the U.S. economy. • The United States needs become much more of an engineering economy because gains from engineering-based innovation are capturable and appropriable within nations.

Beyond federal policies to support traded sector competitiveness as a nation, the report also includes a section on recommended policies that states should implement to bolster their competitiveness, and in turn, the competitiveness of the broader U.S. economy. The state policy recommendations utilize the same “4Ts” framework as the federal recommendations. Ezell and Atkinson state, “Implementing the policies recommended in this report will make the United States a more attractive investment environment for traded sector enterprises and their establishments. The technology policies will help spur innovation in advanced manufacturing, upgrade the technology capacity of manufacturing and other traded sector firms, help restore America’s industrial commons, and support the productivity, innovation, and competitiveness of traded sector SMEs. The tax policies will stimulate a favorable climate for private sector investment by making the overall U.S. corporate tax code more competitive with that of other nations and also by leveraging tax policy to incent private sector R&D and investment.” In conclusion, they urge that U.S. policymakers understand that “manufacturing is not some low-value-added industry to be cavalierly abandoned.” Manufacturing is vital to U.S. competitiveness. I highly recommend reading all of this comprehensive, well-researched, welldocumented report to be able to evaluate all of their recommendations and benefit from the details that are the basis for each recommendation.

• The United States must move toward an economic system more focused on production than consumption, giving short-term consumption less priority in our politics. • The structure of the global trading system must be seriously restructured to ensure that it is a trading system based on marketoriented principles and not the “innovation mercantilism” that has risen in the last decade, which fundamentally hurts the U.S. competitive position while violating the spirit and often the letter of the World Trade Organization.

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MICHELE NASH-HOFF is the President ElectroFab Sales and the author of Can American Manufacturing be Saved? Why We Should and How We Can, available at www.savingusmanufacturing.com or www.amazon.com


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Oil Barron Bulletin SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL FEATURE

VOLUME 11:

Oil Mist & Vapor by BRETT “THE COOLANT GUY” REYNOLDS, CMFS

If you’ve worked in a machine shop long enough, you might have noticed various items such as tool boxes, work benches and machine surfaces becoming oily or sticky. You might even work at a facility where a constant fog hangs in the air during working hours. Both of these issues have one thing in common – Oil Mist & Vapor. So where is the mist coming from, but better still, what can you do about it? In order to know the proper solution to the problem, it’s imperative that we understand the nature of the problem and how it is being created. During machining, mist and vapor formation are given off simultaneously during the metal removal process. The difference in mist verses vapor is the difference in particle size, with vapor and smoke being <1µm. The various mechanisms of mist and vapor formation are the following:

• Evaporation/Condensation – Most often produces smoke, due to fluid coming in contact to the hot work/cutting zone. • Impaction and Centrifugal force – High speed spindles create motion, thus spraying fluid which impacts part and machine surfaces. • Aeration/Entrained air – Entrained air (bubbles) is released when the fluid is at rest, forming aerosols. Not all mist and vapors are attributed to the fluid; welding fumes, along with metal dust, common dirt and parts washer mist all contribute to the overall mist levels in the shop. Mist levels are measured by several methods, both quantitative and qualitative, using either a personal sampling monitor, (Quantitative) and/or light scattering instruments, (Qualitative). The OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit, (PEL) for metalworking fluid mist is 5mg/m3 of mineral oil mist. This is the only statutory limit that has been imposed by OSHA; however most large manufacturing companies are now following the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit, (REL) of 0.5mg/m3 of total particulate mass, as a safety measure. High mist levels in the shop can also be directly correlated to how much tramp oil is in the coolant itself. The higher the tramp oil load, the higher the mist level. High levels of tramp oil contamination (>4%) in the metalworking fluid, can lead to an increased level of bio-mass accumulation. This is due impart to Anaerobic-sulfate reducing bacteria. These microbes are present in the bulk fluid, and are also thus present in the mist/vapor which is generated by the aeration and spraying action of the coolant itself. These bio-aerosols are being linked more and more to the acute effects of cough and phlegm production, as well as shortness of breath and bronchitis. These acute effects may lead to chronic lung conditions such as, asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). So what can I do to reduce the mist levels in my shop? Remove tramp oils on a consistent basis and keep microbial levels in check and under control. Practice good housekeeping procedures. Install mist and filtration collection systems and keep them well maintained. Make sure machine guards are in place and ensure there’s adequate ventilation. Above all, maintaining your coolant can go a long way to reducing the overall mist levels in the shop, thus making a cleaner and healthier work environment for all concerned.

Stay tuned for more useful coolant tips, from The Coolant Guy!

BRETT REYNOLDS, “The Coolant Guy” works for Blaser Swisslube Inc. If you would like more uinformation regarding metalworking fluids, or would like to find out more information about Blaser metalworking fluid products, please contact Brett at 801.722.4095 or via email at b.reynolds@blaser.com. The Oil Baron Bulletin is not affiliated with Blaser Swisslube Inc. or its subsidiaries. Learn more at: www.blaser.com and theoilbaronbulletin@blogspot.com

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President & Membership Team DONALD ANDRASIK Diemaster Tool & Mold, Inc. don@diemaster.net

Reduce your freight expenses by 10-40%! Call PartnerShip at 800-599-2902 or visit 3DUWQHU6KLSFRPIUHLJKWVHUYLFHV.

Past Presidents JOHN COPPOLINO Anchor Danly jcoppolino@anchordanly.com FRANK K. CHESEK Exact Tool & Die, Inc. fkchesek@exact-tool.com JIM TRECOKAS TREC Industries, Inc. jim@trecindustries.com

UPS, UPS Freight, and the UPS brandmark are trademarks of United Parcel Service of America, Inc. All rights reserved.

ROBERT HOTUJAC Kennick Mold & Die, Inc. bob@kennickmold.com

MEMBERSHIP TEAM

Plotting the Course since 1984

Is your organization maximizing its workers’ compensation savings potential?

CompManagement plots the course for over 25,000 local businesses creating savings of over $1.9 billion since 1991. To learn more, contact CompManagement, Inc. at (800) 825-6755, extension 65868 or visit us online at www.compmgt.com today Endorsed by the NTMA Ohio’s Leading Workers’ Compensation Third Party Administrator

22

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november/december 2012

Tanya DiSalvo Criterion Tool & Die/Criterion Instrument tdisalvo@criteriontool.com Paul J. Takacs MP Technologies, Inc. mptusa@aol.com

PROGRAMS TEAM Matt Schron Jergens USA matt.schron@jergensinc.com John Zasadni Yarde Metals Sales johnz@yarde.com

Executive Director RENEE NEUENDORF NTMA Administrator rneuendorf@oh.rr.com phone: 440.360.0131 Visit our website for more information: www.ntmacleveland.org


PrecisionNews // NTMA -CLEVELAND CHAPTER

MEMBER LISTINGS REGULAR MEMBERS Larry Amels

A & J Engineering

216.961.9720

Jeff Smith

Pacific Tool & Die, Inc.

330.273.7363

Jordan Owens

Alternative Design and Fabrication

440.915.7281

Peter Pinaha

Pahl Tool Services

216.433.1711

Herman Bredenbeck

Advance Manufacturing

216.961.9190

Dave Princic

Path Technologies, Inc.

440.358.1500

Fred Montag

Allied Tool & Die

216.941.6196

Aaron Vanke

Performance Point Grinding, LLC

330.220.0871

John Coppolino

Anchor Danly

440.239.7600

Pam Vizer

Polaris Career Center

440.891.7622

Fred Pfaff

Anchor Die Technologies, Inc.

216.671.6000

Ken Putman

Proficient Machining Co., Inc.

440.942.4942

Lee Trem

Arc Drilling, Inc.

216.441.1448

Karen Homer

Profile Grinding Inc.

216.351.0600

Laszlo Repay

Argo Tool Corporation

330.425.2407

Dale Reese

Reese Machine Company, Inc.

440.992.3942

Bill Bennett

Automation Tool & Die, Inc.

330.225.8336

Deb Luber

Richards Grinding, Inc.

216.631.7675

C. McCartney

Bowden Manufacturing Corp.

440.946.7770

Roger Valentine

Rochester Manufacturing, Inc.

440.647.4598

Chris Burton

Burton Industries Inc.

440.974.1700

Michael Schuessler

Rockstedt Tool & Die

330.273.9100

Greg Kaszei

Cardinal Machine Company, Inc.

NA

Leonard Lutch

Ronlen Industries, Inc.

330.273.6468

Patrick Christopher

Christopher Tool & Manufacturing

440.248.8080

Kenneth Wesner

Royalton Manufacturing, Inc.

440.237.2233

Todd Keserich

CompManagement Inc.

216.617.2602

Earl Lauridsen

SC Industries

216.732.9000

James Furman

Component Repair Technologies Inc. 440.255.1793

Billy Bambrick

Stalloy Metals Inc.

216.410.5899

Kym Covert Fox

Covert Manufacturing Inc.

419.468.1761

Bruno Aldons

Tech Industries, Inc.

216.861.7337

Tanya DiSalvo

Criterion Tool & Die, Inc.

216.267.1733

Tony Schiro

Top Tool & Die, Inc.

216.267.5878

David Bredenbeck

Cuyahoga Community College

NA

J.M. Trecokas

Trec Industries, Inc.

216.741.4114

Richard Parrott

Cuyahoga Valley Career Center

440.526.5200

Kathy Byrnes

Tri-Craft Inc. & Tech-Matic Ind.

440.826.1050

Eileen Fertal

Diamond Tool, Inc.

216.481.0808

Mike Campbell

Trust Technologies

440.951.8700

Donald Andrasik

Diemaster Tool & Mold, Inc.

330.467.4281

Laura Onyshko

Tylok International, Inc.

216.261.7310

Rick Rogel

Empire Die Casting Co.

330.908.3050

Forest Reichert

United States Fittings, Inc.

216.663.1986

Frank Chesek

Exact Tool & Die, Inc.

216.676.9140

Adolf Eisenloeffel

Valley Tool & Die, Inc.

440.237.0160

Larry Fargo

Fargo Machine Company

440.997.2442

William Sopko

William Sopko & Sons Co., Inc.

216.289.1400

Roger Winslow

Feedall, Inc.

440.942.8100

Dan Fenton

Fenton Manufacturing Inc.

440.969.1128

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

Roger Sustar

Fredon Corporation

440.951.5200

Al Foote

Compass Technologies

440.734.9600

Fred Baumann

Fre-Mar Industries, Inc.

330.220.3700

Steve Goldstein

Compsolve, Inc.

877.630.0001

Hank Matousek

Grind All, Inc.

216.476.0612

Michael Marrapese

Diamond Metals

216.898.7900

Dale Fleming

Hamilton Mold & Machine, Inc.

216.732.8200

Kyle Julseth

Federated Insurance Company

330.730.8441

Claude Petek

Hubbell Machine Tooling, Inc.

216.524.1797

Todd Turk

Gosiger Machine Tools, Inc.

440.248.3111

Ronald Lapossy

Imperial Die & Mfg Company

440.268.9080

Karl Helfrich

Karl S. Helfrich, CPA

440.250.9140

John Stoneback

J & M Machine, Inc.

440.357.1234

Mary Kaye Denning

Manufacturing Mart

216.470.3969

Walter Harwood

J W Harwood Company

216.531.6230

Eric Stile

Sentry Insurance

715.346.7096

Matthew Schron

Jergens, Inc.

216.486.2100

Michael Kane

Sup-R-Die

216.252.3930

Paul Barker

Jig Grinding Service Company

216.281.5775

Mark Skvoretz

Wasacz & Skvoretz Ltd.

440.239.1911

Robert Hotujac

Kennick Mold and Die, LLC

216.631.3535

John Zasadni

Yarde Metals

330.342.7020

John Kerek

Kerek Industries

440.461.1450

John Herkes

Laser Automation, Inc.

440.543.9291

Nick Papanikolaou

Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grinding, Inc.

440.572.4610

Steven Loecy

Loecy Precision Manufacturing

440.358.0551

Ken Smith

Lorain County Community College

216.365.5222

Fritz Hoffman

Lunar Tool & Mold, Inc.

216.237.2141

Paul Takacs

M P Technologies, Inc.

440.838.4466

Aimee Bell

MAGNET

NA

Leonard May

May Tool & Die, Inc.

440.237.8012

Joseph Tenebria

Myers Precision Grinding Company 216.587.3737

Larry Noble

Norman Noble, Inc., Micromach. Div. 216.761.5387

Dave Futryk

Northern Tool & Gage, Inc.

Richard Kusnir

Nu-Tool Industries, Inc.

440.237.9240

Richard Profant

Omega One, Inc.

216.663.8424

440.877.0034

NTMA - Cleveland Chapter UPCOMING EVENTS Economic Forecast with Ken Mayland November 5th, 6:00pm-8:30pm at Sterles County House For more information contact Renee Neuendorf at: rneuendorf@oh.rr.com or phone: 440.360.0131 Visit our website for more information: www.ntmacleveland.org

november/december 2012

ntma.org

PrecisionNews

23


PrecisionNews // NTMA -NORTHWESTERN PA CHAPTER

MEMBER LISTINGS NORTHWESTERN PA CHAPTER

REGULAR MEMBERS

2012 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

John Murosky

AccuTool

President KEN KUHN Kuhn Tool & Die Co. 814.336.2123

Dennis Heffern

Actco Tool & Mfg. Co.

814.336.4235

Rob Smith

Acutec Precision Machining, Inc.

814.763.3214

Karen Styborski

Advantage Mold & Design

814.337.8535

Dick McClure

Aetna Machine Company

814.425.3881

John Wehrle

Area Tool & Manufacturing, Inc.

814.724.3166

Bud Martin

Arvite Technologies

814.838.9444

Gary Trojanowski

Automation Devices, Inc.

814.474.5561

Jeff Morell

Bra-Vor Tool & Die Company, Inc.

814.724.1557

Dennis Frampton

C & J Industries, Inc.

814.724.4950

Dale Cummings

Canto Tool Corporation

814.724.2865

James Chest

Chest Tool & Die

814.720.7004

Josh Heiser

Corry Custom Machine

814.663.0868

Chad Dillaman

Dillaman Mold & Mfg.

814.807.1232

Barry Stainbrook

Doutt Tool

814.398.2989

Jeff Hanaway

Electro-Tech, Inc.

814.333.2420

Dave Cipriani

Erie Specialty Products, Inc.

814.453.5611

Mark Brosnahan

FRB Machine, Inc.

724.867.0111

James Greenleaf

Greenleaf Corporation

814.763.2915

Andrew Foyle

H & H Machined Products, Inc.

814.838.6801

Theresa Stachera

Hanes Erie, Inc.

814.474.1999

Tom Harrington

Harrington Machine & Tool

814.432.7339

Lon Sippy

Highpoint Tool & Mfg.

814.763.5453

Pete Houck

Houck’s Carbide

814.763.2887

Mike Gunn

Imperial Carbide, Inc.

814.724.3732

Kurt Hamilton

Inlet Tool

814.382.3511

John Watkins

JBM Technologies, Inc.

215.588.5100

KC Gunn

K & S Tool & Die, Inc.

814.336.6932

Ken Kuhn

Kuhn Tool & Die Co.

814.336.2123

Dave Merritt Greenleaf Corp. 814.763.2915

Jamie Clark

Lamjen, Inc.

814.459.5277

Chris Minnis

Laser Tool, Inc.

814.763.2032

Doug Sheets

Layke Tool & Manufacturing, Inc.

814.333.1169

Chuck Guiste Precision Mfg. Institute 814.333.2415

Darrel Leech

Leech Industries, Inc.

814.336.2141

Thomas Fontecchio

M P E Machine Tool, Inc.

814.664.4822

Randy Jones

Marlan Tool, Inc.

814.382.2744

Bill Muck

Merit Tool Company, Inc.

814.456.0582

Mark Sisco

Micro Tool & Manufacturing, Inc.

814.724.4704

Jack Moyers

Moon Tool & Die Co.

814.807.0681

Andy Foyle H & H Machined Products 814.838.6801

Jean McMillin

Morlin, Inc.

814.454.5559

Vic Masone

NMA

814.453.6787

Brian Deane

NuTec Tooling Systems, Inc.

814.724.6336

Tim Barickman NuTec Tooling Systems 814.724.6336

Paul Seymour

Paul E. Seymour Tool & Die Co.

814.725.5170

James Burns

Pennsylvania Tool & Gages, Inc.

814.336.3136

Doug Peters

Peters’ Heat Treating, Inc.

814.333.1782

Chris Learn

Phoenix Laser Solutions

814.724.3666

Brian Dixon

Precise EDM & Tool

814.333.1147

Dan Wilkes

Prism Engineering, Inc.

412.973.7959

Michael Setta

Progressive Tool and Die, Inc.

814.333.2992

Connie Proper

Proper Cutter, Inc.

814.789.4530

Daryl Sheets

Sheets Tool & Manufacturing, Inc.

814.330103

Kevin Shorts

Shorts Tool & Manufacturing, Inc.

814.763.2401

Vice President JOHN WATKINS JBM Technologies 215.588.5100 Treasurer DEBBIE PIPP McGill Power Bell & Assoc. 814.724.5890 Trustee CHRIS MINNIS Laser Tool 814.763.2032 BOARD MEMBERS Lon Sippy Highpoint Tool & Machine 814.763.5453 Bill Muck Merit Tool Company 814.456.0582 Dan Bras Acutec Precision Machining 814.763.3214

Mark Sisco Micro Tool & Mfg. 814.724.4704

Executive Director TAMI ADAMS P.O. Box 203, Meadville, PA 16335 phone: 814.720.0094 tadams@nwpa-ntma.com

24

PrecisionNews

ntma.org

november/december 2012

814.456.7797


Diana Elmquist

Skylon, Inc.

814.489.3622

Kevin Ames

South Morgan Technologies

814.833.5500

Bill Starn

Starn Tool & Manufacturing Co.

814.724.1057

Bruce Hills

Syst-A-Matic Tool & Design

814.336.1026

Tamara Fletcher

Talbar, Inc.

814.337.8400

Ron Sousae

Target Precision

814.382.3000

Scott Hanaway

Tech Tool & Molded Plastics

814.724.8222

Donald Jones

Venango Machine Products, Inc.

814.676.5741

Bill Miller

Wemco Precision Tool, Inc.

814.336.5453

Ron Novel

X-Cell Tool & Mold, Inc.

814.835.3432

Rick York

York-Seaway, Inc.

814.774.7080

NTMA - Northwestern PA Chapter UPCOMING EVENTS Open House Date: November 8th. Location: Kuhn Tool & Die Co. Annual Membership Meeting Date: December 6th. Location: Riverside Inn, Cambridge Springs. Call for details. Visit our newly updated website for more information www.nwpa-ntma.com Contact Tami Adams: tadams@nwpa-ntma.com or 814.720.0094

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Mike Kaliszewski

Allegheny Machine Tool Systems, Inc. 724.942.4451

Russ Weis

AW Miller

724.579.8439

Jim Dammeyer

Boldt Machinery, Inc.

814.833.9836

Gregg Gordon

Bush Insurance Agency

814.398.8601

Greg Bush

Bush Investment Group

814.333.2155

Jeffrey Byham

Byhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Insurance Service

814.724.1680

Dave Henning

C.H. Reed, Inc.

814.397.5873

Beth Smith

Carbis Walker, LLP

814.336.2133

Frank Coppola

Coppola Enterprises, Inc.

814.333.8382

Dan Severo

DJB Group

814.724.1516

MarkTurner

Economic Progress Alliance

814.333.2299

TJ Pennino

ECSR

814.425.7773

Beth Zewe

Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

814.337.7791

Steve Cappellino

Erie Bank

814.336.1223

Jen Kliber

Erie Industrial Supply Co.

814.452.3231

Nate Burtt

Federated Insurance

814.897.6857

Dan Crandall

Fine Print Commercial Printers, Inc.

814.337.7468

Tim Bracken

First National Bank of PA

814.871.1710

Roger Janes

First National Insurance Agency

814.724.4850 814.332.0165

Dan Continenza

First Niagara

Jerry Haas

Haas Factory Outlet/DSM Machinery 814.450.6687

Jay Verno

Hagan Bus. Machines of Meadville

Steven Jackson

Hill, Barth & King

814.336.1512

Trevor Kriner

Kriner Insurance Group, Inc.

814.724.5052

Chris Lowry

Lowry Supply Company

800.424.1212

Debbie Pipp

McGill, Power, Bell & Assoc., LLP

814.724.5890

Michael Moore

Moore Insurance Agency, Inc.

814.827.4654

Peggy Monnie

Northwest Savings Bank

814.336.2111

814.724.4601

Tom Langston

Oil Service, Inc.

412.771.6950

Laurie Perseo

Perseo-Erie, Inc.

814.452.4658

Rick Scott

EHD

814.453.5601

Rick Sherbondy

PNC Bank

814.337.1900

Chuck Guiste

Precision Manufacturing Institute

814.333.2415

Jill Groves

Redevelopment Auth. of Meadville

814.337.8200

Ken Smith

Second Foundation Consulting

814.454.5215

Rich Seidel

Seidel Financial, Inc.

814.336.1133

Gary Alizzeo

Shafer Law Firm

814.724.4540

Chris Coldren

Starlite Group, Inc.

814.333.1377

Greg Wasko

Starn Commoditities Group

814.336.9234

Kim Flynn

Starn Marketing Group

814.333.1365

Russell Schetroma

Steptoe & Johnson

814.336.6400

Bob Warren

The Warren Company

814.838.8681

BECOME AN NTMA-NW PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER MEMBER TODAY!

For more information contact Tami Adams at: tadams@nwpa-ntma.com or 814.720.0094

NTMA - Michiana Chapter UPCOMING EVENTS SAVE THE DATE!

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Small Business Luncheon Roundtable & Tourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Peer-to-peer discussion facilitated by industry leaders from MCNTMA Associates Zolman Tire and Cassady, Neeser & Brasseur, exploring business operation topics of fleet management and business protection services. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss this informative event! Thursday, November 8th at Zolman Tire, Mishawaka, Indiana. Call for more information. For more information contact Kelly Schneider at: Kelly@MCNTMA.org or 574.220.9111 or visit www.MCNTMA.org See page 26 for complete NTMA - Michiana Chapter Information.

,QVXULQJWKHWRROPDNLQJ LQGXVWU\VLQFHZD\EDFN ZKHQ

60LFKLJDQÂ&#x2021;6RXWK%HQG,QGLDQD Â&#x2021;LQVXUDQFHPLFKLDQDFRP november/december 2012

ntma.org

PrecisionNews

25


PrecisionNews // NTMA -MICHIANA CHAPTER

MEMBER LISTINGS MICHIANA CHAPTER

REGULAR MEMBERS Daniel Reifschneider

Accu-Die & Mold, Inc.

269.465.4020

Pam Rubenstein

Allied Specialty Precision, Inc.

574.255.4718

Mike Flowers

Ark Industrial Machining

269.925.1555

Greg Frederick

B&F Machine Products

574.255.7447

Nevin Siqueira

Bender Mold and Machine

574.255.5350

Paul Bonin

Bertrand Products

574.234.4181

JB Brown

Bremen Castings. Inc.

574.546.2411

Dan Hanson

Eagle Technologies Group

269.465.6986

Julie Schut

ELT Tooling, Inc

574.295.5041

Secretary/Treasurer

Paul Krizman

Empire Machine, Inc.

269.684.3713

DAVE RAZZANO Fulton Industries

Barbara Jordan

Exacto Inc, of South Bend

574.288.4716

David Behrens

F&F Machine Specialties

574.255.3173

Dave Razzano

Fulton Industries, Inc.

574.968.3222

Ken Patzkowsky

Hanson Mold

269.429.5555

Michael McLoughlin

K&M Machine-Fabricating, Inc.

269.445.2495

Ken Kasner

K Mold and Engineering, Inc.

574.272.5858

Joe Rudlaff

Kobelco Compressors Mfg Indiana

574.295.3145

Paul Hartz

Mack Tool and Engineering

574.233.8424

Tim Johnson

MCTD, Inc.

219.874.7661

Jay Skalla

Niles Precision Company, Inc.

269.683.0585

Gregory Rogers

Precision Piece Parts

574.255.3185

James Florian

Quality Mold and Engineering

269.422.2137

Tim Mead

R&M Manufacturing Company

269.683.9550

Stan Blenke

Schafer Gear Works

574.234.4116

William & Ann Voll

Sibley Machine & Foundry Corp.

574.288.4611

Herb Eggers

South Bend Form Tool

574.289.2441

Jerry Beck

Star Tool & Die

574.264.3815

2012 BOARD DIRECTORS President TIM MEAD R&M Manufacturing Co. Vice President PAUL BONIN Bertrand Products

BOARD MEMBERS Stan Blenke Schafer Gear Works Timothy Clifford Bremen Castings, Inc. Andy Jordan Exacto, Inc. of South Bend Paul Hartz Mack Tool and Engineering Ann Voll Sibley Machine & Foundry Corp.

NTMA - Michiana Chapter P.O. Box 82 Granger, IN 46530

Mary Hershberger

Superior Tool & Die Company, Inc.

574.293.2591

Ron Newcomer

Toolmasters, Inc.

574.256.1881

Rudy Hanson

United Tool and Engineering, Inc.

574.259.1953

Steve Hartz

Value Tool and Engineering, Inc.

574.246.1913

Matt Tyler

Vickers Engineering, Inc.

269.426.8545

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Kelly Schneider, Chapter Executive phone: 574.220.9111 kelly@mcntma.org

“Our vision is to become the premier center of knowledge, to lead the Michiana Region precision custom manufacturing industry, in continuing leadership in our area. Our goal is to help our members in the precision custom manufacturing industry, achieve business success in a global economy through advocacy, advice, networking, programs and services.” Check out our new website:

Neil Miller

1st Source Bank

574.235.2614

Nichole Slagel

AbsorbTech

574.271.1900

Christine Lauber

Christine Lauber, CPA

574.288.4801

Todd Franks

Federated Insurance

574.315.6108

James Holland

Holland Insurance Group

574.277.0234

Larry Byers

KM Industrial Machinery

269.381.0690

Mark Mondientz

Laven Insurance Agency

574.291.5510

Kelly Wiening

Legal Shield

574.226.4639

Tim Cirone

Machinery Systems

847.490.7913

Tony Ganser

Meredith Machinery

574.320.4176

James Ruthrauff

Merrill Lynch

574.282.3627

Bob Lytle

PCS Company

317.697.7663

Cari Eaton

Powell Tool Supply

574.289.4811

Terry Reamer

Zolman Tire

574.259.7871

www.MCNTMA.org NTMA - MANUFACTURING AMERICA’S FUTURE 26

PrecisionNews

ntma.org

november/december 2012


TECHNOLOGY • BUSINESS • EDUCATION • EVENTS • NEWS • DIRECTORY

PARTICIPATE. SPEAK OUT. LEAD. ...with the NTMA Great Lakes Region Magazine featuring Cleveland, Michiana and NW Pennsylvania

NTMA EXCLUSIVE

ASK ABOUT SPECIAL RATES FOR NTMA MEMBERS!

Precision News magazine’s readers are key decision makers that you as advertisers and sponsors, want to target. Our readers strive to stay up-to-date on the latest in business, education, legislation, human resources, technology, industry news and updates. Our readers want an edge in a constantly evolving industry, and they find it in Precision News. Let your ad be a call to action. Advertise in Precision News today!

Tami Adams

Kelly Schneider

Renee Neuendorf

Executive Director

Chapter Executive

Executive Director

NW Pennsylvania Chapter National Tooling & Machining Association

Michiana Chapter National Tooling & Machining Association

Cleveland Chapter National Tooling & Machining Association

tadams@nwpa-ntma.com phone: 814.720.0094 www.nwpa-ntma.com

kelly@mcntma.org phone: 574.220.9111 www.mcntma.org

rneuendorf@oh.rr.com phone: 440.360.0131 www.ntmacleveland.org

PrecisionNews

TM

visit us at: http://issuu.com/greatlakesprecisionnews

............................................................... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..


* Standard product configuration, peak performance. Š 2011 Makino



Th en Th ew M th e M a a a fle t he kin kino o Di xibi lp y PS PS lit sc o Se Ser u y ov ie de yo r er s liv ies u th ne co VMC er e ed m th .A ne es e to w tr r u el w pr ta i i ab th ly im ke od le s uc o p tio n th po tand res w si n ar ve er st e m d , an ve os fe sp a da td ee tu rtic rd em d, re al at le an pre s a ap m cis nd di . ak n s i in g on pe o. j ob cs co an s m d /p . s.

Great Lakes PRECISION NEWS November/December 2012  

PRECISION NEWS, the National Tooling and Machining Association Great Lakes Region Magazine featuring Cleveland, Michiana and Northwestern PA...

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