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Powerful Women Powerful Words Simon & Schuster Speakers Bureau Proudly Representing Outstanding Women Authors and Speakers


SPEAKING OF SSSB SPRING 2014

Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

“ Your capacity to stir emotion in every word and every action truly made a lasting impact on the children in the room. You have planted seeds of hope in the minds and bodies of our children. ”

Inside, a few of our outstanding women speakers answer questions about how they became the pioneering women, authors, and speakers they are today. Get to know them like never before, and see why they draw crowds and pack venues each and every time. SSSB proudly represents the authors and speakers most relevant to your organization’s events. Contact us to bring one of our remarkable speakers to your next event!

—Big Brothers Big Sisters of Family Services

Get to Know Our Speakers in Their Own Words: 4

Susannah Cahalan, Brain on Fire

8 S.E. Cupp, Losing Our Religion 12 Denise Kiernan, The Girls of Atomic City “Brain on Fire is at its most captivating when describing the torturous process of how doctors arrived at [Cahalan’s] diagnosis. Cahalan’s prose carries a sharp, unsparing, tabloid punch in the tradition of Pete Hamill and Jimmy ­Breslin. ” —New York Times Review

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Mary Buffett, Warren Buffett’s Stock Portfolio

20 Jessica Buchanan, Impossible Odds 22 Laura Schroff, An Invisible Thread 26 Other Outstanding SSSB Exclusives 3


Spotlight On... Susannah Cahalan New York Times Best-selling author of Brain on Fire

An award-winning author and journalist, Susannah Cahalan is the author of The New York Times best-seller, Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness. In this riveting memoir, she recounts the day she woke up in a strange hospital room, strapped to a bed, unable to move or speak. Her medical records—from a month-long stay of which she has no memory—showed psychosis, violence, and dangerous instability, yet, only weeks earlier, Cahalan had been a healthy 24 year old. As weeks went by, a last-minute intervention diagnosing her with a newly-discovered autoimmune disease saved her life. Since sharing her story, Cahalan and her book are credited with raising awareness about this rare condition so that cases are spotted and diagnosed faster. At the podium, Cahalan shares her compelling story and discusses topics that involve the current state of the medical community and new findings and limitations in the study of rare neurological diseases.

“Ms. Cahalan was an excellent speaker at our conference. She showed videos of herself at the height of her illness, and her ability to talk about her experience recovering from such a devastating disorder was inspiring.” —Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

W

hat advice would you give your 7-year-old self?

I think my answer would be simple: Don’t take it all so seriously. I’d try to explain, though I know she wouldn’t listen, that all the drama that feels so important is just temporary. I’d finish up by handing her a copy of Cat’s Eye by Margaret Atwood, which so deftly delves into the cruelty of little girls, and shows that the meanest of the mean girls have their own secret demons. I’d hope this would sink in, but knowing me, it wouldn’t. I’d also urge her to pay close attention to her science classes. Sure, they might not be as sexy or exciting as writing and reading, but they will come in handy one day.

Cahalan with her mom in 2003

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est advice your mother ever gave you?

My mom often uses the phrase, “Make it smaller.” It’s so simple, but so effective. Whenever you’re bothered by something, try to visualize it and then shrink it down. Your emotions will follow suit.

O

ne piece of advice for women just starting in your industry?

Do the things that frighten you. I remember pacing in front of an editor’s office, waiting to pitch a story on clothing stores open late (not exactly Pulitzer Prize winning material, but still). I was terrified, but I pushed through it. The editor accepted the assignment, my first. This experience still remains one of my career’s most defining moments.

W

hat is your proudest professional achievement?

Hands down, the interactions I’ve had with people and families touched by autoimmune encephalitis have been the most rewarding of my life. Last month in Durham, North Carolina, I ran a race called Florence Fourth, in honor of Florence McDow, who passed away from autoimmune encephalitis in 2012 at age 6. After the race, I joined her parents and sister and several other families for a lunch. Each family shared its story—and without exception, everyone cited reading Brain on Fire as a key moment for finding the right diagnosis, helping with their recovery, or giving legitimacy to the lonely and terrifying disease experience. As a journalist—scratch that, as a human being—there’s really nothing better than this.

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Spotlight On... Susannah Cahalan F

(continued)

unniest or most embarrassing workplace/professional faux pas?

Last month, I got lost on the way to a reading in Pennsylvania. GPS told me that it was going to take a little over an hour; it took me five. When I finally walked through the doors, a group of stalwarts remained, and clapped when I finally walked through the doors about three hours late. Embarrassing, to say the least.

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ow did you overcome the struggles you faced as a woman in your industry?? I was lucky enough to have remarkably supportive male and female mentors through my journalism career. These people gave me a chance as a plucky intern, challenged me, yelled at me, and sat me down in front of a computer teaching me how to write a tabloid lede. I learned how to write factually, but still punchily, and I am forever in their debt.

W

hat do you want audiences to take away from hearing you speak?

Cahalan (right) with two other young girls whose diagnosis was facilitated by Cahalan’s story.

I hope that people hear my story and learn how important it is to ask questions, to do outside research, and to trust your gut, even when a very esteemed person in a white lab coat is telling you otherwise. I also hope that people more fully understand the fragility of our minds — and how mysterious our bodies are. We still don’t understand a fraction of how our selves work.


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

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ou are at the pinnacle of your industry, why did you choose to become a speaker? I wasn’t always a comfortable public speaker. In fact, taking in front of groups scared me silly. Brain on Fire has given me a newfound confidence and love for speaking.

Cahalan’s consultant Dr. Najjar, left, and her drawing of a clock that formed the basis of his diagnosis

“Ms. Cahalan was an excellent speaker at our conference. She showed videos of herself at the height of her illness, and her ability to talk about her experience recovering from such a devastating disorder was inspiring.” —Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders

Suggested Speech Topics • Autoimmune Diseases • Memory Loss and Brain Trauma • The Medical Community and Mental Illness • Diseases from a Woman’s Perspective

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Spotlight On... S.E. Cupp Author, Political Columnist, and Conservative Culture Critic

A self-proclaimed “closet conservative in the land of the Left,” S.E. Cupp is the author of Why You’re Wrong About The Right, Behind the Myths: The Surprising Truth About Conservatives, in which she blows the lid off the stereotypes that have been long associated with the American Right. In her latest work, Losing Our Religion: The Liberal Media’s Attack on Christianity, Cupp boldly takes aim at the socalled “mainstream media” and its increasing disdain for Christianity, the faith of 78 percent of Americans. A leader of a new generation of conservatives and feminists, Cupp shares her unique and colorful points of view with audiences for an honest dialogue on conservative ideas in American life and popular culture.

“It was a pleasure to have you speak at our RightOnline Conference. Thank you for your rock solid remarks! Our activists in attendance and all that watched online appreciated hearing from you. Thank you, again!” —Americans for Prosperity Foundation


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

W

hat advice would you give your 7-year-old self?

Worry less. Much less.

B

est advice your mother ever gave you?

Nothing good happens after 2 am. I spent a lot of time trying to prove this axiom wrong...but with few exceptions, she’s of course right.

O

ne piece of advice for women just starting in your industry?

The best advice I got starting out, from my friend Tucker Carlson, was: Say yes to everyone. It worked for me.

F

unniest or most embarrassing workplace/professional faux pas?

Oh, there are far too many to count. From prompter mishaps to interviews gone wrong, and dealing with the sometimes inappropriate behavior of colleagues...there’s a book there. Someday, if ever I have nothing to lose.

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ow did you overcome the struggles you faced as a woman in your industry? The struggles I face in my industry are ongoing, and I don’t imagine ever overcoming them entirely. Initial struggles are getting in the door, which is nearly impossible. The next stage of struggles are finding ways to stay there once you’re in. That’s exhausting. And the stage after that is trying to grow and improve once you’ve proven you can hang. It’s a constant hustle, but the challenge is exciting. The other struggle now for me, like many other women, is figuring out if I can keep up the pace I’m at and also have a family. I’ll let you know! A young S.E. Cupp, ready to take on the world

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Spotlight On...

S.E. Cupp

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(continued)

hat is your proudest professional achievement?

Publishing two books and earning a regular column in the New York Daily News.

W

hat do you want audiences to take away from hearing you speak? Success is not for the satiated. You must be hungry—ravenous—to get it. But there’s no one way to get “there,” wherever “there” is. Doors open every day, and if you’re alert and hard working, easy to work with and polite, generous and diligent, disciplined and a little lucky...there are many ways to get where you want to be. I would hope they leave having learned a little. And I hope they leave pleasantly surprised.

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ou are at the pinnacle of your industry, why did you choose to become a speaker? It’s an honor to be invited to address an audience of any kind or size. I’m incredibly humbled and grateful for my platform, and I don’t intend to take it for granted. If someone wants to hear me speak, I’m happy to oblige.

H

ow do you define the term “Working Woman”?

I think all women work. It’s redundant.


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

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ne change you’d like to see happen for women in your lifetime? Less government intervention and lower taxes. Conservative economic policies empower women to work, raise families and remain self-reliant. Liberal economic policies keep women chained to the State.

Suggested Speech Topics • Redefining the Young Conservative • Losing Our Religion: The Liberal Media’s Attack on Christianity • Why You’re Wrong About The Right: The Surprising Truth About Conservatives

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Spotlight On... Denise Kiernan New York Times Bestselling author of The Girls of Atomic City

A rare photo of some of the young women secretly commissioned to work on the Manhattan project in Oak Ridge, TN. One of many ominous warnings on display at Oak Ridge.

The New York Times Bestselling author of The Girls of Atomic City, Denise Kiernan shares the true story of young women living in a secret government city during World War II while unknowingly working on the first atomic bomb. Lively and engaging, Kiernan intrigues audiences with a story of adventure, sacrifice and controversy. She leads listeners on a journey back in time into a top-secret world where young women and men were forbidden to speak of their work, even to one another, as the United States worked to face the challenges of World War II and the Manhattan Project raced to harness nuclear power.


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

W

hat advice would you give your 7-year-oldself?

Indulge your curiosity, no matter where it leads you. Pay attention to the world around you. You will find delights and mysteries where you least expect them.

H

ow did you overcome the struggles you faced as a woman in your industry? Pick your battles and focus on your allies rather than your perceived enemies. Be careful not to give too much energy to people whose minds you will likely never change. There were always women and men in my career who valued me as a colleague and didn’t care about my gender. As for those who chose to underestimate me: I let them. When someone underestimates you, whether it’s because of your gender, race, religion or other identifier, it can often work to your advantage. I have amazing friends. I spend my time with those who have something of value to offer.

O

ne piece of advice for women just starting in your industry?

“Denise’s presentation was superb in every respect: content, delivery, “tone.” She has a real gift for connecting with her audience—not an easy task in this case, as the group (approximately 800) ranged from students to seniors and knowledge levels from specialists to laypersons. She reached them all, both in the formal lecture and in the Q&A session that followed.” —University of Mary Washington Great Lives Lecture Series

Writers: give yourself permission to write a horrible first draft. It sounds cliché, but it is very true that writing is about rewriting. Early on in your career, it can feel like you’re constantly seeking. You’re seeking agents, publishers, reviews, and more. It can feel as though these perceived “gatekeepers” to success are in an exclusive club and that only a select few get behind the velvet rope. When relating to these gatekeepers, it can help to keep in mind that they are looking for you just as hard as you are looking for them. They need your content and your skill. Without them, none of these individuals have jobs.

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Spotlight On... Denise Kiernan

(continued)

On The Girls of Atomic City... “Rosie, it turns out, did much more than drive rivets.” —The Washington Post “A clear and compelling picture of this fascinating time.” —The Boston Globe

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hat do you want audiences to take away from hearing you speak? All of our stories have value. We are all witnesses to history in ways that may not be immediately apparent to us in the present. Learn to value everyone’s perspectives and experiences, not just the views and experiences of those who are the loudest or who get the most attention. The advice I would give my seven-year-old self still stands: There are wonders and mysteries to be found in the most unexpected places and from the most unexpected sources.

Kiernan at the podium


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

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hat is your proudest professional achievement?

“Denise Kiernan headlined our Secret City Symposium and did not disappoint. She has a natural, relaxed style and satisfied the entire audience from the scholarly historians and university professors to the descendants of those who had worked in Oak Ridge. She is a shining star: professional, engaging, approachable. Most important of all, she knew what the National Archives at Atlanta wanted and that was to promote research into our records. In this day and age of the superficial and synthetic personality, Denise Kiernan is the real thing.” —National Archives at Atlanta

I consider the success of my marriage and the quality of my friendships to be crucial elements of my professional achievement. The people we choose to keep in our lives impact us in married ways. Choosing the right partner in life and the right friends on whom to rely, is key to emotional success, which I consider to be inextricably linked to professional success.

Suggested Speech Topics • The Girls of Atomic City: Life in a Secret City of the Manhattan Project • Lessons of the Manhattan Project • How I Did It: Researching, writing and publishing narrative nonfiction in today’s market

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Spotlight On... Mary Buffett Best-selling Author and Expert Speaker on Investment Strategies

Through her work as a best-selling author, international speaker, entrepreneur, and activist, Mary Buffet advocates self-empowerment through financial investment for women. Her first book, Buffetology, was an immediate New York Times best-seller. Since Buffetology’s meteoric success in 1999, she has co-authored eight more books, including her most recent, The Warren Buffet Stock Portfolio. Buffett speaks regularly on television and radio as a financial expert. At the podium, she discusses finance and investment strategies for newcomers and experts alike. Her continued advocacy of women’s issues is exemplified by her featured role in the upcoming documentary, Femme, focusing on successful international women making a difference in society.

“This is destined to be the business world’s Little Red Book that investors and managers will resort to over and over.” —The Sanibel Captiva Trust Co. on The Tao of Warren Buffett

“[Warren Buffet and the Art of Stock Arbitrage] takes you behind the scenes for a serious exploration of arbitrage techniques that work.” —Gabriel Wisdom, Syndicated Business Radio Host


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

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F

A man is not a plan.

Not realizing I was speaking to the CFO of a company I wanted a job from – it turned out better – I was more relaxed and open.

est advice your mother ever gave you?

H

ow do you define the term “Working Woman”?

Do they define that term for men? I think professional is not gender specific.

unniest or most embarrassing workplace/professional faux pas?

W

hat is your proudest professional achievement?

Teaching a finance class at UCLA Business School and being a best-selling author in 18 countries.

Buffet with famed media mogul, Ariana Huffington

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ne piece of advice for women just starting in your industry?

Have an inner sense of confidence and show it.

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Spotlight On... Mary Buffett W

(continued)

hat do you want audiences to take away from hearing you speak? Common sense language and an easy understanding of complex subject matters related to finance and women’s issues.

“Everyone enjoyed your humor, candor, and wide breath of knowledge on the many subjects you covered…Your truly exemplify the term “professional.” —Omaha Town Hall Lecture Series

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ou are at the pinnacle of your industry, why did you choose to become a speaker? I want every woman to know they can do it. I give many examples of successful women and why, no matter what socio-economic barriers. Mary Buffett at the podium


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

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ow did you overcome the struggles you faced as a woman in your industry? Being one of few, I had to be more professional, work harder and prove myself to my peers. Being referred to disrespectfully.

O

ne change you’d like to see happen for women in your lifetime?

H

ow can women, specifically, benefit from hearing you speak? They can understand that anyone with or without a degree can achieve any goal they put their minds to. We are the only humans that can bear a child, run a company, win an academy award, be a good wife, mother and can make more money than men. We also have the ability to create peace and world leadership models for women throughout the globe. With odds against us, we have to be more proficient investors and asset managers or we risk crisis levels of women living in poverty. With the political realities of spending cuts to entitlement programs there is a critical need for women to invest in themselves.

Total equal rights, equality in our pay, advancement, opportunities and education. More women in the political arena to affect change that brings stability and peace. We earn 22% less than men, but live longer. We spend an average of 11 years as unpaid family caregiver and are more likely to put our family expenses, like college and care of an elderly parent before our own. Twice as many women live in poverty as men.

Suggested Speech Topics • Investment Strategies for Newcomers and Seasoned “Buffettologists” Alike • How to Read and Interpret Financial Statements from Warren Buffett’s Successful Perspective

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Spotlight On... Jessica Buchanan Kidnapped in Somalia, Rescued by SEAL Team 6

Buchanan with husband, Erik Landemalm

A humanitarian and survivor, Jessica Buchanan shares her heart-wrenching yet empowering true story in her book, Impossible Odds. While working to raise land mine awareness in Somalia, she was kidnapped in public by armed Somali land pirates and held for ransom in the inclement outdoors for 93 days, before being rescued by the US Navy’s elite strike team, SEAL Team Six. On stage, Buchanan recounts her story with great detail and emotion and shares her untiring concern to eradicate poverty and illiteracy for children in eastern Africa who are often forced into the roles of child soldiers. She inspires audiences to find hope and coping mechanisms when facing adversity—whether physical or emotional.

“Thank you for speaking at our family conference in Atlanta. We were so impressed by the perseverance and faith you both demonstrated in overcoming such a significant ordeal. You have an important message that carries hope and grace from your hearts that is inspirational and needs to be heard across this earth..” —Southeast Family Office Forum


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

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ow can women, specifically, benefit from hearing you speak? I think women view me as being ‘just like them’ because I am. I’m an ordinary girl who grew up in the Mid-West - I’m a mom and a wife, a teacher and a friend. There is nothing remarkable about me, other than the fact that I have been thrown into some rather extraordinary circumstances in my lifetime, and found the strength to manage to survive. Women can identify with the fundamental nature of my challenges and feel renewed courage to keep moving in an upward direction in their own circumstances, even though they may feel exhausted, empty and tired of the struggle. I am a reminder that miracles happen for the common struggler in this thing we call life, and that while we wait for the miracle to happen, grace and strength always arrive in time to prop us up and walk with us along the way.

“I have never seen a room filled with hundreds of people who were so simply put, spellbound. Your dedication and love for each other, your courage to survive given such impossible odds and your strength to share your story with such dignity and grace was inspirational to all who attended.”

O

ne piece of advice for women just starting in your industry?

Always trust your instincts. Don’t let any situation, any one person, or deadline override your gut feelings. Only YOU know when you feel safe, secure and comfortable. Working for humanitarian organizations in conflict areas can often be unstable and dangerous work. It is important to follow protocol, take the proper security measures and keep your safety as your number one priority. People need help, yes, but you cannot be of any assistance if your security has been compromised and you find yourself in an unsafe situation.

W

hat advice would you give your 7-year-old self?

It’s ok to feel different and a bit misunderstood. Don’t allow that to turn into an insecurity, but use it to become a strength, because someday, you WILL be a force to be reckoned with. Let your creativity have no boundaries and your ‘bleeding heart’ and sensitivity be used to help many throughout your lifetime. Continue to extend compassion, both for others, as well as for yourself.

—Navy SEAL Foundation

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Spotlight On... Laura Schroff Author of New York Times National Best-seller An Invisible Thread

A former media executive at publications that include USA Today, InStyle, and People, Laura Schroff is the author of The New York Times National Best-seller, An Invisible Thread: The True Story of an 11-year-old Panhandler, a Busy Sales Executive, and an Unlikely Meeting with Destiny. When Schroff first met Maurice on a New York City street corner, she had no idea of the unlikely friendship to come that would inevitably change both their lives. Today, she shares this heartwarming story that gave life to an over-scheduled professional who had lost sight of family and happiness, and hope to a hungry and desperate boy whose family background in drugs and crime seemed an inescapable fate. This one of a kind story inspires audiences everywhere to never lose sight of the far reaching good that one random act of kindness can do.

“While Laura’s story is magnificent in her book “The Invisible Thread”, her personal account is breath taking. Perhaps it is so compelling to a room full of people because anyone could and can be Laura. Laura’s action and now her message speaks to human beings capacity for compassion as well as the ability to change.” —House of Hope


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

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hat advice would you give your 7-year-old self?

It’s okay to struggle with reading and math, but to always keep trying and to never give up. I would also try to impress upon my 7-year-old self, that just because I was struggling it did not mean I was not smart or as good as the ones who did excel. I would emphasize the importance of self worth and selfawareness, focusing on encouraging my 7-year-old self to dream big and work hard to achieve those dreams.

Schroff on The Today Show with Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb and dear friend and co-subject of An Invisible Thread, Maurice Mazyck

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est advice your mother ever gave you?

When I was 24-years old, it was a very painful time in my life and my mother told me God would never, ever give me more than I could handle. I never forgot my mother’s wise words and throughout my entire adult life her words brought me an enormous amount of comfort and confidence that I could handle anything that came my way.

O

ne piece of advice for women just starting in your industry?

Publishing a book is not an easy task and it takes an enormous amount of hard work to make your book a success. My advice to any woman publishing a book is to understand the effort required by such an undertaking. Once her book is published, her work has only just begun. I believe taking your book to the next level ultimately is your own responsibility and one that deserves as much, if not more, focus and determination as when writing it. I also believe it is critical to create a strong online brand presence with web and social media channels, which allow you to engage in a dialogue with your readers and potential readers. Never stop throwing ideas against the wall, but also do your research and listen to your audience to understand what ideas and messages resonate with them. It’s so important to continue learning and growing, but also never passing on anything. You never know what opportunity could be just around the corner.

H

ow do you define the term “Working Woman”?

Anyone that finds a passion in their life and pursues it with every part of them.

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Spotlight On... Laura Schroff

(continued)

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hat do you want audiences to take away from hearing you speak?

Schroff with Maurice sharing lunch, just as they did when their friendship started over a decade ago.

“Laura’s recounting of her meeting with Maurice as a young boy was emotional, personally touching and inspiring. Everyone went up to stand in line to say hello, to have their picture taken, or to invite Laura and Maurice to present at their school. Laura’s presentation will remain one of our most successful events ever.” —Robin Hood New York

What I hope to share with audiences is closely tied to the message in my book about my unlikely friendship with Maurice Mazyck. My talks, like the book, emphasize the power of kindness and how each of us has the ability to profoundly change the lives of others. It is about opening up your eyes and hearts to your own surroundings, to the hidden blessings in our lives that are sometimes right in front of us. It’s about harnessing those blessings and reaching out to spread kindness to others, especially those in need. What I never could have imagined is how when you give kindness, expecting nothing in return, you receive the most beautiful gifts. The ripple effect can be just astounding.

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ou are at the pinnacle of your industry, why did you choose to become a speaker? This journey has been a blessing; in fact, I never set out to be a speaker, nor did I ever imagine speaking opportunities would come my way. After my book started resonating with various charity organizations and schools, I was invited to speak. I absolutely love speaking and believe I am extremely fortunate to be doing something I feel so passionate about to groups that feel the same passion. It is an incredible gift that has been bestowed on me, I take it very seriously and there is never a day that I take it for granted.


Powerful Women. Powerful Words.

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ow did you overcome the struggles you faced as a woman in your industry? When I started working in advertising sales in 1977, it was still very much considered a male-dominated profession. I overcame the struggles of being a woman in such a male-dominated industry by working hard, gaining the respect of my peers and never playing the “girl” card. Like strong women who have come before me, and many others who have followed, I measured my success on the results I delivered, not my gender. It was not easy by any means, but nothing worth achieving ever is.

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ne change you’d like to see happen for women in your lifetime? I would love for women to be viewed outside of the traditional roles society has put on them. For example, I would like to see women who work inside the home to be applauded and to be given the credit they so deserve. Their hours are long and hard and I absolutely believe they do not receive the respect that comes with working as hard as they do at one of the most important jobs in America! I would also love to see a woman President in my lifetime. Having worked at Ms. Magazine in the 1970s, it would be such an incredible milestone, honoring and recognizing women. It would be an amazing moment in our country and for women.

W

hat is your proudest professional achievement?

Since I spent my career in advertising sales, certainly publishing a New York Times bestseller with my co-author Alex Tresniowski has definitely been an achievement I never could have imagined. However, my proudest achievement since my book came out in November 2011, is how schools and particularly students of all ages have embraced my book. I never could have imagined the impact An Invisible Thread would have on students. When 12-year old Avital read my book with her mom and made me her Mitzvah Hero, I knew my book was making a difference. There are no words to describe how touched and honored I am to be her Mitzvah Hero. In addition, to see first-hand, how this story has encouraged young people to understand the power of spreading kindness and how adopting such a message can have a positive impact on the world in which they live.

Suggested Speech Topics • An Invisible Thread: A Truly Inspirational Story • Mentoring Youth • Breaking Cycles of Abuse

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More Outstanding Hollye Jacobs

Shyima Hall

A ndrea R aynor

Lisa Genova

The Silver Lining

Hidden Girl

The Voice That Calls You Home

Love Anthony


SSSB Exclusives Jessica B. Harris

Vaddey R atner

Glennon Doyle Melton

K im Stolz

Beyond Gumbo

In the Shadow of the Banyon

Carry On, Warrior

Unfriending My Ex

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The next time your organization is seeking an extraordinary speaker, be sure to contact Simon & Schuster Speakers Bureau. We offer the most celebrated storytellers whose books touch lives and whose keynotes captivate audiences. Before you plan your next event, let one of our expert agents help you deliver the speaker your audience will be talking about for years to come.

info@simonspeakers.com 路 (866) 248-3049

Simon & Schuster: Powerful Women, Powerful Words.  

Simon & Schuster: Powerful Women, Powerful Words.