Page 1

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014


Cowan’s Cowan’s One Source Source Advantage™ Program Program IIRUWKH*UHDWHU.LWFKHQHU:DWHUORR&KDPEHURI&RPPHUFH RUWKH*UHDWHU.LWFKHQHU:DWHUORR&KDPEHURI&RPPHUFH $ $FRPSOHWHEHQH¿WVDQGLQVXUDQFHSDFNDJHEXLOW FRPSOHWHEHQH¿WVDQGLQVXUDQFHSDFNDJHEXLOW

2QH6RXUFH$GYDQWDJHŒLVDQHDV\ÀH[LEOH

IIRUERWK&KDPEHUPHPEHUVDQGWKHLUHPSOR\HHV RUERWK&KDPEHUPHPEHUVDQGWKHLUHPSOR\HHV

DQGFRVWHIIIIHFWLYHLQVXUDQFHDQGEHQH¿WV

$QRWKHU&KDPEHUPHPEHUVKLSUHZDUG $QRWKHU&KDPEHUPHPEHUVKLSUHZDUG

SDFNDJHWKDWDOORZV&KDPEHUPHPEHUVDQGWKHLU HPSOR\HHVWRVDYHXSWRRQJURXSEHQH¿WV

7KH&KDPEHUNQRZVZRUNLQJWRJHWKHUZRUNV

DQGXSWRRQKRPHDQGDXWRLQVXUDQFH.

$QGVRGRZH7KDW¶VZK\ZHFUHDWHG2QH

(QMR\WKHVLPSOLFLW\RIOHWWLQJ2QH6RXUFH

6RXUFH$GYDQWDJHŒ1RZ\RXUJURXSEHQH¿WV

$GYDQWDJHŒZRUNIRU\RX

EXVLQHVVLQVXUDQFHDQGHPSOR\HHLQVXUDQFH FRYHUDJHVDUHZRUNLQJWRJHWKHUWRKHOS\RX

One Source Advantage™ Offers: 



 

 







 









 

 

Cowan C owan Insurance Insurance Group 1-888-333-6337 chamber@cowangroup.ca www.cowangroup.ca www .cowangroup.ca


advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014 WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

features 14 18

FEATURE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

The Business of Giving Back at Christmas

Art Sinclair

Mike Collins

EDITOR:

Heather Hutchings

COVER STORY

Above and Beyond…the Path to Our Future Roger Farwell

23 25

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

M&T Printing Group PHOTOGRAPHY:

FEATURE

KW’s 1st Hockey Helps the Homeless Tournament

Adamski Photography ADVERTISING AND SALES:

FEATURE

The Executive Military Experience (Executrek) Tony Lea and Henrik Noesgaard

David MacLellan – dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Don Critelli – dcritelli@greaterkwchamber.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Mike Collins, Paul Eichinger, Roger Farwell, Mary Sue Fitzpatrick, Tony Lea, Ian McLean, Henrik Nosegaard, Art Sinclair, Lori Straus CONTRIBUTORS:

Teri Hetherington and Julie Tedesco

NETWORKING

ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES: November 21, 2014 for January/February 2015 January 23, 2015 for March/April 2015 March 20, 2015 for May/June 2015 July 17, 2015 for September/October 2015 September 18, 2015 for November/December 2015

Fall Networking

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

departments 4 5

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

The Politics of CanadianBusiness

10

Paul Eichinger

12

Ian McLean

6

ADVOCACY

The Politics of Business Philanthropy Art Sinclair

8

20 26 29

PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

Chamber to Showcase Community to Young Physicians Mary Sue Fitzpatrick

Darlene Jones djones@greaterkwchamber.com SUBMISSION POLICY:

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Waterloo Region leads Canada in Service Innovation

NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS AUGUST 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 2014

30

EVENTS

Mark Your Calendar SPONSOR PROFILE

Heffner-Raising the Roof on Their Own Terms MEMBER NOTABLES

Achieving Success Chamber Members SPONSORSHIP

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio.

PUBLICATIONS PERMIT:

#40026716

FOR PERMISSIONS AND REPRINT REQUESTS

Heather Hutchings - hhutchings@greaterkwchamber.com PRINTED IN CANADA BY:

PUBLICATION OF:

Chamber Sponsors

POSTMASTER ADDRESS CHANGES C/O

ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREETE NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

3


message from the chair

The Policy Agenda of Canadian Business BY PAUL EICHINGER

Stares. Daggers. Incredulous Remarks. At the recent Canadian Chamber of Commerce Annual General Meeting, the Greater Kitchener Waterloo and Cambridge Chamber delegates had just voted in favor of a policy resolution that the rest of the Ontario caucus (some 150 delegates) were voting against. The policy was narrowly defeated, but for the rest of the weekend on several occasions we were reminded of our contrarian vote, and having to defend the position taken.

This is serious stuff. The annual conference of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce brings together some 400 delegates from Chambers across the country. Over the course of three days, 69 policy resolutions that had survived the scrutiny of Provincial and Canadian Chamber Policy Committees were debated, amended, and voted upon by the conference delegates. This is where local chamber advocacy efforts and resolutions, if supported by the national caucus, become advocacy issues to be advanced by Canadian Chamber of Commerce President Perrin Beatty and his staff. Over the coming months, letters will be sent to Federal and Provincial Government Ministers, meetings will be arranged and the national interests of the business community will be advanced in the hope of positively impacting future legislation and government activities. Two policy resolutions put forward by the Board of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce were approved by the national caucus. The first urges the federal government to implement a tax credit strategy for the Canadian music industry (similar to the film and television industry). Our Chamber has been a strong supporter of the local arts and culture sector, and this resolution asks Ottawa to provide tax assistance for the music business similar to many other economic sectors. The second urges the federal government to develop trade agreements and policies that support the export of Canadian food products and support productivity and innovation in the domestic food industry.

4

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Art Sinclair, Vice President of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber ensured these resolutions were understood and supported, and also engaged in thoughtful and reasoned debate for other policy resolutions put forward by delegates. Jason Kenney, Federal Minister of Employment and Social Development was a keynote speaker and credited the Canadian Chamber’s influence in the recent introduction of the Canada Job Grant program. There was also tremendous debate about recent changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, which has particularly impacted businesses in Alberta and the East Coast. With an often “hidden” or understated advocacy role that the Chamber plays, this conference highlighted the importance of this role, and particularly how local resolutions find their way into the national policy conversations. Not all advocacy takes place at the national level. In fact, most of the Chamber direct advocacy occurs at the local level. Recent municipal all-candidates debates will be followed up with meetings with successful candidates to ensure the voice of business is heard. Over the course of a typical year, the Chamber will present 5 to 10 position papers to local or regional councils. And in the spring, KW Chamber delegates will attend the Ontario Chamber caucus sessions….and find out if our provincial colleagues have forgiven us for our streak of voting independence. I am very much looking forward to my one year term as Chair of the Board of Directors. I welcome any thoughts, suggestions or ideas you may have; please forward to myself at peichinger@mte85.com.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Paul Eichinger CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Paul is Vice President at MTE Consultants Inc.


message from the president

Waterloo Region Leads Canada in Service Innovation BY IAN MCLEAN Waterloo Region has a long and well documented history for innovation and new ideas in business and education. We also have compiled an impressive record of achievement in community service. In the new 2014-2015 Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce Membership Directory – which I hope everyone has reviewed since it is one of most impressive editions to date – there are 66 members listed under the category of charitable and community organizations. The community services they collectively provide are highly impressive, including housing, immigrant employment, healthcare, and skills development among many others. The common thread for all of these members is dedicated staff and volunteers who daily make a difference in the lives of Waterloo Region residents. A unique component of our Chamber is that we effectively combine our services to the business community with our support of the Region’s non-profits and charities. Staff and volunteers from these 66 member non-profit organizations serve on the Chamber Board of Directors, policy committees, and assist with event planning along with our other regular functions. The Chamber is an organization of employers of all sizes and in all sectors, public, private and non-profit, across Waterloo Region and collectively our capacity to make a difference locally, provincially and nationally is immense. One organization that most impressively reflects this local commitment to community service is Capacity Canada. Started five years ago as Capacity Waterloo Region, in August of this year they officially changed to a new brand that better reflects its reach and influence beyond the boundaries of Waterloo Region. Lead by CEO Cathy Brothers, a team of talented staff and volunteers from across all sectors of the local community, Capacity Canada offers a range of unique and innovative services to help charities and non-profits build “capacity” to change directions or take on new programs. The original goal, as envisioned by many local community leaders five years ago, was to bring together ideas, people and resources that drive social change. The vision is changing lives through courageous community organizations, accomplished by providing non-profit leaders with new resources and professional support that enhances leadership skills, stimulates cross-sector collaboration, promotes knowledge-sharing, and encourages social innovation.

In a news release last summer, Cathy Brothers noted that their success in building stronger non-profit organizations in Waterloo Region has been noticed and admired elsewhere. The needs the organization fills is not unique to our community and it provides programs and services that can be applied in all communities across Canada. Capacity Chair Steve Farlow noted Waterloo Region has ideas to share. And from the relationships we build, we’ll come back with new ways of filling needs and meeting challenges. As an example of Capacity Canada’s achievements, more than 2000 Board Leaders and Executive Directors/CEOs have attended the Manulife Board Governance Boot Camp and other training sessions. MatchBoard, a Manulife-Capacity partnership, has trained 70 Manulife staff in the region for volunteer roles on the boards of non-profits. In June, MatchBoard moved outside the region for the first time and launched a pilot program for executives at Manulife’s headquarters in Toronto. Capacity Canada is another impressive example of Waterloo Region’s ability to innovate and lead, whether we consider manufacturing, information technology, or supporting the marginalized or vulnerable within our community. We recognize needs such as skills development, immigrant attraction and retention, and social services and continually implement strategies and solutions for addressing our issues. This is again a remarkable community achievement and shows that Waterloo Region is a tremendous location to live and work.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian McLean Ian is President and CEO of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

5


GALA

BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS

F

EBRUARY EB RU UARY 19 , 2015 2 TTH H

T I C K E T S A VA I L A B L E N O W

W

6

W

W

.

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

G

R

E

A

T

E

R

K

W

C

H

A

M

B

E

R

.

C

O

M


advocacy

The Politics of Business Philanthropy BY ART SINCLAIR Big business in America incites big issues. Corporate philanthropy and the choices by American business leaders to support designated recipients are suddenly under a higher level of public scrutiny than most decisions by government. A Wall Street Journal article from August 3, 2014 noted that last year David Koch of Wichita, Kansas-based Koch Industries donated $100 million to New York Presbyterian Hospital (Koch does not live in Kansas anymore). This donation for an outpatient centre actually initiated street protests from organized labour and other similar interests. The idea of anyone disagreeing with a corporate donation of $100 million to Grand River Hospital seems bizarre. Protestors on King Street could get CTV attention since the station is across the street. But don’t expect David Koch or his brother Charles to write a cheque to Grand River or any other hospital in Canada. They don’t like our public health care system. The Koch brothers of Koch Industries have been heavily active in the American political scene – on the opposite side of labour – and their support of conservative causes has made their non-political support a lightning rod for partisan reaction. In 1980, David Koch was the Libertarian Party’s Vice Presidential candidate against Ronald Reagan and George Bush. The Libertarian Party platform was described as the far right of Reagan, claiming the former California Governor represented no change whatsoever from Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale. Since then David and Charles, the CEO of the family conglomerate in Wichita, have widely been cited as one of the drivers for the Tea Party. Some analysts would argue this apparent grass-roots movement was in fact created by the brothers to provide a wider audience and secure electoral support for their political agenda. Naomi Levine, the Executive Director of New York University’s Center for Philanthropy and Fundraising and a former fundraiser with that institution, noted that the political leanings of donors are irrelevant. Institutions may have policies on how the donor’s money is earned and concern could be raised over possible inappropriate public remarks by any individuals associated with that patron, however if the money is forwarded legally then it can be used for the recipient’s expressed objectives.

A Wall Street Journal article from March 2014 noted that while the Koch Brothers spend a significant amount of money on politics, labour unions spend more. Citing a study from the Washington-based Centre for Responsive Politics, it was estimated that between 1989 and 2014 American labour groups spent nearly $639 million on election campaigns while Koch Industries spent $18 million. On a far more positive note, interim CEO of the Creative Enterprises Initiative (CEI) Roger Farwell in his presentation at a Chamber event on October 1 indicated that in Canadian cities such as Edmonton and Saskatoon, financial support for the local cultural sector is strong. This is a significant development since there has been a traditional belief that spending for arts is intrinsically connected to creative sectors such as IT and not natural resource economies such as the Canadian prairies. As noted by Roger, western Canada is channeling their significant private and public financial resources into building strong and vibrant local cultural communities. Hopefully, provincial and federal legislators are aware of this development and will consider financial commitments to match local support in communities across Canada. All American cynicism aside, Canadian and Waterloo Region institutions require support from local business to deliver the services imperative for a growing urban and rural population. Fortunately, for the entire Waterloo Region community, our economic and taxation base continues to expand providing money for a range of vital functions and services. Not all communities across southwestern Ontario are this fortunate.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art is Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

7


Thank You! Ontario Provincial District Council

Individual and Small Business Contributors

BME Consulting Karen Mason Ian McLean Bill Weiler Tim Sothern

for helping the Chamber continue its goal of eliminating the doctor shortage in Waterloo Region Since 1998 the Chamber and a team of dedicated volunteers have cut the number of residents without a family doctor in half. However the battle is not over. Our Recruitment efforts can only happen through the financial dedication of our Corporate Community through which it is funded


perspective on health care

Chamber to Showcase Community to Young Physicians BY MARY SUE FITZPATRICK Health care is a significant issue for all of us and having access to health care professionals is critical to the well being of families in our region. However, many families, locally and across the province, do not have the benefit of being under the care of a family practitioner. This is why the Chamber’s physician recruitment program is an important community health care initiative, not only for our residents’ well being but for the health and prosperity of our business community looking to attract the best and the brightest. With the generous investment and support of our corporate and municipal partners, the Chamber Health Care Resources Council is able to oversee a number of programs throughout the year to attract new family physicians to serve the health care needs of the community. Since this critical initiative was launched in 1998, the Chamber, working with community interests, has successfully attracted over 165 family practitioners. The most significant program is our annual physician recruitment weekend when we host first, second and third year family medicine residents and their partners interested in practice and employment opportunities in Kitchener-Waterloo-Woolwich. The first weekend in November we will be celebrating our 16th year of showcasing the community to these young health care professionals. During their three day community visit our guests will learn about practicing in the greater K-W area and about the many fine amenities that life in our communities has to offer. The Family Medicine Resident Weekend, as we call it, is planned, organized and hosted by the dedicated members of the Chamber’s Family Physician Liaison Task Force chaired by Al Hayes of WalterFedy. The weekend itinerary the volunteers plan and manage for these young physicians in training includes touring Grand River Hospital and the new Medical Centre at The Boardwalk. They will be introduced to local family physicians and other health care professionals and will learn more about the different range of practice opportunities available here. Their partners will be taken on tours of our rural and urban communities and have the opportunity to explore employment opportunities. They will all meet some high profile business and community leaders and learn

more about the region’s diversity and its strong innovative and entrepreneurial spirit. This interesting work and fun filled weekend has been well received and praised by visiting family medicine residents and their partners and it has proven to be one of our most successful recruitment tools drawing many family physicians to local community and hospital-based practices over the past fifteen years. Beyond support of this important physician recruitment weekend, our corporate and municipal partners’ generous annual investment also helps the Chamber to recruit physicians throughout the year. We have been working with family medicine residents nearing graduation, some of whom are training in K-W, as well as established family practitioners from across the province. Personal community visits have been arranged for these young practitioners who have met with local family physicians and toured a number of K-W practice opportunities. These doctors and their partners were very impressed with the area and have made commitments to practice here. These recent recruitment efforts have been exceptionally successful. With support from our community health care partners, we will have attracted an unprecedented number of family physicians this year – a total of fourteen new practitioners to date. The Chamber Health Care Resources Council sincerely thanks all of our partners for their generous investment in this important community health care initiative. With their continued support, five years from now we want to be able to say that every one of our residents has access to a family physician and the best primary care possible.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mary Sue Fitzpatrick Mary Sue is Vice President Family Physician Resources and Health Advocacy.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

9


networking

Autumn Networking

THE CHAMBER’S 2014-15 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

GOLFERS AT THE 2014 ANNUAL GOLF SCRAMBLE

THE CROWD AT THE POINT OF VIEW LUNCHEON WITH MINISTER JOE OLIVER

XENIA HORTON, TRACEY WEILER, JAN LEHMAN AND STEPHANIE TANNER

WATERLOO REGION AIRPORT’S PUTTING CONTEST!

2014 INSPIRING WOMAN AWARD WINNER SUSAN CRANSTON

LESLEY WARREN AND TRACEY WEILER COLLECTING DRESS FOR SUCCESS DRIVE DONATIONS

HOME HARDWARE’S BUSINESS AFTER 5 AT THE HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS SUITES ST. JACOBS/WATERLOO

PRESIDENT & CEO OF MANULIFE DONALD GULOIEN WELCOMING MINISTER JOE OLIVER

THE CROWD TAKING IN ALL OF THE INSPIRING STORIES!

Photography by Adamski Photography

www.the-boardwalk.ca 10

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


networking

Autumn Networking

A FULL ROOM AT THE INSPIRING WOMEN EVENT

THE CHICOPEE TEAM

SPEAKER JANET PODLESKI LOONEYSPOONS COLLECTION

OF THE

POINT OF VIEW LUNCHEON WITH MINISTER JOE OLIVER

MARCIE PARROTT AND BRIAN BOURKE AT THE HOME HARDWARE BUSINESS AFTER 5 EVENT

PAST CHAIR SANDRA STONE PASSING THE GAVEL TO

CHAIR PAUL EICHINGER

YOGA SESSION PROVIDED BY QUEEN STREET YOGA

TRIC FLETCHER, DIANE MORGAN AND KIM FEERE AT THE INSPIRING WOMEN EVENT

SHOTSKI’S, COURTESY OF CHICOPEE

NETWORKING AT THE HOME HARDWARE BA5 EVENT

SPEAKER JULIE COLE OF MABEL’S LABELS

THE REPS FROM MOXIE’S GRILL BAR

INCOMING

Photography by Adamski Photography

JANUARY 10 & 11, 2015 B I N G E M A N S CO N F E R E N C E C E N T R E K I TC H E N E R s     

 

A D M I S S I O N: $10

THEWEDDINGTRENDS.COM F O R M O R E I N F O C A L L 519-895-5239

T I C K E T S AVA I L A B L E AT D O O R C H I L D R E N U N D E R 12 A R E F R E E

BRIDAL MAGAZINE

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

11


new members

August 1, 2014 to September 30, 2014 5i Research / Canadian MoneySaver

Car-San Manufacturing Limited

DrumFIT Inc.

Honeypot Marketing

Financial Services Products Ryan Modesto, Managing Partner 55 King Street West, Suite 700 Kitchener, ON N2G 4W1 Email: info@5iresearch.ca www.5iresearch.ca Phone: (519) 772-7632

Electronic Manufacturing Services Caroline Grandy, Office Administrator 162 McIntyre Drive Units 3, 5-8 Kitchener, ON N2R 1E8 Email: finance@car-san.com www.car-san.com Phone: (519) 885-0403 Fax: (519) 885-2604

Health, Fitness & Exercise Service Danielle Sherbo, President/CEO 606E Colby Drive Waterloo, ON N2V 1A2 Email: sales@drumfit.ca www.drumfit.ca Phone: (519) 574-2267

Graphic Designers Dan Nedelko, Founder 194 King Street South, Waterloo, ON N2J 1P9 Email: dan@honeypotmarketing.com www.honeypotmarketing.com Phone: (519) 241-3201

Exhale Entertainment

Chris’ Tire Discounter

Event Planning Jimmy Petrie, Owner 425 Hespeler Road, Unit 6 Cambridge, ON N1R 8J6 Email: jimmy@exhaleentertainment.ca www.exhaleentertainment.ca Phone: (226) 600-5388

Imrie Risk Management Solutions Ltd.

Advanced Road Craft Inc. Driver Training Mick Sayer, Owner/President 44 Beasley Drive Kitchener, ON N2E 1Y6 Email: advancedroadcraft@gmail.com www.advancedroadcraft.ca Phone: (226) 241-8869

Authentika Consulting Inc Consultants Susan Cranston, Founder/CEO 540 Buckingham Blvd. Waterloo, ON N2T 2V1 authentikaconsulting@gmail.com www.susancranston.com Phone: (226) 989-7533

Balanced Books Accounting & Bookkeeping Services Karen Heppler, Owner karen@balancedbookscanada.com www.balancedbookscanada.com Phone: (519) 504-6215

BizXcel Inc. Business Consultants Charlie Argento, Senior Account Executive PO Box 74, 31 Broad Street Brockville, ON K6V 5T7 Email: info@bizxcel.com www.bizxcel.com Phone: (613) 342-2200 Fax: (613) 342-2210

Tire Dealers, Distributors & Manufacturers Chris Freiburger, General Manager 26 Elm Street, Kitchener, ON N2G 2G4 Email: chris@tirediscounter.ca www.christire.ca Phone: (519) 744-8473

FEDORA’S Entertainment Wayne Pryor, Owner Email: fedoras@live.ca Phone: (519) 401-1437

Circus Music Company Artists - Fine Arts CJ Allen, Owner/Operator Email: cj@circus-music.com www.circus-music.com Phone: (519) 852-0886

FleetCarma

CKR Global Investigators Stephanie Storer National Account Manager 725 Bridge Street West, Suite 202 Waterloo, ON N2V 2H1 Email: stephanie.storer@ckrglobal.com www.ckrglobal.com Phone: (519) 884-6352

Clique Organic Salons Hair Salons (Main), Spas - Beauty & Health Francesco Chieffallo, Owner 417 King Street West, Unit 6, Kitchener, ON N2G 1C2 Email: appointments@cliqueorganicsalons.com www.cliqueorganicsalons.com Phone: (519) 342-1767

Transportation Matt Stevens, CEO 60 Northland Road, Unit 2 Waterloo, ON N2V 2B8 Email: contact@fleetcarma.com www.fleetcarma.com Phone: (519) 342-7385

GAO Consulting Services Inc. Management Consultants Nong Gao, Principle Consultant 663 Rhine Fall Drive Waterloo, ON N2V 2V5 Email: nong.gao@gaoconsultingservices.com ww.nonggao.ca Phone: (519) 572-0128

Insurance Stephen Imrie, CEO, Senior Risk Management Consultant 23-500 Fairway Road South, Suite 360 Kitchener, ON N2C 1X3 Email: stephen@imrierms.com www.imrierms.com Phone: (519) 588-8845 Fax: (519) 893-1271

KW Smart Home Audio Visual Equipment & Supplies Pete Baginski, Owner 156 Fifth Avenue Kitchener, ON N2C 1P7 Email: info@kwsmarthome.com www.kwsmarthome.com Phone: (519) 500-0410

LAN MD Inc. Information Systems - Consultants Mark Dotzert, CIO Email: md@LANMD.com www.LANMD.com Phone: (519) 662-6196

Leanintuit Business Consultants Mike Edwards, Owner Email: mike@leanintuit.com www.mikeedwards.ca Phone: (519) 807-1367

“We’re pleased to announce that we’ve grown our team and expanded our practice into Kitchener. We look forward to serving even more personal and corporate clients in the tri-cities. If you are looking for a full-service accounting firm, give me a call. I’d love to speak with you.”- Paul Drouillard 344 Queen Street W., Cambridge, ON, N3B 1G8 (519)-249-1209

12

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

7-1120 Victoria Street N., Kitchener, ON, N2B 3T2 (519) -579-0891


new members

August 1, 2014 to September 30, 2014 Lomic Books

On Side Restoration

Roynat Capital

Uptown Printing

Writers Jane Orend, Writer/Publisher Email: jmorend@lomicbooks.com www.lomicbooks.com Phone: (519) 807-0445

Fire & Water Damage Restoration Peter Kielstra, Project & Branch Manager 10 Washburn Drive, Unit 3, Kitchener, ON N2C 1N5 Email: apeters@onside.ca www.onside.ca Phone: (519) 896-6700 Fax: (519) 896-6720

Financial Services Products Jason Simon, Senior Associate 40 Weber Street East, Suite 810 Kitchener, ON N2H 6R3 Email: simonj@roynat.com www.roynat.com Phone: (519) 742-5346 Fax: (519) 742-1300

Printers Steve Orr, Owner 220 Erb Street East, Waterloo, ON N2J 1M6 Email: sales@uptownprinting.com www.uptownprinting.com Phone: (519) 742-9080

Skills Plus Hockey Inc.

Paint by Munzy

Hockey Lessons & Schools Eric Calder, President/CEO 259 Stanley Drive Waterloo, ON N2L 1H9 Email: skillsplushockey@rogers.com/ Web: www.skillsplushockey.com Phone: (519) 570-3617

Promotion Agencies & Services Francine Vigh, Consumer Advocate 54 Connaught Avenue, London, ON N5Y 3A3 Email: francine@vipperks4me.com www.VIPperks4me.com Phone: (519) 617-5180 Fax: (226) 781-0481

Lost & Found Theatre Company Artists - Fine Arts Kathleen Sheehy, Actor, Promoter, Organizer Email: ksheehy@lostandfoundtheatre.ca www.lostandfoundtheatre.ca Phone: (519) 896-2253

McGowan Office Interiors Inc. Office Furniture & Equipment Andrew Attridge, Workplace Consultant Voisin Tech Suites - 645 Westmount Road East, Unit 11F Kitchener, ON N2E 3S3 Email: aattridge@mcgowanofficeinteriors.ca www.mcgowanofficeinteriors.ca Phone: (800) 692-6398

McLeod Green Dewar LLP & Associates Lawyers Amy Green, Lawyer/Partner 30 Duke Street West, Suite 605 Kitchener, ON N2H 3W6 Email: green@mgdlawyers.ca www.mgdlawyers.ca Phone: (519) 742-4297 Fax: (519) 744-5526

MR WASH Eavestrough & Siding Cleaning John Holden, Owner Email: mrwash@cyg.net www.mrwash.ca Phone: (519) 574-9274 Fax: (519) 595-3643

Artists - Fine Arts Laura Munz, Promoter 32 King Street North, Waterloo, ON N2J 2W8 Email: paintbymunzy@gmail.com www.paintbymunzy.com Phone: (226) 606-2233

Pair Shaped Inc. Computer Software Dayton Pereira, Co-Founder/CEO Email: dayton@pairshaped.ca www.pairshaped.ca Phone: (416) 993-7354

PeerPoint Consulting Group Inc. Business Consultants Tim Scott, Managing Partner 401 Cavendish Drive Waterloo, ON N2T 2N6 Email: tim@peerpoint.ca www.peerpoint.ca Phone: (519) 883-4171

Raffi Jewellers Inc. Jewellers Kevork Garabetian, President Conestoga Mall, 550 King Street North - Unit B7B Waterloo, ON N2L 5W6 Email: reach_us@raffiwaterloo.com www.raffi-jewellers.ca Phone: (519) 747-2444 Fax: (519) 747-2038

Musical Adventures Musicians John Nevin, Musician Email: jdnevin@gmail.com johnnevinmusicaladventures.webs.com Phone: (226) 444-2831

Neil Mathieson & Margaret Janecki Financial Services Financial Planning Consultants Margaret Janecki, Financial Advisor 3045 Southcreek Road, Suite 27 Mississauga, ON L4X 2X6 Email: m.janecki@rogers.com Phone: (905) 206-9387 Fax: (905) 206-0088

Reds Whites & Brews Wine & Beer Making Russell Brandon, President 550 Parkside Drive, Unit B17 Waterloo, ON N2L 5V4 Email: russellbrandon37@gmail.com www.redswhitesandbrews.ca Phone: (519) 550-0772

T.J. Leslie Motors Automobile Dealers Nicole Cox, Sales Representative 609 King Street North Waterloo, ON N2V 2N3 Email: tomk@tjlesliemotors.com www.tjlesliemotors.com Phone: (519) 888-7171 Fax: (519) 888-7177

The Literacy Group of Waterloo Region Associations & Organizations Carol Risidore, Executive Director 151 Frederick Street, Suite 200 Kitchener, ON N2H 2M2 Email: carol@theliteracygroup.com www.theliteracygroup.com Phone: (519) 743-6090

Topper’s Pizza Pizza Sarah Slingsby, Manager 324 Highland Road West, Unit 12, Kitchener, ON N2M 5G2 Email: toppers30@toppers.ca www.toppers.ca Phone: (519) 585-3151

Tradebank Waterloo Barter, Trades & Exchanges Tom Schnarr, President 405 Nyberg Street Kitchener, ON N2G 2Z1 Email: tschnarr@tradebankwaterloo.com www.thinktradefirst.ca Phone: (226) 336-9900 Fax: (519) 804-3002

VIP Perks 4 Me

Volvo of Waterloo/Jaguar Land Rover Waterloo Automobile Dealers Wade Pedersen, General Manager 533 King Street North Waterloo, ON N2L 5Z6 Email: wpedersen@grandtouringwaterloo.com www.volvoofwaterloo.com Phone: (519) 885-5090 Fax: (519) 886-2036

Waterloo Region Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic Health Care Service & Supplies Leisa Nichol, Business Administrator 123 Pioneer Drive, Suite 101 Kitchener, ON N2P 2A3 Email: lnichol@wrnplc.ca www.wrnplc.ca Phone: (519) 772-2322 Fax: (519) 772-2323

You Will Love it Live Entertainment Debora Ritchie, VP of Corporate Affairs Email: debb@youwillLoveitlive.com www.youwillLoveitlive.com Phone: (519) 500-2122

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

13


feature

The Business of Giving Back at Christmas BY MIKE COLLINS For many of us in business, the Christmas season is synonymous with socializing, festivity and generosity. For many in our community, however, this season has the exact opposite effect.

commercials encouraging other companies to become involved. It is a strong and credible third-party endorsement that has helped us grow the campaign for the past number of years.

It puts more pressure on an already stressful situation. One of the most poignant stories I know about Christmas stress happened years ago. The day before our annual Tree of Hope Radiothon in support of Family and Children’s Services of Waterloo Region, a F & CS employee was leaving work and came upon two children sitting on the curb outside their agency. There was a note from a despondent parent explaining they could not provide a Christmas for the children this year. All of the kids’ processions were in two garbage bags beside them. I learned from the staff at F & CS that this is not an uncommon occurrence. Awareness of situations like this motivates our business to realize good fortune and pushes us to give back through two major Christmas initiatives.

Beyond the community support we provide, these Christmas campaigns are strong, internal team builders and improve staff engagement for our radio station employees. We feel great about leveraging our brands and our local personalities for the betterment of the community. It also provides an opportunity to those of us who work behind the scenes to become involved. The support of the community can be overwhelming. Most moving, however, is when a stranger approaches us at one of our support broadcasts and tells us how our campaign gave them hope and helped them get back on their feet. They are now there to pay it forward with their own donation. That is something you never forget and makes all the effort worthwhile.

The first of our Christmas programs is the CHYM 96.7 Tree of Hope to raise funds for Family and Children’s Services of Waterloo Region, ensuring every child in our community can have a safe and happy Christmas. Our second is the 570 News and Country 106.7 FM Secret Santa Toy Drive to collect new, unwrapped toys for the Salvation Army. This year is our 22nd annual CHYM Tree of Hope campaign. In 2013 cash donations set a record, exceeding $335,000.00. The 570 News and Country 106.7 FM Secret Santa Toy Drive is now in its 10th year. To date, more than 50,000 new unwrapped toys have been collected and donated to the Salvation Army.

If you or your company would like to support any of our radio station initiatives, or any of the other Christmas campaigns you hear about in the community, I would highly encourage it. The business of giving back at Christmas is a most worthwhile endeavour and pays untold dividends in our community.

It is easy for us in radio to give back. We have a huge platform to ask the community for help. When we tell our audiences compelling local stories and make specific, direct requests, our audience consistently responds. We blatantly take advantage of the aforementioned Christmas generosity. We also enjoy the support of the corporate community in our Christmas endeavours. One specific example is the involvement of our friends at KPMG, who support our Secret Santa toy drive. KPMG provides their staff to wrap boxes to be used in our local workplace toy drives. Their staff then helps out on Fridays in December by going out to workplaces and collecting the donated toys. KPMG also produces

14

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mike Collins Mike Collins is the General Manager of the Rogers Kitchener Radio Group; CHYM 96.7, Country 106.7 FM, 570 News and Rogers London Radio. He was the 2010 Kitchener-Waterloo Citizen of the Year, sits on the Board of Governors of Conestoga College and is an active Rotarian.


Let it Snow.

Oh, the weather outside is frightful, but the food is so delightful. That’s the reason that so many families and businesses in the Waterloo Region choose Bingemans. We have been professional caterers for over 50 years, and we would be honoured to cater your next grand occasion. Our experienced event planners can fulfill all of your needs including: venue searches, innovative menu planning, staffing and beverage management.

BINGEMANSCATERING Phone (519) 744-1555

Toll Free: 1-800-667-0833

Web: bingemans.com


Holiday Special

Celebrate the Holiday Season! Waterloo Inn Our party rooms add sparkle to the season's festivities and our menus are magnificent! We have a great variety of banquet rooms for any size group from 10 to 60 or more for your holiday event at the Waterloo Inn. Plenty of free parking!

475 King Street North Waterloo, ON (519) 884-0221 Ext. 502

Rushes

Rushes

Join our 2014 countdown! New Year's Eve dinner and dance starts at 6 pm with a fabulous gourmet dinner, dancing to a DJ at 9 pm and party favours ring in the New Year!!

475 King Street North Waterloo, ON (519) 884-0220 waterlooinn.com

Bingemans Celebrate in style at Bingemans New Year’s Eve Gala, featuring Montreal’s own Hi Fi Showband. Enjoy a Marche style dinner, great entertainment & dance into the new year. Group packages available.

Kingpin Bowlounge

Bingemans 425 Bingemans Centre Drive Kitchener, ON (519) 744 1555 sales@bingemans.com www.bingemans.com

Kingpin Bowlounge

Party, dance and bowl your way into the New Year! Enjoy Boston Pizza food stations, live DJ, drink specials and 10 pin bowling in our state of the art venue. Group packages available. 19+ event.

425 Bingemans Centre Drive Kitchener, ON (519) 744-1555 kmercer@bingemans.com www.bingemans.com

FunworX

FunworX

Join 91.5 The Beat’s Mommylicious Club for this family-friendly NYE celebration. Enjoy the play structure, Rocks & Ropes Course, bowling and a special 8:00 PM countdown. Kids eat free at Boston Pizza, 49PM, with the purchase of an adult meal.

425 Bingemans Centre Drive Kitchener, ON (519) 744-1555 info@bingemans.com www.bingemans.com

Crowne Plaza Kitchener-Waterloo

Crowne Plaza Kitchener-Waterloo

Multi-million dollar renovation of entire hotel completed 2013/2014, including 201 guest rooms, meeting space, lobby and new modern restaurant. Book your next event with the Crowne Plaza KitchenerWaterloo. Kitchener never looked so good!

105 King Street East Kitchener, ON 519-744-4141 agirodat@cpkw-hotel.com www.ihg.com

Gusto Catering Company

Gusto Catering Company

Gusto Catering Company Inc. offers full service catering for private and corporate events, with a reputation for creativity. Whether it's for your wedding celebration, holiday party or just because, call us for a personalized quote for your event.

16

Waterloo Inn Conference Hotel

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

665 Colby Drive Unit 11 Waterloo, ON (519) 888-0634 info@gustocatering.ca www.gustocatering.ca


Holiday Special

Celebrate the Holiday Season! St Jacobs Catering 1396 King St N. St Jacobs, ON (519) 664-2288. Ex277 catering@stjacobs.com www.stjacobs.com/eat

St Jacobs Catering Whether the gathering is at your office, a rented venue or in St. Jacobs, we can provide a holiday feast for groups large and small. Call today for menus and booking information.

Moxie’s Grill/Bar

Moxie’s Grill/Bar

385 Fairway Road South, Kitchener, ON (519) 260-2626 reservations@moxieskw.com www.moxieskitchener.com

Providing the ideal venue for your group bookings. Perfect for corporate functions including meetings and celebrations. We have private and semi-private seating areas including a 100 seat venue on Kitchener’s only year round patio. *Chamber members receive 10% off Sun – Thurs bookings in Nov and Dec.

Charcoal Steak House

The Charcoal Steak House

2980 King Street East Kitchener, ON (519) 893-6570 Email: meredithr@charcoalgroup.ca www.charcoalsteakhouse.ca

The Charcoal Steak House, Martinis and dels Enoteca would like to help you entertain this holiday season. Superb private and semi-private spaces are available for your group from 10 to 60 guests. Call our group events coordinator Meredith today at 519-894- 0110 ex 2109

Johnny Rocco’s

Johnny Rocco’s

509 Wilson Avenue Kitchener, ON (519) 895-2121 gm-kw@johnnyroccos.com

Johnny Rocco’s, a unique Italian grill. Italian cuisine at its best, from authentic classics to signature dishes, wood burning pizza oven and a wide selection of wines along with private rooms for gatherings and celebrations. Available menus to fit all your needs.

Concordia Club

Concordia Club

429 Ottawa Street South, Kitchener, ON (519) 745-5617 Email: mail@concordiaclub.ca www.concordiaclub.ca

Borealis Grille & Bar 4336 King Street East Kitchener, ON (519) 219-9007 office@neighbourhoodgroup.com www.borealisgrille.ca

Shoeless Joe’s Waterloo 253 King St N. Waterloo (519) 208-2884 Email: sjoeswaterloo@gmail.com www.shoelessjoes.ca

Plan your employee holiday gathering with us! Our private rooms seat 20 - 400 as well as our Schenke restaurant which boasts our authentic German menu and warm feeling of "Gemuetlichkeit". We can accommodate all your needs. Book early as space may be limited.

Borealis Grille & Bar At Borealis we feature locally sourced and prepared foods, wines and beers because we genuinely believe “Local Tastes Way Better”. We offer a casual dining experience with comfortable dining rooms and a relaxed bar. Our private dining room can accommodate up to 20 guests.

Shoeless Joe’s A new twist to your Christmas Party. Shoeless Joe’s unique layout offers you and your guests a perfect location for both mingling and a sit down dinner. Dedicated facilities and custom menus will ensure groups of any size an unforgettable event.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

17


cover story

Above and Beyond…the Path to Our Future BY ROGER FARWELL accommodation, funding and staffing for what is now known as This issue of the Advocate is focused on “The Many Faces of Participation House. It began humbly with rental apartments by Service” which is not only a compelling topic itself, but is Fairview Mall and made its way to purpose built and designed extremely timely when one considers the unfolding of yet another freestanding accommodations run independently by Participation generation of our Region. A time when resources of every type House. are at a premium and need outstrips our ability to meet our socioeconomic challenges in conventional ways. And yet, our collective This was my first vivid lesson in the ability to rise to this challenge will power of the human spirit driven by a determine our ability to succeed in ... unless we push ourselves above and collective will to make our home, our charting our course to a prosperous place, a better place. And, I have never future...a future that is smart and beyond, our community will not be forgotten it. caring, to borrow the words of our whole, functional and caring. Governor General. By this time, a culture of community building was emerging at WalterFedy; a At a time when all of us are so culture that we would later declare as one of our core values. The focused on the pressures of our daily commitments, it is difficult quick realization was that there was lots to do and no shortage of to think of extracting even more time to invest in addressing and boards wanting to enlist volunteers to drive toward their goals on solving the numerous needs across our community through behalf of the larger community. Akin to the sort of social volunteer service. And yet, unless we push ourselves above and infrastructure built at Participation House, I quickly found myself beyond, our community will not be whole, functional and caring. at KW Counselling with an amazing group of community We must define who we are as a community by our abilities in builders determined to be there for those in need and, just as entrepreneurship and innovation, and also by our ability to build a importantly, to be there to help prevent negative social outcomes healthy, inclusive and giving place we can call home. in the first place. KW Counselling was followed by service to the Salvation Army Board where I was educated about what it means Doing so is the path to our future. to provide social service “on the Many years ago, as a young street” through to accommodations architect, I was encouraged by for seniors. a senior partner to join a This was my first vivid lesson in the power of The fabric of our community began discussion with a group of the human spirit driven by a collective will to to unfold even further with the mothers whose children with advent of community based cerebral palsy had been make our home, our place, a better place. policing; a philosophical and receiving care and services at And, I have never forgotten it. tactical shift from a police force to a the then Rotary Children’s police service. Education was an Centre. These children were essential ingredient in that shift and fast becoming young adults and so came the Waterloo Region their parents not getting any Children Safety Village at police headquarters. This effort younger in the process. What was emerging was an acute concern enlisted the talent of many volunteers and investment from many on their part as to where these disabled adults would live and how of our corporate citizens who built structures to form the streets the necessary care would be provided when they, as parents, could and roadways that allowed instructors to teach young students no longer do so. There was no blueprint for this solution and I about traffic safety and other precautions. This initiative was soon was mesmerised by the sheer determination of these mothers to joined by our firefighters across the region who added an addition find a solution. Together we invested ourselves deeply, finding

18

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


cover story

to the teaching facility and operate an ambitious safety program from the site.

The results of our collective ability to weld public and private sector ambitions together is all around us.

Providing educational opportunities outside of the normal school curriculum remained a focus in the region — especially business education for youth. This was largely in response to the growing amount of entrepreneurial activity all around us. With the encouragement of many senior members and corporations in the community, a team was created to rebuild Junior Achievement of the Waterloo Region (JAWR). This was a multi-year undertaking that saw the reinforcement of the Board of Directors and the Creation of a Board of Governors, as well as the retiring of an accumulated deficit. JAWR continues to nurture bright young minds. Many graduates have made their mark in our region’s economy and continue to add their mane to the talent pipeline we so badly need to fill. Increasingly, our region concerned itself with our state of readiness to supply or attract talent to capture the potential of our technology and advanced manufacturing industries. Our Prosperity Council, a federation of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce, the Cambridge Chamber of Commerce, Communitech and Canada’s Technology Triangle (CTT), struck a ten year agenda in 2003 fuelled by the “Good to Great” paper to move Waterloo Region into a position to put talent on the ground to drive economic prosperity. Prosperity forums and hundreds of volunteer participants lending their minds and resources drove this agenda forward, advancing our global brand, reinforcing and expanding our post-secondary institutions in built form and talent to unleash young minds, modernizing our health care institutions while adding new

services and practitioners, and advocating for more investment in arts and culture which continues to foster creative endeavours through the Creative Enterprise Initiative.

The results of our collective ability to weld public and private sector ambitions together is all around us. None of it would have been possible without the concerted and unrelenting efforts of the literally thousands of people I have been associated with over the years. All who have the genuine intent to make the Waterloo Region better in every respect by being smart and caring.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Roger Farwell Roger is the recipient of the Governor General’s Caring Canadian Award in 2014. His community work has spanned decades and he continues to play an important part in building a vibrant physical and cultural landscape for the next generation in the Waterloo Region.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

19


events

Mark Your Calendar November 10, 2014

November 14, 2014

100 Mile Feast: A Tour of Italy

Point of View with Diane Finley, MP and Minister of Public Works and Government Services

6:00-9:00pm Location: Waterloo Inn Conference Hotel Ticket: $150 Table of 8: $1200 Join us on a culinary tour of Italy where the menu items are prepared with locally sourced ingredients. Platinum Sponsor: Gold Sponsor:

Gowlings LLP

Bronze Sponsors: Cowan Insurance Group Union Gas-a Spectra Energy Company

November 12, 2014 Libro Chamber Young Professionals Networking Event 5:30-7:30pm Location: Moxie’s Bar & Grill Member Advantage: $5 includes HST General Admission: $10 includes HST

Silver Sponsor: Event Sponsor:

The Honourable Diane Finley will discuss the Build in Canada Innovation Program which assists companies on moving their products and services from the lab to the marketplace. She will provide the benefits of the program for the national economy and how Waterloo Region businesses can participate. Title Sponsor: Event Sponsors: Video Sponsor:

You are invited to join us to develop key relationships, build your business network and connect with other young professionals and business leaders at this casual networking event. Title Sponsor:

11:30am-1:30pm Locaton: DeltaWaterloo Members: $40 includes HST Table of 6: $225 includes HST General Admission: $50 includes HST

November 18, 2014 Business Expo powered by your local Chambers of Commerce 4:00–7:00pm Location: Bingemans Members & General Admission: Complimentary The Cambridge, Guelph and Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chambers of Commerce are excited to host this large-scale exhibitor event with almost 200 booths and over 1200 attendees. Local restaurants and caterers will be on hand to provide samples of their delicious specialties.

Insurance is the last thing business owners think of when times are good. But, when there’s a claim it’s their first call. You should have the best coverage possible. Get an expert opinion on your commercial insurance needs.

insure@erb-erb.com ‡1.800.265.2634 ‡www.erb-erb.com 20

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


events

November 19, 2014

December 3, 2014

Manulife Chamber Academy – How to get the most from your PCC and other advertising

Heffner Women’s Leadership Luncheon

8:00-9:30am Location: Holiday Inn Express Waterloo/St. Jacobs Members: $20 General Admission: $25 Title Sponsor:

November 27, 2014 MNP Networking Breakfast Series presents Alan Quarry 7:15-9:00am Location: Holiday Inn Kitchener-Waterloo Members: $28 includes HST General Admission: $35 includes HST Watch the website for more details.

11:30am-1:30pm Location: Homewood Suites by Hilton Waterloo/St. Jacobs Members: $40 includes HST General Admission: $50 includes HST Watch the website for more details. An enlightening luncheon where you will learn strategies for mindbody balance. You will walk away with practical tips and resources that you can implement to help navigate your way smoothly through day-to-day activities, stressful and difficult times both personally and professionally. Title Sponsor:

December 11, 2014 Chamber Holiday Open House 4:00-6:00pm Location: Chamber of Commerce Members: Complimentary Celebrate the season with fellow Chamber members and staff! We will be accepting donations of non-perishable items or an unwrapped toy.

Title Sponsor: Media Sponsor:

December 16, 2014 Home Hardware Business After 5

December 3, 2014 Manulife Chamber Academy – Setting and Meeting Sales Targets 8:00-9:30am Location: Holiday Inn Express Waterloo/St. Jacobs Members: $20 includes HST General Admission: $25 includes HST Title Sponsor:

5:00-7:00pm Location: Chicopee Ski & Summer Resort Members: Complimentary Exhibit Booth: $50+HST General Admission: $10 includes HST Come out to this casual B2B networking event with friendly faces and easy conversation. Title Sponsor: Media Sponsor:

Wednesday, December 31st Bring your party to our party! Join us for the 2014 countdown in RUSHES Restaurant!

2014

Celebrate and enjoy our Chef ’s fabulous gourmet dinner starting at 6 pm. Dancing to a DJ begins at 9 pm and party favours ring in the New Year at midnight! Overnight packages are available too!

475 King St. N., Waterloo

(519) 884-0220

www.waterlooinn.com

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

21


22

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


feature

KW’s 1st Hockey Helps the Homeless Tournament Former hockey pros join in the effort to raise much-needed funds to help those left out in the cold Lengthy preparations were required for Kitchener-Waterloo’s first Hockey Helps the Homeless fantasy fundraising tournament, presented by Freedom 55 Financial, the financial security planning division of London Life. The event took place on October 24th, 2014 at RIM Park in Waterloo, with the goal of donating $50,000 back to local community organizations that provide programs, shelter, housing and food for Kitchener-Waterloo’s homeless. Hockey Helps the Homeless is a volunteer-driven charity organization that was established in 1996 when a group of Toronto businessmen decided to turn an annual industry hockey tournament into a charitable event aimed at helping the homeless. Since its inception, Hockey Helps the Homeless has expanded its scope and impact right across Canada, raising in excess of $8 million nationally for local homelessness support agencies and driving awareness and support for Canada’s homeless. Today, it is estimated that this year alone, as many as 300,000 people will experience homelessness in Canada, with children and young families making up the fastest growing segment of the population. The face of homelessness and its associated social challenges are changing every day. Funds raised from Hockey Helps the Homeless tournaments stay in the city where they are raised to benefit emergency support programs for homeless of all ages, as well as reintegration projects which help youth and adults transition into safer, healthier, and more sustainable lifestyles. This year’s inaugural tournament in Waterloo played host to 8 men’s teams, offering participants the opportunity to play alongside their hockey heroes (2 pros per team) in a one-day event while individually fundraising in support of the homeless in their community. “Until now all Hockey Helps the Homeless events have been held in NHL markets. We are thrilled to enter the next phase of our expansion by launching into OHL markets,” said Gary Scullion, President of Hockey Helps the Homeless. “Kitchener-Waterloo is a great hockey town which makes it a perfect launch market.” Hockey Helps the Homeless annual tournaments have seen over 200 former NHL hockey pros participate across Canada since 1996, including Gary Roberts, Kris King, Mike Gartner, Mark Osborne, and PJ Stock. “The Hockey Helps the Homeless tournament is a great opportunity to play some hockey, contribute to an important cause and have a big league experience. We all

have a lot of fun while helping those in need in our local communities. I look forward to playing in this tournament every year” said Kris King, former Toronto Maple Leaf and Senior Vice President Hockey Operations, NHL Central Office. Net proceeds from the October 24th KW Hockey Helps the Homeless event will go directly to local partners: HHUG, House of Friendship, YWCA and Lutherwood. Together, they support all facets of the homeless population – women, families, youth, and adult men - and support an individual’s basic need for shelter and assisting them to find stable housing. Collectively, they shelter nearly 2,000 people and support to thousands more each year. In 2013, emergency shelter bed nights totaled 93,274 in the KW area and the need is growing. Hockey Helps the Homeless staff and local volunteers are dedicated to assisting the local KW partners in making sure everyone has a roof over their head while they continue to work towards ending homelessness in Kitchener-Waterloo. If you would like to learn more about the homeless situation in the KW community and across Canada, please visit www.hockeyhelpsthehomeless.com. The October 24th games at RIM Park were free and open to the public.

ABOUT THIS ORGANIZATION

Founded in 1996, Hockey Helps the Homeless is a registered charity with a mission to leverage Canada's affinity for hockey to raise awareness and financial support for the homeless through education, fundraising, and partnering with solutionsbased local homeless support agencies

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

23


PROFESSIONAL ADVICE. PERSONAL ATTENTION. CUSTOMIZED BUSINESS PLANS MEMBER OF

THE GREATER KITCHENER WATERLOO CHAMBER

SUPPORT WITH DEVICE SETUP & NAVIGATION MUCH, MUCH MORE

BUSINESS SOLUTIONS WE OFFER: Smartphones Tablets Tablets aab Cable Services Wireless W ireless Solutions Accessories

Each Each St Store ore has S Small mall Business S Specialists pecialists ready read dy to to help you! you!

Uptown W Waterloo aterloo

75 King St. S, Unit 55 (519) 747-4141

24

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Kitchener Boar Boardwalk dwalk

230 The Boardwalk, Unit 2 (519) 579-6333

Kitchener

685 Fischer Hallman (519) 571-0910

LLocal ocal C Corporate orporate Business Consultant Consultant is:

Dave O’Connor

(519) 241-9377 doconnor@mcnain.com


feature

The Executive Military Experience (Executrek) BY TONY LEA AND HENRIK NOESGAARD The Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada is one of Waterloo Region’s two Reserve Regiments which dates back to the War of 1812. The RHFC is a Primary Reserve infantry regiment of the Canadian Army, with companies in Cambridge and Kitchener, and is a unit of 31 Canadian Brigade Group, headquartered in London, Ontario. Prince Andrew, as a member of the Canadian Royal Family, acts as Colonel-in-Chief. Previously, this post was held by Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon. The Canadian Forces Liaison Council is a group of civilian business and educational leaders who volunteer their time and effort to promote the Primary Reserve Force by highlighting the benefits of Reserve Force training and experience to civilian employers. The Council’s mandate is to enhance the availability of Reservists for their military duties by obtaining the support and co-operation of organization leaders in Canada. One of the ways that the Council uses to educate employers is through conducting Executreks to enable employers to see Reservists in action undergoing training.

near Owen Sound, where the unit conducts a mini battle school/ primary leadership course for the executives. They are then integrated into the Reserve Sections with some participants acting as part of the OPFOR (Opposition or “enemy” Force). A sampling of comments from the 2013 participants included: •

“The program was a fantastic experience.”

Reservists must balance multiple responsibilities in order that they can minimize conflict between their military service, their education, their civilian jobs and their families. This is made more difficult if they do not have an understanding educational institution or civilian employer. The Council encourages civilian employers and educational institutions to grant Reservists military leave on a voluntary basis, without penalty, to allow them to participate in their military activities, duties and training.

“Everything from the class room lectures to the small party tasks was well planned and organized. Kudos to everyone involved!”

“The reservists were a terrific group.”

“Everyone was supportive, understanding and very patient ...”

“Even though most of us were outside of our comfort zones most of the weekend it was a lot of fun.”

Through their participation in the Executrek, employers learn more about reservists and how they can benefit their organizations. In this way it facilitates employers hiring reservists and adopting reservist friendly Human Resource policies which enable employee reservists to continue to meet their military obligations and receive the training to enable them to advance in their military careers.

“I think many of us learned a lot about leadership and teamwork and will be able to apply the military leadership methodology to our 'civilian' lives!”

If you are interested in participating in a one day Executrek or Weekend long Executive Military Experience Executrek, please contact Henrik Noesgaard at noesgaard@sympatico.ca

There is no cost to the participants in an Executrek. As an extension of this program, the Royal Highland Fusiliers developed the concept of a weekend long Executive Military Experience Executrek. In October of 2013, the Regiment conducted its first Executive Military Experience Executrek in which a group of business executives was embedded with reservists of the Royal Highland Fusiliers of Canada for a weekend exercise. As a result of the enthusiastic response of all of the participants (both civilian and military) this has now been adopted as an annual event for the regiment. The Executives participating in the Executrek are embedded with the troops for a weekend long training exercise at CFB Meaford

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Henrik Noesgaard Henrik is Principal and cofounder of mgmt2go Inc. , a Waterloo based management consulting firm and the Canadian Forces Liaison Council Regional Director for Waterloo Region and area.

Tony Lea Tony is Executive Director of the Kitchener Waterloo Branch of St. John Ambulance and a recipient of the Queen’s Golden and Diamond Jubilee Medals.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

25


sponsor profile

Raising the Roof on Their Own Terms BY LORI STRAUS In 1973, John had two options: raise the 32’ x 37’ roof and build a second floor up to it, or take down the roof, build the second floor, and then rebuild the roof. The first option was dangerous, and no general contractor would do it. The second option was more expensive. So he chose the first option and raised each side of the 24” thick beam in the middle himself, a few inches at a time, using 10-ton jacks. When John Heffner, Sr. first opened up shop in 1960, though, he likely didn’t imagine himself lifting a roof, or expanding the business more often than he went fishing, or managing over 180 employees with his sons. (He’s retired now, but he still has an office and visits daily when he can.) It was through excellent customer service that his business grew so quickly and so much. In the early days, that meant opening at 7:00 a.m. to accommodate morning shift workers, and repairing big engines until midnight. After he hired his father-in-law to do oil and tire changes, they could service customers in five languages. He even offered 24-hour towing service by parking the telephone next to his bed. “I will never forget one bitterly cold February morning,” he writes in his memoir, “when there were fifty-four calls from customers whose cars did not start due to the temperature.” Although his sons, John, Jr. and Willy, now steer the company, the emphasis on customer service has not changed. Lance Clyne, a current customer, explains that it’s precisely the customer service that has kept him going to Heffner Lexus Toyota Scion: “I felt like often they went above and beyond what dealers would do, even assisting me in pricing out one of my vehicles for private sale.” Annamae Elliott has been a repeat customer for almost fifteen years. “They treat you like a person, not a sale,” she says. Elliott prefers to deal with the same person in sales. “She was the go-to person when we bought the van. She was so patient with us as we looked at different options, and she was good about not pushing anything on us.” However, providing excellent customer service is perhaps not as easy nowadays as it was when John, Sr. first opened up shop: He didn’t have to navigate the rocky road of the Internet. “One of the things that the Chamber does that I think is really good for small businesses,” says John, Jr., “is that they provide many seminars where businesses can learn. For example, the Internet is an area where a lot of the smaller businesses don't have the expertise nor do they have the funds to hire somebody to help

26

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


sponsor profile

Heffner Lexus Toyota Scion also supports smaller projects, especially new ones where fundraising may be challenging. “It's nice to be able to see when the contribution you've made actually made a difference in people that live in your community who have got a desire and a hope and dream to make something happen,” says John, Jr.

them with that. So, the Chamber will provide seminars on building your Internet image, your social media profile.” In addition to the Chamber’s education and support programs, the Heffners also like its focus on community and ensuring we are recognized outside of our boundaries. For example, they’ve supported the Chamber’s golf tournament for the last fifteen years. Or was it twenty? Neither brother could remember; it’s been that long. The same actually goes for how long Heffner Lexus Toyota Scion has been a member of the Chamber: “I don’t remember not being a member,” says John, Jr. “I’m sure Dad wasn’t a member in the sixties when he first opened up.” “I think early seventies,” says Willy. The company’s slogan, “You’re part of the family,” applies to all aspects of the business, from its community support to its employee health and wellness programs. “Heffner Lexus and the Heffner family have been important supporters of the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony for many years,” commented Chris Sharpe, Interim Director of Development & Donor Relations. “With their sustained support as the title sponsor of the Pops Series, they help us to continue to create ambitious and innovative concert experiences that inspire and entertain audiences of all ages and cultural backgrounds.” Since the opening of the new dealership in 2007, the Ray of Hope’s Morning Glory Café in the dealership is home to an employment program for people ages 15 to 30 who, for various reasons, have difficulties securing full-time work. The café has “probably been the area where we’ve seen the most direct results,” says Willy. “We've seen young kids go through the program and come out of it at the other end of the program basically transformed and changed,” says John, Jr. “All of a sudden, they're just like new people and it's really nice to see that.”

Not only is the welfare of their community important to the Heffners, but also the health and well-being of their employees. The Chamber recognized their achievements in this area, and Cowan Insurance asked to include Heffner Lexus Toyota Scion as a case study in its presentations to clients. The dealership’s health and wellness program includes an on-site fitness facility, an employee assistance program through Mosaic Counselling, an annual wellness fair, and events like a smoothie creation day, where staff worked together within their departments to make the besttasting smoothie ever. Everything the Heffners believe in is wrapped up in what they call The Heffner Covenant: •

To be the leading provider of automotive services in their market. • To provide superior customer care through honesty, integrity and respect. • To provide their employees with a safe and positive workplace, encouraging personal growth within a team environment. • To be a responsible corporate member of their community. Destroying the roof and constructing a new one would’ve been the easier way to solve John, Sr.’s – my grandfather’s - original problem. But that’s not the way he works; he doesn’t destroy his dreams just so he can find an easier one to reach. He raises them high and then reaches them inch-by-inch. His sons, along with all the employees at Heffner Lexus Toyota Scion, are following suit.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lori Straus Lori Straus writes and translates (German to English) for non-profits and small businesses. She has written for just dance! magazine, the Used Car Dealers’ Association, and the Waterloo Centre for German Studies, and translated academic papers. Reach her at www.loristraus.com.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

27


take my card

Benjamin Moore

500 Full Colour Cards

29.99

plus tax

428 Gage Ave. KITCHENER

1120 Victoria St. N. KITCHENER

(519) 578-5330

(519) 576-7576

583 King St. N. WATERLOO

245 Edinburgh Rd. S. GUELPH

(519) 772-1127

(519) 836-4731

www.heerspaint.com

Benjamin Moore Paint Wallcoverings Blinds & Draperies Décor Accessories In Home Consultations

• Printed one side • 12pt coated stock • UV coating included • Customer Supplied Print-Ready Artwork

www.mtprint.com

facebook.com/heerspaint

Professional Development IT PAYS TO KNOW

Enroll now for the smoothest year-end ever! With more than 190 federal and provincial regulations and changes each year r, year, staying payroll compliant is one of the biggest challenges employers face. Stay y Current Stay y Compliant Comp

2014 Year-End Ye ear-End and New Y Year e ea Requirements ear Offfer Offered f ed in Kitchener, Kitchener, Waterloo, Waterloo, a Guelph Guelp and Brantford, Brantford, this seminar is the most efficient and ef effective ffective f way to help you ensure ensure your year-end yearr-end payroll payroll filing is accurate and compliant. In just one day day, y, this seminar delivers in-depth, in-dept the information needed to be up-to-date on all new legislative rrequirements equirements and perform rm year year-end r-end efficiently and accurately. accurratelyy. Recommended as an essential essent part of ever everyy payr payroll oll professional’ professional’’s or practitioner’ practi practitioner’s year-end year-end process. process. Register online at payroll.ca. Register early and save - Earlier bird bird rates available two week prior seminar.. to the seminar

payroll.ca

28

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


member notables

MEMBER NOTABLES Stantec in the Community Day On September 15, 2014, staff from the downtown Kitchener office of Stantec joined with their colleagues across North America and around the world for Stantec in the Community Day. The Kitchener office volunteered their time cleaning up at the Breithaupt Community Centre on Margaret Avenue. Stantec president and chief executive officer Bob Gomes noted that this day of volunteering not only further supports Stantec’s commitment to the community, but it also brings team members together to make a coordinated local impact. More than 5,500 Stantec employees volunteered and participated in this annual event.

CTT Recognized as one of Canada’s Top Economic Development Organizations Canada’s Technology Triangle Inc (CTT) has been selected as one of the top Canadian economic development groups by Site Selection magazine, a leading US-based source for expansion planning information to 49,000 executives of fast-growing firms. The “Top Canadian Group” is designed to recognize the most innovative economic development groups in Canada. This class of ranking is based on investment related to job creation including regional partnerships, proactive programming and legislation, and quality data. Since its inception over 25 years ago, CTT continues to play a key role in shaping the area’s economic future by attracting diverse corporate projects and expansions to Waterloo Region.

UW President to Lead U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities University of Waterloo president and vice-chancellor Feridun Hamdullahpur was recently named Chair of Canada’s U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities. The U15 is an organization of Canada’s fifteen leading research universities who undertake approximately 80 percent of all competitive domestic university research. Collectively, these institutions lead activities valued at more than $5.3 billion annually.

The Charcoal Group introduces dels Enoteca Pizzeria Once a swanky banquet room, the downstairs space in the Charcoal Steak House has continued to evolve since opening in 1976. Banquets made way for the Lower Deck, Kitchener's best and freshest seafood restaurant. The Lower Deck became Del Dente, a mixture of Italian and Mediterranean cuisine, which included the introduction of the now world famous Flower Pot Bread. Now, with a recent renovation, the Charcoal Group has taken the next step, focusing on traditional Italian cooking techniques, using the bounty from around us here in Ontario. Their own charcuterie program on display, with wine on tap, they even kept the Flower Pot Bread - dels Enoteca Pizzeria is evolving once again. www.delsenoteca.ca

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2014

29


Helping Us Make Our Vision Possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

CHAMBER CHAIR’S CIRCLE

CHAMBER PATRON

Chamber

Academy TITLE SPONSOR

CHAMBER TRUSTEE

MEDIA PARTNERS 30

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


CRAFTING A REPUTATION OF QUALITY FOR OVER 45 YEARS. SERVICE | CUSTOM DESIGN | ONSITE REPAIR AND MANUFACTURING

From our Hands

to Hers

ARE GIFT CARDS BLE A IL A NOW AV

CONESTOGA MALL WATE T RLOO 519-747-2444

CAMBRIDGE CENTRE 519-740-7720 www w.r . affi-jewellers.ca


Advocate November|December 2014  
Advocate November|December 2014  

In this edition of the Advocate we looks at the Many Faces of Community Service and the importance of civic volunteerism to Waterloo Region...