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advocate MAY | JUNE 2014 WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

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FEATURE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

Management of Excess Soil: New MOE Guidelines

Art Sinclair

Robert Fedy

EDITOR:

Heather Hutchings

COVER STORY

5 Easy Ways to Save Energy $$

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

M&T Printing Group

Derek Satnik

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PHOTOGRAPHY:

FEATURE

Weber Group Hooked on RAIN-Smart Property Maintenance

Adamski Photography ADVERTISING AND SALES:

FEATURE:

David MacLellan – dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Don Critelli – dcritelli@greaterkwchamber.com

A Trip Through the Extras of Peru

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Robert Fedy,Mary Sue Fitzpatrick, Ian McLean, Derek Satnik, Art Sinclair, Sandra Stone CONTRIBUTORS:

Teri Hetherington and Julie Tedesco ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES:

July 14, 2014 for September/October 2014 September 19, 2014 for November/December 2014

departments 4

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Investing in the Future with Sustainable Business Practices

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

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Sandra Stone

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Strategically Funding Infrastructure for Future Needs Ian McLean

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ADVOCACY

The Challenges of Funding Infrastructure Art Sinclair

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PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

New Family Physicians to Serve Greater K-W Residents Mary Sue Fitzpatrick

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AWARDS

Business Excellence Awards Winners AWARDS

Business Excellence Awards Guests EVENTS

Spring Networking EVENTS

Mark Your Calendar

Darlene Jones djones@greaterkwchamber.com SUBMISSION POLICY:

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio.

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FOR PERMISSIONS AND REPRINT REQUESTS

Heather Hutchings - hhutchings@greaterkwchamber.com PRINTED IN CANADA BY:

PUBLICATION OF:

NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS

February 1, 2014- March 31, 2014 MEMBER NOTABLES

Achieving Success Chamber Members SPONSORSHIP

Chamber Sponsors

POSTMASTER ADDRESS CHANGES C/O

ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREETE NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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message from the chair

Investing in the Future with Sustainable Business Practices BY SANDRA STONE Operating a business by investing in sustainable business practices is becoming increasingly more popular. Companies that are committed to making even small changes in reducing their environmental impact are able to more easily differentiate themselves in the marketplace and not only gain a competitive advantage but also increase their market share. Sustainable business practices are a viable trend that show tangible results on a business bottom line. From large-scale builds that adhere to LEED construction standards to incorporating more tactical daily-operating principles like reducing water and energy consumption, businesses are now, more than ever, operating in more environmentally responsible ways – and consumers notice! Incorporating sustainable business practices into your company's operation does not need to be expensive and difficult to execute or manage on a daily basis. Lessening your business’s environmental impact can be easily accomplished by simply decreasing the amount of waste you generate, conserving water, and reducing energy consumption or air pollution – and a little goes a long way. What your business does today has a direct impact on the future and incorporating principles of sustainability is not only the right thing to do, but is considered a sound business practice. Great Canadian Holidays and Coaches is a business committed to sustainable practices. They were recently recognized as the 2014 Greater KW Chamber Business Excellence Award winner in the Environment & Sustainability category for their long-standing sustainable business practices and improvements. Their investment in business infrastructure extends from large-scale improvements like installation of solar panels and upgraded rooftop insulation, to vehicles equipped with exhaust gas recirculation and electronic tire pressure monitoring systems. Smaller, although not less important improvements also include energy efficient lighting in offices and garage facilities, rainwater collection for the coach/truck wash and air-curtains on garage bay doors to manage heat loss. Great Canadian also believes that every employee has a role to play in making a difference. Drivers are encouraged to reduce their idling time with incentives and marketing activities promote the environmental benefits of travelling on a coach through the "Think Green…Go Blue" program. Everyone is doing their part to make a difference. Chamber Members, across all sectors, invest resources into their businesses as noted by the large number of nominees in the

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Environmental & Sustainability category. The Chamber is pleased to recognize accomplishments by: Alternatives Journal, Borealis Grille & Bar, Geosyntec Consultants, Habitat for Humanity Waterloo Region, Joseph & Company, KW YMCA, The Working Centre’s Community Tools Project, Waste Management and Waterloo North Hydro. These businesses have shown that regardless of size or type of organization, they are making longterm changes and investing in the future. I am pleased to work for a company that is also strongly committed to sustainability. Conestoga Mall, owned and operated by Ivanhoe Cambridge Inc., supports energy and water conservation, waste management and transportation-focused programs for tenants and customers. From organics and recycling initiatives that divert waste from local landfill, energy management systems that automatically control lighting and temperature to electric car charging stations and complimentary water bottle refill stations, the Mall is proud to offer services that make a difference. The Chamber's commitment to environmental sustainability extends to the annual Energy & Environmental Forum that provides members with the opportunity to network with likeminded businesses; and the Craig Hynd Memorial Award, which recognizes a high school student who has demonstrated environmental leadership and is continuing their education in a field related to environmental sustainability. To find out how you can incorporate sustainable business solutions to lessen the environmental impact of your business simply ask your fellow Chamber members what they are doing and how they got started. The question is not why should you operate in a sustainable manner – it is why not!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sandra Stone CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Sandra is General Manager of Conestoga Mall (Ivanhoe Cambridge Inc.). As a Board Member and advocate for local business Ms. Stone provides a unified voice for the 130 retail stores and services at Conestoga Mall, a premier shopping destination in Waterloo Region.


message from the president

Strategically Funding Infrastructure for Future Needs BY IAN MCLEAN Meeting the challenges of infrastructure development remains a priority for all three levels of government in Canada. However, maintaining adequate levels of funding is the constant challenge. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC), in their December 2013 report The Foundations of a Competitive Canada: The Need for Strategic Infrastructure Investment notes that modern and efficient infrastructure is a core component of a competitive economy. Public infrastructure such as roads, transit, bridges, highways, water systems and the electrical grid provide services critical to economic competitiveness, sustainability, and quality of life. However, without sufficient investment into public infrastructure, jurisdictions will fall behind on important measures like productivity. The CCC notes that from the mid 1990s until 2006, infrastructure investment in Canada declined while United States increased their level of funding by 24 percent. Over that same time period, Canada went from near parity with the United States on productivity to 20 percent lower. On a provincial level, the Task Force on Competitiveness, Productivity and Economic Progress chaired by Woolwich Township native Roger Martin noted in their 2013 Annual Report that an effective transportation system is vital for increasing the productivity of workers. Spending minimal times commuting for work purposes increases the time and energy allotted to work activities, which could potentially close the intensity gap, a large contributor to the prosperity and productivity differential between Ontario and many competing North American jurisdictions. Nowhere is this predicament more apparent than the Greater Toronto Area, where the Toronto Region Board of Trade has estimated the state of public transit is costing the region $6 billion annually in lost productivity, a deficit that is expected to increase to $15 billion in 2031 based on current population and growth estimates. The Canadian Chamber notes that due to the 2008 economic downturn and other factors, governments are now placing a renewed emphasis on core public infrastructure. The current challenge is to ensure investment levels are not viewed as a one-off contribution to recession fighting but rather the start of a new sustained level of investment. Unfortunately, as the CCC and many other business and municipal associations have noted, the need for infrastructure investment grossly exceeds available public funds. To succeed, we need to not only attract new levels of private investment but also ensure that

new projects are chosen strategically, effectively and efficiently. Following the aforementioned principles, in February of this year the federal government announced the details on a $47 billion New Building Canada Plan (NBCP). The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) has been advocating for more coordinated and strategic planning to meet the infrastructure needs of communities across Canada and this new plan is an important first step in that process. The NBCP contains three primary components, including national infrastructure, provincial/territorial, and a small communities fund. The national component includes major roads, public transit, rail infrastructure, and national and regional airports. Priority provincial projects include among others water and wastewater, waste management, green energy, and brownfield redevelopment. Also included in the NBCP is a $1.25 billion reinvestment into the P3 Canada Fund to support the use of private/public partnerships in major infrastructure projects. Our Chamber presented and passed a resolution at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce Annual General Meeting in September of 2013 calling on the federal government to increase the utilization of P3s cross Canada, noting in particular the past successes of projects in mid-size urban municipalities such as the new Waterloo Region Courthouse in downtown Kitchener. Finally, all levels of government must ensure that all public investments are as effective as possible. This can be accomplished by focusing on core infrastructure, emphasizing project definition and encouraging better asset management. This is as important for Region of Waterloo businesses and citizens as it is right across the country. The Greater KW Chamber of Commerce will keep on this issue with all governments, because it is critical to everyone!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian McLean Ian is President and CEO of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce

advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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advocacy

The Challenges of Funding Infrastructure BY ART SINCLAIR There is a strong consensus across Waterloo Region, Ontario and Canada that improved and efficient infrastructure is critical for sustained competitiveness and economic growth. However as in many portfolios of Canadian public policy, the demand for required services far exceeds the available financial resources, subsequently placing all three levels of government in extremely difficult predicaments on directing limited funds to an expanding list of priority projects. In the Canadian context, these demands for service are often split on an urban/rural basis. In rural areas, communications infrastructure is the priority against the overwhelmingly urban requirement for public transit. The ongoing and hugely controversial debate surrounding the funding of transit in the Greater Toronto Area provides a significant example of this divide. Since the Progressive Conservative (PC) administration of London MPP John Robarts launched GO service in May of 1967 – around the same time the Leafs last won the Stanley Cup so we are considering a very distant time frame – questions have persisted over who should pay to keep the trains on the tracks and buses on the roads. In particular, should provincial taxpayers in Fort Frances, Kingsville and Napanee be supporting a transit system they essentially never use. In 2006, the McGuinty government established Metrolinx, a provincial agency for coordinating all transportation in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton areas. Two years later in 2008, Metrolinx released The Big Move, a 25 year $50 billion strategy to meet the escalating highway and transit demands for the selfproclaimed engine of the national economy. As The Toronto Star noted in a May 28, 2013 editorial, the Big Move had a big flaw – there were no recommendations on how to pay for new subways and faster GO trains. Metrolinx was subsequently asked to provide a report on a funding plan by June 1, 2013 which was delivered on May 27. The options proposed included a one percent increase on the HST, regional fuel and gasoline taxes at five cents/litre, a business parking levy, high occupancy toll lanes, and development charge amendments. Not surprisingly within the current minority government on University Avenue in Toronto, no one is particularly enthusiastic about moving quickly on anything. The province’s immediate

response was to appoint another panel to review the Metrolinx funding options and report back again. By March of this year, Premier Kathleen Wynne removed gas, sales and income taxes from the list of options. The Liberal government will implement other revenue measures to fund transit expansion however it will not be on the backs of middle income earners. In January of 1998, then Premier Mike Harris shifted the responsibility for funding GO Transit from Queen’s Park to the Regions of York, Halton, Peel, and Durham along with the Cities of Hamilton and Toronto. This decision was made in a political climate nearly twenty years ago that was very similar to 2014 – the PC administration was under heavy pressure from non-GTA municipalities to establish some type of funding mechanism where the users of the system would actually pay the related costs. As most provincial voters recall, Mike Harris was from North Bay and generally unsympathetic to the GTA on any issue. In 1999, the Greater Toronto Services Board or GTSB formally assumed responsibility for GO with funding from the aforementioned municipalities on an annual basis. However in late September of 2001 shortly before the premier announced his resignation, the GTSB was disbanded and responsibility for GO shifted back to Queen’s Park. The idea of the west shore of Lake Ontario paying transit costs alone without provincial support has probably been eliminated for another generation. Fifteen years and three Premiers later, there have been many bureaucratic reorganizations under new governments however we really aren’t any further ahead on funding GTA transit. And Leaf fans as always are still waiting.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art is Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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perspective on health care

New Family Physicians to Serve Greater K-W Residents BY MARY SUE FITZPATRICK The Chamber Health Care Resources Council, along with our community partners and the broader health care community, continues to make significant progress with our physician recruitment initiative. Over the past year, we have been working with a large number of family medicine residents and established family practitioners. Ten of these family physicians have already made commitments to the greater K-W area. Since January 2014, eight of them started rostering patients in newly established community practices while the other two will start rostering patients in May and July of this year. We have also been working with another large group of primary health care professionals who have expressed serious interest in K-W practice opportunities over the past six months. A number of them are established family practitioners who are currently in practices either in Ontario or in other provinces across Canada, and are planning on moving here within the next four to six months. There are also a number of family medicine residents who will be practice ready this summer and into next year who have interest in K-W practice opportunities but who have yet to make final commitments to specific practice groups. Factors for Success Many factors come into play in terms of our success with attracting new physicians. First, we are an exceptional community offering many urban and rural lifestyle amenities that appeal to physicians and their families. We are also home to the Waterloo Regional Campus of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine and the Kitchener-Waterloo Family Medicine Residency Program allowing us to “grow our own” primary health care professionals. As well, a number of our established physicians are at retirement age and their patient rosters are perfect “established practices” for young family practitioners to take over.

The Boardwalk Medical Centre officially opened in January 2014 when seven established family physicians moved their patients from their existing practices to these new state of the art medical offices. To date there are 27 doctors committed to the new facilities, with staggered start dates through 2014. They are at various stages in their careers, with five new medical graduates and some doctors within a few years of retirement who want a smooth transition of care for their patients. The Andrew Street Family Health Clinic opened their doors in January of 2012 at the Conrad Medical Centre with four young physicians and quickly expanded their practice group. With the addition of two new grads in April of this year, there are now eight family practitioners and room for an additional four. Progress & Challenges Depending on the size of their respective practices, we estimate that the ten new family physicians that have been attracted so far this year will be able to provide primary care for between 12,000 and 13,000 unattached patients in K-W. That would bring our underserviced numbers down from 23,460 to between 10,500 and 11,500 unattached patients. While we take great pleasure in celebrating our progress, we realize that our physician recruitment efforts are far from over. Going forward, Kitchener-Waterloo will continue to be challenged with rapid population growth, a growing number of practitioners at retirement age and younger physicians who roster smaller practices as they look for work-life balance. The Chamber Health Care Resources Council would like to thank the Chamber volunteers whose time and commitment make our recruitment programs and events possible. The greatest of appreciation is also extended to our corporate and municipal partners whose continued generous support and investment make our physician recruitment efforts viable and sustainable.

Importance of Facilities Another important factor is the existence of medical facilities that are attractive multidisciplinary centres of health care. We now have two such facilities, The Boardwalk Medical Centre with 80,000 sq. ft. on Ira Needles Blvd. in Waterloo and the smaller, but no less significant, Conrad Medical Centre at King and Andrew Street in Kitchener. Doctors practicing in these multidisciplinary facilities all enjoy the benefits of mentorship, informal consults, collegial support, and a culture of collaboration.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mary Sue Fitzpatrick Mary Sue is Vice President Family Physician Resources and Health Advocacy.


Thank You! Ontario Provincial District Council

RECRUITER BY THE HOUR INC.

Individual and Small Business Contributors

BME Consulting Jeff MacIntyre

Karen Mason Tim Sothern

Ian McLean Bill Weiler

for helping the Chamber continue its goal of eliminating the doctor shortage in Waterloo Region Since 1998 the Chamber and a team of dedicated volunteers have cut the number of residents without a family doctor in half. However the battle is not over. Our Recruitment efforts can only happen through the financial dedication of our Corporate Community through which it is funded


awards

Business Excellence Awards Winners

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1) DEAN FROOME, PRESIDENT OF M & T PRINTING GROUP, ACCEPTS THE BUSINESS OF THE YEAR (OVER 20 EMPLOYEES) AWARD FROM PEGGY JARVIE, ED OF CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION & CAREER ACTION AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO 2) DAWNE TAYLOR-GILDERS, OWNER/PUBLISHER/EDITOR AND SEAN GILDERS OF SNAPD KITCHENER/WATERLOO RECEIVE THE BUSINESS OF THE YEAR (20 EMPLOYEES & UNDER) AWARD FROM JOHN DEANS, PROJECT MANAGER AT S. G. CUNNINGHAM (L) 3) ANDREA HUNDT LORENTZ, CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF GREAT CANADIAN HOLIDAYS & COACHES, ACCEPTS THE ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABILITY AWARD FROM MURRAY COSTELLO, DISTRICT MANAGER FOR WATERLOO/BRANTFORD OF UNION GAS LIMITED 4) WILLY HEFFNER, VICE PRESIDENT OF HEFFNER MOTORS, RECEIVES THE HEALTH & WELLNESS IN THE WORKPLACE AWARD FROM TRACY ELOP PRESENTING FOR GRAND RIVER HOSPITAL 5) STEPHANIE TANNER OWNER OF LITTLE MUSHROOM CATERING ACCEPTS THE HOSPITALITY/TOURISM AWARD FROM MARY D’ALTON, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING PARTNER OF WATERLOO INN CONFERENCE HOTEL (R) 6) SHANE PEGG, DIRECTOR, STRATEGIC INITIATIVES, FROM THE ACCELERATOR CENTRE, RECEIVES THE INNOVATION AWARD FROM RENATA RUSINIAK, MANAGER, CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP AT BLACKBERRY 7) LUCIA HARRISON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR FOR THE KITCHENER-WATERLOO MULTICULTURAL CENTRE, ACCEPTS THE INTEGRATION AWARD FROM SANDI NICHOLLS, ACCOUNT MANAGER OF LIBRO CREDIT UNION (L) 8) ROGER FARWELL OF WALTERFEDY RECEIVES THE MICHAEL R. FOLLETT COMMUNITY LEADER OF THE YEAR AWARD FROM KAREN MASON FROM EQUITABLE LIFE OF CANADA 9) JACK KINCH (L), EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND NEIL MURRAY (R), BOARD MEMBER, FROM THE KITCHENER-WATERLOO HUMANE SOCIETY ACCEPTS THE NON-PROFIT/CHARITABLE AWARD FROM JODY THERRIAULT, ASSOCIATE LAWYER, BORDEN LADNER GERVAIS LLP 10) BLAINE HERTZBERGER, PARTNER FROM ERNST & YOUNG LLP RECEIVES THE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND WORKPLACE TRAINING AWARD FROM DR. JOHN TIBBITS, PRESIDENT OF CONESTOGA COLLEGE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY AND ADVANCED LEARNING (L) 11) DON WALES OF ERB & ERB INSURANCE RECEIVES THE VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR AWARD FROM DR. MICHAEL KELLY, DEAN, LAURIER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & AND ECONOMICS ® 12) MIKE MCCAULEY OF BUFFER BOX IS PRESENTED WITH THE YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR AWARD FROM FERIDUN HAMDULLAHPUR, PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO

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Photography by Adamski Photography


awards

Business Excellence Awards Guests

advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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networking

Spring Networking

PREMIER OF ONTARIO KATHLEEN WYNNE

PROVINCIAL LEADERS LUNCHEON SERIES WITH NDP LEADER ANDREA HORWATH

STANTEC NETWORKING BREAKFAST CROWD

PREMIER OF ONTARIO KATHLEEN WYNNE ADDRESSING THE CROWD

CAMBRIDGE CHAMBER PRESIDENT GREG DUROCHER & KW CHAMBER PRESIDENT IAN MCLEAN WITH NDP LEADER ANDREA HORWATH

ROD REGIER, JENNIFER CASEY & IAIN KLUGMAN AT THE LEADERS LUNCHEON WITH KATHLEEN WYNNE, PREMIER OF ONTARIO

KARL ALLEN-MUNCEY, ELIZABETH ALLEN, TODD COBER COREY MORROW AT THE FEBRUARY HOME HARDWARE BA5 AND

ENTERTAINING ELEMENTS STAFF SERVING DELICIOUS FOOD AT THE BA5

MODERATOR MINTO SCHNEIDER ASKING QUESTIONS OF THE PANEL

Photography by Adamski Photography

A local initiative initiative ffor or iintegrated ntegrated h healthcare ealthcare echnicians, with a unifying goal goal to to create create a collaborative collaborative Physicians, sicians, specialists, specialists, nurses nurses and ttechnicians, ure ar e ass embling a w st ate-of-the-art medical hub. hub. Here Here orphaned patients patients can culture are assembling att this ne new state-of-the-art contiguous he althcare. P atients will ure a ffamily amily doct or, who will pr ovide e xceptional and contiguous secure doctor, provide exceptional healthcare. Patients pharmacy, lab, lab, ima ging, car diac spe cial ttesting, esting, and similar reciate the c onvenience of pharmacy, appreciate convenience imaging, cardiac special cs in a friendly and welcoming welcoming place place with ample free free parking. clinics

the-boardwalk.ca e-boardwalk.ca OPENING S SOON OON cvoisin@theboardwalkmedical.com cvoisin@theboardwalkmedical.com 12

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networking

Spring Networking

THE NETWORKING CROWD AT HOME HARDWARE’S BA5 AT COBER EVOLVING SOLUTIONS

NDP LEADER ANDREA HORWATH ADDRESSING THE CROWD

STANTEC NETWORKING BREAKFAST ON BIG TOURISM & SMALL BUSINESS

PREMIER KATHLEEN WYNNE WITH CITY OF WATERLOO MAYOR BRENDA HALLORAN

KITCHENER’S MAYOR CARL ZEHR, HON. WALTER MCLEAN, CATHERINE FIFE MPP, NDP LEADER ANDREA HORWATH

REGIONAL CHAIR KEN SEILING, PREMIER KATHLEEN WYNNE, WATERLOO MAYOR BRENDA HALLORAN, KITCHENER MAYOR CARL ZEHR AND MPP JOHN MILLOY

NBS PANEL MEMBERS LORETTA LAU-LOWERISON, RICHARD KUPYERS AND DAVE MACNEIL

CARRIE MULROONEY EXCHANGING BUSINESS CARDS PETER NEWTON AT THE HOME HARDWARE BA5 AT COBER WITH

PREMIER WYNNE WITH IAN MCLEAN AND GREG DUROCHER

MPP CATHERINE FIFE, ANDREA HORWATH & WATERLOO MAYOR BRENDA HALLORAN

Photography by Adamski Photography

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advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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feature

Management of Excess Soil: New MOE Guidelines BY ROBERT FEDY In January of 2014, the Ontario Ministry of the Environment (MOE) released the “Excess Soil Management – A Guide for Best Management Practices (January 2014)”. This document is intended to guide the management of excess soil when a property is either being redeveloped, or construction is taking place. The good news is excess soil is viewed as a commodity that can have substantial value, if it is re-used in an appropriate fashion. The guideline provides clear direction as to what soil is considered waste and what soil is considered reusable. If soil will be re-used, management plans are required to be in place for both the source and receiving sites, and a Qualified Person (QP) must oversee the management process. The guideline also provides some clarity to the use and applicability of existing pieces of provincial legislation. Examples of how these guidelines could apply include but are not limited to, municipalities undertaking capital works projects, Conservation Authorities, Earthworks Contractors, Developers, and Gravel Pit Owners.

How to Manage Excess Soil Soil that can legitimately be re-used in another capacity is material that is not “waste” and does not cause an adverse effect on human health or impairment of water quality. Ways that excess soil can be re-used include: a. Reuse On-site: in another capacity such as a noise/landscape berm or other beneficial grading use b. Reuse Off-site: on another property where the material is transported across or on a municipal road, or is transported across a property boundary to another owner’s land c. Reuse as controlled fill: where the receiving property has a license, permit, environmental compliance approval, or approved MOE Risk Assessment to accept the material

What Types of Excess Soil can be Re-Used Types of excess soil could include the following: stripped top soil, road gravel, material from trenching/site grading/general earthworks, or dredged sediment. Rock, crushed concrete (free of excessive rebar) and stone are inert and therefore can be re-used in accordance with a, b and c noted above. Reclaimed asphalt is not excess soil because it is not inert,

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and is not compost because it is processed and subject to other requirements.

What is “waste” The determination of whether a soil is “waste” or not, is based primarily on whether the material is free of debris, such that it can be wholly recycled, does not require processing to remove a contaminant, is not odorous, is not aesthetically objectionable, and is chemically tested to be of no risk (meaning it would not cause an adverse effect to human health or the environment at its intended new location). If soil is determined to be “waste”, it should be transported by a licensed hauler to a licensed landfill and should not be stockpiled (stored) on a property for more than 90 days, unless the local MOE has been notified and agrees to extend the storage timeframe. Soil that has been determined to be “waste” could be remediated or processed on the source property (where it is situated) in order to re-classify some or all of it, as long as the proponent/contractor has a valid Certificate of Approval from the MOE and has undertaken all required notification and engineered controls specified in the approval. Soil classification occurs through chemical and geotechnical analysis, and comparison against several pieces of legislation that govern site development, waste classification, contaminant discharge, etc. The MOE encourages the reuse of excess soil, where feasible and appropriate, in order to avoid unnecessary landfill, to protect the environment and natural resources, and to help maintain a healthy economy. ABOUT THE AUTHOR ROBERT FEDY

Robert Fedy is a licensed Professional Engineer, and a Qualified Person (QP) for Environmental Site Assessment as defined in O. Reg. 153/04. Robert has over 30 years of professional experience including his current position as Director, Environmental Engineering with MTE Consultants Inc. and previously as District Engineer and Abatement Specialist for the Ontario Ministry of Environment and Energy.


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cover story

5 Easy Ways to Save Energy $$ BY DEREK SATNIK

Money Talks For decades now, most businesses in North America have paid their energy bills like their taxes or insurance premiums: as a necessary evil – a cost of doing business. Only the leading minority has taken control of this cost and understood it for the opportunity that it truly is. But this is changing. At Mindscape, we’ve been delighted to see our clients taking control of their energy bills and making reductions of between 10 and 50% or even more, all with a few simple steps that are easily repeated.

An Ounce of Planning… … is worth so much more than a pound of cure. Like most things, with buildings, you truly get what you plan for. Whether your building is a factory, store, office tower, hospital or even a home, a little bit of planning goes a long way. Those of you in this business with some experience will not be surprised at the top 5 recommendations below. Mindscape has experience working on literally thousands of buildings of all types, and this top 5 list is something we’ve proven over and over again.

1. Read and Understand Your Bills You can’t improve what you don’t track or understand. Many businesses give their energy bills to a book keeper, auditor, or financial team, not to an energy specialist. The bill disappears into the vacuum and simply gets paid without being understood. Energy is not a tax: it can be controlled, optimized, and reduced. Clever companies are even turning energy into an opportunity to put money back into operations. Energy is usually one of the greatest annual expenses associated with maintaining business space (compare it to your rent!), and it’s not hard to reduce energy bills. Many businesses will see their first 10% savings for doing little other than reading the bill and beginning to understand how they get charged. It's almost magical, but somehow companies that pay attention to their bills behave differently than those that don't, and their bills are reduced.

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For example, most businesses get billed both for the amount of energy they use, and also for the peak they hit at their worst moment during the billing period. When you know what your peak was, then you can start thinking about what caused the peak to happen and about how you might reduce that peak. Particularly in the tri-cities, the utilities here are all very approachable and very willing to spend time with you explaining how your bill works and what you can do to reduce it. Use their free advice!

2. Keep the Heat In Sometimes the most important things are the most subtle and unexciting. Air tightness is understated, but it’s value is easily tenfold more important than most other considerations when designing efficient buildings. Think about heating your house in the winter with the window open: you can spend as much money as you want on heat while the cold air keeps blowing into the house and the heat just keeps escaping… or you can close the window. Business is no different. Close the bay doors. Seal around the windows. Think about insulation. There is an entire profession of energy advisors who now specialize in looking for other less obvious ways that air (and heat) is leaking out of buildings in uncontrolled ways. By sealing up and preventing leaks, you keep heat where you want it: outside in the summer, and inside in the winter. This costs very little and has huge returns: it means that your heating system will run less and not work as hard, and that you’ll be much more comfortable while you enjoy your cheaper energy bills: as much as 20-30% cheaper, just from air tightness.

3. Turn Stuff Off Yes, it is as easy as it sounds. Most businesses could save an easy 10-20% off their electricity bill just by making sure things are turned off when not in use. This is a great place to get your staff involved too: give them freedom to suggest ways to reduce the amount of energy used by idle equipment, and you'll get suggestions like occupancy sensors, timers, power-bars, or sometimes even just reminder signs. Complicated automation does help here, but not as much as a little training. This is an easy opportunity for friendly competition too: offer a free pair of movie tickets or a restaurant gift certificate to the employee who


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identifies the greatest opportunities to save each month. You'll make your staff happier, and you'll save energy, and the savings will compound.

4. Optimize Equipment Most buildings do not operate as they were intended to. Older buildings that have been renovated, or industrial buildings where process equipment has been moved around and reconfigured, are almost guaranteed to have systems heating the building that was, not the building that is. Settings should be recalibrated / recommissioned every year or two to make sure that they stay optimized. This can often save 10% or more of energy bills. After you've optimized the equipment you have, minimized the amount of heat you're losing to the outdoors, and optimized the way employees use equipment (ie: turn stuff off!), then it's time to start thinking about upgrades. The electrical and gas utilities offer some fantastic incentive programs, starting with up to 50% subsidies for professional energy audits that will help you plan what upgrades to pursue, and then up to another 50% subsidy towards those upgrades. Lowhanging fruit often includes things like lighting, pumps/fans, or variable speed drives. Whatever you upgrade, make sure you commission and optimize it! Many businesses start with upgrading equipment, perhaps because it is more visible than air tightness and optimized control, but this should always be last on the list. It is always cheaper (by as many as 10 times) to spend money on air tightness and optimization before spending money on new equipment. A tight, properly optimized building that is well managed will easily conserve 40% or more of the energy used otherwise, and will be adequately served by mechanical equipment that is much smaller and less expensive. That's worth repeating: by optimizing the building first, you will spend much less on upgrades or replacement equipment.

5. Get Good Help Getting started with energy efficiency is easier than most people think, and it pays off fast. There's a lot you can do without outside help. And once you've done the things listed above, then you'll be in a very good position to make the best use of outside help.

When you're ready to go to the next step, pursuing energy savings of 25% or more, make sure you have good help. There are many firms in the industry that claim to be able to deliver energy audits, and like most things, not all firms are created equal. Make sure to check their references. When we do energy audits, we give our clients a three year plan, and we set our clients up to use the savings from the first year to help fund projects in the second year. The savings compound year over year and set you up for increasing successes, and increasing savings. Ultimately, it puts more and more money back into your business, and it protects you from rising energy prices in the future at the same time.

Get Started Now you know the five easy steps to saving energy dollars. Ontario's energy infrastructure is much like the rest of North America's, and the whole continent is due for significant investment. That investment will drive up energy pricing everywhere: Ontario's prices are expected to rise almost 40% over the next twenty years, and this is quite typical. Now is the time to start investing pro-actively in energy efficiency. Get started with your internal team, and then get some outside help. Savings are easy to achieve, and will pay off many times over in the decades to come.

Happy energy savings!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Derek Satnik Derek Satnik is a LEED速 Accredited Professional Engineer, and internationally awarded expert in sustainable buildings and renewable energy systems. He lives in Kitchener at the Ontario Green Home, and is the Managing Director of local consultant Mindscape Innovations Group (www.mi-group.ca). advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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events

Mark Your Calendar May 1, 2014

May 15, 2014

Manufacturing Summit

Second Foundation Chamber Young Professionals Networking Event

11:00am-5:30pm at Bingemans Tickets: $75 A half-day conference for manufacturing leaders and supply chain partners aimed at exploring the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for Ontario’s manufacturing sector. Platinum Sponsors:

5:30-7:30pm at Block3 Brewing Member: $5 General Admission: $10 You are invited to join us to develop key relationships, build your business network and connect with other young professionals and business leaders at this casual networking event. Title Sponsor:

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May 9, 2014 Leadercast powered by saveONenergy

May 22, 2014

8:00am-4:30pm at Bingemans Tickets: $75

Stantec Networking Breakfast Series presents Bob Gomes, President & CEO of Stantec

Malcolm Gladwell, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and Laura Bush – just to name a few of the world-class speakers that will be a part of this leadership development event broadcast live from Atlanta to hundreds of venues around the world. It’s a day of exceptional motivation, inspiration, education, and not to mention great networking.

7:15-9:00am at Holiday Inn Kitchener-Waterloo

* Lawyers & HR Professionals can receive substantive credits or recertification points- see website for more details. Leadership Sponsor:

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Bob will be sharing with us the history and evolution of Stantec and how his company is dedicated to integrating itself within the communities they live, work, and play in. Title Sponsor: Event Sponsor: Media Sponsor:

May 13, 2014

May 28, 2014

Manulife Chamber Academy – Employee Development: Dealing with Poor Performers

Heffner Women’s Leadership presents Connect the Dots

8:00-9:30am at Holiday Inn Express Waterloo-St. Jacobs Member: $20 General Admission: $25

11:30am-1:30pm at Verses Restaurant Come and connect at a progressive networking luncheon, moving tables with each tapas style course. Title Sponsor:

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events

June 3, 2014

June 23, 2014

Cowan Insurance Group presents a New Member Welcome

100 Mile Feast, The Parisian Experience

5:00-7:00pm Host: Chicopee Ski & Summer Resort Member: Complimentary

6:00-10:00pm at the Waterloo Inn Conference Hotel Ticket: $150 Table of 8: $1200

Learn how working together can work for you! Find out how our services and events can help your business grow, learn about volunteer opportunities, and promote your business to other members.

A new twist will have Chef Lori Maidlow preparing a menu focused on 100 miles from Paris France, while using locally sourced ingredients. Platinum Sponsor:

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Gold Sponsor:

June 10, 2014

Bronze Sponsors:

Manulife Chamber Academy – Modern Selling: Driving Revenue with Simple Adjustments

Menu Sponsor:

8:00-9:30am at Holiday Inn Express Waterloo-St. Jacobs Member: $20 General Admission: $25

Media Sponsors:

Title Sponsor:

June 2014

June 10, 2014

Second Foundation Chamber Young Professionals

Home Hardware Business After 5

5:30-7:30pm Location: TBA

5:00-7:00pm Hosted by Stahle Construction at Roseville Estates Member: Complimentary General Admission: $10

Member: $5 General Admission: $10 Watch the website for details!

Does networking intimidate you or do you thrive on meeting new people? Come out to this casual bi-monthly event with friendly faces and easy conversation that provides an opportunity for B2B networking.

Title Sponsor: Event Sponsor:

June 2014

Title Sponsor:

Energy & Environment Forum

Host Sponsor:

11:30am-1:30pm Watch the website for details!

Media Sponsor:

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475 King Street North Waterloo, ON 519.884.0220 www.waterlooinn.com advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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new members

February 1, 2014 - March 31, 2014 & Then Sum Consulting Ltd.

Bradley A. Straus Contractors Ltd

Business Consultants Lisa Ricci, Owner/Director 570 Dansbury Drive Waterloo, ON N2K 4E2 Email: lisa@andthensum.ca Web: http://www.andthensum.ca Phone: (416) 894-1724

Home Improvements & Renovations Brad Straus, President 746 Snowcrest Place, RR #3, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 Email: brad3@gto.net Web: http://www.strauscontractors.ca Phone: (519) 886-8865 Fax: (519) 886-2640

Aon Construction Services Group Insurance Agents & Brokers Nikki Laskin, Account Executive 5500 North Service Road, Suite 402 Burlington, ON L7L 6W6 Email: nikki.laskin@aon.ca Web: http://www.aon.ca Phone: (289) 313-2630 Fax: (289) 313-2601

Aon Risk Solutions Insurance Agents & Brokers Nikki Laskin, Account Executive 5500 North Service Road, Suite 402 Burlington, ON L7L 6W6 Email: nikki.laskin@aon.ca Web: http://www.aon.ca Phone: (289) 313-2630 Fax: (289) 313-2601

Artisan Zone Art Galleries, Dealers & Consultants Martin Kocak, Co-owner 37 King Street Kitchener, ON N2G 1A1 Email: info@artisanzone.ca Web: http://www.artisanzone.ca Phone: (519) 208-7400

Legal Service Plans Kimberly Vollick, Regional Manager 468 Doon South Drive, Unit 27 Kitchener, ON N2P 0A2 Email: kimberly.vollick@harvardbenefits.com Web: http://www.harvardbenefits.com Phone: (519) 748-5739

Connections Talent Solutions

HJ Machine & Pattern Ltd.

Human Resource Consultants Lee Murray, CEO 536 Mill Park Drive Kitchener, ON N2P 1W1 Email: leemurray@connectionsts.ca Web: http://www.connectionsts.ca Phone: (226) 929-2129

Manufacturers Carole Rier, Office Manager 675 Superior Drive Waterloo, ON N2V 2C8 Email: accounting@hjmach.on.ca Web: http://www.hjmach.on.ca Phone: (519) 746-7077

Coronado Waterloo Stone Works Inc Counter Tops Richard Ejsymont, General Manager 42 Bridgeport Road East, Unit 1 Waterloo, ON N2J 0B3 Email: sales@coronadocorp.com Web: http://www.coronadocorp.com Phone: (519) 884-5200 Fax: (519) 884-0229

Dairy Queen - The Boardwalk Restaurants Robert Maxwell, Owner 330 The Boardwalk, Unit 1 Waterloo, ON N2T 0A6 Email: dqboardwalk@yahoo.ca Phone: (519) 576-3737

Hogan's Canstruct & Son's Construction Michelle Black, Office/Accounts Manager 277 Manitou Drive, Unit E Kitchener, ON N2C 1L4 Email: mblack@hcscontracting.ca Phone: (519) 208-5907 Fax: (519) 208-8762

Infinitum Energy Solar Energy Systems & Equipment (Main), Lighting Consultants & Contractors Saul Peralta, CEO 1408 Victoria Street North, Unit 16 Kitchener, ON N2B 3E2 Email: info@infinitumenergy.com Web: http://www.infinitumenergy.com

AVI-SPL Canada

Fine Line Graphics Inc.

Inspirare Centre

Audio Visual Equipment & Supplies Michael Sawyer, Regional Sales Manager 30 Duke Street West, Suite 1012 Kitchener, ON N2H 3W5 Email: michael.sawyer@avi-spl.com Web: http://www.avispl.ca Phone: (866) 797-5635 Fax: (519) 342-0970

Graphic Designers Ron Beauregard, Vice President 3175 Airway Drive Mississauga, ON L4V 1C2 Email: rrb@flgcorp.com Web: http://www.flgcorp.com Phone: (401) 854-8300 Fax: (401) 231-2373

Social & Human Services Organizations Reynaldo Valerio, Co-founder & CEO 55 King Street West, Suite 716 Kitchener, ON N2G 4W1 Email: contact@inspirarecentre.ca Web: http://www.inspirarecentre.ca Phone: (519) 772-7745

Good Practice Physiotherapy

Baden Coffee Company

Physiotherapists Lana Good, Owner/Physiotherapist 620 Davenport Road, Unit 20 Waterloo, ON N2V 2C2 Email: lana@goodpractice.ca Web: http://www.goodpractice.ca Phone: (226) 220-7757 Fax: (888) 503-7757

Chiropractors Shannon Viana, Chiropractor/Owner 525 Belmont Avenue West, Suite 107 Kitchener, ON N2M 5E2 Email: reception@inspirehealthandwellness.ca http://www.inspirehealthandwellness.ca Phone: (519) 745-1331 Fax: (519) 745-1332

Coffee Break Service & Supplies Nick Burke, General Manager 1427 Gingerich Road Baden, ON N3A 4S3 Email: nick@badencoffee.com Web: http://www.badencoffee.com Phone: (519) 634-5807 Fax: (519) 634-5138

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Harvard Risk Management Corporation

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Inspire Health & Wellness

Intelligent Office Waterloo Office & Desk Space Rental Service Aimee Leveck, Business Centre Manager 22 King Street South, Suite 300 Waterloo, ON N2J 1N8 Email: aimee.leveck@gmail.com Web: http://www.intelligentoffice.com Phone: (519) 279-0160 Fax: (519) 279-0161

Irvine Contracting Inc Roofing Contractors Lori Mara, Owner 310 Northumberland Street Ayr, ON N0B 1E0 Email: irvinecontracting@gmail.com http://www.irvineroofingkitchener.com Phone: (519) 571-3260

Janet Lynn's Bistro Restaurants Nikki Weiler, Owner 677 Belmont Avenue West, Kitchener, ON N2M 1N8 Email: info@janetlynnsbistro.com Web: http://www.janetlynnsbistro.com Phone: (519) 725-3440

Kitchener Waterloo Community Orchestra Inc. Charitable & Community Organizations Heather Rawlings, Treasurer Adult Recreation Centre, 185 King Street South Waterloo, ON N2J 1P7 Email: kwcommunityorchestra@gmail.com Web: http://www.kwco.ca Phone: (519) 895-1299

Lindt Outlet Boutique Kitchener Chocolate Cheryl Ertel, Retail & Corp. Sales Manager 4500 King Street East, Unit 4 Kitchener, ON N2P 2G4 Email: k@lindt.ca Web: http://www.lindt.com Phone: (519) 650-9141

Mennonite Central Committee Ontario Charitable & Community Organizations Patty Ollies, Thrift Development Officer 50 Kent Avenue Kitchener, ON N2G 3R1 Email: ianmartensjanzen@mennonitecc.on.ca Web: http://www.mcc.org/ontario Phone: (519) 745-8458 Fax: (519) 745-0064


advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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new members

February 1, 2014 - March 31, 2014 Mind, Matter & Motion Limited

S.L. Marcella Carpets Ltd.

Sound Events Inc.

The UPS Store #398

Holistic Health Services Nicole Cluett-Penny, Owner 885 Glasgow Street, Unit 5 Kitchener, ON N2V 2P3 Email: info@mindmatterandmotion.com http://www.mindmatterandmotion.com Phone: (519) 208-0430

Floor Materials, Sales and Contractors Nick Marcella, 110 Frobisher Drive, Unit 1 Waterloo, ON N2V 2G7 Email: nick@marcellacarpets.ca www.floorsfirst.com/marcellacarpets Phone: (519) 885-2357 Fax: (519) 885-2704

Audio Visual Equipment & Supplies Dave Johnston, Manager 265 Lawrence Avenue, Unit J5 Kitchener, ON N2M 5R1 Email: info@soundevents.ca Web: http://www.soundevents.ca Phone: (855) 535-3939

Digital Imaging, Printing & Photography Cheepeng Tan, Owner 871 Victoria Street North, Unit 7 Kitchener, ON N2B 3S4 Email: store398@theupsstore.ca Phone: (519) 569-7336 Fax: (519) 569-7397

Techland Automotive Service

TIMELINE JOURNEY LTD.

Sawatzky Valuations Inc.

Automobile Service & Supplies Matt Lubczuk, Owner 140 Alpine Road, Unit 4 Kitchener, ON N2E 1A1 Email: techlandauto@gmail.com Web: http://www.techlandauto.com Phone: (519) 745-7102

Home Improvements & Renovations Steve Tennant, Director 71 Ellis Avenue, Kitchener, ON N2H 4G6 Email: timelinejourney@yahoo.com Web: http://www.timelinejourney.com Phone: (519) 277-8463

NetSuite Inc. Computer Software Jonathan Panigas, Account Executive 5800 Explorer Drive Mississauga, ON L4W 5K9 Email: jpanigas@netsuite.com Web: http://www.netsuite.com Phone: (905) 219-8546

Office Central Office Supplies Rob Tanner, Account Manager 498 Markland Street Markham, ON L6C 1Z6 Email: robt@officecentral.com Web: http://www.officecentral.com Phone: (800) 835-9565

Perimeter Innovation Business Consultants Brian Haacke, President 761 Lucerne Avenue, Waterloo, ON N2T 2Y3 Email: brian@perimeterinnovation.com http://www.perimeterinnovation.com Phone: (519) 741-7241

Plextec Inc. Computer Consultants Todd Ladouceur, President 5 Paulander Drive, Unit C Kitchener, ON N2M 5B6 Email: todd@plextec.com Web: http://www.plextec.com Phone: (519) 893-5126

Business Consultants Alison Sawatzky, President 496 Albert Street, Suite 4 Waterloo, ON N2L 3V4 Email: alison@sawatzkyvaluations.com http://www.sawatzkyvaluations.com Phone: (226) 317-0600 Fax: (226) 317-0601

Schnarr Craftsmen Inc Home Improvements & Renovations Carol Schnarr, General Manager 215 Bathurst Drive, Unit 2 Waterloo, ON N2V 2B2 Email: carol@schnarrcraftsmen.com http://www.schnarrcraftsmen.com Phone: (519) 725-0411

Slide Communications Advertising Agencies & Consultants Eva Andrews, Partner – Client Service 27 William Street Paris, ON N3L 1K9 Email: eva@slide.ca Web: http://www.slide.ca Phone: (519) 302-2700

The Murray Group Strategic Marketing Communications Inc. Marketing Consultants Scott Murray, President 536 Mill Park Drive Kitchener, ON N2P 1W1 Email: scott@themurraygroup.ca Web: http://www.themurraygroup.ca Phone: (519) 241-4474

The Sunbeam Lodge

Windows To Adoor

Social & Human Services Organizations John Vos, Administrator 389 Pinnacle Drive Kitchener, ON N2P 2P7 Email: jvos@sunbeamlodge.com Web: http://www.sunbeamlodge.com Phone: (519) 896-6718 Fax: (519) 748-5537

Windows & Doors Tyler Scarr, Owner 1408 Victoria Street North, Kitchener, ON N2B 3E2 Email: windows_to_adoor@hotmail.com Web: http://www.windowstoadoor.ca Phone: (519) 743-9330

We’re IRS Registered to perfform b both th corporatte and personal p U.S taxation services.

www.dskcga.com d k m/irs /i 22

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Waterloo Windows & Siding Siding Contractors Barry Norlock, General Manager 891 Guelph Street, Unit 6 Kitchener, ON N2H 5Z2 Email: barrynorlock@gmail.com Web: http://www.waterloowindows.ca Phone: (519) 578-2793 Fax: (519) 578-2972


We’re active members of the communities we serve. That’s why at Stantec, we always design with community in mind.

stantec.com

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feature

Weber Group Hooked on RAIN-Smart Property Maintenance For avid fisherman Mark Hartley, a water resources engineer for Walter Fedy, it was easy to see the importance of reducing the flow of murky, polluted water from parking lots into local rivers. His challenge was preparing a proposal to present to his company’s landlord to help them see the value and take action. The Weber Group, who manage the Queen South Business Centre located at 675 Queen Street South, Kitchener, were open to a meeting but first Hartley approached RAIN, a stormwater education program delivered by REEP Green Solutions in partnership with the Cities of Kitchener and Waterloo to get additional information about practical, relatively inexpensive practices they could recommend for the property that could also result in up to a 45% reduction of the site’s stormwater utility bill. When he made the pitch, he was shocked by how quickly they asked, “when do we get started?” Explains Alex Weber, Business Administration Manager at Weber Group “I’m asked on a regular basis by present and prospective clients what our company does to protect the environment. We already have waste, water and energy conservation policies in place so when I heard about this it was a no brainer.” Hartley jokes “my only regret was not recommending a bigger first project.” In the fall of 2013 a portion of the asphalt parking lot was torn up and replaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers. A bowlshaped rain garden was added as a complement to existing landscaping to absorb flows from another section of the parking lot. Both of these features soak up and filter runoff from the parking lot. In order to reduce pollutants on the parking lot, Weber Group hired a Smart About Salt Certified (tm) contractor to maximize safety while minimizing salt application. By taking action to reduce impacts on nearby Schneider Creek and spreading word about the program, the site will qualify for stormwater credits through the City of Kitchener. For this particular property, estimated savings will be in the hundreds of dollars per year but for larger sites it can add up to thousands. Alex Weber sees this project as just the beginning. Weber explained, “now that stormwater management is on our radar, any time we do renovations we will consider what we can do to help.”

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L TO R- ALEX WEBER, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MANAGER AT WEBER GROUP, CHERYL EVANS, RAIN PROGRAM MANAGER AND MARK HARTLEY, WATER RESOURCES ENGINEER AT WALTERFEDY.

Not all property managers have environmentally focussed consulting engineering firms as tenants that can help motivate landlords to take action. Fortunately, the RAIN Program offers a variety of support services including presentations, workshops and free RAIN Business Visits in Kitchener and Waterloo. Because of the environmental track record of the Weber Group and Walter Fedy, the Queen South Business Centre project received demonstration project funds from RAIN to help offset project implementation costs and install educational signage. The project profile will be featured on the RAIN and City of Kitchener websites. Within a month’s time they will be applying for stormwater credits to reap additional financial rewards. Every property manager has a role to play in reducing the volume and improving the quality of the water that flows from their properties. “Individual actions across the cities will add up to big improvements in the health of our urban creeks,” adds Mark Hartley. This year 3 sites in Kitchener and 1 site in Waterloo will receive $4,000 to assist with project completion and signage. For information about how to apply for demonstration project funding, how to register for a RAIN Business Visit and how to apply for stormwater credits in the Cities of Kitchener and Waterloo click www.reepgreen.ca/rain or call 519-744-9799 ext 4.

advocate MARCH | APRIL 2014


feature

A Trip Through the Extras of Peru The western South American nation of Peru provides an impressive and glorious history for visitors. The nation uniquely combines pre-Columbian and colonial history with recent history. There are many species of colourful birds in Peru with a variety foods originating from the country— including both potatoes and tomatoes. Peru has twice been awarded the Worlds Culinary Travel Destination designation. There are many languages spoken in Peru, even if some are spoken by very few people. There are many climatic zones packed in next to one another in narrow strips. When it rains, there is more rain, and when the sun is overhead, there is extreme sun, and residents require a high volume of sun block. The rivers are bigger, wider and faster. Peru has the America’s deepest canyon and the world’s driest desert. There is more luxury than you might have expected and definitely more holidays because of religious traditions. On moonless nights, there seem to be more stars in the sky.

The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce is taking an eight day tour departing on September 24, 2014 to experience some of the extras of Peru. On this exciting journey you will visit the City of Kings, Lima the capital of Peru, a cosmopolitan and modern yet colonial city. Step back in time and follow the footsteps of Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who discovered the city on your tour of Lima, before taking a spectacular flight over the snow capped Andes to the oldest inhabited city in the southern hemisphere, Cusco, at an elevation of 11,440 feet. Cusco has a World Heritage Centre designation in recognition of its preservation of Incan architecture as well as its Baroque buildings and churches built by the conquistadors. You will have the opportunity to see for yourself how wonderful the city is on your walking tour along with a visit to its ancient ruins, Tambomachay, Kenko, Pucapucara and Sacsayhuman, considered

advocate MAY | JUNE 2014

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feature

A Trip Through the Extras of Peru (cont’d) one of the greatest Inca sites after Machu Picchu. It's believed to have been a royal retreat and was built with some of the largest stones to be found on an Inca site. Some of the stones weigh as much as 300 pounds. There is a free day on this tour which can be spent exploring Cusco or you may want to visit the Sacred Valley and the world famous Pisac Market. The Sacred Valley stretches all the way from Cusco to Aguas Calientes, the town at the base of Machu Picchu. There are beautiful villages dotting the valley that you will visit including the well known town of Pisac, home to the famous market. Sellers come from all the surrounding villages, many of them from remote villages high in the Andes to sell their products. Not only is it a place for selling ones wares but it's a meeting place for locals that don’t see each other regularly. You will find colorfully dressed women in their woven skirts and tops with their signature hats. It is a beautiful way to spend the day. This free day will help you acclimatize to the high elevation. Also not to be missed while you are in Cusco is the chance to try guinea pig, a culinary delicacy for Peruvians. Then travel by Vistadome train service (surrounded entirely by glass and wagons with large panoramic windows this train service offers unique scenic views and multiple opportunities to take amazing photos) through the sacred Urubamba Valley to the "Lost

City of the Incas" Machu Picchu. Perched 8,200 feet above the valley, it was hidden by mountains and semi-tropical jungles for 400 years until discovered by Hiram Bingham of Yale University in 1911. This citadel served as a place of worship, a site for star gazing and a private hacienda for the family of the Incan Pachacutec. It is also believed that during the time of the conquistador raids the Inca hid here. You will have time to explore this fascinating archaeological site with a local guide who will bring the stories of the Inca at Machu Picchu to life for you. It has the quality of being utterly surprising, no matter how many images of it you have seen. It is partly that it is so ambitious and partly that it is so exquisitely situated, spilling along ridges and across hillocks and down vertiginous drops, taking in the surrounding peaks hundreds of feet above and the rushing river hundreds of feet below. Walking these streets, you feel that there was tremendous intention in this construction. After the heights of the mountains, Lima’s setting on the coast offers opportunities to sample various types of seafood. One also needs to make sure that they try a Pisco Sour before returning home. Peru is an exciting destination with so much to offer from its archaeological sites, to its small cities and villages, sampling its gastronomy to perhaps exploring its jungle. This trip is an opportunity to experience the life and culture of Peru with fellow travellers from Waterloo Region, but you will come home with memories that will last a life time.

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member notables

MEMBER NOTABLES Stemmler’s Recognized for National Food Industry Leadership Stemmler’s Meat and Cheese was recently awarded the prestigious Health and Wellness Award by Food in Canada, the nation’s leading food and beverage processing magazine. The Heidelberg –based company received one of five 2014 Leadership Awards which recognize the innovation and commitment that Canadian businesses require to grow in the current competitive economic environment. A profile of Stemmler’s in the April 2014 edition of Food in Canada recognizes their exemplary efforts on reformulating products to assist customers with special dietary requirements. Their innovate approaches have resulted in 350 percent growth over the past eight years and the construction of an environmentally advanced facility for meeting market demands. Congratulations to the Stemmler family on this milestone achievement.

Cowan Insurance Group Appoints Vice President, Finance Heather McLachlin, President of the Cowan Insurance Group, announced the appointment of Jennifer Justason as Vice President, Finance of Cowan Insurance Group Ltd. effective March 31, 2014. Ms. Justason joined Cowan in 2007 as Controller and in her new role assumes responsibility for the company’s financial leadership, performance measurement and management, operational effectiveness, and IT. Prior to joining Cowan, she worked in public accounting and holds Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA), Chartered Accountant (CA) and General insurance Essentials (GIE) designations.

triOS College Recognized For Excellence In Education For the fourth consecutive year, triOS College Business Technology Healthcare has been awarded the Deloitte Best Managed Company Award and this year becomes a Best Managed Gold Star Winner. The college has been awarded this designation for re-defining postsecondary education by listening to student and employer needs and delivering. triOS has nine campuses across Southern Ontario, graduating over 20,000 students since its inception in 1992. The Waterloo Region campus is located at Market Square in downtown Kitchener.

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member notables

MEMBER NOTABLES Schnarr Craftsmen Thirty Year Anniversary Waterloo-based renovator Schnarr Craftsmen Inc. is celebrating thirty years of service. The company considers itself extremely fortunate to have worked with hundreds of excellent clients over the years and extends thanks to the community. The company started out of a garage and has witnessed many changes across the renovation industry, however has not lost a focus on securing and maintaining satisfied clients. Also, Schnarr recognizes their excellent employees, subtrades and suppliers they have worked with through the past three decades and have become an integral part of their success. Collectively, these talented people have provided a string of awards and exemplary projects that continue to raise the bar.

Great Canadian Holidays & Coaches Receive Prestigious Award in Los Angeles Larry and Lorna Hundt, co-owners of Great Canadian Holidays & Coaches, were presented with the Motorcoach Operator of the Year award at a 3700 delegate convention for both the United Motorcoach Association (UMA) and National Tour Association (NTA) in Los Angeles on February 19, 2014. The Kitchener-based company was recognized for industry contributions and successes in running one of the most well-regarded bus companies in North America. The Hundts, along with their family and entire staff were honoured to receive this award along with the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce 2014 Business Excellence Award for Environment and Sustainability.

Mulrooney & Associates â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fifteen Years of Service and a New Location Kitchener-based Mulrooney & Associates, a professional services firm in bookkeeping, accounting, payroll and taxation, is celebrating fifteen years of service and moving to a new location. The company has a staffing complement of seven employees who are all credentialed and specialized in the services they provide. Carrie Mulrooney, CB, CPB, founded the organization in 1999. The new office in mid-construction is located at 335 Lancaster Street West in Kitchener with a spring 2014 opening in sight.

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Mail Fulfillment

KITCHENER 907 Frederick St. T 519-571-0101 299 Doon Valley Dr. T 519-748-3523 WATERLOO 265 Weber St. N. T 519-886-6800 CAMBRIDGE 125 Sheldon Dr. T 519-621-6611 BRANTFORD 134 Shaver St. T 519-759-0087 GUELPH 21 Malcolm Rd. T 519-836-4441 LONDON 1074 Dearness Dr. T 519-685-4144 392 Clarence St. T 519-672-6770 318 Neptune Cres. T 519-455-6667 797 York St. T 519-963-4050

becomeacma.com

www.mtprint.com © 2012 Certified Management Accountants of Ontario. All rights reserved. ®/™ Registered Trade-Marks/Trade-Marks are owned by The Society of Management Accountants of Canada. Used under license.

WELLAND 87 West Main St. T 905-734-3378

Complimentary Program Exclusively for Chamber Members

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Contact Dana Walton at 519.749.6047 or dwalton@greaterkwchamber.com to be part of one of our valuable Peer2Peer groups focused on helping members grow their network and learn new skills in a helpful and collaborative environment.

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Helping Us Make Our Vision Possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

CHAMBER CHAIR’S CIRCLE

CHAMBER PATRON

Chamber

Academy TITLE SPONSOR

CHAMBER TRUSTEE

MEDIA PARTNERS 30

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Couple of sandwiches short of a picnic? We can help. That’s why so many businesses in the Waterloo Region choose Bingemans. We have been professional caterers for over 50 years, and we would be honoured to cater your next corporate event. Why not make your next company gathering a picnic. Our experienced event planners can fulfill all of your needs including: location, menu planning, staffing and beverage management.

BINGEMANSCATERING Phone (519) 744-1555

Toll Free: 1-800-667-0833

Web: bingemans.com

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May | June Advocate