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JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

Waterloo Region 2017 and Beyond


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advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017 WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

features 16

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

COVER STORY

Chambers of Commerce Can Make Significant Contributions to Canada's Future Perrin Beatty

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FEATURE

M&T Printing Group

Manufacturing in 2017 and Beyond

PHOTOGRAPHY:

Adamski Photography

FEATURE

ADVERTISING AND SALES:

Meet the 2016-2017 Board of Directors FEATURE

David MacLellan – dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Don Critelli – dcritelli@greaterkwchamber.com Karen Cross – kcross@greaterkwchamber.com

Waterloo EDC - Inventing the Future

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Tony LaMantia

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Perrin Beatty, John Ferguson, Tony LaMantia, Rosa Lupo, Ian McLean, Jenna Petker, Sean Simpson, Art Sinclair, Joerg Stieber

FEATURE

PHOTOGRAPHY: Adamski Photography & Tina Geisel

The Apparent Failure of Polling in the U.S. Presidential Election

CONTRIBUTORS:

Sean Simpson

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Teri Egerdeen

PROFILE

GHD Celebrates 25 Years with the Chamber John Ferguson

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FEATURE

Recognizing these Chamber Members who are Record Reader Award Winners

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Connecting with Business in 2017 Rosa Lupo

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Ian McLean

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ADVOCACY

More Changes Expected Across the Provinces Art Sinclair

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PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

Family/Emergency Physicians Explore Kitchener-Waterloo Jenna Petker

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NEW MEMBERS

October 1, 2016 to November 30, 2016

January 20, 2017 for March-April 2017 March 17, 2017 for May-June 2017 July 14, 2017 for September-October 2017 September 15, 2017 for November-December 2017 SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

Darlene Jones djones@greaterkwchamber.com

NETWORKING

Fall Networking HI-LIGHTING MEMBERS

Hi-lighting New Members Who Joined in 2016

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio. PUBLICATIONS PERMIT:

#40026716

FOR PERMISSIONS AND REPRINT REQUESTS

Heather Hutchings - hhutchings@greaterkwchamber.com PRINTED IN CANADA BY:

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Explosive Housing Sales Leading Economic Growth

ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES:

SUBMISSION POLICY:

departments 4

Heather Hutchings DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

Joerg Stieber

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Art Sinclair EDITOR:

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PUBLICATION OF:

EVENTS

Mark Your Calendar MEMBER NOTABLES

Chamber Members Achieving Success POSTMASTER ADDRESS CHANGES

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SPONSORSHIP

Chamber Sponsors

C/O

ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREETE NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 519.576.5000

The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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message from the chair

Connecting with Business in 2017 BY ROSA LUPO

As I write this article, December 31st is just around the corner. We will soon be tipping our glasses of champagne and wishing each other “Happy New Year”. Before getting too ahead of myself, I do want to take a moment and reflect on 2016. It was another packed year full of events, networking and advocacy at The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber. The Chamber hosted more than 82 events which saw more than 7,000 people in attendance – events such as the Inspiring Women’s Event, the Business Excellence Awards Gala, the 100 Mile Feast and numerous Business After 5’s at a variety of different business locations. The Chamber also launched its mentorship program – CAMP – which assisted new and established businesses in various industries grow to the next level. This was a strenuous program which included group information sessions and oneon-one targeted mentorship from eight different mentors. As one of those mentors, I was impressed with the caliber, grit and enthusiasm of the mentees. Some of the new programming and initiatives of The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber in 2016 included co-ordination of the innovation corridor between KW and Toronto, airing of the CTV Made Right Here series featuring businesses in our community and the CEO roundtables, which provided CEOs the opportunity to connect with peers and influential speakers to assist in growing their businesses. I am looking forward to more wonderful innovative events and initiatives in 2017. 2017 will also bring new challenges with the introduction of light rail transit and all the possibilities it brings. Hopefully the trains are not too delayed. In addition to the internal new transit infrastructure, the Chamber is making connections with the Toronto Chamber in order to strengthen the Toronto-KW corridor connectivity and business community. The mayors of Kitchener, Waterloo and Toronto have been discussing the benefits of increased connectivity in infrastructure and among the business community along the corridor. I’m hopeful that in

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2017 we will make strides in furthering this connectivity and putting the Toronto/KW corridor on the global map. The strength of this corridor is more than just a numbers game. There are synergies and complimentary aspects of the businesses in these two communities which together will strengthen and enhance both communities. The Region of Waterloo will benefit from having a stronger connection to the financial industry largely headquartered in Toronto. Toronto will benefit from having a stronger connection to the entrepreneurial spirit which is vibrant in the Region of Waterloo. Both Toronto and the Region of Waterloo will benefit from the ease of moving human capital, ideas and resources between them. The Chambers of each of the Region of Waterloo and Toronto have committed to co-ordinating their efforts with local businesses and municipalities and members of parliament to facilitate this interconnectivity. In 2017 this will be a priority for the KW Chamber and I look forward to seeing how this changes the landscape of the Region of Waterloo. So although I am looking forward to 2017, I am equally content to sit back and reminisce a bit about the success we have enjoyed in 2016. Wishing you and yours a happy and safe holiday and a prosperous 2017.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Rosa Lupo CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Rosa Lupo is a partner at the global law firm of Gowling WLG (Canada) LLP who practices in the area of corporate commercial law. She is enthusiastic about helping businesses and owners grow, expand and thrive.


message from the president

Explosive Housing Sales Leading Economic Growth BY IAN MCLEAN A strong economic performance across Waterloo Region in 2016 is leading to high expectations for 2017 and beyond. Perhaps the most notable economic trend of 2016 was an explosive and record-breaking residential housing market. The 2016 Ontario Economic Update, compiled by the Ontario Chamber of Commerce (OCC) and the Credit Unions of Ontario (CUO), projected that MLS residential sales in Waterloo Region would increase by 6.7 percent in 2016 and 5.2 percent in 2017, a growth rate far above the provincial average. According to the Kitchener-Waterloo Association of Realtors (KWAR), by the end of November 2016 a total of 6,352 residential transactions had been completed for the year compared to 5,341 during the same period in 2015, an increase of nearly 19 percent. Total 2016 sales were higher by the end of November than any other entire year on record. The only period when sales exceeded 6,000 was 2007 at 6,148. The average price of all residential properties sold in November 2016 was $411,602, a fifteen percent increase from last year. Detached homes sold for an average price of $473,014, a 14 percent increase. James Craig, president of KWAR, noted in the Waterloo Region Record that housing sales are indicative of the strong regional economy, low unemployment and other local amenities. Local real estate investments remain relatively favourable to the Greater Toronto Area, where the average price for residential properties reached $776,684 in November. A major priority for local municipalities and the business sector moving forward into 2017 and beyond is to continue to attract passenger service at the Region of Waterloo International Airport. The low Canadian dollar was responsible for American Airlines service into Chicago being cancelled, even though it was highly utilized. The business community will continue to advocate for more service. Looking at the positive side, Howard Eng of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority spoke at a recent Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce event and noted that our local airport could benefit from the lack of future capacity at Pearson Airport in Mississauga. In order to compete for global talent and investment, the network of smaller, regional airports such as Waterloo Region, Hamilton and London need to collaborate to ensure that travelers locally and from around the globe can get to our region.

Mr. Eng noted that “to me, let’s get those tourists, let’s get the business, then let’s get the airlines here,” indicating there is a significant linkage between airport facilities and economic development. In terms of trade-enabling infrastructure for local business, we are and will be benefiting from expanded GO train service and the LRT once it becomes operational. The third link in the chain is increased air passenger service for business leaders connecting with potential global partners and investors travelling into the region. Prospects for new air services received a significant boost with the announcement in early November that the federal government will be revising the rules around foreign ownership of domestic carriers. Vancouver-based Canada Jetlines, which now expects to become Canada’s third national air-carrier in the new year, has provided a plan to fly from Breslau to major centres such as Vancouver, Winnipeg, Edmonton and Halifax once their new investment funding flows through. And Enerjet Airlines is actually exploring service in our region as well. After one year of operation the new and rebranded Waterloo Economic Development Corporation has made significant progress both in terms of attracting investment into the region and providing export and partnership opportunities abroad. Many delegations from around the world visited our community over the past year, particularly during the week of Oktoberfest, and we expect this forward momentum to continue into 2017 and beyond. The above trends and developments combined with global leading post-secondary institutions, incubator and start-up centres and an expanding manufacturing sector all make local prospects for 2017 look bright.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian McLean Ian is President and CEO of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2016

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advocacy

More Changes Expected Across the Provinces BY ART SINCLAIR In a column last year I wrote about the remarkable turnaround of the Ontario and Alberta economies from late 2014 into 2016. As 2016 closes, conditions have not dramatically changed. However in Canadian economics the emphasis is perpetually on “current” trends and forecasts. As we regularly witness, provincial economies are the victims or beneficiaries of rapid and unexpected changes, and the new year may provide indications that another transition is either in progress or approaching. This is an assessment that is not unusual in Canada. Provinces regularly move from the depths to the top of the economic growth roster. The issue is the length of time for a major cycle to commence and complete its maneuverings The Provincial Outlook report from RBC Economics last September notes that dependence on oil remains the distinguishing factor in Canada with oil-producing provinces struggling amid low revenues and belt-tightening in the private and in some cases public sectors. Oil consuming provinces like Ontario are witnessing growth opportunities as the result of a lower Canadian dollar, more competitively priced energy commodities, and lower interest rates. Furthermore, RBC predicts the economies of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland to further contract, expanding their provincial recessions which commenced in 2015. The Alberta deficit is close to $11 billion, the highest in provincial history. Saskatchewan will reach a twenty year high in unemployment, translating into a weak housing and construction market. The TD Economics Provincial Economic Forecast also published last September predicts that the regional divergence should start to diminish in 2017 as natural resource-based economies begin to recover – however at marginally low levels. The TD perspective is relatively more optimistic for Alberta and Saskatchewan, predicting that by 2018 the two western prairie provinces will sit “at the top of the leader board with growth at or above two percent,” while Ontario and BC will conversely fall short of that level.

The Atlantic provinces have not experienced the cyclical swings of most of Canada. Economic activity generally increased in 2105-16, but remains subdued and limited by an aging population. The Nova Scotia and PEI economies are stable, while Newfoundland and New Brunswick were proportionately more impacted by the oil market. The RBC report called prospects in New Brunswick as relatively dim, as government efforts to stimulate the economy through infrastructure spending have resulted in the start of very few major projects. My earlier column last year discussed the possibility of an oilsector bailout similar to General Motors or Chrysler that occurred eight years ago. A Saskatoon Star-Phoenix report from early December of 2016 indicated that Premier Brad Wall and the province of Saskatchewan is threatening legal action with Ottawa over national carbon pricing, following statements the province will not sign any national climate plan. Combined with major anticipated regulatory environmental change by the Trump administration in Washington – running in the opposite direction from Canada – we should expect environmental lawyers on both sides of the border to be submitting huge billable hours. Bailouts won’t be on any agenda. As Canadian economist John Kenneth Galbraith wrote many years ago, economics is extremely useful as a form of employment for economists. Predicting the future with a level of certainty, particularly after the US election, is not highly recommended.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art is Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

Both banks have observed a fading housing market in Ontario and British Columbia, with the larger impact on the west coast. As this pattern continues, both provinces will depend on other economic sectors to initiate and drive growth, particularly manufacturing and exports in Ontario. Uncertainty in B.C. over softwood lumber could become highly volatile and present on-going political challenges in Victoria and Ottawa. advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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perspective on health care

Family/Emergency Physicians Explore Kitchener-Waterloo BY JENNA PETKER This past November, local family physicians, emergency physicians, business leaders and community leaders joined volunteers of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce in hosting 18 family medicine residents and 5 emergency residents and their partners from across Ontario.

was taking a personal guided tour of the new Google space, where our guests were able to see inside and explore the innovative and creative workspace built in downtown Kitchener by local contractor S.G. Cunningham Construction Ltd .

Our 18th Annual Family/Emergency Medicine Resident Weekend was the first weekend in November. It is our largest recruitment initative to promote Kitchener-Waterloo as a great place to live and work. This weekend is planned and organized by our amazing volunteers of the Chamber Health Care Resources Council Family Physician Liaison Task Force chaired by Al Hayes of WalterFedy.

According to Chamber President & CEO, Ian McLean, this weekend has been crucial in residents’ decisions to establish their practices in the area. “New family doctors are sought after by communities across Ontario, Canada and the U.S. This weekend is an opportunity to highlight all that Waterloo Region offers as a place for them to practice, their partners to build a career and for them to raise a family. We are very fortunate to have wonderful sponsors, partners, and volunteers that showcase our community.”

During their three-day community visit, family medicine residents toured Grand River Hospital and the Medical Centre at The Boardwalk, while the emergency residents toured both St. Mary’s and Grand River Hospitals. Their partners toured our rural and urban communities including the St. Jacob’s Farmers Market and had the chance to explore employment opportunities. Over the weekend, the residents and their partners met some high profile business and community leaders and learned more about the Region’s diversity and its strong innovative and entrepreneurial spirit.

Chamber Health Care Resources Council initiatives are only made possible by the generous support and investment of our sponsors who are recognized on page 6. Along with these major corporate and community investors, the Chamber Health Council extends special thanks to this year’s resident weekend supporters who added the special touches that thoroughly impressed our visiting residents and their partners: Brentwood Livery, Communitech, Airways Transit, Google, Tomasz Adamski, Kennedy’s Catering and host, Delta Waterloo.

Residents and partners were guests of Communitech at a special luncheon at The Hub and enjoyed Kennedy’s famous Waterloo County menu while Communitech’s Iain Klugman spoke about our leading-edge, collaborative and innovative communities. Visitors also enjoyed virtual tours in The Hive. Another highlight

Members of the Health Council’s Family Physician Liaison Task Force are to be congratulated on another successful Family/ Emergency Medicine Resident Weekend. Your support and involvement and that of Chamber Board members and local business and community leaders over this important annual weekend made it especially warm and welcoming for our visiting residents and their partners. Working with community partners, the Chamber has helped to attract over 190 family physicians since 1998 with the number of people without a family doctor being cut in half.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jenna Petker Jenna is Physician Recruitment Lead for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

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perspective on health care

Throughout the action packed weekend, the residents and their partners enjoyed seeing our medical facilities, touring Communitech and Google as well as various other areas of our community.

Photography by Adamski Photography

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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new members

October 1, 2016 to November 30, 2016 3 Bay Auto Sales Ltd. Automobile Dealers Wally Pietraszko, Owner 330 Mill St Kitchener, ON N2M 3R7 Email: wally3bay@hotmail.com 3bayautosales.ca Phone: (519) 581-1239 Fax: (519) 489-1398 ACE Events Event Planning Linda Breault, Chief Events Officer 1730 Bishop St N, Unit 13 Cambridge, ON N1T 1N4 Email: lindabreault@aceevents.ca aceevents.ca Phone: (519) 841-8401 Bankspeak Inc Financing Consultants Rob Hall, President 697 Breakwater Cr Waterloo, ON N2K 4H8 Email: info@bankspeak.ca bankspeak.ca Phone: (226) 748-4091 Belmont Natural Health Centre Health & Wellness Tom Daly, Clinic Director 690 Belmont Ave W, Suite 201 Kitchener, ON N2M 1N6 Email: tomdaly@belmontnaturalhealth.com www.belmontnaturalhealth.com Phone: (519) 578-7489 Christine Burow Consulting Consultants Christine Burow, Owner Email: cburow@sympatico.ca christineburow.com Phone: (519) 501-7280 ECO COURIER Courier Service Nate Russell, President 480B Glenelm Cr Waterloo, ON N2L 5C8 Email: ecocourierkw@gmail.com ecocourierkw.com Phone: (226) 791-4257

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Foodlink Waterloo Region Agriculture & Food Anna Contini, Manager 7 Albert St E, St Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0 Email: info@foodlink.ca foodlink.ca Phone: (519) 513-8998 Hahn Plastics (North America) Ltd. Plastics Elizabeth Hueftlein, General Manager 180 Northfield Dr W, Unit 4 Waterloo, ON N2C 0C7 elizabeth.hueftlein@hahnplastics.com hahnplastics.ca Heart At Home Decorating Interior Design Services Sharon Christie, Owner 401 DeerRidge Dr, Kitchener, ON N2P 2S6 sharon@heartathomedecorating.com heartathomedecorating.com Phone: (519) 222-1547 iGotPro International Business Network Solutions Ltd Marketing Consultants Ash Nandrajog, CEO 905 Audrey Place, Kitchener, ON N2E 0B9 Email: ash@igotpro.com igotpro.com Phone: (519) 722-2897 International Home Interiors Limited Furniture Dealers Bernhard Just, Secretary/Treasurer 1373 Victoria St N Kitchener, ON N2B 3R6 Email: internationalhome@sympatico.ca internationalhomeinteriors.ca Phone: (519) 742-8501 Fax: (519) 742-8000 Jeff Gingerich-Century 21 Home Realty Inc. Brokerage Real Estate Jeff Gingerich, Sales Representative 4169 King St E Kitchener, ON N2P 2E8 Email: jeff.gingerich@century21.ca jeffgingerich.com Phone: (519) 505-4488

Jen Schrafft Coaching Coaching Jen Schrafft, Owner, Professional Coach Email: jen@jenschrafftcoaching.com jenschrafftcoaching.com Phone: (226) 972-4811 Joseph Schneider Haus Museums Sean Jasmins, Marketing & Partnerships Supervisor 466 Queen St S Kitchener, ON N2G 1W7 Email: sjasmins@regionofwaterloo.ca josephschneiderhaus.com Phone: (519) 742 7752 Kurtis Jewellers Jewellers Cindy Coombs, Manager 151 Frobisher Dr, Suite C212, Box 15 Waterloo, ON N2V 2C9 Email: cindy@kurtisjewellers.com kurtisjewellers.com Phone: (519) 747-4967 LegalShield Legal Services Robyn Ross, Independent Associate / robynaross@legalshieldassociate.com legalshield.com/hub/robynaross Phone: (519) 955-2757 Light-Core Digital Enterprises Inc. Business Consultants Sharon Gilmour-Glover, Chief Implementation Officer Email: sharon@light-core.com light-core.com Phone: (888) 690-9493 Lighting Research Marketing Consultants Gerardo Rios, Owner/President/CEO 434 Hazel St, Unit 5 Waterloo, ON N2L 3P8 Email: gerard.rios@lightingresearch.biz lightingresearch.biz Phone: (647) 545-0475


new members

October 1, 2016 to November 30, 2016 (continued on page 14) Limestone Counselling, Coaching & Consulting Counselling Leanna Callum, Founder/Director, Individual, Couple and Family Therapist 610 Lancaster St W, Kitchener, ON N2K 1M3 Email: lc@limestonecounselling.ca limestonecounselling.ca Phone: (519) 590-2220 Lyndon Fish Hatcheries Inc. Event Planning Marilyn Price, General Manager 1738 Queen St New Dundee, ON N0B 2E0 Email: sales@lyndonfishhatcheries.com lyndonfishhatcheries.com Phone: (519) 696-3076 Fax: (519) 696-3556 MPress Music Music Instruction Instrumental Nadia Mazzarolo, Owner 259 King St W, Suite 206, Kitchener, ON N2G 1B1 Email: nmazzarolostudio@gmail.com mpressmusic.ca Phone: (226) 929-7726 National Bank of Canada Banks Mark Giovannetti, Commercial Account Manager, SME Development 851 Fischer Hallman Rd Kitchener, ON N2M 5N8 Email: mark.giovannetti@nbc.ca nbc.ca Phone: (519) 744-8402 Fax: (519) 741-8041 Never Enough Thyme Inc. Caterers Shana Goodreau, Sales & Catering 83A Arthur St N Elmira, ON N3B 2M8 Email: neverenoughthyme@bellnet.ca neverenoughthyme.ca Phone: (519) 669-0374

Oak & Rumble Video Production Dave Hiff, President 305 King St W, Unit 604 Kitchener, ON N2G 1B9 Email: dave@oakandrumble.com oakandrumble.com Phone: (519) 716-9664 Parker Lawrence Concierge Concierge & Personal Assistant Services Michelle Parker, Partner 270 Shakespeare Dr Waterloo, ON N2L 2T6 Email: concierge@parkerlawrence.ca parkerlawrence.ca Phone: (226) 791-8944 POI Business Interiors Office Furniture & Equipment Anthony Goad, Regional Manager 180 Northfield Dr W, Unit 2Waterloo, ON N2V 1K4 Email: agoad@poi.ca poi.ca Phone: (519) 279-6858 Precision Kaster Auto Automobile Repairing & Service Mike Norris, President 466 Phillip St Waterloo, ON N2L 5J2 Email: mike@precisionkasterauto.com precisionkasterauto.com Phone: (519) 725-4951 Fax: (519) 883-7431 Read Jones Christoffersen Ltd. Engineers Tim Van Zwol, Regional Manager 22 Frederick St, Suite 1014, Kitchener, ON N2H 6M6 Email: kitchener@rjc.ca rjc.ca Phone: (519) 954-6392 Fax: (519) 744-5489 Royal Home Inspection Home Inspection Service Roy Gutermuth, Owner/Home Inspector 43 Windom Rd, Kitchener, ON N2A 2P3 Email: roy@royalinspection.ca royalinspection.ca Phone: (519) 893-8374

Sabrina Fitzgerald Honorary Members Sabrina Fitzgerald, c/o PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, 95 King St S, Suite 201 Waterloo, ON N2J 5A2 Email: sabrina.r.fitzgerald@pwc.com Phone: (519) 570-5758 Fax: (519) 570-5730 Sotheby's International Realty CanadaThe Ashley Group Real Estate Brokers & Agents Sarah Rioux, Sales Representative 125 Lakeshore Rd E, Suite 200 Oakville, ON L6J 1H3 Email: srioux@sothebysrealty.ca sothebysrealty.ca/en/ Phone: (519) 998-4295 Spa Dent Dental Equipment Christine Bell, General Manager 55 Northfield Dr, Suite 254 Waterloo, ON N2K 3T6 Email: info@spa-dent.com spa-dent.com Phone: (519) 725-4025 Fax: (519) 725-4024 The Arthritis Society Charitable & Community Organizations Robin McLean, Regional Development Manager 809 Victoria St N, Unit 7 Kitchener, ON N2B 3C3 Email: info@arthritis.ca arthritis.ca Phone: (519) 743-2820 Fax: (519) 743-4142 The Brand Architect Marketing Consultants William Wallace, Owner 64 Peppler St, Unit 1 Waterloo, ON N2J 4P7 Email: info@thebrandarchitect.ca thebrandarchitect.ca Phone: (519) 504-1720

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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networking

Fall Networking

GEORGIA CUNNINGHAM, IAN MCLEAN, SENIA SVORINIC SVORINIC AT THE 100 MILE FEAST

POINT OF VIEW LUNCHEON ON THE SOUTHERN ONTARIO REGIONAL AIRPORTS STRATEGY

THE ALWAYS FESTIVE BUSINESS AFTER 5 PLANNING COMMITTEE

100 MILE FEAST CHEFS PREPARING THE PLATES!

MICHELE BAUMGARTEN, SANDRA MCCAULEY, LESTER HOLLEY AND A SUNWING REPRESENTATIVE, PULLING THE WINNER’S NAME!!

AT THE

AND JOE

POINT OF VIEW SPEAKER HOWARD ENG, PRESIDENT & CEO OF THE GREATER TORONTO AIRPORTS AUTHORITY Photography by Adamski Photography and Tina Geisel

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BUSINESS EXPO TITLE SPONSOR BDC’S BOOTH

THE CULINARY TALENT PREPARING FOOD FOR THE GUESTS 100 MILE FEAST

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networking

IAN MCLEAN MODERATING THE LUNCHEON PANEL FEATURING CHRIS WOOD, HOWARD ENG AND TONY LAMANTIA

CHAMBER MEMBER KIMBOP PROVIDING DELICIOUS SAMPLES AT BUSINESS EXPO

DESSERT BEING PLATED FOR THE 100 MILE FEAST GUESTS

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ANDREW COPPOLINO TAKING SOME PHOTOS OF THE 100 MILE FEAST CHEFS! Photography by Adamski Photography and Tina Geisel

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advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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new members

October 1, 2016 to November 30, 2016 (continued from page 14) The Culinary Studio Restaurants Jody O'Malley, Owner 740 Belmont Ave W Kitchener, ON N2M 1P2 Email: info@theculinarystudio.ca theculinarystudio.ca Phone: (519) 496-5595

Tri-Beyond Senior Home Care Senior Citizen Services Jessica Eichel, Owner 61 Sweet William St Kitchener, ON N2E 4C5 Email: tri.beyondshc@gmail.com www.tri-beyond.com/ Phone: (519) 580-0612

The Kissner Group Manufacturers Kristie Kimmett, Category & Marketing Manager 32 Cherry Blossom Rd Cambridge, ON N3H 4R7 Email: kkimmett@sympatico.ca kissner.com Phone: (519) 279-4887

Upside Accounting Accounting & Bookkeeping Services Mike Widdis, Profit First Professional 10 Queen St W, Cambridge, ON N3C 1G1 Email: mike@upsideaccounting.ca upsideaccounting.ca Phone: (226) 214-3233

The Sutherland Group Business Consultants Steve Sutherland, Managing Partner 420 Hill St E Fergus, ON N1M 1H7 Email: info@thesutherlandgroup.ca thesutherlandgroup.ca Phone: (519) 820-9439 Tom Wilhelm Professional Corporation Accountants, CPA-CA Tom Wilhelm, Owner 30 Spetz St, Kitchener, ON N2H 1K1 Email: twilhelm@twcpa.ca twcpa.ca Phone: (519) 744-3586 Fax: (519) 744-3587

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Uptown Beauty Lounge Spas - Beauty & Health Marci Matejcek, Owner 4 King St S, Waterloo, ON N2J 1N8 Email: info@uptownbeautylounge.com uptownbeautylounge.com Phone: (519) 954-5274 Waterloo Region Museum Museums Sean Jasmins, Marketing & Partnerships Supervisor 10 Huron Rd Kitchener, ON N2P 2R7 Email: sjasmins@regionofwaterloo.ca waterlooregionmuseum.com Phone: (519) 748-1914

Wellington-Waterloo Community Futures Development Corporation Charitable & Community Organizations Jane Shaw, Business Coordinator 294 Mill St E, Unit 207 Elora, ON N0B 1S0 Email: jane@wwcfdc.com wwcfdc.com Phone: (519) 846-9839 Fax: (519) 846-2343 Wheeler Windows Inc. Windows & Doors Jeff Wheeler, Director Email: wheelerwindows@gmail.com wheelerwindows.com Phone: (519) 743-7906 Willow Brae Pallets Manufacturers Cheryl Weber, Owner 3 Bast Place, RR1 Waterloo, ON N2J 4G8 Email: info@willowbraepallets.com willowbraepallets.com Phone: (519) 664-3688 Fax: (519) 664-1689 XLNTEC Inc. Information Technology Xinhua (Frank) Ling, Founder & CEO Email: xinhua@xlntec.com www.xlntec.com Phone: (226) 988-9330 Your KW Host Division of Vieth & Company Inc. Sightseeing Guides & Tours Angela Vieth, Founder, Managing Director Email: info@yourKWhost.ca yourKWhost.ca Phone: (226) 476-6016


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BEA BE A gala gala.ca .ca PRESENTED BY:

• CENTRE IN THE SQUARE • In celebration of the Chamber’s 130th Anniversary, we are hosting the event at a new venue! The evening will feature an elegant standing dinner reception, followed by the awards presentation, a dessert reception and after party.


cover story

Chambers of Commerce Can Make Significant Contributions to Canada’s Future BY PERRIN BEATTY Less than six months ago, the Trudeau government celebrated the first anniversary of the election that brought them to office, and the polls confirm that this government continues to enjoy a deeper and more durable honeymoon than that of any other Canadian government of recent memory. One of the factors that has contributed to the success of Mr. Trudeau’s first year in power has been the so-called “bromance” between him and the immensely popular President Obama. Through this relationship, they’ve been able to focus on a handful of significant initiatives that strengthened the Canada-U.S. relationship, including measures on climate change, trade and border crossings. This has positioned Canada quite advantageously with the Democrats, who see Mr. Trudeau’s government as a model to follow for leftist politics. Unfortunately for Mr. Trudeau, it isn’t the Democrats that won. Mr. Trump’s election took everyone off guard, from the Canadian government to the business community. Already, this is substantially changing the landscape surrounding us. Donald Trump not only feels the United States shouldn’t step up its campaign against climate change, but denies that it is a problem at all. On trade, his mantra is “America First,” and he believes multilateral trade agreements are disadvantageous for the United States. His picks for Homeland Security and National Security advisors suggest a stricter border policy. So how does Canada position itself in all of this? It won’t be easy. Mr. Trudeau positions himself as a proponent of inclusive growth through open economic borders, but we need countries to be trading with – like our neighbour to the south. So there is cause for concern when we hear our most important trading partner, which consumes seventy percent of our exports, talk of eliminating the North American Free Trade Agreement, one of the most successful trade agreements anywhere in the world. If the United States decides to review their stake in NAFTA, Canada will have no choice but to be part of the process. Despite the fact that NAFTA has driven trade and investment among the

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three North American countries to new heights and has created important growth in each of them, many Americans have come to believe that it is not a benefit, but a threat. Mr. Trudeau, in partnership with the Canadian business community, will need to remind the new administration of why the world envies what we have built together. It will be necessary to point out that, if the United States is our most important trading partner, we are theirs as well. For instance, across the lake in Ohio, 308,000 jobs depend on Canada-U.S. trade and investment, for a total value of 33.9 billion dollars per year – and that’s just Ohio1. Even faced with that logic, it may well be that the U.S. administration will opt for a renegotiation rather than the abolition of the agreement. Whether we like it or not, Canada may soon find itself sitting down at the bargaining table. If that’s the case, then business needs to insist that it’s priorities are part of the process. Negotiations are not a one-way street and we should be developing the list of items that we want discussed, like new processes and new investment to make it easier for our citizens and our goods and services to cross the border, or the elimination of Buy America policies that shut Canadian companies out of procurement contracts at the state and municipal levels. Government should also be requesting an accelerated process to harmonize standards and greater respect for the rule of law when protectionist measures like the country of origin labeling regulations that have cost Canadian agrifood billions of dollars are repeatedly found to have violated US commitments. Opening NAFTA may not be all bad, however. The agreement is certainly due for a modernization, since it is already 22 years old. There are new economic realities like e-commerce and digital trade, or new parameters to intellectual property protection, which could be updated in a negotiation. Ultimately, though, the US election should also serve as a reminder to both business and government that Canada urgently needs to diversify its global markets. In this context, CETA, the comprehensive economic trade agreement with the European Union, is a vital strategic asset. And now that Mr. Trump has officially announced the death of the Trans-Pacific Partnership as


cover story

we know it, talks should be opened up with Canada’s Asia-Pacific partners to establish lucrative bilateral agreements. Japan is already an important client for many natural resource companies on this side of the Pacific. In fact, Canadians are fortunate to have such an immense resource wealth. There are few countries anywhere that don’t envy this vast resource inheritance, which Canadians have both the ability and the responsibility to bring to global markets in a conscientious way. A sustainable resource development strategy will also need to include infrastructure investments and a sustained improvement of the Canadian brand. Canada has the resources, tools and now the opportunity to play a more prominent role on the global economic stage. Although next year’s sesquicentennial will be a time to celebrate our achievements over our first century and a half, the work is just starting. We can look to the future with optimism, but good fortune is most often just the result of hard work. Chambers of commerce across the country are uniquely positioned to initiate the conversations, and eventually put in place the actions that we will need as we diversify our trade and strengthen our economy. By working together, chambers of commerce can contribute to build the next 150 years of Canadian business success.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Perrin Beatty The Honourable Perrin Beatty is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the 200,000-member Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Canada’s largest and most representative national business association. A former Member of Parliament, Perrin is from Fergus, Ontario.

1

Government of Canada International Trade – State Trade Fact Sheets http://can-am.gc.ca/business-affaires/fact_sheetsfiches_documentaires/oh.aspx?lang=eng

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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hi-lighting members

Hi-lighting New Members Who Joined in 2016 Sopas Kitchen Sopas Kitchen is a professional catering service specialized in authentic Spanish Cuisine. We thrive in serving our customers with quality, pride and excellence. For corporate and social events, contact us for a unique catering experience.“Fresh food with Spanish twist”

H2R Business Solutions Inc.

255 Highview Drive, Unit 3 Kitchener 519- 729-6604 sopaskitchen@hotmail.com www.sopaskitchen.com

H2R Business Solutions Inc.

From Hiring to Retiring – We’re your Human Resources Solution. With a proven track record providing HR leadership and implementation of best practices in human resource management, consider us for the following: HR Outsourcing, Recruitment, Harassment Investigations, Employee Engagement, HR Audits, Training, AODA, Employee Handbooks and Terminations.

Jill Zappitelli, CHRL, President 519-954-7222 (office) 519-500-7570 (cell) Jill@YourH2R.com www.yourH2R.com

VOR Physiotherapy

VOR Physiotherapy

We are a rehabilitation team of Physiotherapists, Massage Therapists, and Athletic Therapists, who specialize in the treatment of dizziness, vertigo, concussion, and jaw disorders. We strive to deliver personalized service in a very challenging area of rehabilitation.

Soul City Health and Wellness At Soul City Health and Wellness, we offer Massage Therapy, Cupping Massage, Reiki, Hot Stone Massage, Pilates, and Doula Services. We directly bill to insurance companies, appointment's can be booked online. All massage therapy services are provided by an RMT.

Descendants Beer & Beverage Co

Gaetanne Aggerholm 303 - 55 Erb Street East, Waterloo 519-208-0150 www.vorphysio.com

Soul City Health and Wellness 151 Frobisher Drive Building C-210 Waterloo 226-647-7685 info@soulcityhealthandwellness.ca www.soulcityhealthandwellness

Descendants Beer & Beverage Co

Descendants Beer & Beverage Co. is not your average craft brewery. With a European style bierhalle, eatery, full bar, retail store and event space there is always something fun and interesting going on. Nightly events such as Trivia, Live Comedy, Live Music and Buck a Shuck Oysters in the bierhalle. Tours available with booking. Contact info@descendantsbeer.com for information about KW’s coolest craft brewery!

Lee Brooks, BFA, PGDip Ed PR, Promotions & Events Mgr. 319 Victoria Street North Kitchener 226-241-3700 www.descendantsbeer.com

Steadfast Gas Services

Steadfast Gas Services

Steadfast Gas Services offers a range of services for both commercial and residential including heating and cooling, fireplaces, water heating and conditioning, gas lines, and indoor air quality. We pride ourselves on providing quality work at affordable prices.

597 Colby Drive,Unit #6, Waterloo 519-603-9916 info@steadfastgasservices.com www.steadfastgasservices.com

Limestone Counselling, Coaching & Consulting Personal and Workplace Solutions

Limestone Counselling, Coaching &Consulting

Limestone’s effective counselling and professional services are grounded in over 15 years of specialized experience in human services. Many Employee Benefit Programs cover the cost of our services. Call for an appointment. Phone inquiries are welcome.

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610 Lancaster Street West Kitchener 519-590-2220 lc@limestonecounselling.ca www.limestonecounselling.ca


hi-lighting members

Hi-lighting New Members Who Joined in 2016 Stewmen Inc Waterloo 905-904-0889 1-866 - STEWMEN kylstwrt@gmail.com www.stewmen.ca

Stewmen Inc Stewmen Inc is Canada's primer full-service cleaning company. Regular service, carpet cleaning windows etc. Everyone at Stewmen is process oriented, customer focused- we're growing rapidly on a strong base of customer service, quality and unfetted integrity. We want to be your cleaning service provider.

MAC Financial Services Inc.

MAC Financial Services Inc.

Shane Cartwright, FMA, CIM Wealth Management Advisor 490 Dutton Drive, Suite C3 Waterloo 519-725-2600, Ext. 285 scartwright@mac-ca.com

MAC Financial Services Inc. provides integrated wealth management services by working with accountants and portfolio managers to create comprehensive financial plans for our clients and quarterback the implementation to secure their financial future.

Fortis Analytics

Fortis Analytics

55 King St W, Suite 700 Kitchener 519-772-7730 marc_vincelli@fortisanalytics.com www.fortisanalytics.com

Fortis Analytics is a statistical consulting firm that helps leaders in the insurance and charitable health space achieve their business objectives through tried-and-true advanced analytical methods. We offer expertise in actuarial experience analytics, predictive analytics, and financial forecasting.

Upside Accounting

Upside Accounting

10 Queen Street West Cambridge 226-214-3233 Mike Widdis, CPB mike@upsideaccounting.ca http://upsideaccounting.ca

AMM Cameron Consulting

Analy tic s Cons ult ing. Act ionable I n s ig h t.

We believe that small businesses drastically change the world. They change the world by thinking creatively but based on real-time data and advice. Real-time data and advice are the core of UpSide.

AMM Cameron Consulting

Marcel Cameron President & CEO 226-647-6997 work 705-272-9376 mobile marcel.cameron@schooleymitchell.com http://schooleymitchell.com/mcameron

AMM Cameron Consulting doing business as Schooley Mitchell We ensure you are receiving superior telecommunications and credit card processing services at the best price. We are independent of all vendors and act only with your best interests in mind. A risk-free review will identify the challenges you face and provide practical, cost-savings solutions. If we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find savings for you, there is no fee for our services.

International Home Interiors

International Home Interiors

1373 Victoria St N Kitchener 519- 742-8501 internationalhome@sympatico.ca www.internationalhomeinteriors.ca

Home of the Stressless Chair . . . the only chair endorsed by the American Chiropractors Association. For over 44 years International Home Interiors has been offering beautiful name brand furniture from around the world. From Italy to Brazil . . . searching the world for you.

Realty Executives Complete Properties Inc.,Brokerage

Realty Executives Complete Properties Inc., Brokerage

421 Greenbrook Drive Kitchener ON N2M 4K1 Office: 226-686-0400 www.completeproperties.ca

FORTIS ANALYTICS

Whether you are buying or selling a home, looking for investment properties or commercial space our Executives can help you. Our Executives are not just agents, we are local experts offering industry leading technology to support the tech savvy buyers and sellers. We are an international company with over 50 years experience. Give us a call for all your real estate needs.

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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events

Mark Your Calendar January 19, 2017

February 2017

MNP Networking Breakfast presents Annual Speed Networking 7:15-9:00am at the Inn of Waterloo Members: $30 Future Member: $35 Maximize your networking opportunities with other professionals a few minutes at a time! Meet dozens of local business professionals in a single event and leave with connections that you never knew were out there!

Home Hardware Business After 5 5:00-7:00pm Location to be announced Members: Complimentary Future Members: $10 Come out to this casual B2B networking event with friendly faces and easy conversation.

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January 26, 2017 G

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Libro Chamber Young Professionals present a Mentor Mix & Mingle

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5:30-7:30pm at Maxwell’s Concerts & Events Members: $5 Future Member: $10 Paul Maxwell, Founder and President of Maxwell’s Concerts & Events will candidly share his experience as a young professional growing his business and making valuable connections. Following this, attendees will mix & mingle with other young professionals and have the opportunity to connect with seasoned local mentors and entrepreneurs from various industries in a relaxed and informal setting. Title Sponsor: Event Sponsor:

Insurance is the last thing business owners think of when times are good. But, when there’s a claim it’s their first call. You should have the best coverage possible. Get an expert opinion on your commercial insurance needs.

insure@erb-erb.com ‡1.800.265.2634 ‡www.erb-erb.com 20

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events

March 1, 2017

March 3, 2017

Business Excellence Awards Gala

Annual International Women’s Day Breakfast

6:00-10:00pm at Centre In The Square Member Ticket: $175 Member Block of 8 Tickets (seated together in theatre): $1350 Future Member: $200 Future Member Block of 8 Tickets (seated together in theatre): $1600

7:00-9:00am at Crowne Plaza Kitchener-Waterloo Member Ticket: $30 Member Table (10): $275 Future Member Ticket: $35 Future Member Table (10): $330

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The region’s premier networking Gala event with over 900 attendees presents 12 awards to Chamber members who have made exceptional contributions through their involvement and leadership for the betterment of our community.

The Annual International Women’s Day Breakfast is an event held in partnership with between the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce and respected community leader Karen Redman. This breakfast aims to celebrate all that women have done in our community and around the world.

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advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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RBC Dominion Securities Inc.

RBC Dominion Securities Waterloo is hiring new Investment Advisors Seminars will be held in our boardroom over the next few months for those interested in more details. RBC Dominion Securities in Waterloo is seeking motivated individuals for a fulfilling career in the wealth management industry. If you’re looking for the support you need to build a successful career, RBC Dominion Securities offers several advantages:

O O O O

Strength and stability Independence with support Powerful tools and technology Top caliber training

With an independent focus that encourages and rewards initiative, industry-leading investment and wealth

management support, and the backing of Canada’s largest financial institution, RBC Dominion Securities is the premier choice for investment professionals who want to build a successful wealth management practice.

For more details and to RSVP, please contact Aurelia at 519-747-6956 or aurelia.mercu@rbc.com. We value diversity in the workplace, are committed to Employment Equity and will provide reasonable workplace accommodation to applicants with disabilities. RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. RBC Dominion Securities Inc. is a member company of RBC Wealth Management, a business segment of Royal Bank of Canada. ®Registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. ©2016 RBC Dominion Securities Inc. All rights reserved. 16_90561_007

at matterrs s

Protect your buildings, landscaping, dscaping, staff and visitors vis over-salting. Being Smart About Salt helps you remove ve the risk of icy areas and use salt wisely without compromising mpromising public safety sa . Become Smart About Saltt certified and make sure l contractor is too.

www.curbthesalt.ca/business www.curbthe salt.ca/busine ss the Smart About Salt Council.

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feature

Manufacturing in 2017 and Beyond BY JOERG STIEBER I believe there is a good chance that manufacturing will have a renaissance in North America over the next 8 – 10 years. The labour cost advantage of China and other industrialized Asian countries over the US and Canada has been steadily declining and the gap will likely completely close before 2020. We are already seeing a trend to “re-shore” many manufactured components because the inflexibility of off-shore supply chains and sometimes “quality creep” drive up cost that partially offsets a diminishing price advantage. The question is, will we be able to take advantage of this opportunity? Most of all, we need a well educated and skilled workforce which is large enough to fill the available jobs. The problem of skills shortages has haunted manufacturers in Canada and the US for at least thirty years. Although we are better off in Ontario, and the Waterloo Region in particular, than many areas in the US, it is still difficult to find good people. We need to take every opportunity to get the message out to students, parents, teachers and guidance councillors that there are good jobs with a future in manufacturing. We also need good transportation infrastructure, a regulatory system free of unnecessary bureaucratic barriers and reliable electric power at competitive prices. According to the 2016 annual report of the Ontario Auditor General, Hydro One is getting less reliable but costs more. We all know how the cost of electricity has escalated in recent years. If we don’t get a grip on these problems, we will miss out on the opportunity to bring manufacturing back to Ontario. Let’s not forget, manufacturing is one of the main engines of creating growth and wealth in an economy. The US economy is currently firing on all cylinders with the unemployment rate down to 4.6%* which must be one of the lowest among the G7 countries. This will clear the way for the long expected 25 bp interest hike by the Fed with the resulting support for the US dollar. Obviously, a strong USD is generally good news for Canadian manufacturers exporting to the US. However, it would be wrong to fall into the trap to rely solely on the exchange rate for competitiveness. A lot of manufacturers had to learn this the hard way in 2003 – 2007 when the CAD went to par with the USD and stayed there for six years. At Ontario Drive & Gear it has been our strategy not to rely on a low CAD but to invest the exchange rate windfall in leading edge manufacturing technology to improve productivity.

The biggest factor of uncertainty in the US is President-elect Trump. During election night it was interesting to see market futures nose-diving as a Trump win looked more and more likely, only to rebound when he gave his acceptance speech. Depending on which of the “two Trumps” will eventually be the president, things could be good or bad. Lowering taxes, particularly business taxes, increasing spending on infrastructure and reducing/streamlining regulations will boost the US economy and create more opportunities for Canadian exporters. It will also add to the 20 trillion debt mountain of the US federal government, but that will be a problem down the road. However, Trump’s protectionist instincts are worrisome. A trade war with China and/or Mexico would cause serious disruptions in supply chains and could lead to a major recession. Where it gets really scary is NAFTA. Although I believe that at least the Canada/US part is fine because there are just too many jobs depending on it on both sides of the border, the uncertainty will be very damaging to the economies of all three players. With Trump stopping all Obama climate initiatives and pulling out of the Paris accord, I believe our federal and provincial governments need to re-think their carbon tax initiatives. From a climate perspective, if the US does not play along, whatever Canada does in this area will have very little effect. However, it could have a huge economic impact on Canadian business if we price ourselves out of the market by going it alone. * Source: The Economist

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joerg Stieber Joerg Stieber took over the management of Ontario Drive and Gear as President & CEO in 1985. Under his leadership the company experienced strong growth based on technical excellence. In 2010, Joerg decided to step back from the operational side of the business into his present role as Chairman of the Board.

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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feature

Meet the 2016-2017 Board of Directors

SEATED ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: KELLY MCMANUS, RICK FILSINGER, SABRINA FITZGERALD, ROSA LUPO, RENATA RUSINIAK, CAMERON KOZLOWSKI, NEIL HENDERSON TOP ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: IAN MCLEAN, RENE GATIEN, JEFF MACINTYRE, ALLISON BOURKE, KATHRYN ALLAMBY, TED MCKECHNIE, JAN VARNER, THOMAS MANUEL, MARK CHRISTENSEN, PATRICK KLANN. MISSING: ADAM SMITH

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Post your jobs today! (519) 824-4120 x52323


feature

Waterloo EDC – Inventing the Future BY TONY LAMANTIA The last year has been incredibly active at Waterloo EDC, the newly formed Investment Promotional Agency for Waterloo Region. Since opening our doors a year ago, the team and I have been squarely focused on attracting new companies and accelerating the business momentum already well-established in the region. As the first point of contact for companies of all sectors looking to locate, relocate or expand in Waterloo Region, one of the major goals for 2016 was hiring a high performance team and I am excited to announce that the organization is now fully staffed. This very experienced team brings a wealth of industry acumen in auto, tech, manufacturing, institutional and consumer sectors and I am confident we will be able to put and keep Waterloo Region on the global map for innovation hot spots. Waterloo Region is quickly establishing itself as the global epicentre for next generation automotive technology, with more than 50 local organizations focusing on connected and autonomous vehicles, such as the GM Innovation Lab at Communitech. In September 2016, we co-hosted the inaugural AutoTech Symposium which connected new and existing Canadian automotive technology companies with automotive decisionmakers in the area of autonomous vehicle technology, software, occupant and vehicle safety and “greening”. Just recently, the Ontario government was in town to announce the launch of the first automated vehicle pilot project in Canada – in partnership with the WatCAR Project at the University of Waterloo’s Centre for Automotive Research, Erwin Hymer Group and BlackBerry QNX – which will bring driverless vehicles to Ontario roads. In line with our key operational objectives, the team closed four new investments in 2016: ETAS Embedded Systems Canada (a Bosch subsidiary), NCC Group, Highview Residences and Hahn Plastics. There has also been a steady flow of traffic from international businesses, government delegations and key investment intermediaries. Within the last year, the team led foreign investment and growth focused missions to California, Chicago, Germany and Japan – all key areas for growth in Waterloo Region’s core sectors of Information and Communication Technology, Advanced Manufacturing/Automotive, Food Processing and Financial Services. Working with key stakeholders and through extensive research, we recently achieved another major milestone with the launch of our new, internationally-oriented brand – Waterloo EDC. Through the research process, it became clear the name “Waterloo” resonated strongly with the international business community and has positive equity that can be leveraged. This name is our competitive advantage and using it makes good business sense. The new brand comes with a new tagline: “Waterloo EDC – inventing the future” which emphasizes action, talent, innovation

and disruption – all of which is clearly demonstrated by the world leading institutions and companies in our community, such as the Institute for Quantum Computing, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, the Center for International Governance Innovation, the Accelerator Centre, Communitech, Thalmic Labs, Miovision, Clearpath Robotics and Aeryon Labs, just to name a few. In addition to ramping up operations and establishing a corporate vision that is locally rooted, internationally competitive and globally renowned, Waterloo EDC has been very active in the community and continues to support local company expansions, new companies landing in the region as well as participating in a number of community events, such as co-hosting the aforementioned AutoTech Symposium, sponsoring the Waterloo Innovation Summit, hosting a “Build Your Future” event focused on supporting local businesses and introducing our new organization during our first Public Information Meeting. Looking ahead to 2017, there is a healthy pipeline of high confidence deals with nearly 30 qualified investment opportunities in various stages of the sales cycle. Internationally, we will be leading investment missions to California, Northeast US and Europe. Locally, we will continue to focus on business expansion and retention alongside our Economic Development Office (EDO) partners, as well as greater support on development of the Region of Waterloo International Airport and the area Township’s economic initiatives. Support and advocacy for continued infrastructure investment is key to the Region’s future economic and social vibrancy. Waterloo Region truly is inventing the future and the team at Waterloo EDC is excited about shaping this journey. Let’s get to work! ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tony LaMantia Tony is President and CEO of Waterloo EDC. His career spans more than 25 years of experience in large public sector organizations as well as private sector growth-oriented companies. Previously, LaMantia has worked for the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure. Tony helped lead the Ministry in both attracting investment to the Province and working with industry and regional stakeholders. LaMantia's private sector repertoire includes executive-level roles with innovative and entrepreneurial companies in the technology and mining sectors. advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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The Apparent Failure of Polling in the U.S. Presidential Election BY SEAN SIMPSON This looks bad. Really bad. On behalf of Ipsos and nearly the entire North American polling industry, I’d like to offer a “mea culpa” for incorrectly predicting, with some degree of certainty, the election of Hillary Clinton as the next President of the United States. On the surface, this kind of miss has not been seen since the infancy of the polling industry in the United States, when in 1936 the Literary Digest produced polling which predicted a landslide victory for Republican Alf Langdon (who?) over Democrat Franklin Roosevelt. Twelve years later, in 1948, Gallup and others had predicted the election of Republican Thomas Dewey over Harry Truman. Oops. The industry has had nearly seven decades to study the science of polling since these failures. How could the industry be so collectively wrong again, now in 2016?

How could the industry be so collectively wrong again, now in 2016? The trouble with being a pollster is that you have limited opportunity to compare polling estimates against an actual result, and to see whether what the industry or an individual firm is doing is actually correct. Each national election presents a chance to compare our prediction against an outcome, to learn from both our successes and failures, and to refine our techniques in the future. In the spirit of the scientific method, following each election, Ipsos test various hypotheses that could be a potential source for error, and those that we can’t disprove are investigated further. First, we need to understand the degree of the polling miss. Every major pollster and news outlet, save one, predicted a Clinton victory, with the average margin being a three-to-fourpoint lead for the Democrat in the national popular vote. Ipsos’ States of the Nation polling for Reuters had a three-point Clinton lead. (The poll that predicted a Trump victory had a three-point lead for the Republican). While counting is, remarkably, still ongoing, Clinton at present has a two-point lead in the popular vote, making Ipsos’ prediction, and the industry’s, quite precise on a national basis and well within the claimed accuracy of the polls. In fact, the national popular vote estimates of most major polling

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firms in the industry were more precise in 2016 than they were in the 2012 election. But the U.S. President is not elected based on national popular vote; rather, it is the performance of the candidates in a handful of key swing states that determines the outcome of the election. It is here that polling failed, and it is here that the majority of future analysis will take place. ■

In Florida (29 Electoral College votes), Ipsos had a 1-point Clinton lead (too close to call); Trump won by 1.2 points, or roughly 113K votes.

In Michigan (16 Electoral College votes), Ipsos had a 1-point Clinton lead (too close to call); Trump won by 0.3 points, or roughly 11K votes.

In Pennsylvania (20 Electoral College votes), Ipsos had a 3-point Clinton lead; Trump won by 0.7 points, or roughly 47K votes.

In Wisconsin (10 Electoral College votes), Ipsos had a 6-point lead for Clinton; Trump won by 0.8 points, or roughly 22K votes.

In Ohio (18 Electoral College votes), Ipsos had a 1-point lead for Clinton (too close to call); Trump won by 8.1 points, or roughly 450K votes.

In short, Ipsos polling was quite precise in both Florida and Michigan, could have been better in Pennsylvania, but was wildly off the mark in Wisconsin and Ohio. While the Electoral College outcome makes the election result look like a blowout in Trump’s favour, the election was in reality extremely close. The total winning vote margin across Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania combined will likely be no more than 80,000 votes across three states with a cumulative population of nearly 28 million Americans. In other words, if more than 80,000 Democrats had shown up to vote across these three states, the polling all of a sudden looks much more accurate, President-Elect Clinton would be calming the nerves of Canadians, and you wouldn’t be reading this article. In kicking the tires of our methodology, we’ve already eliminated two explanations for the failure to predict the Trump victory in


feature

these key swing states. Many were quick to point to a low turnout for this election, however these conclusions were made before many of the votes were counted. It appears that overall voter turnout is similar in 2016 as it was in 2012. Hypothesis #1 rejected.

There has also been speculation about "Shy Trumpers" There has also been speculation about “Shy Trumpers” – that people were embarrassed or ashamed to tell pollsters that they were voting for Trump. Why, then, would Ipsos have accurately captured the Trump vote in most states, but not in Ohio or Wisconsin? Were “Shy Trumpers” only found in these states? Neither Ipsos, nor independent investigations of individual polling or metadata, has found any evidence of this dynamic. Hypothesis #2 rejected. Ipsos believes that the error was not in sampling, either through coverage or response bias. Rather, we believe that the failure of polling in some states was due to differential turnout, and failing to predict who would show up and vote. Ipsos’ turnout model did not sufficiently account for the lower Democratic turnout in key swing states, especially those in the rustbelt and Midwest. It’s not that the sampling techniques are incorrect, it’s that the models used to predict turnout are incorrect. A key lesson learned is that in a disruptive election, the past is not prologue. Simply put, we cannot rely on our tried and tested tools, like turnout models and assumptions about who is going to vote. We need to continuously update, revise and refine our turnout

models to try and better translate vote choice into voting behaviour, accounting for the uniqueness of each election cycle. Perhaps the favourability of a candidate (or lack thereof) should be incorporated into the model, or perhaps the degree to which a respondent is angry is a predictor of whether or not they’ll vote. Or it could be that the current inputs into the turnout model are correct, and that it’s the mathematical formula that needs adjusting. These are all possibilities that we will be exploring.

...poll precision and accurate election prediction are not always bedfellows. Finally, it is worth reiterating that poll precision and accurate election prediction are not always bedfellows. While polls were quite precise this time, they were wrong. Polls in 2012 were less precise, but right.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sean Simpson Sean Simpson is Vice President of Ipsos Public Affairs in Canada, and leads its Public-Opinion Polling specialization.

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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profile

GHD Celebrates 25 Years with the Chamber BY JOHN FERGUSON, P.ENG, MBA Established in 1928, GHD is privately owned by our people and operates across five continents— Asia, Australia, Europe, and North and South America—and the Pacific Region providing engineering, environmental, and construction services to private and public sector clients. Globally, we employ 8,500 people in 200 offices and have delivered projects in more than 90 countries. In North America, our resources include 4,000 people in more than 130 locations. Our business model is to work internationally and deliver locally. Put simply, we work where our clients work. The business is aligned on five key market sectors that include Water, Energy & Resources, Environment, Property & Buildings, and Transportation. Our interdisciplinary services have evolved and grown through the broad range of needs that have been

The cornerstone of our business is our client-service-led culture. identified by our clients. We provide a comprehensive range of services at every stage of the project life cycle to help our clients investigate, plan, develop, design, build, maintain, and improve assets. In Waterloo Region, GHD's roots were born out of the 2014 merger between GHD and Conestoga-Rovers & Associates (CRA) which was founded locally in 1976 and grew to 3,000 people in 100 offices across North America prior to the merger. GHD's Canadian head office remains in Waterloo, employing 500 people in the Region. The cornerstone of our business is our client-service-led culture. We understand the markets in which our clients operate, and we recognize their business challenges and project drivers. We are connected to our clients’ businesses, responsive to their needs, and insightful about their challenges. At GHD, the empowerment and growth of our people across a connected global network is key to delivering client service excellence – through a focus on safety, leadership, and development, and an inclusive culture. GHD has been a proud member of the Chamber since 1991. 2016 marked our 25th anniversary with the Chamber and the year we

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became a Chamber Chair’s Circle sponsor. One of the key benefits the Chamber provides to GHD is connection to other businesses in the community. Getting to participate with our neighbours and building regional networks helps GHD and its employees to thrive in the community.

We recognize that contributing to the communities in which we operate is key to our long term sustainability. We recognize that contributing to the communities in which we operate is key to our long term sustainability. More importantly, it demonstrates the beating heart of GHD. In this regard, we are extremely proud of our people’s involvement in various activities that are making a real difference to those in need through our 'GHD in the Community' program. For instance, continuing an annual tradition, our Waterloo offices worked together this past October to raise funds and food donations for the local Food Bank. People participated in activities such as a road hockey game, jousting duels, a barbeque, raffle, and silent auction, which helped GHD meet its goal of raising more than $25,000 this year. Over 100 people also volunteered their time at the St. John's Soup Kitchen, preparing and serving meals to the community.

HFH helps break the cycle of poverty in our communities by providing affordable homes. Our Waterloo offices also participate in an annual Habitat for Humanity (HFH) team build. HFH helps break the cycle of poverty in our communities by providing affordable homes. GHD’s team participate by donning their hard-hats and safety shoes and spending the day at the build sites hammering, sawing, and lending a hand wherever it was needed.


profile

GHDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s objective is to be a valued business partner for our clients over the long term, offering the right combination of skills, whether for developing new projects or sustaining value improvement of existing asset portfolios. Our balanced global presence is an advantage in serving large corporate clients who are active across multiple geographic regions. To realize the benefits of a global structure requires connecting people across different disciplines and locations to offer truly responsive client service. Our service model provides a framework for active collaboration and leadership that is aligned with our strategy to respond to the demands of water, energy, and urbanization. This framework provides the basis for contemporary thinking and implementation of innovative practices, leading technologies, and active risk management. The past year has seen GHD make significant progress towards our Strategy to 2020 objectives, and a single brand renowned for client service and a culture of safety. It has also validated much of the rationale underpinning our strategy, which increasingly

differentiates us and corroborates the benefit of running our own race rather than following others. Our future is clearly and unambiguously built around using our leading technical skills to make our clients successful in their endeavours and to provide great service.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Ferguson, P.Eng, MBA John is a principle at GHD and is the Industrial Manufacturing Service Sector leader in North America.

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2017

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EADER A DR

RDS WA

RECO R

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Recognizing these Chamber Members who are Record Reader Award Winners

A Body In Motion Rehab A&W Able-One Systems Inc. Advanced Road Craft Adventure Guide AMJ Campbell Angie’s Kitchen Apollo Cinema At The Crossroads Family Restaurant Ltd. Awe Events Barber-Collins Security Services Ltd Belgian Nursery Bell ”Bingemans, Funworx, BigSplash” Block 3 Brewing Co. BMO Bank of Montreal Brentwood Livery Brodrecht’s Flooring Canada Brunswick Frederick Lanes Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory Canadian Clay and Glass Gallery Canadian Water Conditioning Inc. Carousel Clothing Caudle’s Catch Seafood Charcoal Steak House Chef D (Darryl Fletcher) City Cab Clique Organic Salons Cober Evolving Solutions Collins Formal Wear Concordia Club Conestoga Mall Costco Wholesale Craig Keller Crystal Clear Water Centres

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Culligan Water Conditioning of Kitchener Cynosure Jewelry Dan’s Discount Windows & Doors Delta Waterloo Designs By Amanda Dominion Lending Centres Premier Mortgages | Alison Lopes Drouillard Sambrook Kingston LLP Dutch Mill Flower Shop Eastforest Homes Envie Intimates Factory Flooring Carpet One Floor & Home Fairview Park Mall Feelings From The Heart (Pat) Fiddleheads Smoothie Bar Cafe Frid & Russell Co Limited Glenbriar Bottled Water Co. Ltd. Global Pet Foods Golf’s Steak House & Seafood Goliger’s Travel Plus Hacienda Sarria Hawksview Homes Heer’s Paint & DÈcor Heffner Lexus Toyota Highland Place Home Hardware Stores Limited Huether Hotel Innocente Brewing Company Innuendo Just Fix It K-W Counselling Services Inc Kitchener Coin Kitchener Rangers

Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery Kitchener-Waterloo Humane Society Kitchener-Waterloo Multicultural Centre Krown Little Mushroom Catering M&T Printing Group Mac’s Convenience Manulife Financial Maxwellís Concerts and Events Moose Winooski’s Mortgage InGenuity Inc Morty’s Pub Movati Athletic Waterloo My IT Guy Newtex Cleaners Northstar Travel Oktoberfest Orsan Air Service Oxford Learning Waterloo Paquette Travers and Deutschmann Pet Valu Petals ‘n Pots Pop-A-Lock Locksmith of Southwestern Ontario Princess Twin Cinema Rabideau Law Rabideau Law - Geoff Rabideau RBC Royal Bank Ren’s Pets Depot Rogers Saav Kitchens Scotiabank Sheridan Nurseries Limited Sherwood Staples Stemmler’s Meat & Cheese

Strassburger Windows & Doors Sun Life Financial Swanson’s Home Hardware Building Centre TD Canada Trust ATM Tepperman’s The Bauer Kitchen The Boardwalk The Coach House Therapeutic The Duke of Wellington The Home Depot The Literacy Group of Waterloo Region The Westhill The Working Centre THEMUSEUM Thrift on Kent Tim Hortons Tone-Gar Securities Trends For Men U-Save Wholesale Flooring Ultimate Vision Web & IT Solutions Value Village Verve Electric Inc. Vijay’s Indian Cuisine Walper Hotel Waterloo Garage Doors Waterloo Region Museum and Doon Heritage Village Waterloo Taxi Westmount Golf and Country Club Whistle Bear Golf Club Winexpert (Westmount) Wright Limousine Your Neighborhood Credit Union Zehrs Ziggy’s Cycle


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member notables

Member Notables James Craig elected KWAR President James Craig, a real estate sales representative with CBRE Limited, was recently elected to serve as president of the Kitchener-Waterloo Association of Realtors (KWAR). Joining Mr. Craig as officers of the Association are Charlotte Zawada of RE/MAX Twin City Realty as Past President, Tony Schmidt of Howie Schmidt Realty as 1st Vice President, Brian Santos of Peak Realty as 2nd Vice President, and Executive Officer Bill Duce. New to the board of directors this year is Nicole Pohl of RE/MAX Twin City Realty. Returning as directors are Jane Gardner of Royal Lepage Wolle Realty, Eric Klimstra of Royal Lepage Grand Valley Realty, Colleen Koehler of RE/MAX Twin City Realty, David McIntyre of McIntyre Real Estate Services Inc., and Ginger Whitney of Whitney & Company Realty Limited.

Stemmler’s Recognized for Growth Stemmler’s Meat & Cheese of Heidelberg recently made the Canadian Business and PROFIT 500 list as one of Canada’s fastest growing companies for the fourth straight year in 2016. The company was also featured in Canadian Business Executive Magazine’s prestigious Best of Canada Edition for 2016. Stemmler’s has completed over 30 years as a family business in the artisan meat manufacturing industry. In September of 2016, they officially opened a new processing plant on McMurray Road in Waterloo to meet the growing demand for their products.

Waterloo Region Home Builders’ Association – 70 Years of Service On November 3, 2016, the Waterloo Region Home Builders’ Association (WRHBA) held their 70th Anniversary Gala and SAM Awards of Distinction.

Waterloo Region Home Builders’ Association

This year’s event not only recognized and awarded the highest levels of achievement in the local residential development and construction industry, but also served to celebrate the Association’s 70th anniversary. A video was presented providing a decade retrospective back to the establishment of the WRHBA in 1946. Attendees saw both the history of the association along with world events that occurred in each time period. Congratulations to the WRHBA on this significant milestone and their on-going service to their membership and community.

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Helping Us Make Our Vision Possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

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text

CUSHMAN C USHMAN & WAKEFIELD. WAKEFIELD W AKEFIE ELD.

BUILT BU UILT LT TO T LEAD. LEAD.

The Power of Education BY JOAN FISK

CUSHMAN & WAKEFIELD IS A LEADER IN THE LOCAL & GLOBAL REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE, PUTTING THE CLIENT AT THE CENTRE OF EVERYTHING WE DO.

WE WE WE WE

NEGOTIATE. CREATE. REDEFINE. NAVIGATE.

FOR OUR CLIENTS. Michael H. Polzl President, Broker of Record Cushman & Wakefield Waterloo Region Ltd. 4295 King Street East, Suite 101 Kitchener, ON N2P 0C6 +1 519 585 2200 cushwakewr.com

advocate JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2016 2017

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January - February 2017 Advocate  
January - February 2017 Advocate