Page 1

advocate THE VOICE OF BUSINESS

SEPTEMBER | OCTOBER 2010

KW Oktoberfest – A community partnership The growth of St. Jacobs THEMUSEUM – A place for everyone Uptown Waterloo Jazz Festival delights record crowds


advocate VOICE OF BUSINESS SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

features 5 6

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

FEATURE

Administering vacations: requirements & policies Understanding Vacation Time & Pay Steven Van Alstine, CPM, CAE

EDITOR:

FEATURE

FEATURES EDITOR:

Aud events keep Kitchener front and centre

Art Sinclair

Heather Hutchings

LoriAnn Livingston

9

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION:

Cober Printing Limited

FEATURE

The growth of St. Jacobs

PHOTOGRAPHY:

Adamski Photography Cover photos courstesy of Waterloo Region Tourism Marketing Corporation

Marcus Shantz

14

FEATURE

THEMUSEUM – A place for everyone Museum Staff

16

KW Oktoberfest – A community partnership

26

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Patti Brooks, Dr. Barbara Carmichael, Mary D’Alton, Owen Lackenbauer, LoriAnn Livingston, Peter McFadden, Angela Olano, Marcus Shantz, Art Sinclair, Steven Van Alstine

FEATURE

Thanks Larry

CONTRIBUTORS:

Chamber Staff

23

ADVERTISING AND SALES:

David MacLellan - dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Mandy Chapman- mchapman@greaterkwchamber.com

COVER STORY

Owen Lackenbauer

20

Aubrey Walters

Julie Tedesco, Aubrey Walters

FEATURE

Uptown Waterloo Jazz Festival delights record crowds

ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES:

Patti Brooks

October 4 for November | December 2010 November 12 for January | February 2011

FEATURE

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

Developing a vacation policy

Kathryn McEwin kmcewin@greaterkwchamber.com

Steven Van Alstine, CPM, CAE

SUBMISSION POLICY:

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio.

departments 4

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

The power of laughter – and other lessions learned

13

Mary D'Alton

7

ADVOCACY

The business of attracting visitors Art Sinclair

8

12

22

WRIEN UPDATE

The unconventional tourist Peter McFadden

10

18

24

EVENTS

June 1 - July 31, 2010

PUBLICATIONS PERMIT:

Notice of Annual General Meeting

FOR PERMISSION AND REPRINT REQUESTS

EVENTS

27 30

#40026716

PRINTED IN CANADA BY:

Heather Hutchings - hhutchings@greaterkwchamber.com PUBLICATION OF:

Mark your calendar PROFILE

Chamber Star – Karl Allen-Muncey

COBER

Chamber Staff

POSTMASTER ADDRESS CHANGES:

SPONSOR PROFILE

Laurier School of Business & Economics Dr. Barbara Carmichael

Summer networking NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS

MEMBER NOTICE

MEMBER NOTABLES

Achieving Success Chamber Members SPONSORSHIP

Chamber Sponsors

PRINTING LIMITED

C/O

ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREET NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

3


a message from the chair

The power of laughter - and other lessons learned BY MARY D’ALTON Having the opportunity to be acting President and CEO as well as board Chair, during a time of great change at the Chamber, has been a double-edged sword. You know that change is inevitable, but you also soon realize you will not be able to accomplish what you had originally thought you would. So - my learnings from this year are: you are only as good as the people you work with (have believed this to be true in the hotel business for years , but clearly now I realize it is in every business). Lucky for us we have great volunteers and staff. Secondly, you may have an “A” plan but you had better have a “B’ plan in your pocket because change is certain and you need to be prepared. Thirdly, when things get tough, keep pushing through to the other side. Stopping in the middle and sitting there is not an option. My last learning is that even when things are tough, you can laugh together at the shear insanity of it all. My thanks to the dedicated people who work at the Chamber, new and not so new, to the numerous volunteers on the board and committees and the members who assist us financially through sponsorship, generous expertise and a myriad of kind ways - and of course our partner associations in the community. The Greater KW Chamber is living proof of small business in action. I want to share with all of you the hard work that has been going on behind the scenes these past months. We will go into the fall well organized with a new leader in place. The board is especially pleased that our membership survey is complete and we will be sharing the outcomes with all of you. More importantly we now have information directly from you to help the board and the staff and the committees to make better decisions about programming and priorities going forward. The Quarry branding project, first undertaken in 2005, has been dusted off and is being revitalized with updated information and feedback from members, staff and volunteers to take us into 2010/11 and beyond. The Chamber’s eNewsletters will have a new look and

4

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

approach this fall and our website is in the capable hands of the eSolutionsGroup as we prepare for the launch of a muchimproved website in January. All of this has been done with an aim to communicate more often, more easily and more effectively with all of you. And once again we benefit from the generosity of member organizations. In the end we have learned that the reason those “Berlin” business men originally got together in May 1886 is the same reason the Chamber still exists today; the need to meet and engage in lively debate, to ensure that information is shared and that small business voices are heard and that the community prospers. Our largest, generous members and our smallest newest members have different immediate needs but they are absolutely in agreement on wanting to help each other make this a healthy, prosperous community. We are a truly unique organization not just in terms of our diverse membership representing all business sectors but also our size (over 1700 member companies representing roughly 60,000 employees) and importantly our connection to our provincial and national associations – the Ontario and Canadian Chambers of Commerce. I finish my year urging you to get involved with a committee or to offer to assist at an event. The Chamber is a great training ground and offers numerous opportunities for you to expand your network. You will be challenged and you will learn a lot. Cheers and thanks. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mary D’Alton, CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mary D’Alton is Chair of the Chamber’s Board of Directors and President and Managing Director of the Waterloo Inn Conference Hotel.


feature

Administering vacations: requirements & policies BY STEVEN VAN ALSTINE, CPM, CAE

Understanding Vacation Time & Pay One of the biggest anxieties for organizations is dealing with annual vacations. While it may seem like a simple and straightforward aspect of the employment relationship, it can be quite complex. This is particularly true if your organization operates in more than one jurisdiction in Canada, as 14 different employment standards acts, with accompanying regulations, exist across the country: one for each of the 10 provinces and 3 territories and a federal act for those organizations that are federally legislated. Each of the 14 employment standards acts contains sections providing employees with vacation in the form of paid time away from work. This annual vacation is made up of two components: time and pay. However, how that time and pay is calculated and treated varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Essentially, employees earn vacation time and accrue vacation pay over a 12-month period, and then enjoy the earned vacation time and receive the accrued vacation pay during the next 12-month period, within the time frames outlined in the legislation. Following this process, employees only take vacation time and receive vacation pay after they are earned. When the above process is followed, the vacation pay is calculated on the actual vacationable earnings. Vacationable earnings include regular wages, work-related bonus payments and other types of earnings, depending on the jurisdiction in which the employee works. When employees take vacation time, they receive vacation pay instead of regular wages. In practice, however, organizations do not generally administer vacation time and vacation pay in this way. Many allow employees to take vacation time and receive vacation pay in the same 12-month period they are earned and accrued. Some also allow employees to carry over unused vacation; accrue vacation time and vacation pay as one component (such as one day per month of regular pay to a maximum of 10 days); or provide for more paid vacation time than required by legislation.

which employees earn and accrue their vacation entitlements (time and pay). Employees are allowed to take their vacation time during the same 12-month period as they earn it, and they are paid at their regular pay rate while on vacation. Theoretically, by the end of the year, the vacation time and pay have been earned and taken, and the vacation time and pay accumulators should be at zero. However, if the vacationable earnings in that jurisdiction include other types of earnings an employee has received during the year, the vacation pay received (paid at the employee’s regular pay rate) may not equal the total vacation pay owed to the employee. Therefore, a reconciliation of the vacation pay owed versus the amount the employee was paid (regular pay rate) when the vacation time was taken is required. Any outstanding balance must be paid to the employee. Depending on the jurisdiction, this balance must be paid within 4 to 12 months of the employee having earned it (in this case, 4 to 12 months after the end of the calendar year, December 31). Similarly, if all the vacation time was not taken, unused vacation time may be carried forward, but it must be taken within the legislated time frame applicable to the jurisdiction (4 to 12 months). Organizations may also choose to provide vacation time that is greater than required by legislation. In this case, an organizational policy must state how that excess vacation time will be handled.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Steven Van Alstine CPM, CAE Steven Van Alstine, is the Vice-President of Compliance Programs and Services for the Canadian Payroll Association (CPA).

For example, let’s consider the following scenario. An organization uses the calendar year as the 12-month period in

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

5


feature

Aud events keep Kitchener front and centre BY LORIANN LIVINGSTON When the Memorial Cup came to the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium Complex - affectionately known as The Aud - in 2008, it came with dollar signs. Ten million of them, at best guess. An estimated 3,000 hotel room nights were booked during the 10-day tournament, not to mention the spin-off benefits for local restaurants, stores and shops as thousands of hockey fans converged.

and into the United States, not to mention viewers on national television networks. And The Aud isn’t just about major sporting events. More than a dozen adult and minor hockey tournaments come to The Aud annually, attracting athletes and spectators to the restaurants and hotels in the area, while six to eight religious conventions annually attract more than 30,000 people to the area for several weekends throughout the year. Cheerleading is growing in popularity, and the Aud has hosted several cheerleading competitions that attract 2,500 to 3,000 athletes – often accompanied by their families - to stay for the weekend in Kitchener to compete in a provincial or national championship.

THE CROWD INSIDE THE AUD AT A KITCHENER RANGERS GAME.

The impact of an event such as the Mastercard Memorial Cup is not just economic. The city’s own hometown favourites, the Kitchener Rangers, played in the final match against the Spokane Chiefs to the cheers of hockey-wild local crowds. Hosting the championship was a huge boost to the city’s own spirit and created a memorable experience for visitors. As one of two remaining not-for-profit hockey teams in the Ontario Hockey League (OHL) – Peterborough being the other – the Rangers’ contribution to the city, and to its fans, fosters a unique and reciprocal relationship with the community. Events such as HomeSense Skate Canada International 2009, the World Junior Figure Skating Championship and the Scott Tournament of Hearts put The Aud – and the city of Kitchener – on display for spectators and visitors from across the country,

6

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Whether it’s premier sporting events or leading entertainers, Kitchener is more and more becoming a destination that counts for people outside the region. For residents in the region, The Aud is not only a big-city venue offering entertainment at affordable prices, it offers a baseball field featuring inter-county baseball games, a skate park and hockey arenas – it is a hub in the community simply because it is owned by the community.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

LoriAnn Livingston LoriAnn Livingston is currently employed by the City of Kitchener in the Marketing and Communications Department as a Communications and Marketing Associate.


advocacy

The business of attracting visitors BY ART SINCLAIR The Region of Waterloo has long been recognized as a centre for entrepreneurship and generally a great location for business. From J.M. Schneider to many of the world’s leading technology companies currently based in our community, local entrepreneurs have built an enviable reputation around visioning, assuming risk, and mostly hard work. Every year –and the November 9 event is rapidly approaching – The Waterloo Region Entrepreneur Hall of Fame Gala recognizes our bold and resilient business community. Leaders such as Moses Springer, Oscar Kuntz, Carl Dare, Joseph Seagram and A.R. Kaufman have all been inducted as significant contributors to a centre of commerce that is the envy of communities across Canada. And certainly the ideals and principles of those leaders are evident across the businesses and institutions that compose our tourism and cultural sector. This month we have assembled a great collection of articles from individuals who are focused on attracting visitors to Waterloo Region. As you will note, there are some tremendous stories about events such as Oktoberfest and attractions such as St. Jacobs that clearly encompass the same sense of entrepreneurialism that has defined us as businesses and a community. Over a decade ago, while working with the Government of Ontario, I attended a management retreat in St. Jacobs. The guest speaker at the meeting was Milo Shantz who, as you will read in a later article, is usually credited for developing the current tourist industry in the village. Mr. Shantz clearly impressed everyone at that meeting with his recollection of the vision he and many colleagues shared for the future of St. Jacobs, transforming it from a rural community with a very uncertain future into a thriving tourist attraction. And, as his son Marcus writes in his article this month, much of the success of St. Jacobs over the years can be attributed to a remarkable sense of cooperation and collaboration between many partners, including business and government.

Oktoberfest. Owen Lackenbauer, a former Chair of the Kitchener Chamber of Commerce, documents the evolution from a four day event with 2500 revelers to the current $21 million economic generator where 600,000 people participate over ten days. As Mr. Lackenbauer notes, the idea of a broad-based Oktoberfest event originated with the Kitchener Chamber of Commerce who ultimately established connections with local German-Canadian and service clubs to build the nation’s largest community festival. Along the way, individual businesses and other organizations have given tirelessly of their resources to make Oktoberfest a truly unique experience for visitors and local residents alike. Contrasting against the distinctly rural environment of St. Jacobs is an article this month on THEMUSEUM, an institution providing a major contribution to the on-going revitalization of downtown Kitchener. While the local business community has built a global reputation for innovation, particularly in information technology, THEMUSEUM provides new and interactive exhibits that offer, as the article by THEMUSEUM staff points out, something for everyone. Marcus Shantz writes that while Waterloo Region does not have the striking natural features like beaches or mountains that many communities across Canada possess, we do have a unique asset – our people. There exists a distinct culture that produces farmers markets, relief sales and numerous other events that appear ordinary to us but can be special to visitors. We are the main attraction. No one has probably described the Waterloo Region any better.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art Sinclair is the Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

That sense of collaboration is very much evident in this edition’s feature article on the history of the Kitchener Waterloo

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

7


workforce development: WRIEN update

The unconventional tourist BY PETER MCFADDEN We usually think of tourists in terms of visitors who have travelled from another place, near or far, who arrive in our great region to experience its abundant amenities and/or to visit friends and relatives. This is a fairly accurate albeit limiting definition which captures leisure travel, group travel and travel for meetings and conferences. The most significant trip motivator within these travel categories is visiting friends and relatives. If we step back and take a demographic snap shot of the make up of our region and more particularly look at the inflow of people we can observe two distinct and significant groups within the community that are relatively new to it. These groups do not fit the traditional definition of a tourist but can very much act like a tourist and therefore have great potential to be viewed as tourists. Let’s expand our definition of tourist to anyone who may have limited knowledge about the community and its cultural, historical, recreational and entertainment amenities and think of those people that have been residents for less than five years. One such group would be post secondary students attending Conestoga College, the University of Waterloo or Wilfrid Laurier University from the community next door or from a world away. These students and their friends and relatives who would like to visit them can, with the right kind of ongoing promotion and engagement strategies, be converted into tourists. This group, however, is not the focus of this article. The focus is the immigrant population which now stands at 22.3% of the Region’s population with a significant part of it here for five years or less. They have come here to live, prosper and raise their families. Once this group of recent immigrants overcomes the challenges of getting settled and securing a job, they are eager to learn and experience as much as they can about their new Canadian homeland. They want to sample the culture, explore its heritage, and experience its many recreation and

8

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

entertainment opportunities that many of us tend often to take for granted. Embracing this significant tourism opportunity requires a different kind of outreach and engagement strategy that is not based on a quick hit but rather on a welcoming community approach over time. It requires an ongoing process of invitation whereby their curiosity is nurtured and their interests defined and connected to opportunities in the region. It takes a multi pronged approach that can involve marketing and communications initiatives, peer-to-peer activity, community consultations and innovative packaging. If they feel welcome they will be more receptive to learn about and explore their new home and invite friends and family to join them in the experience. Each of us can be an ambassador to those new to the community, particularly immigrants, and invite them to experience and enjoy the wonders that are Waterloo Region. If you are not sure about the wonders, what they are and where they are, there is an easy solution - just click on one or both of the websites listed and the world that is Waterloo Region is at your finger tips; for the immigrant web portal “Newcomers Waterloo Region” www.newwr.ca and for the Waterloo Regional Tourism Marketing Corporation website go to www.explorewaterlooregion.com.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Peter McFadden Peter McFadden is the Executive Director for WRIEN and former President and CEO of the Southern Ontario Tourism Organization.


feature

The growth of St. Jacobs BY MARCUS SHANTZ Milo Shantz is usually credited (or blamed, depending on one’s perspective) for developing the tourist industry in St. Jacobs. But Milo was quick to share responsibility with all kinds of people, and it actually wasn’t his idea in the first place. Visitors had “discovered” the local Old Order Mennonite community sometime in the 1970’s, and their curiosity quickly became intrusive. More modern Mennonite congregations, along with Mennonite Central Committee Ontario (MCC), became concerned that tourism could be a limited benefit for the community or visitor. Interestingly, these church leaders adopted an “if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em” attitude. They reasoned that they couldn’t stop visitors from coming, but they could try to shape tourism in a better way. To do that, they needed an entrepreneur who shared that goal. So MCC leaders began talking to Milo Shantz. Milo had spent most of his life in agri-business, was well known as a lay leader in the Mennonite church, and was looking for a new business challenge at mid life. He was just over 40 years old. His first business in St. Jacobs was the Stone Crock restaurant. The idea was to expose visitors to local Mennonite culture through an authentic Waterloo County dining experience. While the restaurant thrived, the problem was that visitors had more questions about Mennonites than most waitresses had the time or knowledge to answer. So the next project was “the Meetingplace” (now known as “The Mennonite Story”), a small museum and interpretive centre. It was completed in 1980 and substantially renovated in 2006. Milo led the project by assembling a team of Mennonite historians, writers and artists. Ongoing management was turned over to a group of volunteers at St. Jacobs Mennonite Church. The renovation of the Mill and other historic buildings for artisans, artists, and other retailers followed. The stockyards south of St. Jacobs had always had a small farmers’ market. Milo saw the potential to grow it by adding a Saturday market and a new building in 1986. Other projects followed, and other entrepreneurs were drawn to St. Jacobs. Tourism in St. Jacobs began with Mennonites, but it now reflects all of Waterloo Region’s many traditions. Our farmers’ market vendors represent the full spectrum of world culture, and the

oldest tourism-related retailer in St. Jacobs is “A Touch of Scotland”. This diversity enables us to offer a richer experience to visitors, and is an accurate mirror of who we are today. One thing to learn from all this is that tourism in St. Jacobs grew from many people. Milo Shantz may have driven the vision and investment, but collaboration with hundreds of partners was central to realizing the vision. You can’t have a successful farmers’ market without dozens of quality vendors. You won’t have an authentic cultural museum if you’re not working closely with the community it represents. At times, the growth of tourism in St. Jacobs produced conflict (primarily over parking and visitor traffic), and these issues were also resolved through community processes led by the Township of Woolwich. Today we continue that collaboration. We promote local businesses through a multi-stakeholder marketing partnership and work on local festivals and events. The most satisfying thing about being involved in St. Jacobs today is working with hundreds of small businesses – artisans, market vendors, farm produce stands, bed & breakfasts – who make our area special. In Waterloo Region, we have countryside and cities have interesting points. However we don’t have striking natural features like beaches, mountains or waterfalls, and our urban environment is not really unique when compared to major cities. But we do have people: a distinct culture that has produced farmers’ markets, relief sales, Oktoberfest, syrup festivals and dozens of other events. Our people have conserved farmland and gently shaped our rural landscape into one of the most productive agricultural regions anywhere in the world. This culture and community seems ordinary to us, because we live here. But it can be special to visitors. We’re the main attraction.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Marcus Shantz Marcus Shantz is President of Mercedes Corp. in St. Jacobs.

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

9


networking

Summer networking PHOTOS BY ADAMSKI PHOTOGRAPHY

1

2

4

3

5

6

7

8

10

1) CROWD AT THE JULY CYP EVENT HELD AT OLIVER & BONACINI

5) THE CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS EVENT AT OLIVER & BONACINI

2) DINERS AT THE 100 MILE FEAST

6) LISA CASHMORE AND KELLY SUE LABUS AT THE 100 MILE FEAST

3) THE CHAMBER’S PAST PRESIDENT, JOAN FISK AND CELEBRITY CHEF JAMIE KENNEDY

7) SOME OF THE AUCTION ITEMS AT THE 100 MILE FEAST

4) ADDING THE FINISHING TOUCHES, JAMIE KENNEDY AND STAFF

8) LINDA JUTZI, JULES KOVARIK, SHERRY WOLF, CAROLYN MCLEOD-MCCARTHY AND KAREN REDMAN

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


networking

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

9) OLIVER & BONACINI PATIO VIEW

13) CATHY FARWELL, ROGER FARWELL, ANNE LUKIN, MEI WEI AND FEI WEI

10) CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS, AMBER, SHANNON, SHANNON AND NARRI

14) A TASTING STATION AT THE 100 MILE FEAST

11) ART SINCLAIR AND MAYOR BRENDA HALLORAN

15) ANDREW COPPOLINO, JAN JAWORSKY, DAVE JAWORSKY AND AUBREY WALTERS

12) NETWORKING AT THE CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS EVENT

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

11


new members

June 1 - July 31, 2010 2242918 Ontario Inc.

House Seats

Pinel Medical Inc.

Health, Fitness & Exercise Service Dann Thew, Director 539 Mariner Drive Waterloo, ON N2K 3Y8 Email: thetalamasca@gmail.com Phone: (226) 338-6648

Entertainment Jim Eagle, Managing Director 525 Beechwood Drive, Unit 26 Kitchener, ON N2T 2G7 Email: Jim@houseseats.ca Phone: (519) 489-2385

Medical Equipment & Supplies Ludwig Piron, President 339 Glenridge Drive Waterloo, ON N2J 3W7 Email: pinel@golden.net Phone: (519) 888-0997 Fax: (519) 725-3658

The Defacto Group

Levitt Safety Limited

Consultants Chris Chang, Vice President Engineering 597 York Street Kitchener, ON N2G 1T9 Email: cgchang@thedefactogroup.ca Phone: (519) 208-1663 Fax: (519) 208-2208

Safety Equipment & Clothing Paul Kroes, Instrument Specialist 1903 Perth Line 43 New Hamburg, ON N3A 3Z5 Email: paul.kroes@levitt-safety.com Phone: (800) 268-6196

Mint Pharmaceuticals Inc. Domus Sudent Housing Inc. Property Management Tara Schlupp, Partner 405 King Street North, Suite 1 Kitchener, ON N2J 2Z4 Email: tarab@domushousing.com Phone: (519) 342-0608 Fax: (519) 342-0697

The ELDC Group Consultants Greg Viner, Director 55 Northfield Drive East, Suite 364 Kitchener, ON N2K 3T6 Email: greg.viner@eldc.ca Phone: (519) 572-4863

Pharmacies Jaiveer Singh, Director of Finance 1093 Meyerside Drive, Unit 1 Mississauga, ON L5T 1J6 Email: info@mintpharmaceuticals.com Phone: (905) 271-9696

The MT Space Charitable & Community Organizations Heather Majaury, Executive Producer 141 Whitney Place Kitchener, ON N2G 2X8 Email: info@mtspace.ca Phone: (519) 585-7763 Fax: (519) 744-9342

Norah Rae Consulting Grade Expectations Learning Centres Training & Development Lisa Taylor, Director 1360 Weber Street East Kitchener, ON N2A 1C4 Email: kitchener@gradeexpectations.ca Phone: (519) 745-8798 Fax: (519) 745-2720

HiLight Design Website Design & Development Mary-Lynne Snedden, Owner 64 Sheldon Avenue North Kitchener, ON N2H 3M4 Email: mary-lynne@hilightdesign.ca Phone: (519) 581-8274 Fax: (866) 374-8675

12

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Accounting & Bookkeeping Services Norah Rae, Owner 103 Norman Street Waterloo, ON N2L 1G8 Email: kenorae@sympatico.ca Phone: (519) 745-1893

SAF Drives Inc. Electronic Equipment, Supplies & Service Kent Foster, General Manager 88 Ardelt Ave Kitchener, ON N2C 2C9 Email: kfoster@safdrives.com Phone: (519) 743-5491 Fax: (519) 743-3610

Springpad Media Advertising Agencies & Consultants Ryan Schnarr, Partner 23 Autumn Ridge Trail Kitchener, ON N2P 2J6 Email: erin@springpad.com Phone: (519) 894-6831

Syon Systems Computer Software Scott McEachern, Owner 15 King Street North Waterloo, ON N2J 2W6 Email: smceachern@syonsystems.com Phone: (519) 883-4080 Fax: (519) 883-8232

WebCanada Inc. Marketing Consultants Emily Squirrell, Account Executive 2 Carlton Street, Suite 1000 Toronto, ON M5B 1J3 Email: emily.squirrell@webcanada.com Phone: (416) 977-4411 Fax: (416) 977-4434


advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

13


feature

THEMUSEUM – A place for everyone BY THEMUSEUM STAFF A place where ideas transcend objects, THEMUSEUM offers experiences that intersect art, science and technology. Featuring five floors of interactive and diverse exhibits and programs for people and families of all ages, THEMUSEUM in downtown Kitchener will be turning seven this fall. Originally geared towards families with children under twelve, it has ‘grown up’ in many ways and has already proven it can offer something for everyone. Adapting quickly to demands made clear by the community has widened its appeal by scanning the globe for fresh, cultural, relevant content to be enjoyed by all facets of Waterloo Region. Over the past three years, THEMUSEUM put itself, Kitchener and Waterloo Region on a much larger cultural map by attracting or creating shows of international calibre including Discovering Chimpanzees: The Remarkable World of Jane Goodall, Andy Warhol’s Factory 2009 and Our Body: The Universe Within. Each of these initiatives successfully contributed to THEMUSEUM’S success and helped demonstrate its ability for diversity and relevance. THEMUSEUM’S credibility was confirmed with support from the municipalities in the spring of 2010 and through a report from the Ontario Ministry of Tourism in 2008 that cited THEMUSEUM’S annual economic impact for downtown Kitchener and Waterloo Region at $6.7 million. Along with the support of the community, much of THEMUSEUM’S success can be attributed to what CEO David Marskell calls the festival strategy. “We tend to look at the community as our collection,” says Marskell. “By encouraging businesses and individuals to participate in our exhibits and showcase what they offer whether from universities, retailers or other cultural institutions, it’s beneficial to everyone because it ultimately makes a larger impact. Our success is directly related to the numerous collaborations within the community and the hardworking team here that have created our interactive events and exhibits.” THEMUSEUM is becoming increasingly known for becoming a stage for the community as well. Over the last three years it has opened its doors to community and ethnic groups for celebrations and fundraisers, couples for their weddings, and companies of all sizes for client and staff parties, meetings and

14

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

conferences. In part, investments made by THEMUSEUM into audio visual equipment, conference tables and chairs, linens and other furniture has helped make this a possibility, but it is also due to its vast, dynamic space and attractive architecture that creates a distinct look for each event.

Up Next Among the permanent collections and exciting daily programs, THEMUSEUM also rotates special exhibits and events to keep fresh in the minds of culture goers in Waterloo Region and beyond. This fall, Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, which features over 150 objects from Titanic’s debris wreck site two and half miles beneath the ocean will be on display. Beginning in early 2011, THEMUSEUM will present an original show of the iconic Canadian painter Tom Thomson. With the help of curator Virginia Eichhorn, Executive Director of the Tom Thomson Art Gallery, the show will feature works from the gallery and others including the McMichael, National Gallery and the AGO. SEARCHING FOR TOM: Tom Thomson: Man, Myth and Masterworks will explore the life and work of Thomson, plus the mystery around his death and will ultimately appeal to all Canadians.

Get Involved For more information on becoming a member, volunteering, booking your class or group, renting THEMUSEUM for your company’s next function, buying tickets or planning your next visit, please contact: THEMUSEUM 10 King Street West Kitchener, ON N2G 1A3 www.THEMUSEUM.ca info@THEMUSEUM.ca THEMUSEUM, located in downtown Kitchener, is a vital component of Waterloo Region’s growing and vibrant cultural sector. This fall, they will be hosting Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition which will showcase more than 150 pieces from the ship’s debris field.


cover story

KW Oktoberfest – A community partnership BY OWEN LACKENBAUER A small celebration held at a Kitchener German club in 1967 has grown to become the nation’s largest community festival of its kind in North America, thanks to a 1969 initiative by the then Kitchener Chamber of Commerce. In the late 1960s the Kitchener Chamber was responsible for promoting tourism in K-W through its Visitors and Convention Bureau (VCB). VCB volunteers organized two events to do the job: a summer Heritage festival and a Winterfest. Both were abandoned after they failed to meet expectations. The Heritage Festival experienced poor attendance. Winterfest’s obituary was written in 1970 when January thaws two years running melted ice sculptures and affected snow related events. The idea that Oktoberfest could be the solution came to VCB organizers after witnessing an Oktoberfest staged in 1967 by Concordia Club to acknowledge Canada’s centennial and promote Canada’s multicultural character. Conceived by the club’s then manager, Julius Rauchfuss, the event ran four-days and attracted 2500 revelers. The club decided to repeat the event in 1968. Attendance increased to 4000.

Chairman of the Chamber’s VCB at the time was Darwin Clay, president of Budd Automotive Canada. He enlisted two members recognized for their promotional talents to help organize a larger and broader based Oktoberfest: Richard (Dick) Hermansen, former director of public affairs for Wilfrid Laurier University and Owen Lackenbauer, a public relations manager with BFGoodrich Canada. In early 1969 the trio met with executives of the local GermanCanadian clubs, service clubs and Bingeman Park to solicit their support and participation. Chamber directors greeted the initiative with a vote of confidence and $200 to help fund the event’s initial administrative needs. Volunteers were expected to do the rest. The 1969 K-W Oktoberfest ran five days starting with an interservice club dinner at Bingeman Park on October 14 and ended Sunday October 19 with an interdenominational church service organized by the K-W Council of Churches. The event at the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium featured Cardinal Paul-Emile Leger and attracted an audience of 6500. Julius Rauchfuss was pictured on the 1969 promotional poster. A great singer and showman who could always be counted on to energize a crowd, Rauchfuss later became widely known as “Mr. Oktoberfest” and was one of the festival’s biggest boosters. When the last steins were emptied the 1969 festival recorded attendance of almost 70,000. Purchases of souvenirs, advertising and entertainment (beyond the Chamber’s $200 grant) were payable net 30. Much to the organizing committee’s relief, revenue covered all debts – leaving a slight profit!

OWEN LACKENBAUER AND WIFE OLLIE, AT OKTOBERFEST.

16

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

The four local German-Canadian clubs at the time (Concordia, Transyvania, Schwaben and Alpine), Bingeman Park and the Kitchener


cover story

Memorial Auditorium became fest halls. Budd Canada, J.M. Schneider, BFGoodrich, Kaufmans, Dutch Boy Food Markets and area restaurants contributed staff and products. A Budd Canada engineer organized the first Oktoberfest parade. A Miss Oktoberfest pageant was created.

Over the years the festival welcomed among its many distinguished guests Pierre Trudeau, Raymond Burr, Arte Johnson, John Diefenbacker, the Pied Piper of Hamelin, Bobby Gimby, Robert Stanfield and John Candy plus numerous sports and media celebrities.

Visitors contributed thousands of dollars to the local economy and Kitchener-Waterloo achieved widespread publicity, setting the stage for the following year’s festival.

An Ontario Festivals and Events economic impact study conducted in 2003 registered an attendance of 587,000 during that year’s Oktoberfest of which 283,000 were from outside K-W. The average visitor spent $125 in the community on goods and services for a direct economic impact of $11 million to front line businesses during the 10-day period. The equivalent of 733 full time jobs were created. All three levels of government realized increased tax revenues.

Chamber president in 1969 Keith Staebler realized the Chamber had a “tiger by the tail” which needed to be nurtured carefully if it were to realize its potential. Concerns were expressed that, if the festival was to be expanded to 10 days in 1970 as recommended by Clay and his organizing committee, year-round staff would be needed. Also worrying the Chamber was how it would safeguard the festival as a community owned event. The discussion led to the formation of K-W Oktoberfest, a nonprofit corporation separate from the Chamber and owned by all citizens of Kitchener and Waterloo. Kitchener lawyer and committee member, Mike Walters, drew up its constitution and registered the festival’s name. All symbols and logos were copywrited. Directors were elected. They included: Clay, Lackenbauer, Walters, Werner Metzger (Concordia), Michael Hoesch (Transylvania), Paul Weiner (Schwaben), Richard Mausser (Alpine), Lawrence Bingeman , Mayor Donovan Meston (Waterloo), Alderman Bob Wagner (Kitchener), Norman Schneider (JM Schneider), Dr. Jack Bishop, Barry Bernstein (Kitchener downtown Business Association), Archie Gillies (Kitchener Chamber manager), M.L. (Spec) Turner (Waterloo Chamber manager), Joe Zuber, Jr. (Inn of the Black Walnut), Fred Ryan (Waterloo Square Shopping Cenre) and Bryce Rhunke (Fairview Shopping Centre). Hermansen was hired to manager the new entity. 1970 was the watershed year that established what is today’s 10-day K-W Oktoberfest with its nationally telecast Thanksgiving Day parade, Miss Oktoberfest pageant, festhalls, family and sports activities and the involvement of local charities, service clubs, businesses and industry. More than 400 volunteers work year-round to make it all happen.

In non-economic terms, K-W’s image was enhanced and the community is known across Canada and the U.S. largely because of Oktoberfest. Today K-W Oktoberfest’s direct economic impact on the community is estimated to be at least $21 million annually. More than 600,000 people take part in the 10-day event. In recent years, several financial institutions, regional municipalities and the Chamber sponsor an event called ‘Passport to Success’ to attract new investment to the region. Outside business leaders are invited to experience Oktoberfest and become acquainted with our community, its leaders and opportunities. Unquestionably, K-W Oktoberfest, now in its 42nd year, is a boon to the entire region of Waterloo. It offers citizens a chance to unwind, celebrates the region’s heritage, attracts tourist revenue, creates jobs and generates international awareness and goodwill for our community.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Owen Lackenbauer Owen Lackenbauer, a retired public relations and communications consultant, is a long standing community leader with an impressive volunteer record with many organizations including the Chamber and K-W Oktoberfest.

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

17


events

Mark your calendar BY CHAMBER STAFF

September 14, 2010

September 21, 2010

September 23, 2010

Chamber Academy: BlackBerry 101–Working Smarter With Your BlackBerry® Device

Chamber After 5: Regional Trade Show

Point of View: Social Intelligence & Bill 168

4:00–8:00pm

11:30am-1:00pm

Session 1: 9:00-11:00am Session 2: 12:00-2:00pm Session 3: 2:30-4:30pm

Location: Bingemans 425 Bingemans Centre Dr., Kitchener Members & General Admission: Complimentary

Location: The 41 41 King Street W., Kitchener Member Admission: $50 General Admission: $60

Don’t miss this event and an opportunity to market your company to over 2,000 members of the business community from Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge and Guelph.

Helen Jowett from McDonald Green will help you understand your responsibilities as a manager and as an employer with respect to Bill 168. Helen will discuss how to recognize early signs of trouble in the workplace and how to manage them immediately and effectively.

®

Location: Chamber of Commerce 80 Queen St. N., Kitchener Member Admission: $40 General Admission: $50 This class is designed to focus on increasing your knowledge and optimize your BlackBerry® experience. Learn Tips & Tricks from a Professional BlackBerry® Trainer so you can be even more productive.

Title Sponsor:

September 16, 2010 Chamber Young Professionals: Season Kick-Off 5:00-7:00pm Location: The Flying Dog Member and General Admission: $5 Come out to this casual event to meet other young professionals and learn about the slate of events planned for the upcoming season.

S

Holiday EASON

December 10 and 11 Corporate Christmas Party

A great opportunity for smaller size companies to join in for a big size Christmas party offering a full Christmas Buffet Dinner followed by music and dancing in Rushes Restaurant

PLANNER

November or December Christmas Party

Some dates are still available for you to host your own Christmas party with delicious Christmas dinner menu’s and special overnight room rates for any size group of 10 or more! 475 King St. N.

18

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

www.waterlooinn.com Waterloo, ON 519.884.0220

1.800.361.4708


events

September 29, 2010

September 30, 2010

October 5, 2010

Annual General Meeting

Networking Breakfast Series presents Civic Amalgamation Discussion

New Member Welcome

4:30-6:30pm

NEW DATE

Location: Waterloo Inn & Conference Centre 475 King St. N., Waterloo Member Admission: Complimentary Network with fellow Chamber members while learning of the wide spectrum of current business trends and concerns and what the Chamber is doing to meet the demands of its diverse membership and the community. The new Board of Directors will be installed during this event.

7:30-9:00am Location: Holiday Inn Kitchener-Waterloo 30 Fairway Road S., Kitchener Member Admission: $28 pre-registered, $35 at the door General Admission: $40 pre-registered, $45 at the door Passport (Members Only): $185 – attend all eight Networking Breakfast events, or send a different employee each time. A panel will discuss the pros and cons of amalgamation in advance of the municipal elections and the amalgamation-related referendum.

5:00-7:00pm Hosted by: Emmanuel Village Member Admission: Complimentary Learn how working together can work for you! Find out how the Chamber’s services and events can help your business grow. Learn about volunteer opportunities and promote your business with a 30 second infomercial. Title Sponsor:

Host Sponsor:

Event Sponsors:

October TBD, 2010 Chamber Young Professionals: Selling Yourself Effectively 5:00-7:00pm Media Sponsor:

Member and General Admission: $5 It’s hard to actively promote yourself, but it’s a necessary skill for career growth. Learn tips to help make the process easier.

(continued on page 28)

THE RECORD REACHES MORE ADULTS THAN THE TORONTO PAPERS COMBINED!

84,600 MORE ADULTS DAILY

TToo aadvertise dvertise oorr ppartner artner w with ith tthe he W Waterloo aterloo R Region egion R Record ecord please call 519-894-2250. 4-2250.

77,200 MORE ADULTS ON SATURDAY* *Source: NADbank® 2009

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

19


feature

Thanks Larry BY CHAMBER STAFF An individual who has become as familiar to Oktoberfest and Waterloo Region as Onkel Hans himself is taking some well deserved time off.

noted as a crusader for the government support and sponsorship funding which is vitally important to the entire Ontario tourism industry and overall provincial economy.

Larry Blundell (has anyone ever see him in the same room with Onkel Hans?) recently announced that he will be retiring as Executive Director of Kitchener Waterloo Oktoberfest at the end of December. He has served in this capacity since 1995.

The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce has also benefited from Larry’s knowledge as he has served on our Federal and Provincial Affairs Committee, continually reminding board members and staff of the critical contribution that visitors provide towards business profitability and prosperity across the region. In the corridors of government and among his business contemporaries, he has few equals in terms of his knowledge on industry issues.

In a recent Waterloo Region Record article, Larry noted that he has been involved in one way or another with the festival for three and one-half decades. Like the many thousands of volunteers throughout the community, he has witnessed the event escalate from “an annual party” into an economic generator of $21 million. We in Waterloo Region know Larry for his local service, however through his many years of experience he has emerged as a leading advocate on the provincial and national levels for the tourism and hospitality sector, most particularly events like Oktoberfest that drive visitors to large and small communities across the nation. Larry served as President of Festivals and Events Ontario (FEO), one of the province’s leading tourism associations, for four years. In 2008 he was inducted into FEO’s Hall of Fame, where recipients are recognized for their “above and beyond” achievements, dedication to advancing industry interests, and the respect they have earned from their peers. Larry was

20

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Above all, Larry has been the festival’s ambassador at meetings, conferences and other events which provide the opportunity to sell the great community we all call home to the rest of the world. Current Oktoberfest President Paul Buttinger summarized everything succinctly when he noted that Larry’s impact and influence reaches far beyond Waterloo Region to many in the tourism industry. It will be difficult, as Buttinger mentions, to fully express our appreciation for his service, and harder still to replace him. As Larry said in a media release, all good things must come to an end and it is time for me to take a breather in my life and start enjoying my senior years in other endeavours. Congratulations on your retirement Larry and be sure to include a few days off on your calendar next year.


Because you want progress in your meeting. Not just a meeting in progress.

Allow us to cater to business professionals like yourself. Our meeting planner will make your vision a reality with creative menus, a great location, natural light throughout all rooms, WiFi, plus more than 17,000 square feet of meeting space able to accommodate 6 to 600 people. Give us a call and let us help make your next meeting a success.

For more information visit www.deltakitchenerwaterloo.com or call 519-744-4141. Mention this ad and have your meeting ‘Maestro-ized‘.


profile

Chamber Star – Karl Allen-Muncey BY CHAMBER STAFF The Chamber Star was developed to recognize volunteers and to show appreciation for their significant contribution. It is awarded to an active committee member three times a year following a Committee Chair nomination process. We are excited to announce that Karl Allen-Muncey is the recipient of the Chamber Star. Karl has only been in the KitchenerWaterloo area for 14 months but has already made a huge impression on the hundreds of people that have connected with him. He has a creative approach to business and impressive knowledge of social media and networking.

the evening. The event would not have been the same without Karl’s expertise! Karl’s company, in partnership with Amy Vandenberg, is CuteGecko, a creative design agency that focuses on strengthening brand positioning through developing and delivering engaging designs and innovative marketing communications. Karl is also heavily involved in local initiatives in both the business and community sectors and derives a great amount of enjoyment from working and connecting with people. As the recipient of the Chamber Star, Karl will receive a recognition package of generously donated products and/or services.

As a volunteer on the 100 Mile Feast committee, Karl was integral in the event communications, including creation of the website, the use of social media, the event’s video presentations and the Twitter “Tweet Wall” that entertained us throughout

Thank you Karl, for your time and your support of the Chamber, its members, and the community.

H AVE

Y

KARL ALLEN-MUNCEY

R VOTE! OU

Join us as we look back on the accomplishments of the past year and look forward to the opportunities of the upcoming year at the Chamber’s Annual General Meeting on September 29, 2010.

Chamber members have the opportunity to vote at the Annual General Meeting to confirm the Nominating Committee’s slate of names to the 2010-2011 Board of Directors. The Nominating Committee, appointed by the Board, recommended seven candidates for the seven available positions on the Board. The call for independent nominations for the 2010-2011 Board of Directors closed on August 23, 2010 with no additional nominees. Therefore, an election is not required. If you are the voting delegate of your company and are unable to attend, you may send a representative to vote on your behalf by completing a proxy form. The proxy form must be received at the Chamber office by 5:00 pm on September 28, 2010 by fax to 519.742.4760. A proxy form may be obtained by calling Kathryn McEwin at the Chamber at 519.749.6032.

22

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


feature

Uptown Waterloo Jazz Festival delights record crowds BY PATTI BROOKS

KIRA CALLAHAN FULL STAGE

Thank you KW for supporting the 18th annual UpTown Waterloo Jazz Festival! This is my 13th year with the Festival and I feel so privileged to be a part of this amazing and successful weekend. The Festival’s success was sparked by a dedicated executive and volunteer team but has fanned and grown into a summer signature event due to the support of jazz fans and artists across the country. The generous contributions of local businesses and individuals allow the Jazz Festival to continue to grow and attract new jazz talent from all over the globe. This year we expanded the festival and offered our guests two stages. The satellite stage was in Waterloo Public Square on King Street in UpTown Waterloo and featured local jazz artists and individuals new to the jazz scene. The main stage in the Waterloo City Centre parking lot featured world renowned artists such as Jake Langley, Sophie Milman, and Matt Dusk. With approximately 30,000 people in attendance throughout the weekend, we also saw a record breaking crowd of 10,000 guests

Saturday night. In a year that has seen some festivals and events across Canada struggle, the UpTown Waterloo Jazz Festival has been able to thrive and grow. Guest attendance and the continuous dedication and support from our sponsors and Festival partners have helped us weather these difficult economic times. The sponsors and the guests that keep coming back year after year, cement the UpTown Waterloo Jazz Festival as part of the cultural fabric of Waterloo Region. We hope you will join us again next year July 15-17th, 2011!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Patti Brooks Patti Brooks has been the Executive Director for the UpTown Waterloo Business Improvement Area since 1998 with the goal to promote and beautify UpTown Waterloo.

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

23


sponsor profile

Research in tourism entrepreneurship BY DR. BARBARA CARMICHAEL The NeXt Centre (Centre for the Study of Nascent Entrepreneurship and the eXploitation of Technology) in the School of Business & Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University, is a research centre that serves as a locus for encouraging scholarly activity in entrepreneurship, stimulating and facilitating research in entrepreneurship, hosting events and promoting links between scholars and practitioners. Stepping into the Director’s position of the NeXt Centre in 2009, I took advantage of my expertise in tourism research. In April 2010, we hosted an international academic conference in tourism entrepreneurship that attracted a wide range and number of international researchers with delegates coming from as far as the United Kingdom, Ireland, USA, Philippines, Macao, South Africa, Kenya and Canada. Tourism entrepreneurship research is multifaceted and involves the consideration of external, personal, and interpersonal factors that provide challenges and opportunities for success. This was a unique and important opportunity to bring academics and their doctoral students together in this emerging under-researched area. As part of this academic conference, we hosted a popular breakfast event attended by members of our local community. This event showcased the work of three successful tourism entrepreneurs in overcoming the challenges of a changing external environment. Bill Allen (President of Tourism Industry of Ontario) moderated the event and offered his own insights in attractions management. The panellists Mark Bingeman (President of Bingemans Inc.), Alex Mustakas (Artistic Director and Chief Entertainment Officer, Drayton Entertainment), and Rob Thorburn Sr. (Chairman and Owner of Scenic Caves Nature Adventures), stressed the importance of diversification and the need to create a cluster of new products in this process.

24

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

The role of innovation was important to all three entrepreneurs. In the case of Drayton, diversification involved the transfer of similar products into different locations; for Bingemans, the use of different products in different seasons, packaging with others and focus on both indoor and outdoor events were important strategies. For the Scenic Caves attraction, new products consistent with the natural theme include gardens, ponds, suspension bridge, zip line and eco-tours. All three speakers stressed the importance of networking and the benefits of being involved with local organizations such as tourism organizations and Chambers of Commerce. This panel discussion represented a way of bringing researchers and practitioners together as shown in the lively question period, suggested avenues for future research, practical examples for teaching and insights for practice. A special edited volume of the Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Planning is under review as a follow up to this conference. Papers were grouped under a number of themes including: entrepreneurship, firm performance, external influences, rural entrepreneurship, nascent entrepreneurship and innovation, networks, and entrepreneur characteristics. If you would like any further information in regards to the papers presented, please contact me directly at bcarmichael@wlu.ca. In May 2010 we welcomed guest speaker Professor Frederic Dimanche from SKEMA Business School in Nice, France who presented his research in service innovation in the ski industry. This talk was attended by academics from WLU and UW as well as by practitioners in the Ontario ski industry. This session allowed for an interesting interchange of academics and practitioners with lessons from ski resort management that could be adopted by Ontario resorts through a more flexible use of physical and human resources.


sponsor profile

Our new Associate Director, Dr. Sofy Carayannopoulos, Assistant Professor in the School of Business & Economics brings with her expertise in knowledge management and technology and we are working together in the upcoming year to highlight the importance of research in entrepreneurship and technology firms. One of the key challenges facing the tourism industry today is the need for innovation and the use and exploitation of technology. E-Tourism is an important research area with implications for data collection, marketing and entrepreneurship. In KitchenerWaterloo we have a vibrant tourism industry as well as an international reputation for the development of digital technologies. Combining and harnessing expertise and research in these two areas offers great potential for our regional development. As part of our mandate at NeXt, we are interested in leading and facilitating research in such initiatives. If you have knowledge in this area, please contact us; we welcome new insight and expertise in these areas.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Barbara Carmichael Dr Barbara Carmichael, Director of the NeXt Centre, is a Professor in Human Geography with research interests in tourism experiences, tourism events and tourism entrepreneurship. In entrepreneurship her work focuses on transnational tourism entrepreneurship, commercial home entrepreneurship, lifestyle entrepreneurship and e-tourism. Barbara can be reached at bcarmichael@wlu.ca.

The Laurier School of Business & Economics is one of Canada's leading business schools. With more than 4,500 students enrolled in full and part-time undergraduate, masters, PhD and diploma programs, it is also one of the largest. The School has more than 100 full-time and 65 part-time faculty members and is noted for its innovative programs and commitment to teaching excellence. The School is proud to announce its new Executive Masters in Technology Management (EMTM) program, the first of its kind in Canada. The one-year weekend program combines state-of-the-art management practices and insights into emerging technologies that are driving global innovation and change. The EMTM commits to develop leaders who will effortlessly manage advances in science and technology in the context of the dynamic and strategic business skills critical to innovation and competition. Beginning in January 2011, a select group of students will be coached by an elite group of professors and professionals sourced from the best institutions around the world, culminating in a Master of Science degree in Management. For more information about programs at the Laurier School of Business & Economics, contact Megan Harris, Manager, Marketing and Communications, Laurier School of Business & Economics at mharris@wlu.ca

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

25


feature

Developing a vacation policy BY STEVEN VAN ALSTINE, CPM, CAE To avoid confusion and minimize the potential of future legal dispute, your organization should develop a vacation policy stating how vacation is handled. A vacation policy that is properly documented and communicated results in three important benefits: it provides for consistency across all departments, establishes a process that is viewed to be fair, and reduces the number of repetitious questions about the policy or procedure. The vacation policy can never fall below the minimums laid out by employment standards. Rules can be written and enforced that exceed the laws, but individual clauses that do not at least meet the minimum standards are not enforceable. If your organization operates in more than one jurisdiction, you need to have either separate policies for each province or territory, or a generic policy for all employees. However, in the latter case, to meet the minimum requirements of all of the jurisdictions, your policy must comply with the minimum requirements of the most generous jurisdictions in which your organization operates. You would also be wise to obtain legal counsel on the policies to ensure compliance in all jurisdictions that they operate. In short, the administration of annual vacation can become quite complex. However, it is essential that you take proper measures to

When developing a vacation policy, you should keep the following in mind: • Ensure that it is clear and concise. • Include exactly how much vacation time and pay employees are entitled to receive. • Outline when employees can take their vacation time and how vacation will be scheduled. • State what happens to unused vacation time, such as carry-over and/or use-it-or-lose-it provisions. (Note: British Columbia and Manitoba do not allow use-itor-lose it provisions.) • Indicate when and how vacation pay will be remitted to employees.

ensure compliance with the employments standards of the jurisdictions in which your organization operates. Also, by developing a clear, comprehensive vacation policy to communicate those measures, you will not only ensure that these measures are applied consistently throughout your organization but also that your legal risk is reduced.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Steven Van Alstine CPM, CAE Steven Van Alstine, is the Vice-President of Compliance Programs and Services for the Canadian Payroll Association (CPA).

26

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


member notables

Member notables LEHDER Environmental celebrating 15 years LEHDER Environmental Services was conceived of in early 1994 when four Sarnia area men – Sid Lethbridge, Des Hayles, Mike Denomme and Mark Roehler –decided to capitalize on their experience and expertise in environmental services to start their own company. LEHDER was incorporated in October 1994 and operations began in January 1995 with their first customer, Owens Corning. Out of that simple start, LEHDER has grown from the original four partners to forty people in 2009. What started out as a portfolio of one valued customer has grown to over 300. LEHDER Environmental Services is an environmental consulting company focused on providing Excellence in Industrial Air Quality Services.

Ted Rowe appointed as MTE’s next president MTE Consultants Inc. (MTE) recently announced that Ted Rowe has been appointed by their Board of Directors as the company’s fourth president, effective November 1, 2010. MTE’s current president, Greg Marks, will be retiring from the company after serving in the role since 2006. Mr. Rowe has over 21 years experience in the engineering field and has worked with MTE since 2007. MTE is an employee-owned company – recently marking its 25th anniversary – providing multidisciplinary services in the fields of engineering, environmental science, toxicology and land surveying.

NextEnergy CEO an award finalist NextEnergy is proud to announce company founder and CEO David Hatherton is among the Ontario finalists for the Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year Award. David Hatherton has been a leader in the domestic and international geothermal, renewable and energy efficiency industry for over 25 years. In 1980 he founded Earth Systems Inc., which trademarked WaterFurnace in Canada and the USA. The names of the Ontario winners will be announced at a gala banquet in Toronto on October 13, and the overall winner will represent Ontario at the national banquet in Toronto on November 17.

Xylotek top Canadian tech workplace Xylotek Solutions, a full-service, IT consulting firm that has been one of the fastest growing companies in Canada, has placed 3rd overall in the 2010 Best Tech Workplaces awards, and is the no. 1 (and only) Canadian firm selected. The Xylotek team, from bottom to top, engenders the very best that our highly competitive industry has to offer," says Douglas W. Grosfield, President and CEO of Xylotek Solutions. Xylotek was established in 2005 by two local systems engineers - Grosfield and Michael Topp. A third partner, Chris Pickard, joined them one year later. Member Notables are taken from local news sources and member submissions. In order to be considered “notable” an item must be an accomplishment or event that is outside of the ordinary course of business and therefore deemed newsworthy. While we would like to include all submissions, space constraints make it necessary for the Advocate editors to choose items that best fit the above criteria and are most timely.

advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

27


events

Mark your calendar (continued from page 19) BY CHAMBER STAFF

October 20, 2010

October 21, 2010

October 29, 2010

Chamber Academy: Online Marketing: Go Hyper-Local. Advertise Where Waterloo Region Is on the Web

Networking Breakfast Series presents Winners Circle

Point of View with Edwin Outwater

7:30-9:00am

Location: Conrad Centre for Performing Arts 36 King Street W. Kitchener Member Admission: $50 General Admission: $60

8:00-10:00am Location: Chamber of Commerce 80 Queen St. N., Kitchener Member Admission: $40 General Admission: $50 From Google AdWords to Sports Illustrated, you’ll learn where best to put your marketing budget online to reach Waterloo Region business professionals.

28

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Location: Holiday Inn Kitchener-Waterloo 30 Fairway Road S., Kitchener Member Admission: $28 pre-registration, $35 at the door General Admission: $40 pre-registration, $45 at the door A panel of Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Award winners: Business Under 20, Business Over 20, and Volunteer of the Year tell us their secrets of success.

11:30am-1:00pm

As Edwin Outwater enters his fourth season as Music Director of the Kitchener Waterloo Symphony (KWS), he will discuss where the KWS currently is, his vision going forward, and compare the KWS to other orchestras and cultural organizations with regard to innovation in the 21st Century.


take my card

To have your card displayed here, please contact our Membership Managers: David MacLellan at

519.749.6042 or Mandy Chapman at

519.584.5660

VICTORIA ELECTRIC OF KITCHENER Ltd

" , 

" ,  U 

1-/, 1-/, U , , - - //  iÀۈVi * Õà q ˆ˜Vi ££™Çä ™Çä -iÀۈVi *Õà -ˆ˜Vi

THIS IS NOT A COMPASS. It’s a simple tool for solving complex problems. Similar to how we’re not just accountants. We’re a partnerdriven accounting network with over 1,000 offices in more than 100 countries. BDO. More than you think. Assurance | Accounting | Taxation | Advisory Services The Bauer Buildings 150 Caroline St S Suite 201 Waterloo ON www.bdo.ca BDO Canada LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership, is a member of BDO International Limited, a UK company limited by guarantee, and forms part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. BDO is the brand name for the BDO network and for each of the BDO Member Firms.

6HUYLFH 6 HUYLFH ‡ 0 0DLQWHQDQFH DLQWHQDQFH ‡ 1 1HZ HZ &RQVWUXFWLRQ &RQVWUXFWLRQ ‡ ' 'HVLJQ HVLJQ 6HUYLFH 6HUYLFH 8 8SJUDGHV SJUDGHV ‡ 5 5HQRYDWLRQV HQRYDWLRQV ‡ +HDWLQJ +HDWLQJ Î ä ä >}i Îää >}i Ûi°] Ûi°] 1˜ˆÌ 1˜ˆÌ £Ó £Ó ˆÌV…i˜iÀ]  ˆÌV…i˜iÀ] " ÓÓ  Ó n Ó n

519 51 9

576-2220 5 76-2220

Delivering SOLUTIONS for 4 generations... meeting tomorrows

COBER

communications needs!

• Large Commercial Printing • Dynamic Document Publishing • Business Communication • Direct Mail • E-Marketing • Fulfillment & Distribution • Kitting & Warehousing

T 519.745.7136 • TF 800.263.7136 info@coberprint.com • www.coberprint.com advocate

SEPTEMBER

| OCTOBER 2010

29


sponsors

Helping us make our vision possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

CHAMBER CHAIR’S CIRCLE

CHAMBER PATRON

TITLE SPONSOR

CHAMBER TRUSTEE

MEDIA PARTNERS 30

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Rotman Leadership Series


Grow Your Business By Advertising Your Company On-Hold

HOLD PLEASE COMMUNICATIONS LTD.

1.800.465.3394 - Ext. 21 www.holdplease.com

The Advocate Magazine - September | October 2010  
The Advocate Magazine - September | October 2010  

In the September | October edition of the Greater KW Chamber of Commerce Advocate Magazine we look at two of our biggest local festivals the...