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advocate NOVEMBER |

Public Benefit? Social Profit? Not-for-profit? The Benefits of Strategic Community Partnerships Investing in Community Are You Doing Everything You Can To Build Your Business?

DECEMBER 2012


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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

FEATURE

Meet the 2012-2013 Chamber Board of Directors

EDITOR:

FEATURE

The Benefits of Strategic Community Partnerships Philip Hatcher

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Cober Evolving Solutions

COVER STORY

Public Benefit? Social Profit? Not-For-Profit?

PHOTOGRAPHY:

Adamski Photography ADVERTISING AND SALES:

FEATURE

Sandra Walneck

David MacLellan – dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Don Critelli – dcritelli@greaterkwchamber.com Michelle Kienitz – mkientz@greaterkwchamber.com

FEATURE

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Are You Doing Everything You Can To Build Your Business?

Murray Costello, Philip Hatcher, Lester Holley, Ian McLean, John Neufeld, Art Sinclair, Dr. Barbara Schumacher, Rosemary Smith, Jan Varner, Sandra Walneck

Investing in Community

Jan Varner

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Heather Hutchings DESIGN AND PRODUCTION:

John Neufeld

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Art Sinclair

FEATURE

CONTRIBUTORS:

Experience China

Teri Hetherington and Julie Tedesco

Lester Holley

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ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES:

FEATURE

November 16, 2012 for January | February 2013 January 23, 2013 for March | April 2013 March 22, 2013 for May | June 2013

Corporate Community Building Rosemary Smith

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

Darlene Jones djones@greaterkwchamber.com

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MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Focusing on What is Important

SUBMISSION POLICY:

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Murray Costello

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Better Serving our Community through Charitable Giving Ian McLean

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ADVOCACY

Responsible Corporate Conduct in Competitive Global Markets

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Art Sinclair

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PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

Healthy Campus, Healthy Community: University of Waterloo Health Services Expansion Dr. Barbara Schumacher

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Autumn Networking

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio.

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ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREET NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

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message from the chair

Focusing on What is Important BY MURRAY COSTELLO I can’t think of a more fitting theme for my first Advocate article as board chair than the great synergy that exists between building successful communities and building successful companies. Successful businesses, from sole proprietorships to large multinationals, know that giving back to the communities they serve is more than the right thing to do – it’s good business. Companies do well when communities thrive. In fact, the company that I have worked for over the past 26 years, Union Gas, is so passionate about this linkage that it has made a commitment to vibrant communities one of its core values. In her article Corporate Community Building, Rosemary Smith of the Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation details the many reasons “why it is good for business” to make investments in communities. Among the benefits she cites are the many opportunities for leadership skills development available to those who become actively involved in community initiatives. Union Gas invests its time and money in employee-led volunteer initiatives in the community. I have seen first-hand how our employees flourish as a direct result of their engagement in community efforts, and this leadership development is an invaluable resource for our business. In our community, we are extremely fortunate to have so many rich opportunities to get involved. And this October, two important initiatives come to mind. In many local workplaces United Way campaigns are in full swing. The community programs that the United Way of Kitchener Waterloo & Area support have a positive, life-altering impact on tens of thousands of local people every year. Today’s United Way is a catalyst for local social change, not merely a source for its funding. Beyond monetary investment, they mobilize staff, volunteers and other resources to achieve community impact. Change truly does start here.

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North America's largest Bavarian Festival, the Kitchener-Waterloo Oktoberfest, drew thousands of visitors to the area who enjoyed the German music, food, and culture that is at the heart of this community-owned festival. Oktoberfest creates opportunities for more than 70 charities and not-for-profit organizations to raise funds that support the high quality of life enjoyed in Waterloo Region. As I look to the year ahead at the Chamber, I am excited about the many opportunities and activities that are planned. I know how fortunate I am to have the opportunity to work with such a talented and skilled group of board members and Chamber staff. I hope you enjoy this edition of the Advocate and I am confident that our members, both for profit and not-for-profit, have the collective means and enthusiasm to drive positive change in the KitchenerWaterloo community.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Murray Costello CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS Murray Costello is the Union Gas District Manager for the Waterloo/Brantford district. He is accountable for the safe and efficient construction, operation and maintenance of the natural gas distribution system within the district. Murray received his Engineering Degree from the University of Waterloo and is an active community volunteer.


message from the president

Better Serving our Community through Charitable Giving BY IAN MCLEAN Over the past year, as the Chamber celebrated our 125th Anniversary, we collectively had the opportunity to reflect on where we have been as a business community and where we are going. University of Waterloo Distinguished Professor Emeritus Ken McLaughlin wrote in our July/August 2011 Advocate that the local Chambers of Commerce and their predecessors, the Boards of Trade, have had a profound impact on Kitchener and Waterloo. Few public institutions can match their legacy of community concern and vision. Dr. McLaughlin subsequently traced the role the local business community, and Chambers of Commerce, played in conceptualizing and implementing a plan for a new university. One can hardly imagine another community in Canada in which two universities like UW and WLU would ever have been created, let alone emerge as internationally-acclaimed centres of advanced learning and research. Business support of local charities and not-for-profits has also played a major role in the development and evolution of Waterloo Region. The articles contained within this edition provide significant examples of the unique partnerships that have formed throughout the community for our collective benefit and interests. In the current era of strict corporate and organizational accountability, businesses and governments are increasingly required to measure progress in their key areas of responsibility. Businesses have known for years that carful oversight on expenditures and determining the best value on spending is key for their success, therefore it is not surprising that a similar approach now guides the public and non-profit sectors. In this respect, the Vital Signs initiative from the Kitchener and Waterloo and Cambridge & North Dumfries Community Foundations has served a significant purpose and provided immense guidance for our community in relation to focusing our activities and ensuring the best return on charitable investments. The 2012 report issued in early October indicates that although Waterloo Region provides more charitable donations on an annual basis than both the provincial and national averages, the donor profile is shifting. Specifically, fewer young adults are donating,

with the majority of contributions originating from older adults with an annual income over $80,000. The Vital Signs report notes this trend is problematic since the local Community Foundations’ donor base does not reflect the diversity of age or range of incomes across the community. Also noted was the recent decline of volunteerism. Waterloo Region now ranks below both the provincial and national averages with volunteer rates of less than 42 percent. Local organizations have indicated a particular issue on integrating youth and immigrants. As an organization that depends on volunteers for the delivery of our diverse programs and services, the Chamber and our partners must increase our efforts to include community diversity within our agenda setting. Businesses know the importance of succession planning for success over the longer term. In family operations, the transition from generation to generation is always a central component in decision-making. Increasing the participation of youth in volunteer activities is also critical for ensuring the sustainability of not-forprofit organizations and services that make our community function on a daily basis. On a positive note, Waterloo Region has excellent community assets in place such as innovative social and business sectors. However there remains room for improvement in understanding the different leadership styles of immigrants, opening up leadership programs to youth, and identifying sectors of the population not adequately served by current programming. All important issues for governments, business and non-profits across Waterloo Region to consider and act upon.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian McLean Ian McLean is President and CEO of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

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advocacy

Responsible Corporate Conduct in Competitive Global Markets BY ART SINCLAIR The new global economy has initiated serious discussions within academia, government and business associations related to responsible corporate conduct at home and abroad. While many of the articles in this edition of the Advocate focus on corporate social responsibility in Waterloo Region, numerous local businesses are expanding their operations across the world where their activities in foreign markets and communities are becoming increasingly complex and challenging. As the Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC) noted in their 2012 report Responsible Business Conduct in a Complex World, the increasing power of global economic forces, particularly in emerging Asian and South American economies, combined with a relatively weak U.S. economy means more Canadian companies are forced to pursue opportunities beyond their traditional markets. International investment is critical to Canadian economic growth. In the third quarter of 2011, the value of our direct investment abroad was $50.2 billion higher than the same period in 2010, a staggering level of activity which provides a significant benefit to all of Canada. The CCC position is that businesses are accountable to their shareholders, host countries, communities and employees for conducting their activities in a manner which is safe, respectful, legal and sustainable. The aforementioned report emphasizes that a single poor performer can damage the reputation of all Canadian companies and subsequently diminish any prospects for international partnerships. Obviously, with the expanding level of Canadian foreign investment, the importance of rules for conduct increases exponentially. However, the CCC concludes that legislation is not the appropriate mechanism for resolving these issues and making changes when damage has been inflicted. The appropriate role for the federal government is to maintain responsible business conduct as a voluntary corporate practice consistent with internationally recognized guidelines. The Canadian Chamber’s review of corporate social responsibility follows a March 2009 report from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) that noted the federal government expects Canadian companies to meet and exceed high standards of social responsibility. Many Canadian companies, particularly those in the mining and oil industries

exploring opportunities in foreign jurisdictions, have been seeking advice from Ottawa on managing their activities in complex and challenging environments. The 2009 report commenced a serious examination of this area of public policy. The Canada Business Network, a collaboration between the federal and provincial governments to provide centralized assistance to businesses, notes that in order to stay competitive in today’s markets individual companies should seriously consider where corporate social responsibility fits into everyday operations. Businesses are recognizing that consumer demand is increasing for products and services from organizations that consider and measure the impact of their operations on the environment, the communities where they operate, their employees, their stakeholders and the general public. Locally, Manulife Financial’s approach to global corporate social responsibility aligns with their focus on delivering reliable and forward-thinking solutions for clients and communities where a presence is maintained. Corporate giving operates under a decentralized model that emphasizes giving back to communities and encouraging employees to do the same. In June of this year, Sun Life Financial was again named to the list of Canada’s 50 Best Corporate Citizens by Corporate Knights, a Toronto-based research organization and magazine focused on business ethics and responsible capitalism. Sun Life has been included on this prestigious list seven times in the past eleven years. The most recent distinction recognized their reduction in greenhouse gases, a strong health and safety record, and annual reductions in waste produced. The message from business and government is that corporate social responsibility, like environmental sustainability, is no longer an option but an imperative. Cooperation and collaboration among all sectors is critical for economic growth and job creation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art Sinclair is the Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

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perspective on health care

Healthy Campus, Healthy Community: University of Waterloo Health Services expansion BY DR. BARBARA SCHUMACHER News of local family doctor shortages, ambulances out of service while off-loading patients at hospitals, and long wait times at emergency rooms and walk-in clinics keeps people wondering if our health care system will be ready when they need it. The University of Waterloo’s Health Services is an integral part of that local health care system, just as our students and graduates are integral members of the local community. In a region of approximately half a million residents, the university has 34,000 registered students who are shopping in the same grocery stores and malls, riding the same buses, and going to the same movie theatres and pubs as everyone else. When it comes to health care, we are all interrelated, so reliable, comprehensive Health Services at the university is vital to the overall health of our community. “As Chief of Staff for both hospitals in Kitchener-Waterloo, I see firsthand the impact of our large student population on our local healthcare system. The University of Waterloo’s Health Services expansion project will not only provide timely and needed primary care to its students but also relieve some pressures for our hospitals.” Dr. Ashok Sharma, MD, Chief of Staff, St. Mary’s General & Grand River Hospitals

Our Health Services is the equivalent of the family doctor’s office, community mental health centre, public health service, and urgent care clinic for our students while they are away from home. With 250 to 300 appointments per day, our medical staff evaluate and treat physical illnesses, injuries, and mental health conditions ranging from mild depression to bipolar disorder. They provide educational programs, employ health promotion and prevention strategies like vaccinations and nutrition counselling, and work with medical specialists, hospitals, and the public health office to access services and support public health initiatives.

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Our Health Services building was designed to serve 9,000 students in 1968 and has remained unchanged since then, so our medical staff struggle to now care for 34,000 students within the same facility. The resultant overcrowding, long wait times, lack of privacy, infectioncontrol challenges, and inability to care for family members of graduate and international students have led some students to turn instead to local walk-in clinics and emergency rooms for care. To keep up with the health care demand on campus, we have launched a $10-million expansion of Health Services, approximately 80% of which students voted to fund through school fees. The construction — which began in November 2011 and is scheduled for completion in spring 2013 — will add about 18,500 square feet to expand and enhance critical services like mental health care, add a Family Health Clinic for students’ spouses and children, employ more health care professionals, and alleviate demand on local health services. The good health of our campus and our community is vital, and we are proactively working to protect and enhance it.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Barbara Schumacher Dr. Barbara Schumacher has led the University of Waterloo Health Services as Medical Director since 1986. She is an ardent advocate of interprofessional, collaborative health care for students and has been the lead champion for the Health Services expansion project since its inception.


feature

Meet the 2012-2013 Chamber Board of Directors

BACK ROW (L TO R): PAUL EICHINGER - MTE CONSULTING, SANDRA SCHELLING - CONESTOGA COLLEGE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY & ADVANCED LEARNING, IAN MCLEAN - GREATER KITCHENER WATERLOO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, KATHRYN ALLAMBY - MANULIFE FINANCIAL, AL HAYES - WALTERFEDY, DAVE JAWORSKY, SANDRA STONE - CONESTOGA MALL, TIM SOTHERN - BDO CANADA LLP, MURRAY COSTELLO - UNION GAS, RICK BAKER - SPIRITED LEADERS CORPORATION FRONT ROW (L TO R): MARTIN VAN NIEROP - UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO, LINDA DANCEY - GRAND RIVER PERSONNEL LTD., JASON KIPFER - TD CANADA TRUST, NEIL HENDERSON - BORDEN LADNER GERVAIS LLP, ROSA LUPO - GOWLINGS LLP, BRIAN BENNETT - BME CONSULTING, SABRINA FITZGERALD - PWC LLP, CAMERON KOZLOWSKI - BMO BANK OF MONTREAL, RON SCHERTZER - NEXTENERGY INC NOT PRESENT: MICHEÁL KELLY - SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & ECONOMICS, WILFRID LAURIER UNIVERSITY, KAREN MASON - EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA

Photography by Adamski Photography

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networking

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AL HAYES, AUBREY WALTERS, MURRAY COSTELLO AT THE AGM JULIE TEDESCO WELCOMING AGM GUESTS CYP NETWORKING EVENT AT DESIRE2LEARN PAT YOCOM AND MURRAY COSTELLO TAP THE KEG AT CHAMBERFEST

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new members

August 1, 2012 to September 30, 2012 1 Stop HR Consulting

CuteGecko

JD Graphics

Human Resource Consultants Christie Ferguson, President 15 Watson Crescent Ayr, ON N0B 1E0 Email: info@1stophrconsulting.com Web: http://www.1stophrconsulting.com Phone: (226) 750-3160

Marketing Consultants Karl Allen-Muncey, Creative Director & Producer 121 Charles Street West, Unit 329A Kitchener, ON N2G 1H6 Email: info@cutegecko.ca / Web: http://www.cutegecko.ca Phone: (226) 338-3377

Automobile Customizing Dan Leiskau, President 130 Frobisher Drive Waterloo, ON N2V 1Z9 Email: dan@jdgraphics.com / Web: http://www.jdgraphics.com Phone: (519) 746-3400 / Fax: (519) 746-0998

Daw Immigration Solutions Inc

Jones Electric of Kitchener Inc.

Artals Promotions Inc.

Immigration & Naturalization Consultants Chris Daw, Owner 279 Weber Street North, Suite 105 Waterloo, ON N2J 3H8 Email: chris.daw@dawimmigration.com Web: http://www.dawimmigration.com Phone: (519) 342-5342 / Fax: (519) 342-4751

Electrical Contractors Andy Jones, Owner & Master Electrician 588 Peach Blossom Court Kitchener, ON N2E 3Z9 Email: joneselectricofkitchener@gmail.com Phone: (519) 745-5158 / Fax: (519) 745-0914

Durrell Communications

Manufacturing Consultants Noel Butler, President 79 Norman Street Waterloo, ON N2L 1G4 Email: nvbutler@gmail.com / Web: http://www.leansolution.ca Phone: (519) 880-0968

Promotional Products Jenn Givlin, Director, Sales & Marketing 11 Samuel Street Kitchener, ON N2H 1N9 Email: info@artals.com Web: http://www.artals.com Phone: (519) 744-5946/ Fax: (519) 744-7962

Blackcar Waterloo Region Limousines Ken Hubert, Owner 75 Gail Street Cambridge, ON N1R 4M4 Email: info@blackcarwaterloo.com Web: http://www.blackcarwaterloo.com Phone: (519) 888-1008 / Fax: (519) 888-1008

Calla Studio Photographers Tina Weltz, President 76 Howard Avenue Elmira, ON N3B 2E1 Email: callastudio@bellnet.ca Web: http://www.callastudio.ca Phone: (519) 669-3993 / Fax: (519) 669-0679

Cardinal e-Quality Ltd. Printers Sorin Badea, Manager 675 Queen Street South, Unit 214 Kitchener, ON N2M 1A1 Email: sorin@cardinalequality.ca Web: http://www.cardinalequality.ca Phone: (519) 513-4573

Ces Vending Solutions Restaurant Equipment & Supplies Brandon Ces, Owner 288 Parkmount Drive Waterloo, ON N2L 5S2 Email: brandon@cesvending.com Web: http://www.facebook.com/cesvendingsolutions Phone: (519) 589-1189

CORPORATE PLUS Marketing & Promotions Inc Promotional Products Wendy Woolcox, Owner 108 Greenbrook Drive Kitchener, ON N2M 4J6 Email: wendy@corporateplus.ca Web: http://www.corporateplus.ca Phone: (519) 576-7171 / Fax: (519) 576-4513

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Communication & Public Relations Consultants Melissa Durrell, President & CEO 121 Belmont Avenue Waterloo, ON N2L 2A8 Email: durrellcomm@gmail.com Web: http://www.durrellcomm.com Phone: (519) 500-4408

e2f Tech inc. Translators & Interpreters Patrick Hebert, President 204 Pastern Trail Waterloo, ON N2K 3X4 Email: patrick@e2ftech.com / Web: http://www.e2ftech.com Phone: (519) 745-6847

Gamsby and Mannerow Engineers Glenn Anderson, Branch Manager 330 Trillium Drive, Unit D Kitchener, ON N2E 3J2 Email: ganderson@gamsby.com Web: http://www.gamsby.com Phone: (519) 748-1440 / Fax: (519) 748-1445

Grand River Contracting Inc. Contractors - General Daryl Conly, Business Development 86 Howard Place Kitchener, ON N2K 2Z4 Email: info@grandrivercontracting.com Web: http://www.grandrivercontracting.com Phone: (519) 748-4955 / Fax: (519) 748-0185

Lean Solutions Canada

Mennonite Economic Development Associates Economic Development Allan Sauder, President 155 Frobisher Drive, Unit I-106 Waterloo, ON N2V 2E1 Email: meda@meda.org / Web: http://www.meda.org Phone: (519) 725-1633 / Fax: (519) 725-9083

Memory Funeral Home Funeral Homes David Chatson, Manager 2723 Victoria Street North Breslau, ON N0B 1M0 Email: dchatson@arbormemorial.com Web: http://www.memorycemetery.ca Phone: (519) 648-2888 / Fax: (519) 648-2680

Memory Gardens Cemetery Cemeteries 2723 Victoria Street North Breslau, ON N0B 1M0 Email: ewoodley@arbormemorial.com Web: http://www.memorycemetery.ca Phone: (519) 648-2888

Notebook Galaxy Digital Solutions

Artists - Fine Arts Nicole Daigle, Owner 165 Norfolk Avenue, Cambridge, ON N1R 3V4 Phone: (519) 267-1928

Computer Sales & Service Catrine Klien, Controller 347 Weber Street North, Unit B Waterloo, ON N2J 3H8 Email: accounting@nbgalaxy.com Web: http://www.nbgalaxy.com Phone: (519) 886-1112

HD Style Studio

Omni Basement Systems

Interior Design Services Alison Habermehl, Principal/Owner 43 Culpepper Drive, Waterloo, ON N2L 5K8 Email: alison@hdstylestudio.com Web: http://www.hdstylestudio.com Phone: (519) 954-4128

Waterproofing Contractors Lynn Rooney, Executive Assistant 95 Frid Street, Unit 3 Hamilton, ON L8P 4M3 Email: info@omnibasementsystems.com Web: http://www.omnibasementsystems.com Phone: (866) 875-6664 / Fax: (905) 577-6664

Greenfire Studio


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Today's Safety Training

Property Management Andrew Bass, President 583 Mill Park Drive Kitchener, ON N2P 1V4 Email: andrew.bass@sympatico.ca Phone: (519) 894-9578

Financial Services Products George Van Vliet, Senior Manager - Trade Finance 1 James Street South, 9th Floor Hamilton, ON L8P 4R5 Email: george.vanvliet@scotiabank.com Web: http://www.scotiabank.com Phone: (905) 523-4338 / Fax: 1 (905) 577-8535

Safety Consultants & Training Mike Nowakowski, Owner 8 Tami Court Kitchener, ON N2B 3V2 Email: mjn2@rogers.com Web: http://www.todayssafetytraining.ca Phone: (519) 573-9549

Real Estate Brad Stoneburgh, Broker 360 Bay Street, Suite 200 Toronto, ON M5H 2V6 Email: bstoneburgh@par-med.com Web: http://www.par-med.com Phone: (416) 364-5959 / Fax: (416) 364-2233

Social Venture Partners

Treehaus Collaborative Workspace

Charitable & Community Organizations Lisa Pooley, Coordinator 295 Hagey Boulevard Waterloo, ON N2L 6R5 Email: info@svpwr.org / Web: http://www.svpwr.org Phone: (519) 772-4590

Raymond James Ltd.

Society for Technical Communication Southwestern Ontario Chapter

Charitable & Community Organizations Gabrielle Clermont, Co-Founder & Treasurer 79 Joseph Street Kitchener, ON N2G 1J2 Email: gabrielle@treehaus.ca Web: http://www.treehaus.ca Phone: (519) 239-6972

PAR-MED Realty Limited

Investments Don Shouldice, Branch Manager 100 Regina Street South, Suite 175 Waterloo, ON N2J 4P9 Email: don.shouldice@raymondjames.ca Phone: (519) 743-7774 / Fax: (519) 743-3335

Retire-At-Home Services Home Health Care Services Michael Wolf, Executive Director 85 Roosevelt Avenue Waterloo, ON N2L 2N6 Email: kwc@retireathome.com Web: http://www.retireathomekw.com Phone: (519) 208-2000 / Fax: (519) 208-8749

Schwaben Club Banquet Rooms Don Egley, General Manager 1168 King Street East Kitchener, ON N2G 2P1 Email: schwaben@kitchenerschwabenclub.com Web: http://www.kitchenerschwabenclub.com Phone: (519) 742-7979

Associations & Organizations Robert Cundari, President 404 King Street West, Unit #308 Kitchener, ON N2G 4Z9 Email: president@stc-soc.org / Web: http://www.stc-soc.org Phone: (226) 989-8921

Strongly Worded Letters Communication & Public Relations Consultants Lisa McLean, Owner 23 Galt Street Guelph, ON N1H 3G4 Email: lisa@stronglywordedletters.ca Web: http://www.stronglywordedletters.ca Phone: (519) 240-1748

Urban Wellness Studio Rehabilitation Services Janet Weldon, Owner 40 Francis Street South Kitchener, ON N2G 2A2 Email: info@urbanwellnessstudio.ca Web: http://www.urbanwellnessstudio.ca Phone: (519) 603-0545 / Fax: (519) 603-0551

Waxworks Creative Website Design & Development Ray Coulas, Business Development Manager 100 Conestoga College Blvd, Unit 1101 Kitchener, ON N2P 2N6 Email: jime@waxworks.com Web: http://www.waxworks.com Phone: (519) 895-2008

The Roberts Centre of Integrative Medicine Naturopathic Doctors, Employee Assistance Programs Aaron Samanta, Naturopathic Doctor 1322 Sawmill Road Waterloo, ON N2J 4G8 Email: info@rHealth.ca Web: http://www.rhealthchallenge.ca Phone: (519) 746-0770

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feature

The Benefits of Strategic Community Partnerships BY PHILIP HATCHER Charitable organizations play a vital role in Waterloo Region and throughout every community across Canada and, according to Imagine Canada’s Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating (CSGVP), 84% of Ontario residents over the age of 15 make a monetary or in-kind donation annually. Thus it is safe to propose that most Canadians would agree that helping charitable organizations is beneficial for their local communities, 81% in fact (CSGVP, 2010). What about the role of local businesses in supporting the local community? How does this benefit local business? And how does this benefit community long-term? Both businesses and charities struggle with the many challenges in their respective environments and as competition continues to increase for both, community partnerships become increasingly valuable – but who you partner with is equally important. For local charities, relationships with local businesses help to provide the lifeblood of their success, including new donor and volunteer relationships and new opportunities for increased visibility within the community for the many valuable programs and services they offer. These opportunities allow charitable organizations to continue to benefit the many communities they operate within. For local businesses the value derived from community partner relationships comes in a variety of forms; some not fully understood or recognized by many businesses, including positive branding and brand differentiation, and increased local visibility. Although community partners may add increased branding power, sincerity and proper values alignment is crucial to avoiding a public relations backfire with today’s aware and sometimes skeptical consumers. Aligning your community partner relationships with your customer’s values and your business’s core competencies provides the best branding opportunity, while ultimately supporting your community and your bottom line. Consumers today are expensive to acquire and continuously evolving, from the way they transact with businesses (online transactions, mobile payments, etc.) to the way they make decisions about who they do business with. These new socially conscious consumers pay equal attention to the values of an organization as they do to the cost of a product or service – often even willing to pay more for a product offered by a socially conscious company (Nielsen Online, 2012).

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Marketing to today’s socially conscious consumer means that businesses need to not only get involved within their communities, but to tell their customers about it. In order to be effective, businesses now require a strategic approach to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). A strategic approach to CSR includes many of the things that you and your team may already be doing and simply organizes it into a plan that aligns with your business core competencies, your customers, and the communities you operate within. The important part is telling that story to your customers; whether via traditional media or leveraging the power of the current social media frenzy, your strategy holds little value if your customers do not know about the role your company plays in the community and nationally. For example, the Starbucks™ Shared Planet™ campaign, which has a focused effort in purchasing “the highest quality, ethically sourced and responsibly grown coffee” (www.starbucks.ca, 2012). This campaign clearly aligns with their core competencies, their customers, and has even created a “community feel” at many locations – an impressive accomplishment for an international brand. Strategically generating and implementing a CSR strategy, including strong community relationships, will provide a wealth of benefits including positive branding and increased local visibility. The results go well beyond simply developing and supporting customer relationships, but also directly correlate with employee retention, satisfaction, and productivity, ultimately leading to a positive financial return – all while benefiting your community and your customers.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Philip Hatcher Philip Hatcher is the Director of Marketing & Business Development at Formulating Change - a company that enables users to round up their debit/credit transactions to donate to their favourite charities every time they make a purchase for themselves.


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advocate MAY | JUNE 2012

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Public Benefit? Social Profit? Not-For-Profit? BY JOHN NEUFELD There is a conversation underway about what to call the ‘charitable’ and broader ‘non-profit’ sector. While a consensus has not yet emerged about the new moniker (by the way, I vote for ‘Public Good’), we can all agree that the time has come to recognize the significant contributions of the 88,000 charities and 73,000 nonprofit organizations to the prosperity, health and well-being of our country. In other words, let’s give them a name that truly reflects their worth and one that moves us beyond the stereotype of organizations poorly run, begging for government handouts, and piecing together vital services out of people’s basements. Public Good organizations are an important part of our economic landscape. The nonprofit and voluntary sector in Canada, not including the value of volunteer work, accounts for 7.1 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product (GDP) (Statistics Canada, 2009), more than the auto sector. The sector also employs over 11% of Canada’s economically active population and contributes significantly to the health and well-being of our communities. When businesses and families are thinking about moving here what to do they consider? They look for housing, schools, parks, recreation opportunities, health care facilities, social services, a vibrant arts community, transportation, community safety, and more. Public Good organizations are key providers in each of these areas. House of Friendship alone annually serves over 42,000 people living on low incomes in our community. If you want a strong robust economy and a healthy community, you need a viable and sustainable Public Good sector. Viability and sustainability are two words often heard in the sector today. It used to be that doing good was as simple as people coming together for a need – basically, sharing the community wealth for the benefit of all. Service organizations, churches and businesses were at the forefront of this charity. House of Friendship can trace its roots to a store-front mission in post-Depression Kitchener (1939). We are fortunate to continue to have close relationships with local groups. Soon, the Rotary Club of Kitchener Conestoga will launch its 10th annual Turkey Drive in

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support of House of Friendship’s Christmas Hamper program. Club members and their families will raise over $225,000 to help give their neighbours the gift of food this Holiday season. The charitable spirit is alive and well in Waterloo Region! After World War II came the rise of the Canadian modern welfare state that relied on charities and non-profits to provide services (Imagine Canada, 2005). While this increased legislative and professional standards for charities and non-profits, it also increased government funding, particularly in the fields of health, education and social services. This enabled governments to formalize and stabilize services, and make them more accessible for more people. That was all good and well until the recession of the 1980’s, which ushered in a time of government austerity and the unraveling of this social safety net. From 1992 to 1999, total government program spending fell by approximately 20 percent (Imagine Canada, 2005). Governments short on revenue began to cut back funding for many charities and non-profits, a trend that continues. Government transfers now account for less than 20% of revenue for core non-profit institutions excluding hospitals, universities and colleges (Statistics Canada, 2009). In the 90’s governments also went from funding annual programs to funding short-term projects while at the same time offering workshops that focused on teaching charities how to fundraise. Meanwhile, the need for services did not decline. In fact, it increased as communities and governments continued to rely on charities and non-profits to fill the gaps in services. Unfortunately, House of Friendship continues to serve record numbers this year in its Emergency Food Hamper program, and its Charles Street Men’s Hostel is overflowing. Like many Public Good organizations, House of Friendship has been successful in working with businesses to meet community needs and create opportunities. Family businesses such as Herrles Country Farm Market regularly stock the shelves of our Emergency Food Hamper program. Other small businesses help sponsor House of Friendship fundraising events or host their own e.g. Colour Paradise Greenhouses annual Charity Wreath Silent


cover story

Auction. Some businesses provide gift-in-kind support to help keep our overhead low. For example, Electri-Tech Services Inc. donates used vans to House of Friendship and Waterloo Nissan’s courtesy shuttle delivers the Friendship News to downtown churches. Larger companies like Sunlife and RIM offer matching gift programs and employee incentives for volunteering. Most recently, The Cowan Foundation has supported House of Friendship’s Under One Roof capital campaign to transform women’s addiction services. Many businesses like KPMG and Home Depot support House of Friendship numerous times throughout the year. They ‘give back’, because they understand an investment in their community is an investment in our collective future. Businesses have also influenced the way charities and non-profits ‘do business’. Business plans, funding models, strategic planning, management models, accountability, decision-making models, transparency…all became the new norm during the corporatization trend of the early twenty-first century. And while much of this was helpful in teaching charities and non-profits how to operate to survive, it increased the administrative burden on organizations, challenging them further to do more with less. Today, most successful charities and non-profits have to engage in fundraising; House of Friendship must fundraise 17% or $1 million of its annual operating budget. But fundraising alone will not be enough. Canadian data shows that we are at another cross roads: although people are giving more, the number of Canadians giving and volunteering is stagnant at best (total volunteer hours for 2007 are virtually identical to 2010 and there is little change in donations – Imagine Canada, 2010). If you couple this with demographic trends of an aging population that needs to spend increased amounts on health care and a younger, much smaller population saddled with increasing debt and struggling to find their financial feet, let alone having time to volunteer, you have the recipe for decline, unless… Like most periods of challenge and transition, this one is asking fundamental questions about how we do things and how different sectors work together. ‘Innovation and collaboration’ is the new

language for charities and non-profits. Waterloo Region with its rich legacy of philanthropy, community service and innovation is well-positioned to contribute to this conversation. Local MP Peter Braid’s private member’s motion, M-559, received unanimous support in the House of Commons, and as a result, the Finance Committee is now examining ways to motivate increased giving amongst Canadians. Governor General David Johnston has challenged Canadians to join him in encouraging philanthropy and volunteerism. Community champion Tim Jackson is working with The Task Force on Social Finance, ‘to improve the flow of capital to social enterprises (both for profits and non-profits) and to increase the financing options available to non-profits to become more sustainable’. Locally, social venture partnerships and social profits are putting this idea into action. And Charities and nonprofits are doing their part too, engaging businesses and community stakeholders; House of Friendship is one of many charities participating on community roundtables, committees and cross-sector groups to find new solutions to emerging challenges. While the nature of the partnership has changed, there is no doubt that the relationship between the Public Good sector and business remains critical to the continued prosperity and well-being of our community. From fundraising to creating new models of sustainable finance, businesses are working closely with charities and non-profits to ensure that we can continue to create and achieve sustainable population and economic growth in Waterloo Region.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

John Neufeld John Neufeld has served as Executive Director of the House of Friendship since August of 2009. He holds an MSW from the University of Toronto and an MBA from Wilfrid Laurier University.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2012

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events

Mark Your Calendar BY CHAMBER STAFF

November 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2012

November 14, 2012

November 15, 2012

Survive & Thrive with Greg Viner

Business Expo powered by your local Chambers of Commerce

Point of View: Canada’s Skills Shortage and Literacy Challenge

8:00-9:30am Location: Waterloo Inn Members: $15 Series Pass: $50 General Admission: $20 Series Pass $60

4:00–7:00pm Location: Bingemans Members & General Admission: Complimentary Admission

11:30-1:00pm Location: Delta Kitchener-Waterloo Members: $35+HST General Admission: $45+HST

Powerful 90 minute workshops designed to help move individuals and organizations forward:

The Cambridge, Guelph and Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chambers of Commerce are excited to announce this new initiative. Building on the Chamber After Five regional tradeshow, this largescale exhibitor event has the added feature of 4 speakers spread throughout the event discussing "Technology Solutions and Your Business". Topics will range from eCommerce, Digital Marketing to Search Engine Optimization. As in the past, local restaurants and caterers will be on hand to provide samples of their delicious specialties.

Join TD Bank Financial Groups’ Chief Economist Craig Alexander as he examines the challenges Canada is facing as weak literacy rates in adults continues to build and stark regional differences persist. He will also touch on the state of literacy in Canada, the economic costs of poor literacy skills and policy options to enhance Canada’s literacy performance. A discussion will follow by Professor Mikal Skuterud, professor with the Department of Economics at the University of Waterloo.

Nov 6 - Developing Excellence Nov 13 - Building Powerful Teams Nov 20 - Communicating for Results Nov 27 - Dominating Your Local Online Market Event sponsor:

Event Sponsors:

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events

November 21, 2012

November 27, 2012

December 5, 2012

WalterFedy Networking Breakfast Series presents Elizabeth Witmer

Second Foundation Chamber Young Professionals Networking Event

Rogers Business After 5

7:15-9:00am Location: Holiday Inn Kitchener-Waterloo Hotel and Conference Centre

5:30-7:30pm Location: Borealis Grillhouse & Pub, Kitchener Member Advantage: $5 General Admission: $10

Members: $28+HST General Admission: $35+HST Elizabeth will speak to her experience on transitioning from Queen’s Park, including the challenges of holding an elected office and the aspects of political life that were most difficult to depart from.

You are invited to join us to develop key relationships, build your business network and connect with other young professionals and business leaders at this casual networking event.

5:00-7:00pm Location: Embassy Room at Bingemans Members: Complimentary Exhibit Booth: $50+HST General Admission: $10 (HST included) Come on out to the biggest networking BA5 of the year! Title sponsor:

Title Sponsor: Media Sponsor:

Title Sponsor:

November 28, 2012 Women’s Leadership presents What’s Next For You?

Media Sponsor:

11:30-1:00pm Location: Golf’s Steak House & Seafood Members: $25+HST General Admission: $35+HST

December 11, 2012 Chamber Holiday Open House

Reached that point in your life where you’re wondering what’s next? Join Susan Cranston as she explores ways for women to remain relevant at work, home and in the community. It’s never too late to live your dreams and find ways to build your personal brand.

4:30-6:30pm Location: Chamber of Commerce Members: Complimentary Celebrate the season with fellow Chamber members and staff! We will be accepting donations of non-perishable items or an unwrapped toy.

Holiday Magic Charmed

Annual Corporate Christmas Part y

December 7 or 8

Rushes Restaurant offers individual companies a gala Christmas party dinner buffet, DJ music and dancing!

Rushes Private Dining Room

November and December

Excellence

Planning a Holiday Event?

November-December-January

Delighted

Celebration Ride Rate

Traditional

Christmas Day Dinner Buffet

Tuesday, December 25th

Classic

Rushes New Year’s Eve Dinner

Monday, December 31st

Private

The ultimate venue for festive fine dining for your business, office staff or family gatherings for lunch or dinner. Our variety of party rooms add sparkle to the season for any size group and our menus are magnificent!

December 9-January 7

Why chance the drive home after your event? Treat yourself to our ‘good neighbour’ overnight rate! Our “Over-the-Top-Three-Roast-Buffet” dinner features all of the seasons traditional fare and more!

Bring your party to our party! Our Chef has created a fabulous 5-course gourmet dinner for New Year’s Eve.

475 King Street North, Waterloo ON

www.waterlooinn.com

519.884.0220

1.800.361.4708

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2012

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Investing in Community BY SANDRA WALNECK In our community, the old line, “I gave at the office,” has real truth in it. To make it even more realistic, add “and at my kid’s school, the front door, and the local coffee shop.” When there is need, the business leaders of Waterloo Region respond generously. It is this generosity that led to the successful launch of Social Venture Partners Waterloo Region (SVP), a unique network of communityminded individuals combining financial contributions and professional skills with a passion for community. By pooling dollars and sharing their expertise and volunteer power, SVP is making a difference in our community. Tim Jackson, Vice President, University Relations, University of Waterloo, is one of the people responsible for bringing SVP to our region. While a partner at Tech Capital Partners, Jackson learned about SVP through Rosemary Smith, CEO of The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation. Wanting to increase philanthropy within his own peer group, and particularly within the tech sector, Jackson was intrigued when Smith described SVP’s approach. With 25 chapters in cities in the United States, Canada, Japan, and India, SVP has given more than $41 million dollars (USD) to nonprofits since 2007. After some initial research, Jackson, Smith, and colleague Jacqui Murphy attended an international SVP conference in Dallas in 2009. They returned inspired. In every community where SVP had started, volunteerism and JACQUI MURPHY, CO-FOUNDER OF SVP WATERLOO philanthropy had REGION, SPEAKS AT 8X10, AN ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF generally increased. THE SPIRIT OF POTENTIAL.

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SVP’S KICK-OFF CELEBRATION, NOVEMBER 2010 AT THE TANNERY.

The first step for SVP was to choose a focus for their investment. At the first meeting, as people went around the room sharing their hopes for our community and their personal interests in giving, children and youth came up again and again. It was the unanimous choice. Reviewed annually, it has been renewed for 2011 and 2012. A six month comprehensive application process is undertaken each year to choose the investee. Charities attend an information session. If they meet certain criteria they may submit a letter of interest. “We require that they have at least one full time staff. They must be based in Waterloo Region, be stable, and be focused primarily on our area of focus - child and youth,” explains Jennifer King, Executive Director, SVP. Shortlisted candidates may then submit a full proposal. SVP conducts due diligence reviews of each applicant, which include site visits. This is not a top-down operation; the Investment Committee is comprised of partners.

JENNIFER KING, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF SVP WATERLOO REGION

The appeal of SVP is apparent. It brings together like-minded people who donate not just money but their time to an individual organization, or “investee,” in order to help the organization take its work to the next level.

King describes the last step. “Together, we narrow it down to two organizations and they pitch to the partnership. We make our choice the same night, a vote is taken, and the next day we notify the organizations.”

Hosted by Jackson and his wife Jane Arnold, the first SVP meeting was held at their home in November 2010. Today, SVP has grown to 50 individuals from all backgrounds. For an annual contribution of $5000, partners join as individuals, or as couples. Although it started off as how do we get the technology sector involved, this has broad appeal. We have teachers, lawyers, people from the public sector, and retirees.

Strong Start was the first investee in 2011.The relationship between partners and Strong Start will not end after one year. The funding and volunteer commitment is for a three to five year period. Woolwich Counselling Centre is the 2012 investee; another will be added to the investee portfolio in May 2013. SVPWR donated $65,000.00 this year alone.

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CHILDREN LEARNING THE SOUNDS OF LETTERS AND WORDS WITH THE HELP OF PROPS IN STRONG START’S GET READY FOR SCHOOL PROGRAM.

The value of the volunteer hours that partners provide is harder to calculate. Says King, “We know the money is absolutely necessary for investees. But for even greater impact, partners give their time. It is about wrapping our arms around an organization and giving them everything we’ve got.” Partners assist the investees with everything from strategic planning, to fundraising, to human resource management. Dave Caputo, President and CEO of Sandvine, along with his wife, Lina, joined SVP in 2010. “I loved that my wife and I could join this together. I also loved the idea that there were outlets for getting our kids involved with the investees.”

GUESTS LOOK AT THE DISPLAY OF PHOTOGRAPHY UP FOR BID AT SVP’S ANNUAL 8X10 SILENT AUCTION, HELD TO RAISE FUNDS FOR ITS GRANTING PROGRAM.

It is important to Caputo that he can see where his money is being used. “The difference is writing a cheque and hoping it goes to the right place and writing a cheque and seeing that it goes to the right place.” Knowing that the first investee, Strong Start, makes a real difference in the lives of children is gratifying. “We are profoundly changing the life of the child by taking them from a bottom quartile reader to a top quartile reader. We are affecting their ability to have a meaningful job, and find success in life.”

CHILDREN LEARNING THE SOUNDS AND SHAPES OF LETTERS IN STRONG’S START’S GET READY FOR SCHOOL PROGRAM.

Caputo enjoys the selection process for each investee. “It reminds me a bit of Dragon’s Den. We get to see excellent pitches of deserving charities, and then we can decide which one we can make the biggest impact on with our money and expertise.” King is enthusiastic about the future of SVP. “The whole idea behind SVP is that we can do more TRACY ELOP, CFO OF KIDSABILITY AND together than we can do SVP PARTNER, SPEAKS AT THE ANNUAL 8X10: EXPOSE POTENTIAL EVENT. individually. By pooling our dollars, by getting together in teams and supporting projects. We meet like-minded people, we have fun, and it leads to many other things. We are growing a community of philanthropists.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sandra Walneck Sandra Walneck is a freelance writer living in Waterloo. Sandra and her husband, David Kerr, joined SVP in 2010.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2012

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Are You Doing Everything You Can To Build Your Business? BY JAN VARNER Probably not… like so many of us there are not enough hours in a day to do everything we’d like to or should do.

• Learn when to say "yes" and how to say "no".

You know that as a small/medium sized business you want to do everything you can to capture your share of the explosive growth that this area is and will be experiencing. While at the same time you worry about getting the best employees and whether this community can maintain its quality of life to keep its residents- your customers!

• Keep track of where your giving and community involvement resources are going each year.

Whether you run a coffee shop, a promotional materials business, a consulting business, or a b2b, reaching out to your community paves the way for customer loyalty. You can volunteer for a charity, for a committee at the Chamber, local government, or in your business or home neighbourhood. But…….all of these take time- something that small/medium sized businesses have little. Can you afford not to? The “best use of time” is to ensure any usage of it has many benefits for each activity. What do I mean by that? I mean that you must ensure that your community involvement (time, money, expertise, relationships) is strategic for you and your business. Involvement in your community is a good way for a business to develop a positive reputation, reinforce relationships with customers, and develop closer relationships with community leaders and officials. Strategic community involvement ensures that activities flow from your business case- where are your customers and how can you get alongside them when not just “selling” to them? What community priorities exist that your involvement will enhance - not only those priorities but also your business case? All of the answers to these questions begin to form your giving and community involvement plan. Just as a business plan helps your business stay on course toward its financial goals, a charitable giving and community involvement plan however informal - can help a business achieve its company and community goals. A giving and community involvement plan can help you: • Make wise decisions about which community programs to support.

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• Strengthen ties to your customers and your community.

• Increase the sense of satisfaction you and/or your employees derive from charitable giving and community involvement. Need some help getting started? United Way KW was started by business leaders over 70 years ago and continues to be a strong link between business and community investments. We can assist you in exploring the “strategic” part of your community involvement plan. As United Way KW works with your Chamber to introduce a Small Business Community Champion program, be ready with your community involvement plan! You care about your business. You care about your community. Commit to enhancing both. Change starts with you.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jan Varner Jan Varner was appointed CEO of United Way KW in May 2005. Jan is an active volunteer in the community. In 2007, Jan was nominated for the Michael R. Follett Community Leader of the Year Award with the Greater KW Chamber of Commerce. In 2009, she was nominated for an Oktoberfest KW Women of the Year award. That same year, Jan was honoured with Wilfrid Laurier University’s MBA Alumnus of Distinction Award.


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Š 2012 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. All rights reserved. In this document, “PwC� refers to PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an Ontario limited liability partnership, which is a member firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited, each member firm of which is a separate legal entity. 2175-14 0312

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2012

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Experience China BY LESTER HOLLEY I had an exceptional opportunity to join a group of 123 local business and retired individuals from Waterloo Region who toured China this fall. The Chinese tour operator has worked with over 800 US Chambers taking over 20,000 people a year to China. The tour is 11 or 12 days, goes to Beijing, Shanghai and two small cities, Hangzhou and Suzhou, of three million each outside of Shanghai. The price is under $2500/per person and you will see the sights, hear the sounds and feel the economic boom of China. The package includes the direct flight to China, the flights from Beijing to Shanghai, accommodations in 4-5 star new North American hotels, all food, daily guided bus tours, and admission to most of the attractions on the tours, with some extra side trips available for additional fees. We started at the Jade Museum where jade is crafted into incredible carvings, before touring the “Ming tombs” where almost all of the emperors of that dynasty are buried. Each emperor’s burial plot contains a rather large hall, courtyard and several other outbuildings and an official tomb. Though most are not excavated- they contain the burial chambers of the emperor and empress as well as all of the emperor’s female “concubines” which could number from 10 to 50. From the Ming tombs we drove to the "Great Wall". We had an opportunity to explore a good portion of the wall, a chance to climb to the top and to experience the incredible mountain vistas. The hike on very uneven and well worn steps on the 2000 year old wall is well worth the effort.

AT THE GREAT WALL

The next day started with the Pearl market, the Temple of Heaven, the Summer Palace and the Kunming Lake. We then boarded rickshaws to tour the famous “Hutong” district of old Beijing. Once the homes of the affluent, they have not changed in over 600 years and have few modern amenities. We actually had lunch at the home of our guide’s acquaintance, Leo. Leo cooked a traditional lunch for us and we ate at two tables in his cramped living room. This was a highlight for many on the trip. The home only had one living room, one bedroom and one

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very small kitchen for a family of 5. Leo has quite an interesting hobby of raising crickets for competition. After lunch we were off to tour through the “Forbidden City”, the palace of 1,999 rooms and home to 24 emperors, built when the capital was moved to Beijing in the 1400's. Next on to Tiananmen Square where we walked across the same path the tanks took in 1989. Dinner included the famous Roast Peking Duck.

THE TEMPLE OF HEAVEN WHERE THE EMPERORS PRAYED FOR A GOOD HARVEST

CLOUD ROCK TEMPLE PAGODA

We flew to Shanghai, and drove about an hour to Suzhou where the construction of the Grand Canal from Shanghai to Beijing about 1000 years ago brought significant prosperity as a silk trading town. We took a boat tour on the canals and walked through the old city experiencing life as it was lived 1000 years ago. Next the silk processing plant. After touring one of the famous gardens in the morning, we drove to Hangzhou, another city within an hour of Shanghai. Here we took a boat tour of a famous lake in the inner city


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park, visited Lingyin Buddhist temple and then on to a tea plantation to taste some of the freshest and refreshing green tea at the Longjing Green Tea Co. Finally we arrived at Shanghai. Travelling through the Yangtze River Delta around Shanghai, we saw traditional farmers working in the rice paddies, growing bamboo or harvesting pearls but beside the farms were rows of new apartment towers, or large industrial complexes. We spent a few hours at the famous Yu Gardens bazaar where we could all try our bargaining skills and then attended the “Era Acrobatic Show”, a Chinese version of Cirque du Soleil. We walked to the famous historic waterfront called the “Bund” that would be the landmark heart of the colonial trading city that most of the world would associate with Shanghai. From here we looked across the river to the new skyscrapers including the Oriental Pearl TV tower and the famous “bottle-opener” skyscraper which is one of the worlds’ tallest buildings. That evening we had an unbelievable evening river cruise along the “Bund” with the lights of the city reflecting on the water, the weather was perfect. To quote one group member, “this evening itself was worth the trip.” When I look back on the 11 days I am amazed at how much I learned, how much I saw and how many new friends I made. We all gained a much better appreciation of China’s culture, economy, history and future outlook. Though I wouldn’t call this a “trade mission”, it certainly was a starting point that would help you consider that next step of potentially doing business in China and with a better understanding of culture, history and business practices in your back pocket. It’s affordable enough to consider taking family members as the tour has attractions for everyone. If you or any one you know is interested in participating in the March 30, 2013 departure, don’t hesitate to contact me. I would be happy to share more details and trip information with you.

TOUR GROUP AT THE WEST LAKE GARDEN

ENTRANCE TO TIGER HILL

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lester Holley Lester Holley, BBA, CMA is the VP Finance and Strategic Initiatives at the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Lester has extensive experience in senior roles in finance and strategic planning in both large and small businesses. Lester is also involved on several charity boards. SHANGHAI CANAL CRUISE

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2012

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Corporate Community Building BY ROSEMARY SMITH The importance of companies’ involvement in community building cannot be stressed enough. As our community grows, our need for talented employees grows. It becomes the responsibility of every employer in our Region to ensure they participate in the development of a strong, vibrant employee base.

• Enhance reputation and brand recognition;

Let’s take a moment to understand some of the data for our Region. The percentage of the population made up of immigrants is projected to increase from the current 22% to an estimated 31% in 2030. Currently, all labour force growth is fueled by immigration. By 2030, all population growth will be reliant on newcomers. Also, workers born in Canada are more mobile than past generations.

• Promote business practices that customers find appealing.

The world is certainly shrinking and future workers will be faced with many options related to which community in the world they will choose to call home. Data tells us that the opportunity for challenging and well paid employment is not the only attraction for relocating employees. New employees are looking for assurances that educational opportunities exist. They want to know that the community they choose has lifelong learning opportunities that prepare their families for a future of change and the assurance of skills development that will ensure their employment potential. As well, the availability of family doctors, specialists and hospitals providing world class services are integral to a newcomer deciding to work in a community.

• Support business goals and mission statements; • Improve community and stakeholder relationships; • Illustrate the investment made by the business in its employees; • Assist in creating a healthy community and

In their quest to improve their community, some of today’s corporations have moved beyond the traditional silent, cheque writing model to an entity that is more involved with actual charitable outcomes. These corporations not only want to achieve measurable returns, they also want to be involved with causes for which they have strategic alignment. And, they see tremendous returns such as leadership development and skills building for their employees. This hands-on involvement provides heightened feelings of pride and accomplishment, leading to a much stronger sense of belonging. Corporate investments in a community have a positive and powerful effect on both the business and community. Good works have a way of rippling outward – much like the effect of a stone dropped into a pond. Whether it is a gift of money, free ad space, services, or employee time, all have a way of inspiring others to do more. If you own a business or you’re a corporate executive, your investment in the health of our community is a must. Your employees will be engaged, your corporate image will benefit and your community will thank you and be the reservoir of talented individuals you need to assure the future of your business.

After these employees have assured themselves of housing, healthcare and education opportunities, they turn their view to the richness of the creative and artistic nature of their potential communities. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Most people want to know that when work is done, they have the opportunity to attend concerts, sports offerings, festivals, galleries and have great choice in dining venues. The breadth, depth and vibrancy of the creative offerings are not only an attractor but a true asset for the retention of employees. It is for reasons such as this that the Chamber and its members have long been involved in programs such as Physician Recruitment and the Prosperity Council. As good and necessary as these investments are for the community, they are also very good for business. What impact do they have? Corporate investment can:

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Rosemary Smith Rosemary Smith grew up with a spirit of community and a commitment to it. She first became a resident of Kitchener-Waterloo in 1970 and after a successful career at The Mutual Life of Canada she joined The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation. As their CEO, she works to encourage cross-sectoral leadership and collaboration in an effort to take this community from good to great.


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Karen Mason

Ian McLean

for helping the Chamber continue its goal of eliminating the doctor shortage in Waterloo Region Since 1998 the Chamber and a team of dedicated volunteers have cut the number of residents without a family doctor in half. However the battle is not over. Our Recruitment efforts can only happen through the financial dedication of our Corporate Community through which it is funded advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2012

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member notables

Member Notables Paul Eichinger Joins MTE Consulting as COO Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors Vice Chair Paul Eichinger was appointed Chief Operating Officer of MTE Consultants Inc. effective September 10th, 2012. Mr. Eichinger has over 25 years of experience in municipal planning, business attraction, and real estate. Paul was previously Vice President at Coldwell Banker Peter Benninger Realty and Director of Economic Development at the City of Waterloo. MTE is an employee-owned company providing multidisciplinary services in the fields of civil and structural engineering, environmental science, toxicology and land surveying. The company supports clients in the public and private sectors, providing services to various markets. Since beginning in 1985, MTE has grown to 200 employees with offices in Kitchener, Burlington, and Stratford. Angelo Innocente, retired Vice President at MTE, is also a past board member at the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

Christie Digital Launches Hyphen In a new effort to increase the speed of prototyping and environmental testing, technology leader Christie Digital launched a new division within the company called Hyphen. This is a major initiative from Christie to help business innovate and enter the market faster. The new division is set to revolutionize the speed in which business creates, innovates, and reaches the consumer market. Not only will Hyphen quicken the speed of prototyping but also offer a wide range of environmental testing for a product over a number of different stress, electrical, and mechanical methods. As a division of Christie Digital Systems Canada Inc., Hyphen is able to extend a history of expertise to their customers. With more than 80 years of technological firsts and a long list of product awards, Christie is recognized around the world for its excellence in manufacturing superior and dependable visual display solutions.

Miovision Nominated for Ontario Business Achievement Award Kitchener-based Miovision Technologies has been nominated for the prestigious Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) Award for Small Business at this year’s Ontario Business Achievement Awards hosted by the Ontario Chamber of Commerce. Since their inception seven years ago, Miovision has grown from an idea, graduated through the Accelerator Program at the Accelerator Centre, and now delivers very strong growth in traffic data collection for governments and other organizations around the world. The RBC Award for Small Business recognizes two organizations under 100 employees who are forward-thinking in their overall business practices from escalating sales and new market development to boosting employee morale and skill acquisition, and elevating environmental stewardship and corporate citizenship. They prove that being small does not make them less competitive.

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WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


member notables

Waterloo Region Home Builders’ Association Waterloo Region Home Builders’ Association (WRHBA) was named 2012 Local Association of the Year by the Ontario Home Builders’ Association. The award is presented to the local association that has made significant contributions to the residential construction industry and raised awareness of the sector within their community. Of note among a list of outstanding achievements is WRHBA’s comprehensive government relations and advocacy efforts through eight liaison committees that meet regularly with municipal staff. The association is also committed to encouraging youth to join the industry and supports various projects, including a renowned Student Ambassador Program at three levels of educationhigh school, college and university.

Waterloo Region Home Builders’ Association

Member Notables are taken from local news sources and member submissions. In order to be considered “notable” an item must be an accomplishment or event that is outside of the ordinary course of business and therefore deemed newsworthy. While we would like to include all submissions, space constraints make it necessary for the Advocate editors to choose items that best fit the above criteria and are most timely.

TAKE T AKE T THE HE

LOW-SALT LOW-SALT C HALLENGE CHALLENGE

Throughout the winter winter,, it’ it’ss essential esssential to keep walkways and parking lots ice-free. At the same time, tim me, it’s it’s important to reduce our reliance property.. Excess on salt to help protect the environment ennvironment and our property Exxcess sources salt can seep into the groundd and ultimately affect our sour rces of water.. It can damage drinking water damagge buildings, properties and landscaping, landdscaping, expense. resulting in needless expens se se. Why not become a Smart about Salt™ certified site? It’s a small investment of time that will pay long-term dividends It’ to both you and our commun community. nity. Become certified and make sure your snow removal cont contractor tractor is too.

REGISTER REGISTE R TODAY: TODA AY:

visit www www.smartaboutsalt.com .smartaboutsalt.com or call 647-722-5699 /smartaboutsalt This message is from the Region of W Waterloo, atterloo, a proud member of the Smart about Salt Council. The Smart about Salt symbol is a regist ered trademark of the Smart about Salt Cou uncil. registered Council. Smart about Salt is a trademark of the Smart S about Salt Council.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2012

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sponsors

Helping Us Make Our Vision Possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

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Presented by:

Chamber

Academy TITLE SPONSOR

CHAMBER TRUSTEE

MEDIA PARTNERS advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2012

31


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The Advocate Magazine - November | December 2012  
The Advocate Magazine - November | December 2012  

In this edition of the Chamber advocate publication we look at giving back to the community and how this will help the community but also he...