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advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

Business Improvement Areas- Supporting Small Business An Integrated Approach to Immigrant Employment Success in Small Business Starts With the Right Banking Solutions Did the CEEO Do the Right Thing by Investing in Small Local Businesses or Should We Have Focused on Local Arts & Culture?


advocate NOVEMBER

| DECEMBER 2011

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

FEATURE

Meet the 2011/2012 Chamber Board of Directors

EDITOR:

FEATURE

An Integrated Approach to Immigrant Employment Arran Rowles and Nora Whittington

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Cober Evolving Solutions

COVER STORY

Business Improvement Areas- Supporting Small Business

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Cameron Kozlowski FEATURE

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Did the CEEO Do the Right Thing By Investing in Small Local Businesses or Should We Have Focused on Local Arts & Culture?

Brian Bennett, Don Bisch, Patti Brooks, Mary Sue Fitzpatrick, Mark Garner, Cameron Kozlowski, Ian McLean, Bill Pegg, Arran Rowles, Art Sinclair, Heather Sinclair, Nora Whittington CONTRIBUTORS:

FEATURE

Canadian Chamber Focuses on Competitiveness Issues FEATURE

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Brian Bennett

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Ian McLean

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Darlene Jones djones@greaterkwchamber.com

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Government Action Needed to Assist Small Business Sector

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ADVOCACY

All Governments Need to Cut Red Tape for Business

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Art Sinclair

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ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES:

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

Small Business Drives Local Economy MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Bryan Atcheson and Teri Hetherington November 7, 2011 for January | February January 23, 2012 for March | April March 19, 2012 for May | June May 18, 2012 for July | August July 23, 2011 for Sept | October

The Benefits of Chamber Membership

departments

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Adamski Photography and Chamber staff David MacLellan - dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Don Critelli- dcritelli@greaterkwchamber.com JR Waddell- jwaddell@greaterkwchamber.com

Success in Small Business Starts With the Right Banking Solutions

Bill Pegg

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PHOTOGRAPHY:

ADVERTISING AND SALES:

FEATURE

Heather Sinclair

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Heather Hutchings DESIGN AND PRODUCTION:

Patti Brooks and Mark Garner

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Art Sinclair

EVENTS

Autumn Networking NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS

August 1, 2011 to September 30, 2011 EVENTS

Mark Your Calendar SPONSOR PROFILE

SUBMISSION POLICY:

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio. PUBLICATIONS PERMIT:

#40026716

FOR PERMISSION AND REPRINT REQUESTS

Heather Hutchings - hhutchings@greaterkwchamber.com PRINTED IN CANADA BY:

PUBLICATION OF:

Equitable Life of Canada: A Waterloo Success Story Don Bisch

PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

Increasing Healthcare Investments across Waterloo Region

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Mary Sue Fitzpatrick

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MEMBER NOTABLES

Achieving Success Chamber Members SPONSORSHIP

Chamber Sponsors

POSTMASTER ADDRESS CHANGES: C/O

ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREET NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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message from the chair

Small Business Drives Local Economy BY BRIAN BENNETT Jeff McIntyre indicated in his last Advocate article that he would be handing off the gavel, and I have it firmly in my grasp! I would like to thank Jeff for the passion, enthusiasm, and leadership that he brought to the role and Chamber over the past year, and look forward to his continuing contributions.

Small business owners experience a variety of challenges and emotions, ranging from excitement, exhilaration, frustration, fulfilment, concern and the thrill of success. Throughout all of this there is the satisfaction in knowing that you are steering the ship and controlling your destiny.

I appreciate your confidence in providing me with the opportunity to serve as your Chair for the upcoming year. I am privileged to serve in the same company as the men and women who have served as Chair over the past 125 years. I look forward to working with the Board, Chamber staff, committee members, volunteers, Chamber members, and community partners over the coming year.

It is essential for small business owners to take leadership of their business. This includes identifying your objectives supported by a business plan that needs to be constantly reviewed and adjusted based on business, market and economic conditions.

I would also like to thank all departing Board members along with many returning and new Directors for your stewardship and leadership. We have a new dynamic and diversified Board with a wealth of experience and enthusiasm that will provide a strong foundation for the Chamber during the upcoming year. This is an exciting time to be associated with the Chamber amidst renewed momentum, buzz and energy! We are on a firm financial footing with our membership base growing. Our focus this year will be to build on our ongoing initiatives identified by our members, including advocacy, networking, education, and member services. We will further leverage technology, enhance our peer to peer initiatives, and expand social media to support existing members while attracting new and younger members who are the future of our Chamber. We need and value your input in order to serve you more effectively, so please don't be shy! As Small Business Week for 2011 has recently passed, it is appropriate to reflect on the influence this sector asserts on our economy and community. It has often been said that small business is the engine of the Canadian economy, and Waterloo Region is no different, representing 80% of Chamber member businesses. The creativity and entrepreneurship of this group is essential to grow the local economy and create jobs, while contributing to the health and vitality of our community.

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One of the benefits of a larger company is the ability to collaborate and exchange ideas due to scale. Unfortunately, small business does not always have this luxury due to size or competitive constraints. This is where businesses professionals in an advisory capacity can be an essential sounding board, including accountants, lawyers, bankers, the Waterloo Region Small Business Centre and your Chamber network. The Waterloo Region Small Business Centre is one of numerous government/community programs that provide an invaluable service, including assisting in starting and growing a business, feedback regarding your business, and continued support. Ensure that you take advantage of these centres located across the Region. So let's take this opportunity to celebrate our member's entrepreneurship and success this year with Business Building Community.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Brian Bennett CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS Brian Bennett is a Financial Services Executive and the owner of BME Consulting, a financial consulting services firm.


message from the president

Government Action Needed to Assist Small Business Sector BY IAN MCLEAN As Brian Bennett indicated in his column, small business is the engine of the national and local economy. More importantly these enterprises are the backbones of communities across Canada, employing millions of workers and paying taxes to support essential public services.

potential, including minimizing their regulatory and administrative burdens, lowering the barriers for small firms seeking expansion into global markets, making the tax system simpler, and working to attract immigrants whose skill level matches those needed by small employers.

According to Industry Canada, 98 percent of businesses in Canada, or approximately one million, are small – fewer than 100 employees. Five million people work in small enterprises, or almost half of the private sector labour force. One quarter of small firms operate in the goods-producing sector while three quarters provide services.

Small Business Week of 2011, which officially ran from October 16 to 22, highlighted on a national scale the immense contributions of entrepreneurs to Canada. From its start as a small event in British Columbia during 1979, Small Business Week has grown to become a national celebration with hundreds of events providing training and development opportunities for existing and potential entrepreneurs.

Statistics alone do not fully advance the importance of small business. These organizations offer significant opportunities for enterprising individuals, are a source of new products and innovations, and provide a critical role in promoting competition and economic renewal. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC), in a policy brief released last August, listed a series of unique challenges that owners of small businesses must address on a daily basis in order to remain competitive. Small firms face regulatory compliance costs five times higher than their larger counterparts. Owners of small firms spend more time complying with red tape and less on ensuring the success of their businesses. The result is restricted economic activity and job creation. According to the CCC, small firms face constraints on their ability to raise capital. Access to capital may be particularly challenging for start-up technology companies with new products that do not meet commercial lending collateral requirements. Furthermore, the formation and growth of small entrepreneurial firms and technology companies may be hindered by the overall lack of venture funding capital in Canada. The amount of venture capital financing, relative to the size of our economy, is smaller than the United States. As a result of this predicament, some potentially high-growth companies may fail to expand and prosper in Canada.

The Waterloo Region Small Business Centre, with the support of municipalities, the provincial government, and local businesses continues to provide a vital service for individuals seeking assistance on starting an operation in any and all sectors of the economy. A special thank you is extended to the many volunteers who serve on the Centre’s Board of Advisors. The recent federal and provincial election campaigns placed a renewed emphasis on the importance of small business to the Ontario and national economies. The three major parties all advanced plans to assist this vital sector. As business advocates, the challenge for our Chamber, the Ontario Chamber and Canadian Chamber is to ensure elected parties implement their agendas for small business growth and development. A recovery from the recession depends on it.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian McLean Ian McLean is President and CEO of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

The CCC has proposed a series of recommendations to government for assisting small businesses in reaching their full

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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awards nominations

presents

BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS GALA February 16th, 2012 We come together again to celebrate and recognize those members of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce that have left their indelible mark on the community through their leadership and exceptional involvement in bettering the greater Kitchener Waterloo area. The event of the year is fast approaching! Purchase your tickets today at: www.greaterkwchamber.com or by calling 519.749.6052

Award Categories Business of the Year Award

Integration Award

(over 20 employees)

Business of the Year Award

Michael R. Follett Communty Leader of the Year Award

(20 employees and under)

Environment & Sustainability Award Healthy Workplace Award Hospitality/Tourism Award Innovation Award 6

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

Non-Profit / Charitable Award Professional Development and Workplace Training Award Volunteer of the Year Award Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award


advocacy

All Governments Need to Cut Red Tape for Business BY ART SINCLAIR Many years ago, a colleague of mine at Queen’s Park used to say that governments like to cut red tape sideways. The inference is that cutting a strand of tape lengthwise produces two strands. By attempting to eliminate bureaucracy, governments often create more barriers for businesses who should be focused on creating economic growth and jobs. Three elections in a twelve month time frame allows for analysis of issues that appear at the federal, provincial and municipal levels of government. In retrospect, cutting the regulatory burden for business, particularly small enterprises, is a priority that all elected and non-elected officials need to designate as a priority. When Mike Harris took control of the Premier’s Office in June of 1995, he established a Red Tape Commission to review all provincial regulations affecting business. This initiative fulfilled a major campaign commitment in the now infamous Common Sense Revolution policy document. A decade and one half later, federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty (who was also a member of the Harris government in 1995) announced the establishment of a Red Tape Reduction Commission in his 2010 budget. That same colleague who is referenced above also frequently observed that in politics, nothing is new. Support for Minister Flaherty’s initiative although recycled from Queen’s Park has been strong from business groups across Canada, indicating that resurrected policies voters support are an improvement over innovative and new ideas that no one really likes. In a submission to the federal Red Tape Reduction Commission last February, the Ontario Chamber of Commerce indicated that the burden of red tape costs Canadian business $30 billion annually in compliance expenses alone. Chamber members from across Ontario have cited excessive paperwork for approvals and compliance as a disincentive to investment in their operations. Furthermore, an on-going unclear relationship between the various system partners makes government regulations and related programs difficult to navigate. A submission by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC) to the same commission in June of 2011 noted that red tape is a major barrier for competitiveness and severe disincentive to

investment. Furthermore, commercialization and innovation are impeded heavily by excessive permits and approvals required for compliance. In the portfolio of taxation, the CCC argues, the administrative and compliance burden on businesses of all sizes must be reduced. Most notably, the heaviest share of this burden is carried by small and medium enterprises, translating to the smaller the business the higher the tax compliance cost per employee. Factors contributing to tax compliance costs generally include the high level of paperwork, tax system complexity, frequent changes in legislation, different rules across different jurisdictions, and the requirement to deal with multiple audits (federal/provincial). The CCC recommends that the Red Tape Commission utilize the principle of “think small first” where regulatory regimes incorporate the understanding that many businesses have limited resources for dealing with compliance issues. Before a regulation is drafted, the process needs to be communicated, defining the objective, cost of compliance, and accountability. Sunset clauses should be considered and those business sectors impacted need to be consulted. Regulatory changes should not be made, particularly where costs are associated, without appropriate notice. Lastly, a new regulation that aligns with one already in place at another level of government may not be required unless justified. As new governments and elected officials are becoming established over the next few months, the national, provincial and local business sectors must ensure that red tape reduction remains their priority. Inaction is not an option.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art Sinclair is the Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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perspective on health care

Increasing Healthcare Investments across Waterloo Region BY MARY SUE FITZPATRICK The success of the Chamber’s physician recruitment efforts is highly dependent upon on-going financial support from the provincial government and our community partners to ensure quality local health care. Two recent announcements will provide significant investments for meeting our short and long-term community objectives. Over the next 20 years, the number of seniors in Ontario will double, with the fastest growing group being those over age 80. This will put unprecedented pressure on healthcare systems serving seniors – programs that are already under strain. In order to better address the needs of our rapidly growing senior population, an ambitious partnership involving the Ontario government, postsecondary sector and Schlegel Villages has been established that will develop Canada’s first centre of excellence for research, training and innovation in senior health care and wellness at the University of Waterloo. The full development on Waterloo’s north campus will be built in three phases, starting with a 192-bed long-term care home owned and managed by Schlegel Villages. It will include a specialized building where faculty, staff and students from the University of Waterloo, Conestoga College and the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging (RIA) will work and learn with residents and staff from the adjacent long-term care home. Construction on the first phase should begin in late 2012 and be completed late spring 2014. Two later phases will develop assisted living and independent living for seniors as well as a primary care health centre to create a full continuum of care. "This project is a sterling example of government, university, college and private collaboration," said Ron Schlegel, chair of Schlegel Villages and Founder of the RIA. “We have a university that is tops in Canada for innovation and entrepreneurship, a college with a passion for building a workforce better equipped to meet the needs of growing numbers of seniors, a research institute with a strong track record in practice-relevant research, and a provider of long-term care and retirement that is a leader in the province." Four research chairs are already in place and actively working in the areas of geriatric medicine, geriatric pharmacotherapy,

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vascular aging and brain health, and nutrition, while a fifth chair in enhanced senior care is at Conestoga College. The new learning, research and innovation centre will be operated as part of RIA. The provincial government is also expanding services at Grand River Hospital to ensure local residents have better access to the quality care they need, close to home. With financial support from Queen’s Park, the hospital will be able to provide care for more patients in expanded programs that include mental health, intensive care, ambulatory care and surgical services. This increased capacity will help to decrease wait times for patients. Grand River Hospital’s redevelopment project will provide more services in the following areas: • Acute adult mental health (eight additional beds) • Child and adolescent inpatient mental health program (4 additional beds) • Intensive Care Unit (6 additional beds) • Operating rooms • Ambulatory care • Medicine (30 additional beds) The investment and redevelopment will provide the staff, physicians and volunteers with an improved and modern health care environment in which to deliver high quality care. President & CEO Malcolm Maxwell relayed that Grand River Hospital is delighted to receive this funding. “It will go a long way in helping us provide exceptional care for more patients in our new, expanded care spaces.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mary Sue Fitzpatrick Mary Sue is Vice President Family Physician Resources and Health Advocacy.


feature

Meet the 2011/2012 Chamber Board of Directors

BACK ROW: RON SCHERTZER- NEXTENERGY INC, MARTIN VAN NIEROP- UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO, AL HAYES- WALTERFEDY, SANDRA SCHELLING- CONESTOGA COLLEGE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY & ADVANCED LEARNING, MURRAY COSTELLO- UNION GAS A SPECTRA ENERGY COMPANY, KATHRYN ALLAMBY- MANULIFE FINANCIAL, RICK BAKER- SPIRITED LEADERS CORPORATION, IAN MCLEAN- GREATER KITCHENER WATERLOO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, SANDRA STONE- CONESTOGA MALL, NEIL HENDERSON- BORDEN LADNER GERVAIS LLP, LINDA DANCEY- GRAND RIVER PERSONNEL LTD. FRONT ROW: ROSA LUPO- GOWLINGS LLP, KAREN MASON- EQUITABLE LIFE OF CANADA, TIM SOTHERN- BDO CANADA LLP, LOIS NORRIS- DARE FOOD LIMITED, BRIAN BENNETT- BME CONSULTING, JEFF MACINTYRE- SO THERE BUSINESS SOLUTIONS/WINEXPERT KITCHENER SOUTH, GINNY DYBENKO- UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO, SABRINA FITZGERALD- PWC LLP, CAMERON KOZLOWSKI- BMO BANK OF MONTREAL - COMMERCIAL SERVICES NOT PRESENT: PAUL EICHINGER- COLDWELL BANKER PETER BENNINGER REALTY, BROKERAGE, DAVE JAWORSKY- RESEARCH IN MOTION

*Photography by Adamski Photography

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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networking

Autumn networking 1

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1) (L TO R) PAUL EICHINGER, MURRAY COSTELLO, JEFF KIENAPPLE, DAN FLANAGAN ON THE GOLF COURSE. 2) (L TO R) DOUG DENNON, PETER MCFADDEN AND ROB BERNARD AT THE REGIONAL TRADESHOW. 3) SHELDON RIER FROM MITO GRAPHICS, WITH HIS LIVE DISPLAY.

*Photography by Adamski Photography

4) A GROUP OF ATTENDEES OF THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING, (L TO R) DIANE FREEMAN, MARTIN VAN NIEROP, TOM GALLOWAY AND KEN SEILING. 5) THE ROGERS’ WINNING GOLF TEAM OF (L TO R) RYAN MCCOLL, GREG HEFFERNAN, JAY DETLOR AND STEPHEN LANGAN . 6) GUESTS OF THE AGM ENJOY NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES AFTER THE OFFICIAL MEETING PORTION.

it’s our 125th anniversary!

join us to celebrate a year of special events may 2011 to may 2012 www.greaterkwchamber.com

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networking

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7) A HAPPY GROUP FROM YMCA OF CAMBRIDGE AT THE REGIONAL TRADESHOW. 8) NETWORKING AT THE CHAMBER AFTER 5 REGIONAL TRADESHOW. 9) PAST CHAIR JEFF MACINTYRE PASSES THE GAVEL TO INCOMING CHAIR BRIAN BENNETT

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10) (L TO R) RICK BAKER, RUTH KENNEDY AND IAN MCLEAN AT THE AML/ROGERS CHAMBER CONNECTIONS HELD AT THE WATERLOO WELLINGTON FLIGHT CENTRE. 11) INTRODUCTION OF THE 2011-2012 CHAMBER BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

*Photography by Adamski Photography

THE RECORD REACHES MORE ADULTS THAN THE TORONTO PAPERS COMBINED!

84,600 MORE ADULTS DAILY

TToo advertise advertise or or ppartner artner with with tthe he Waterloo Waterloo Region Region R Record ecord please call 519-894 519-894-2250. 4-2250.

77,200 MORE ADULTS ON SATURDAY* *Source: NADbank速 2009

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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new members

August 1, 2011 to September 30, 2011 Accqtech

Danipa Business Systems

LAF Design Inc.

Computer Networking Todd Raymore, Chief Technology Officer 2969 Kingsway Drive, Unit 606 Kitchener, ON N2C 2H7 Email: todd@accqtech.ca Web: www.accqtech.ca Phone: (519) 880-3693 / Fax: (519) 894-0481

Website Design & Development Danielle Reynolds, Vice President Sales and Marketing 38 Indigo Street Kitchener, ON N2E 4E6 Email: info@danipa.com Web: www.danipa.com Phone: (519) 748-6874 / Fax: (519) 342-6332

Graphic Designers Lee Fitzgerald, Creative Director 203 Corrie Crescent Waterloo, ON N2L 5W3 Email: lee@laf-design.com Web: www.laf-design.com Phone: (519) 653-6042

Dan's Discount Windows

Graphic Designers Jennifer Malcolm, Creative Director Designer 418 Robert Ferrie Drive Kitchener, ON N2P 2Y3 Email: malcolmcc@rogers.com Web: www.malcolmcc.com Phone: (519) 841-2841 / Fax: (519) 894-1708

AIM Corporate Health Health Care Supplies & Service Mike Sehl, Medical Director 340 Hagey Boulevard Waterloo, ON N2L 6R6 Email: msehl@aimhealthgroup.com Web: www.aimcorporatehealth.com Phone: (519) 747-2677

All Occasion Wrapping

Mondor Design Associates

Packaging Materials & Service Sherri Vautour, Owner 37 Fourth Avenue Kitchener, ON N2C 1N9 Email: sherri@alloccasionwrapping.ca Web: www.alloccasionwrapping.ca Phone: (519) 880-5337

Dunrite Manufacturing Inc. Manufacturers Gordon Holden, President 666 Colby Drive, Unit B Waterloo, ON N2V 1A2 Email: dunrite.mfg@gmail.com Phone: (519) 886-9700 / Fax: (519) 886-4043

Graphic Designers Philip Mondor, Owner 33 Flanders Road Breslau, ON N0B 1M0 Email: philip@mondorassociates.com Web: www.mondorassociates.com Phone: (226) 444-2076

The Athletic Club (Waterloo) Inc

Grand & Toy

National Home Health Care

Health, Fitness & Exercise Service Mike Nolan, Managing Partner 405 The Boardwalk Waterloo, ON N2T 0A6 Email: mnolan@the-athletic-club.ca Web: www.theathleticclubs.ca Phone: (519) 256-2010 / Fax: (519) 256-2015

Office Supplies Suzanne Birch, Inside Account Manager 200 Aviva Drive Vaughan, ON L4L 9C7 Email: suzannebirch@grandandtoy.com Web:www.grandandtoy.com Phone: 1(416) 401-6300

Home Health Care Services Corrine Chenier, Manager 148 Weber Street East Kitchener, ON N2H 1C9 Email: cchenier@rogers.com Phone: (519) 578-3188 / Fax: (519) 578-9109

Cascade

GWS Water Store & Supply Co. Ltd.

Employment Agencies Julie Spilger, Manager 871 Victoria Street North Unit 226 Kitchener, ON N2B 3S4 Email: julie.spilger@cascadedisability.com Web: www.cascadedisability.com Phone: (519) 883-7138 / Fax: (888) 897-9038

Water Equipment, Service & Supplies Jeremy George, Owner 183 Frobisher Drive Waterloo, ON N2V 2G4 Email: jeremyg@gwsltd.ca Web:www.gwsltd.ca Phone: (519) 747-2227 / Fax: (519) 747-9613

Health, Fitness & Exercise Service Annie Puran, Director, Busines Services & Development 585 Queen Street South Kitchener, ON N2G 4S4 Email: info@myohcc.com Web: www.myohcc.com Phone: (519) 208-7125 / Fax: (519) 208-6082

Chervin Kitchen & Bath

Human Resources Professionals Association (HRPA)

Kitchen Cabinets Jeff MacIntyre, Business Development Manager 20 Benjamin Road Waterloo, ON N2V 2J9 Email: jeff@chervin.ca / Web: www.chervin.ca Phone: (519) 885-3542 / Fax: (519) 884-2512

Dairy Queen - Laurelwood Restaurants Robert Maxwell, Owner 600 Laurelwood Drive, Unit 140 Waterloo, ON N2V 0A2 Email: dqwaterloo@yahoo.ca Phone: (519) 883-0000

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Windows & Doors Dan Kuepfer, Owner 199 Victoria Street South, Kitchener, ON N2G 2C1 Email: dansdiscount@bellnet.ca Web: danswindows.ca Phone: (519) 579-1994 / Fax: (519) 579-4292

Malcolm Creative Communications

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Associations & Organizations Carla Calderon, Territory Marketing Specialist 150 Bloor Street West, Suite 200 Toronto, ON M5S 2X9 Email: ccalderon@hrpa.ca Web: www.hrpa.ca Phone: 1(416) 923-2324 / Fax: 1(416) 923-7264

Ontario HealthCare Clinic

Pet Valu - Bridgeport Road Pet Shop & Supplies Kevin Brooks, Owner 94 Bridgeport Road East Waterloo, ON N2J 2J9 Email: taskkinc@rogers.com Web: www.petvalu.com Phone: (519) 886-6234


new members

Pet Valu - Highland Center

Rees Communications Inc.

Tilted Pixel Inc.

Pet Shop & Supplies Kevin Brooks, Owner 324 Highland Road West Kitchener, ON N2M 5G2 Email: taskkinc@rogers.com Web: www.petvalu.com Phone: (519) 744-2941

Marketing Consultants Gillian Rees, Owner 579 Altheim Crescent Waterloo, ON N2T 2Z5 Email: gillian@reescommunications.com Web: www.reescommunications.com Phone: (519) 880-1736

Website Design & Development Matt Inglot, Chief Executive Officer 279 Weber Street North, Unit 119 Waterloo, ON N2J 3H8 Email: info@tiltedpixel.com Web: www.tiltedpixel.com Phone: (519) 885-2922

Pet Valu - Ira Needles

RT Projects Inc.

WingsUp - Kitchener

Pet Shop & Supplies Kevin Brooks, Owner 235 Ira Needles Boulevard Kitchener, ON N2N 0B2 Email: taskkinc@rogers.com Web: www.petvalu.com Phone: (519) 744-7475

Management Consultants Robert Taweel, President 105 Pinnacle Drive, Unit 17 Kitchener, ON N2P 1B8 Email: info@rtprojectsinc.com Web: www.rtprojectsinc.om Phone: (519) 342-6629 / Fax: (519) 342-6629

Restaurants Chris Rau, President 2399 Kingsway Drive Kitchener, ON N2C 1A5 Email: crau@rogers.com Web: www.wingsup.com Phone: (519) 893-0202

Pet Valu - Stanley Park

Teletek Structures Inc.

WingsUp - Waterloo

Pet Shop & Supplies Kevin Brooks, Owner 1005 Ottawa Street North Kitchener, ON N2A 1H2 Email: taskkinc@rogers.com Web: www.petvalu.com Phone: (519) 744-7411

Engineers Laura Marciniwe, President 490 Dutton Drive, Unit A2 Waterloo, ON N2L 6H7 Email: laura@teletekstructures.com Phone: (519) 954-8714 / Fax: (519) 954-8716

Restaurants Chris Rau, Vice President 65 University Avenue, Unit 18 Waterloo, ON N2J 2V9 Email: crau@rogers.com / Web: www.wingsup.com Phone: (519) 725-5252

Lawyers Thomas Popek, Associate 3400 HSBC Center Buffalo, NY 14203 Email: kgibbons@phillipslytle.com Web: www.phillipslytle.com Phone: 1(716) 847-5469 Fax: 1(716) 852-6100

The Children's Wish Foundation of Canada - Kitchener Charitable & Community Organizations Anne Boehm, Regional Development Specialist 725 Westney Road South, Unit 7 Ajax, ON L1S 7J7 Email: anne.boehm@childrenswish.ca Web: www.childrenswish.ca Phone: 1(905) 427-5353 / Fax: 1(905) 427-0536

Your Advantage Insurance Insurance Lesley Burke, Broker 122 Herbert Street Brantford, ON N3R 4A5 Email: lesleyburke@sympatico.ca Web: www.youradvantageinsurance.com Phone: 1(519) 752-0911 / Fax: 1(519) 752-0948

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advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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feature

An Integrated Approach to Immigrant Employment BY ARRAN ROWLES AND NORA WHITTINGTON In 2009, the Waterloo Region Immigrant Employment Network (WRIEN) participated in engaging the community in discussions about the potential to improve the lives of immigrants in Waterloo Region through the development of a local Immigration Partnership. WRIEN worked with community partners to launch the Immigration Partnership in 2010. After extensive community planning and consultation, the Integration Task team made a recommendation that “WRIEN be integrated within the Immigration Partnership.” As part of this process, it was recognized that WRIEN could best achieve its employer engagement mandate by being part of this broader initiative. On August 1, 2011 WRIEN formally integrated into the Immigration Partnership. WRIEN, which existed from 2006-2011, acted as a catalyst for a number of initiatives that were focused on engaging employers to hire Internationally Trained Immigrants (ITI’s). During these five years, programs such as Mentorship and Internship were established and many educational and networking events were held. Many employers in Waterloo Region participated and acted as leaders in recognizing the valuable role that ITI’s could play in creating a diverse and competitive business environment. The new Immigration Partnership is comprised of a broad range of stakeholders, including employers, service providers, immigrants, municipal government representatives, health care providers, and other representative groups. The Immigration Partnership is built on three pillars: Settle, Work, and Belong. Current funding for the Immigration Partnership has been provided by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), the Region of Waterloo and the United Way. The mandate of the Immigration Partnership is to help facilitate successful settlement and integration of immigrants and refugees in Waterloo Region by creating and enhancing partnerships. Collaborative strategies such as coordination, information sharing, problem-solving and implementing strategies for change will be used to create a system whereby immigrants have opportunities to engage fully within their communities, including within the business sector. The integration of WRIEN into the Immigration Partnership is currently underway. The goal is to continue various WRIEN programs and the support it has provided to both employers and service providers. Programs such as Mentorship and Internship will continue to support individual ITI’s in their goals of guiding job-ready newcomers into the workforce. An Action Group and

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Advisory Group have been launched to support the “Work” pillar and members of these groups will focus on developing opportunities to engage and support employers in the recruitment and retention of ITI’s. Some members of the former WRIEN Steering Committee will sit on the new Action Group along with others from the community. Additionally, work has begun to ensure that job postings are distributed in an organized manner and all newcomers have the opportunity to access them. We are pleased that our linkage to the Chamber of Commerce and its members will continue throughout this process. While some things, with respect to the work of WRIEN, will remain the same, the launch of the Immigration Partnership and the integration of WRIEN bring new opportunities for collaboration. As part of this process we want to engage with as many employers as possible. We value your ideas and input and would welcome hearing from you. Please feel free to contact us if you wish to become involved or have an idea that will help us to reach our goal of ensuring that immigrants and refugees have access to employment that matches their training and qualifications while enriching the workplace environment. The staff member responsible for supporting the “Work” pillar is Nora Whittington. She can be reached at nwhittington@regionofwaterloo.ca , 519-575-4757 ext. 3173.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Arran Rowles & Nora Whittington Arran Rowles joined the Immigration Partnership in May 2011 and works as the Manager.

Nora Whittington previously worked for WRIEN and is now the Community Engagement Coordinator for the “working” pillar of the Immigration Partnership, where she has worked since July 2010.


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cover story

Business Improvement Areas Supporting Small Business BY PATTI BROOKS AND MARK GARNER

Downtown Kitchener The Downtown Kitchener BIA formally known as the KDBA (Kitchener Downtown Business Association) has seen significant change over the last few years. We conducted a rebrand of the organization a few years back providing clarity in the community on the significant role we play in downtown Kitchener. BIA’s play a specific role in the community mandated by the Municipal Act and have very clear roles based on that definition which is marketing, events and advocacy based. We have worked on some significant projects over the last couple of years with an increased focus on traffic flow in the core through the expansion of a vibrant and diverse event portfolio, taking into consideration all months of the year. The strategic direction of the BIA has led to a partnership with the City of Kitchener in the development of a retail attraction program. This program will generate increased traffic flow downtown and will support and grow existing businesses. Our members realize that infilling vacant space with complementary business opportunities will provide for an overall retail experience in the downtown, which will subsequently provide an overall healthy business community. We are starting to see transitional change and investments in the core with the addition of businesses like Gloss, White Tiger and Bead Boutique to name just a few recent additions. We could not do this program without the partnership and investments the City of Kitchener has made in recent years in collaboration with the Region of Waterloo, Government of Ontario, and Federal Government on these catalyst projects. The King Street Master Plan and related redevelopment was one such catalyst project to bring forward a unique design which is

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pedestrian friendly and more flexible, providing a key driver in the evolution of downtown. This is a streetscape which is now keenly sought after by other municipalities and BIAs and has won awards for the team at Kitchener City Hall. The Downtown Kitchener BIA has implemented “Downtown Incentive Cards” reaching large employers in the core as well as the surrounding neighbourhoods, showcasing retail offerings and shop local initiatives for the downtown. Additionally, we offer ongoing support to our membership through increased training in partnership with UpTown Waterloo BIA and the Waterloo Region Small Business Centre. We are running ongoing training sessions to help the membership develop the skills needed in today’s small business environment, such as the application of social media tools and helping them to remain competitive in a tough retail market. By marketing downtown as a destination, we are showcasing the importance of Downtown Kitchener on the health of the overall community and reestablishing the core as the economic heart of the community it once was. We have developed this program in a partnership which will focus on the BIA looking after the core of the boutique business opportunities - those which are stores that may have 1 to 5 retail locations, and the City of Kitchener focus is on those operations above 5 employees or franchise type businesses. We are also focusing on attracting businesses that are successful in other geographic locations around southwestern Ontario, new businesses looking at start up opportunities or even the relocation of businesses on existing side streets to the main King Street locations.


cover story

UpTown Waterloo Small businesses are the job engines that make our economy. As a Business Improvement Area, UpTown Waterloo is aware of the challenges for small business and we are committed to assisting in the promotion of a strong, effective and successful business community in the city core. It is the mandate of all BIA’s to “oversee the promotion and beautification of the core area and to promote the area as a business and shopping destination.” Our office and Board of Directors communicate with our businesses on a regular basis through newsletters, personal visits and of course, our open door policy. Through the exchange of information, experience and idea sharing, we support all businesses in UpTown Waterloo with several initiatives. Beautification projects include floral displays throughout the core, Holiday/Christmas décor, maintenance and cleaning of our streets and sidewalks, accessibility issues and a graffiti removal program to name a few. Marketing and advertising co-op opportunities are available year round and festival and events bring thousands of guests to our core. Parking programs are available to our UpTown Waterloo employees with two parking initiatives in partnership with the City of Waterloo.

variety of business in UpTown Waterloo, a healthy financial sector, proud independent business owners, wonderful samplings of eateries from casual to café, fine dining to international cuisine, as well as health and wellness providers make UpTown Waterloo a popular shopping destination. A good percentage of people living in our core area certainly help with the vibrancy and health of UpTown Waterloo.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Patti Brooks & Mark Garner Patti Brooks is Executive Director of UpTown Waterloo Business Improvement Area.

Mark Garner is Executive Director of Downtown Kitchener Business Improvement Area.

We lobby on behalf of our membership at municipal and provincial levels through our association with the Ontario BIA Association. Our efforts to maintain and revitalize UpTown Waterloo are and always will be ongoing. Having a wonderful

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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events

Mark Your Calendar BY CHAMBER STAFF

November 3, 2011

November 9, 2011

November 23, 2011

Knightsbridge Leadership Series Presents Marketing Your Product Internationally

Point of View with James Temple from PwC

Point of View with Jim Prentice

7:30am-9:00am Location: Hacienda Sarria Member: $35 General Admission: $50 Pre-registration is required. A key aspect to marketing a product internationally is possessing a strong brand identity - part of which is “country of origin” influence. Dr. Brad Davis, Laurier Chair in Brand Communication and Associate Professor of Marketing, will be discussing why branding is of the utmost importance to Canada’s economic growth both in domestic and international markets. Dr. Davis will focus on how to build strong Canadian brands and in what ways this branding will enable Canadian founded brands to obtain more recognition in the marketplace. Title Sponsor:

Speaker provided by:

11:30am-1:00pm Location: Bingemans, Embassy Room Member: $35 General Admission: $45 Pre-Registration is required With all of the demands on small business today, how do emerging companies look at integrating good corporate responsibility practices into their day-to-day operations? Hear more about a recent PwC report looking at Canadian Private Companies and see how these findings relate to developing the business case behind “CSR” and how it translates into the small business environment. Title Sponsor:

11:30am-1:00pm Location: Waterloo Inn Conference Hotel Member: $35 General Admission: $45 Pre-Registration is required. Protecting Canada in Uncertain Times: Join the Honourable Jim Prentice, Senior Executive Vice-President and Vice Chairman of CIBC, as he will describe how Canada can chart a different course in a period of global economic uncertainty Title Sponsor:

Event Sponsor:

November 24, 2011 Research In Motion Chamber Young Professionals Presents Comedy Night 7:00pm-10:00pm Location: Rum Runner’s Pub – Yuk Yuk’s Member: $10 General Admission: $15 Pre-Registration is required. Come out to the Chamber Young Professionals Comedy Night to have a laugh, make new connections, and learn how to entertain clients in a non-traditional environment! Title Sponsor:

What you want to protect the most ... We Protect the Best! Insurance is the last thing business owner’s think of when times are good. But, when there’s a claim it’s their first call. With Erb and Erb, you know you have best coverage possible. Get an Expert Opinion on your Commercial Insurance Needs insure@erb-erb.com · 519-579-4273 · www.erb-erb.com · Commercial Property · Commercial Auto · · Professional & Business Liability · Surety ·

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events

December 1, 2011

December 7, 2011

December 9, 2011

Networking Breakfast Series Presents Social Media Strategies

AML/Rogers Chamber Connections

Knightsbridge Leadership Series Presents Leading Change

7:15am-9:00am Location: Holiday Inn Kitchener-Waterloo Member: $28 General Admission: $40

5:00 PM - 7:00 PM Location: Chervin Kitchen & Bath 20 Benjamin Road, Waterloo ON, N2V 2J9 Member: Complimentary Admission General Admission: $10 Exhibitors: $75

7:30am-9:00am Location: Hacienda Sarria Member: $35 General Admission: $50 Pre-Registration is required.

Just a decade ago, the term 'social media' was virtually non-existent in the lexicon of the business world. Now, it has become a valuable (and in some sectors necessary) tool for networking, marketing, customer service and a variety of other facets of doing business, from the local level right up through to international organizations. Join Erin and Ryan Schnarr of Springpad Media as they discuss strategies for success, potential pitfalls and field your questions about how using social media can benefit your business.

Does networking intimidate you or do you thrive on meeting new people? Come out to this casual event with friendly faces and easy conversation that provides an opportunity for B2B networking. Title Sponsor:

Media Sponsor:

The skills needed to facilitate change are key competencies for those wanting to make a difference. Uncertainty and complexity define our world and competencies in change management play a critical role in helping individuals and organizations successfully adapt. Organizations that fail to recognize and value this do not survive. Join Dr. Gene Deszca, Professor and the Associate MBA Director at Wilfrid Laurier University, as he discusses the two important areas of change management. Title Sponsor: Speaker provided by:

Media Sponsor:

December 14, 2011 Chamber Holiday Open House 4:30pm-6:30pm Location: Chamber of Commerce Office 80 Queen Street North, Kitchener Complimentary / RSVP required Please join us and celebrate the season! Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and beverages provided. Come and see familiar faces and make new connections to welcome the Holiday Season!

Holiday EASON

S

PLANNER

CORPORATE CHRISTMAS PARTY - DECEMBER 9th or 10th A great opportunity for smaller size companies to join in for a big size Christmas Party in Rushes Restaurant! PRIVATE HOLIDAY FUNCTIONS Celebrate the season with family, friends or business associates in Rushes Private Dining Room , perfect for small luncheons or large dinners! CHRISTMAS DAY DINNER BUFFET - DECEMBER 25th Let us look after Christmas dinner and the cleanup! NEW YEARS EVE Five course dinner plus DJ music and dancing in Rushes Restaurant! NEW YEARS DAY BRUNCH Celebrate 2011 with the finest brunch in town! www.waterlooinn.com 475 King Street N., Waterloo ON 519.884.0220 or 1.800.361.4708

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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feature

Success in Small Business Starts With the Right Banking Solutions BY CAMERON KOZLOWSKI Success in small business includes having the right banking products and services to support your business foundation. As a result, small business owners will have more time to plan and execute on their business strategy to the take their business to the next level of success. The banking sector provides small business a host of services to meet their needs. The number of services and which ones a small business needs or should consider can be an overwhelming task. Talking with your financial service provider’s small business banking advisor is the best place to develop a customized solution that will work for you. By key questions, you can help prepare for such conversation and determine what products and services are needed for your business. Below are some key questions to consider:

Q: I am a small business. Where should I start? Consider some of the following options to help you get started as a small business owner. • Start with a cost-efficient business chequing account. Look for a banking plan with a fixed monthly fee matched to your business volumes to minimize your banking fees. • Start with online banking. You will remain completely up-to-date with 24/7 access to your accounts.

Q: Money in. Money Out. How do I control the flow? You can control the flow of cash with easy and accessible cash management solutions for receivables and payments. • Control the flow with debit and credit cards. Encourage your customers to pay with MasterCard, Visa, Amex and Interac payments. This ensures money is deposited into your account either the same or next business day. • Control the flow with Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Your customers can pre-authorize their regular payments (like a fitness membership fee), ensuring you are always paid on time.

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• Control your expenses with a Credit Card for Business Pay everyday expenses and take advantage of interest-free borrowing until the payment date. A consolidated expense statement means less time spent on reconciliation and more on business.

Q: I’d like to take care of my employees. Can a bank help me out? Banks have products and services to help you aim for high morale and low turnover to boost productivity. • Ensure paydays run smoothly. You can save the time you spend on payroll administration and use such time to build your business. Banks have partner relationships with industry Pay Roll Services. The service can help you stay current with provincial and federal legislation, file remittances to government agencies on your behalf, manage employee data and ensure your employees are paid accurately and on time. • Ensure employees feel valued with employee benefits. You can keep employees satisfied with a Group Banking Plan. Financial institutions will offer your employees value-added banking services and products such as free banking for several months, preferred-rate loans, investments and retirement planning.


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Q: My business is growing. How do I keep up? With access to bank financing, your business can continue to grow. • Keep up with a Business Line of Credit. For day-to-day operating requirements and for exceptional opportunities, a line of credit can provide access to additional funds to qualified businesses at the time it is needed most. • Keep up with financing for fixed assets and real estate. You can ensure financing comes with payments you can handle. Business Loans and Commercial Mortgages can make major purchases possible with a range of terms, a choice of amortization and a repayment schedule suited to your needs.

Q: I’m making money. What’s the best strategy for investing it?

• Plan and manage your own investments. With an online Brokerage Account and market information, locate and make your own investment decisions from a range of financial products and options. • Plan to get expert advice. Add confidence to your investing. Build and maintain a portfolio for your business with a Financial Planner or Registered Investment Professional. The above questions and answers touch on the key products available. There are also a number of more specialized products and services available. Now, you are ready to take advantage of one-on-one advice from a knowledgeable small business banking professional who can help you choose a customized business solution that makes sense for your particular business.

When your business generates extra cash, choose from these options to invest your money. • Plan to have money available when it’s needed. Your money can grow without being “locked in” with a High Rate Savings Account. • Plan for secure growth. With Guaranteed Investment Certificates or Term Deposit Receipts, you can choose from a variety of terms and flexible options to meet your shorter or longer term goals. • Plan for long term growth. Mutual Funds offer the potential for higher returns and easy access to global markets.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Cameron Kozlowski Cameron Kozlowski is the Commercial Banking Area Manager, Waterloo Region (Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge), at BMO Bank of Montreal. Cameron is on the Board of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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Did the CEEO Do the Right Thing by Investing in Small Local Businesses or Should We Have Focused on Local Arts & Culture? BY HEATHER SINCLAIR In the recent edition of Rotman Magazine, Roger Martin and Jennifer Riel point out that “technology is meaningless until and unless it solves a human problem.” They use the example of Mark Zuckerberg and his Facebook phenomenon to illustrate that Zuckeberg’s art side (psychology and computer science majors) was instrumental in the creation of something that addressed not only how things work, but how people work (Rotman Magazine, Fall 2011, University of Toronto). The success of Facebook’s modern marriage between art, science and technology has defined the early part of this century, and Facebook is now a household word, reaching every corner of the globe. At its heart is the notion that modern innovation comes out of a symbiosis between art, science and technology. The idea that this cross-discipline partnership should be extended beyond individuals to entire communities is a key principle on which the Creative Enterprise Enabling Organization (CEEO) was founded. In Waterloo Region, science, arts and technology do not yet enjoy equal representation at the innovation table. CEEO has recognized that Canada’s technology hub needs to significantly bolster its creative sector; not only to make the Region more attractive for the talent that arrives from far and wide to work and live here, but also for the arts to be heard along side of the science and technology titans that dominate the Region. Providing the arts with an equal voice to science and technology (including industrial and advanced manufacturing) is no small task and the CEEO has its work cut out for it. First, it must enforce the notion that the arts sector is made up, in part, of small businesses and entrepreneurs. This group deserves the same treatment as any start-up business. The region must undergo a paradigm shift so that the idea of small business encompasses arts businesses as well. Creative sector initiatives must be seen as being as vital to all aspects of the community as their “familiar” business counterparts. To accomplish this the CEEO must secure investment for the sector and strategically invest in it, while providing the services and resources it needs to succeed. It will happen on various levels and include micro-financing, mentoring, book keeping, bulk purchasing, business planning, as examples. All the while, the CEEO must make every attempt at tracking the sector’s economic impact – before, during and after its direct involvement. The CEEO recently invested $50K total into twelve local entities. The criteria - the money had to be used to enable sustainable revenue growth. 59 applications were received ranging from individual visual artists to one of the largest cultural employers in

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the area, and everything in between (retailers, production studios, festivals, magazines, galleries, education programs, and tourist destinations). One-third of applicants sought capital investment to grow their businesses reinforcing CEEO’s priority to address micro-financing to enable the sector to better compete. As the CEEO works to change the nature of the dialogue between arts, technology and science, it changes the thinking and nomenclature around business and art itself. Challenging the longstanding perceptions that our approaches to enabling sustainable businesses for the Region is by definition separate and distinct than we take toward investing in the economic viability and sustainability of arts and culture moves the Region toward ending the ghettoization of its creative sectors, and this is a good thing when it comes to attracting investment, talent and business to the area. To compete with places like Austin ‘Creative City’ Texas, look no further than our own backyard. Our creative leaders are visionaries who can galvanize the Region as truly distinct as we move into the 21st Century. The Perimeter Institute has attracted Stephen Hawking, and what Rob Deyman has done with the TD Kitchener Blues Festival is as notable bringing in nearly 150,000 people over 4 days - and we should note the relative local economic impact. The brand equity inherent in the Boathouse is the stuff that would be the envy of many “traditional” small businesses and cannot be bought. The list goes on: Cambridge’s Folk Festival and Library; Waterloo’s Uptown Jazz Festival, the Jazz Room; Kitchener’s RareFunk, Kwartz Lab, Walper Hotel; the Region’s Art Allies, Pat the Dog, The New Quarterly, to name but a few. The potential for the area to be as unique and innovative as anywhere on the world stage is real. We are rich with content, innovation and leadership. It’s in our DNA, has been growing for over 200 years and informs our inherent and authentic brand. The tipping point is here and together, we are about to accelerate the creative vitality and sustainability of our communities well beyond our borders. The economic impact for the Region is beyond our imagination. ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Heather Sinclair Heather Sinclair is the CEO of the Creative Enterprise Enabling Organization.


feature

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www.hrpa.ca/benefits advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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sponsor profile

Equitable Life of Canada: A Waterloo Success Story BY DON BISCH Equitable Life of Canada’s story is one that many small business owners can likely relate to. It began in November 1920 when Sydney Tweed started the Company in a 2nd Floor Office on King Street in Waterloo with little more than a rented typewriter, $150 in furniture and just one clerk. But Tweed didn’t let his modest beginnings hold him back. Within one week of starting The Ontario Equitable Life and Accident Insurance Company, he had chalked up $300,000 in sales. And by the end of the first year, Equitable Life had more than $7 million of insurance in force – a record unequalled by any Canadian life insurance company.

means offering a wide selection of competitive individual life and health, savings and retirement, and group products to meet the financial and health needs of Canadians.

Equitable Life in the Community Equitable Life has always believed in giving back to the communities in which we operate, and we support various charitable initiatives in Waterloo Region. Most notably, our annual United Way campaign helps strengthen our community and improves the quality of life for those living in Waterloo Region. In 2010, our employees also demonstrated tremendous generosity through the "Movember" fundraiser for prostate cancer research and awareness, and our annual Adopt-aFamily initiative to support local needy families during the holiday season. As well, Equitable Life provides financial support to a number of other educational and healthcare institutions in Waterloo Region, including:

In 1936, the name changed to The Equitable Life Insurance Company of Canada, demonstrating the SYDNEY TWEED, FOUNDER, commitment to provide all Canadians with EQUITABLE LIFE OF CANADA. protection. In 1963, Equitable Life adopted a mutual ownership structure, a move that has served the Company well ever since. We are proud to be one of Canada’s • The John M Harper District Branch Library, largest mutual life insurance companies, and we believe our mutual status continues to best serve the long-term interests of our large • The Waterloo Region Hospital Foundation, and growing base of policyholders. • Wilfrid Laurier University, and Since then, the Company has continued to grow. In 1971, we • The Museum opened our new Head Office Building on Westmount Road in Waterloo, and an addition was added in 2005. In 2010, Equitable Life surpassed $2 billion of assets under administration and $60 billion of life insurance in force. Today, more than 500 employees work at the head office and in our regional offices, and the Company is represented by more than 10,000 independent producers across Canada. When Sydney Tweed started the Company more than 90 years ago, he chose the image of a lighthouse shining in the darkness to represent the Company’s commitment to providing Canadians with financial protection. That commitment was instilled from the beginning and has carried on ever since. During the Great Depression it meant pioneering an inexpensive family income policy that offered families security in insecure times. Now, it

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EQUITABLE LIFE EMPLOYEES PARTICIPATE IN THE UNITED WAY’S DAY OF CARING.


sponsor profile

Equitable Life’s People Like all businesses, the key to Equitable Life’s success is our people. Under the leadership of President and Chief Executive Officer, Ronald Beettam, we invest in our employees in a variety of ways, including through professional development and workplace health initiatives. These investments were acknowledged earlier this year as Equitable Life was named one of the Waterloo Area’s Top Employers for the third year in a row. Equitable Life was also recently recognized by Waterloo Region with a Gold Award for workplace health. This is the second year the Region has run its Healthy Workplace Awards Program to profile workplaces that demonstrate a strong commitment to improving the health of their employees.

Commerce Group Benefits Plan. We have partnered with Cowan and the Chamber to provide members and their employees with a comprehensive and cost-effective group benefits program. At the same time, we have supported many Chamber initiatives and events, including the Chamber Challenge Bonspiel, the Corporate Challenge and the Chamber’s Annual Golf Scramble. Most recently, we participated in the Chamber’s After 5 Regional Tradeshow and presented the Michael R. Follett Community Leader of the Year Award at the Business Excellence Awards Gala held earlier this year. And now, Equitable Life is proud to be a Keystone Sponsor of the Chamber’s 125th Anniversary celebrations. Some of our senior leaders have also been active on the Chamber’s Board of Directors. Karen Mason, Senior Vice-President of Group Benefits, is our latest executive to serve as a member of the Board. She was recently appointed treasurer of the Board’s Executive Committee and serves as a Board liaison for the Chamber Health Care Resources Council. The impressive success of the Health Care Resources Council is only one example of the Chamber’s strength and its dedication to preserving and improving the vitality of our community. It is in all of our best interests to ensure that our Chamber remains strong, so that it can continue to be an effective advocate for our businesses and citizens alike. As the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce celebrates its 125th Anniversary, Equitable Life congratulates both the Chamber and its business leaders in working together to strengthen the ties within our expanding community and to keep our local economy healthy and prosperous for many years to come.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Don Bisch JON SIDER AND KAREN MASON ACCEPT AN AWARD FOR WORKPLACE HEALTH FROM WATERLOO REGION ON BEHALF OF EQUITABLE LIFE.

Equitable Life and the Chamber Over the years, Equitable Life has enjoyed a close and longstanding relationship with the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Since 1984, Equitable Life has been the proud provider of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of

Don Bisch is Director, Corporate Communications at Equitable Life of Canada. Prior to joining Equitable Life in 2010, Don worked at Rogers Publishing as editor of magazines for the insurance industry. Don holds a Masters of Journalism degree from Carleton University.

advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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feature

Canadian Chamber Focuses on Competitiveness Issues The Canadian Chamber of Commerce, to assist businesses in rapidly changing global markets, has identified 10 barriers that impede our ability to compete effectively. With pressure from competitors intensifying, strategic investments and smart public policies are urgently required and essential for Canadian business. It is the responsibility of the private and public sectors to direct greater investments towards innovative practices and technologies, equip Canadians with sufficient skills and training, and position Canada as an attractive environment for entrepreneurs.

The Top 10 Barriers to Competitiveness are: 1) Getting qualified workers to meet the needs of employers Government investment in higher education provides a high return. A skilled and educated workforce is also critical for attracting foreign direct investment. 2) Designing better policies to help people find and keep jobs Canada’s labour market policies have to be improved, particularly those that assist youth securing their first job and long-term unemployed individuals re-entering the workforce. An assessment of minimum wage laws and employment insurance benefits is urgently required. 3) Delivering a better tax system Canada’s tax system is over-dependent on high-cost sources of tax revenue causing the national economy to grow at a lower rate than might be possible with a more efficient system. 4) Abolishing interprovincial barriers In an era of increasing globalization, internal trade barriers artificially raise prices and significantly increase the cost of doing business, keeping firms from growing to a size large enough to compete effectively in foreign markets.

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6) Facilitating foreign investment in Canadian business Foreign direct investment can convey great advantages by bringing to Canada knowledge, technology, efficiencies, and economies of scale. As an enduring policy, Canada should embrace foreign direct investment and reduce related barriers. 7) Stimulating the need for research, innovation and development of new products and tools Research & Development in Canada can be promoted by adopting a strong intellectual property regime, fostering collaboration among educational institutions, developing robust innovation clusters, and investing in the education and skills of our people. 8) Encouraging investment in new technologies and equipment to boost productivity Canadian businesses are well behind our competitors, including the US and UK, on investing in machinery and equipment. Between 1987 and 2009, Canadian businesses invested 23% less per worker in machinery and equipment than the United States. Canadian workers have fewer tools do their jobs, a trend which is detrimental to productivity, innovation, and competitiveness. 9) Investing made easier for the launch and growth of Canadian businesses Greater effort must be directed toward attracting foreign investment into Canadian venture capital and developing a stronger venture capital sector to maximize the overall competitiveness of the national economy. 10) Creating reliable funding for investment and infrastructure

5) Implementing regulations that make things easier for business

In an environment of deficit reduction, governments will not always be able to provide sufficient funds to meet all infrastructure requirements. As a result, public decision makers must also create tools/foster the environment for bringing private sector and community partners together to fill infrastructure gaps when taxpayer dollars are not available.

Although high regulatory standards can enhance Canada’s reputation globally, application and administration can be the difference between success and failure for business. Resources spent on unnecessary and overlapping regulations cannot be invested on efficiency and competitiveness.

The CCC has asked local chambers and boards of trade to analyze the preceding list and identify those barriers which are the highest priority. The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber policy advisory committees will be reviewing this issue over the next months and a response will be forwarded to the CCC.

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM


member notables

Member notables Ginny Dybenko Appointed to CSA Board of Directors Ginny Dybenko, Executive Director of the University of Waterloo Stratford campus, was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of the CSA Group. The CSA Group is an independent, not-for-profit membership association serving business, industry, government and consumers through standards development, application products, and services in training, testing and certification. Ms. Dybenko is former Dean of the Wilfrid Laurier University School of Business and Economics and a member of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors.

Liaison College Grand Reopening Regional Chair Ken Seiling and Kitchener Mayor Carl Zehr were in attendance on September 22, 2011 for the grand reopening of Liaison College in the refurbished Doon Twines factory at 50 Ottawa Street South, Kitchener. Established in 1996, Liaison College is a private career institution focused exclusively on preparing students for employment in culinary arts. Graduates have secured positions in some of the most prestigious restaurants in Canada.

ABCO Group Grand Opening Kitchener Mayor Carl Zehr and National Hockey League legend Bobby Baun were in attendance at the September 22, 2011 Official Grand Opening of ABCO Group Office Solutions at 107 Manitou Drive in Kitchener. Local radio station 96.7 CHYM-FM was also present for the event. Serving Kitchener-Waterloo, Cambridge and Guelph, the new 10,000 square foot ABCO superstore features pre-owned furniture including desks, chairs, file cabinets, tables and work stations. Congratulations to Manager Glenn Elliott and his staff on this successful opening.

eSentire secures New Contracts Cambridge-based security firm eSentire has secured new multi-year contracts of approximately $1.5 million with clients across North America and Europe. The contracts are with mid-sized enterprises in financial services including asset management and insurance. The clients have contracted for Collaborative Threat Management services for security event monitoring, intrusion detection and prevention and defenses against Advanced Persistent Threats. With these new contracts, eSentire is adding managed security services for an additional user base of approximately 10,000.

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member notables

(continued from page 27)

MTE Named to 2011 Zweig Letter Hot Firm List Local engineering firm MTE Consultants Inc. has once again been named to the Zweig Letter Hot Firm List. Recognition of the firm’s tremendous growth from 2007 to 2010 allowed the organization to receive this designation for a third year in a row. MTE, one of only 11 firms with head offices located in Canada, placed 67th out of 176 firms. During the 2007-2010 period, MTE merged with five firms – Frontline Environmental Management, Waterloo Geoscience Consultants, GlobalTox International Consultants, McNeil Surveying Inc. and Finelli Engineering Inc. Through these acquisitions and organic growth, MTE has increased the size of its staff compliment from 125 to over 200 people. Angelo Innocente, Vice President, Business Development at MTE, is a former member of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors.

Glenbriar Technologies Inc. Reorganizes Ontario Operations Effective October 1, 2011, Glenbriar Technologies software division, Peartree Software, was absorbed into Glenbriar by vertical short form amalgamation. Going forward, the Peartree name will be used only as a brand name for Glenbriar’s software products, and all operations have been consolidated into Glenbriar. Robert Matheson, CEO of Glenbriar, is pleased to announce the appointment of Christine Padaric as Vice President, Human Resources, with responsibility for Ontario operations effective immediately. Ms. Padaric has been an employee of Peartree since 1996, and has taken an increasingly greater role in the management of the Waterloo operations of Glenbriar and Peartree.

Glenbriar Technologies Inc.

Len Crispino Retires from the Ontario Chamber of Commerce After ten years leading the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, President & CEO Len Crispino has announced his retirement. Prior to joining the OCC in April of 2002, Len held a series of senior positions in the Ontario government, including Assistant Deputy Minister, Ministry of Economic Development and Trade, and President and Chief Executive Officer of Ontario Exports Inc. Apart from his work at the OCC, Len and his wife Marisa own and operate The Foreign Affair Winery near Vineland Station. He is also Chair of the Board of Governors at Niagara College. The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce would like to thank Len for his exemplary service to the provincial business community, and wish him well in his future endeavours.

Member Notables are taken from local news sources and member submissions. In order to be considered “notable” an item must be an accomplishment or event that is outside of the ordinary course of business and therefore deemed newsworthy. While we would like to include all submissions, space constraints make it necessary for the Advocate editors to choose items that best fit the above criteria and are most timely.

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advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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feature

The Benefits of Chamber Membership BY BILL PEGG As a member of the Chamber since 1988, Hallman Business Forms, Labels & Printing Ltd., has enjoyed many of the benefits from the programs offered to member businesses.

not so depending on available time. Regardless, I’ve always been involved somehow. That involvement has returned dividends to the company over and over again throughout the years.

We have participated in the TD Credit Card/Merchant and Esso Credit Card programs almost since inception. The attraction of these and other programs offered by the Chamber is that a small business enjoys the benefits and savings that are generally reserved for much larger companies.

In short, Chamber membership is well worth the investment!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bill Pegg

In addition to taking advantage of specific programs, Chamber membership has allowed us to participate in all of the events that are offered at reduced member rates. But most important and something which supersedes all of the various available programs are the tremendous networking and business opportunities that Hallman has enjoyed over those many years. It would be almost impossible to calculate the tangible and intangible benefits that we’ve derived from our membership.

Owner Hallman Business Forms, Labels & Printing Ltd., since 1988 Member of the Chamber Networking/Breakfast Committee Other current volunteer activities include: Chair, K-W Gaming Centre Sponsors Association

When we (or rather I) first joined the Chamber as owner of Hallman, (I had been a member with my previous employer since 1978) the Chamber was the sounding board and discussion group that I didn’t have in house as a sole proprietor. That was invaluable. As a Chamber member, I’ve always strived to stay involved in committee work, some years heavily and some years

President, Kitchener Panthers Baseball Commissioner, Junior Inter County Baseball League Inc. Operating Committee Member, Kitchener Sports Association (KSA)

Thank-You! For spreading the gift of kindness on November 4th! Tell us your stories online at www.kwcf.ca. 30

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sponsors

Helping us make our vision possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

CHAMBER CHAIR’S CIRCLE

CHAMBER PATRON

CHAMBER

CONNECTIONS Manulife Financial

TITLE SPONSOR

LEADERSHIP SERIES

CHAMBER TRUSTEE

MEDIA PARTNERS advocate NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2011

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The Advocate Magazine - November | December 2011  
The Advocate Magazine - November | December 2011  

In this November | December edition of the Greater KW Chamber of Commerce Advocate Magazine we look at what it takes to succeed as a small b...