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advocate THE VOICE OF BUSINESS

NOVEMBER | DECEMBER 2010

Employer sponsored retirement plans Setting up a group benefits program Meet the new Chamber Board Keys to a successful workplace wellness program


advocate VOICE OF BUSINESS NOVEMBER

| DECEMBER 2010

WWW.GREATERKWCHAMBER.COM

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

FEATURE

Aubrey Walters

Setting up a group benefits program Karen Mason &Teresa Norris-Lue

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EDITOR:

Heather Hutchings

FEATURE

Standing up for jobs and job-creators

FEATURES EDITOR:

Harold Albrecht

Art Sinclair

COVER STORY

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION:

Cober Printing Limited

Employer sponsored retirement plans Chris Donnelly

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PHOTOGRAPHY:

Adamski Photography

FEATURE

Meet the 2010/2011 Board of Directors

ADVERTISING AND SALES:

David MacLellan - dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Mandy Chapman- mchapman@greaterkwchamber.com

FEATURE

New Directors joining the 2010/2011 Board FEATURE

Keys to a successful workplace wellness program Sandy Delamere

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Harold Albrecht, Sandy Delamere, Chris Donnelly, Mary Sue Fitzpatrick, Jeff MacIntyre, Karen Mason, Teresa Norris-Lue, Janet Peddigrew, Art Sinclair CONTRIBUTORS:

Julie Tedesco, Aubrey Walters ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES:

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MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Setting our course

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Jeff MacIntyre

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ANNOUNCEMENT

Chamber welcomes new leader ADVOCACY

Hartford of the north and pension reform Art Sinclair

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PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

Practice opportunity & the new generation physician Mary Sue Fitzpatrick

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EVENTS

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EVENTS

Mark your calendar

November 12, 2010 for January | February February 1, 2011 for March | April April 4, 2011 for May | June June 6, 2011 for July | August August 1, 2011 for September | October October 3, 2011 for November | December

SPONSOR PROFILE

BMO - Bank of Montreal Pioneering a great customer experience

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

Janet Peddigrew

SUBMISSION POLICY:

MEMBER NOTABLES

Achieving Success Chamber Members SPONSORSHIP

Chamber Sponsors

Kathryn McEwin kmcewin@greaterkwchamber.com Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio. PUBLICATIONS PERMIT:

#40026716

FOR PERMISSION AND REPRINT REQUESTS

Heather Hutchings - hhutchings@greaterkwchamber.com PRINTED IN CANADA BY:

PUBLICATION OF:

Autumn networking NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS

August 1 - September 30, 2010 POSTMASTER ADDRESS CHANGES: C/O

ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREET NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

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| DECEMBER 2010

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a message from the chair

Setting our course BY JEFF MACINTYRE As I assume the role of chair of the board I think back to eight years ago when I began my involvement with the Chamber as a member of the Regional and Municipal Affairs committee. At that time I learned how important the work of the Chamber is to the members and business community and, equally important, I learned of the passion of the volunteers and staff at the Chamber. A passion to make the Greater Kitchener Waterloo community a better place to do business, work and to live is a common thread running throughout all those involved. Over eight years the passion for the Chamber community, business success and personal growth has not diminished. The staff, volunteers, board members, corporate partners and community partners continue to push the mandate of business success. As we begin our 125th year, our focus is and will continue to be relevance to our business community. Running a business in this day and age has its challenges. Our challenge will be to continue providing the tools needed to act as a conduit to member and community business accomplishments. I take this opportunity to thank Past Chair Mary D'Alton for the tremendous effort put in as last year’s Chair. Combining her role as board chair, acting CEO resulting from the departure of the President and her full time gig at the Waterloo Inn was impressive. Her effort is a classic example of why the Chamber has thrived since its inception. People like Mary have made this community what it is by digging in when required because of their passion for success in our community. I welcome Ian McLean as President and CEO and three new members elected to the Chamber Board, including Linda Dancey (Grand River Personnel), Rosa Lupo (Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP), and Lois Norris (Dare Foods Limited). Together with the returning members of the

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Board of Directors, we are committed to assist the staff and members to succeed. We have 124 years of history and a recently completed membership survey that maps our course. Our success will be measured by continuing to provide the appropriate number of networking opportunities that our members desire. That combined with advocacy issues that are relevant, assistance with employment concerns, business assistance, government relations and physician recruitment will keep us busy. Our success will be determined by our visibility, membership satisfaction and relevance. It is an honour to assume the role of Chair of the Board of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. I look forward to a year of measurable achievements. Our business community will overcome challenges, celebrate victories and continue to move the mandate of being the voice of business forward. Thank you for this opportunity.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jeff MacIntyre, CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS Jeff MacIntyre is the owner of two small businesses in the area. Winexpert Kitchener South is an on-premises winemaking shop. So There Business Solutions assists employers to increase profitability through market access, sales assistance, business development planning strategies, mentoring and training.


announcement

Chamber welcomes new leader On September 21, 2010, Ian McLean was formally announced as the new President and Chief Executive Officer of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce and he began his duties on October 5, 2010. Ian has been a resident of Waterloo Region for forty years, where he attended Kitchener Collegiate Institute. He graduated from the University of Toronto with a Bachelor of Arts degree and acquired a Diploma in Business Administration from Wilfrid Laurier University. Most recently, Ian was President of McLean & Associates, a local consulting firm specializing in business development and international trade development strategies. Previously, he worked as an Executive Director with the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board. His public service background includes seven years on Waterloo City Council (2003 to 2010), where he was Chair of the Finance and Strategic Planning Committee. He has also served on numerous community Boards including the Waterloo Public Library, the KW Art Gallery and the Waterloo Uptown BIA. “It is a great honour to take on this IAN MCLEAN role” said McLean. “The Chamber has a long and proud history of being a positive catalyst in the growth of this community. Greater Kitchener Waterloo is a progressive and involved community and I look forward to working on its behalf along with our staff, stakeholders, members and partners.”

One of Ian’s first tasks will be to work with the Chamber Board of Directors to finalize and revitalize the strategic plan. The Chamber has a long history of working collaboratively with all levels of government and values its solid relationships with elected officials, government staff, and association members on addressing and resolving important matters that affect business. Ian looks forward to celebrating the Chamber’s upcoming 125th anniversary in 2011.“Next year promises to be extremely exciting and productive,” noted McLean. “The entire community will have the opportunity to celebrate 125 years of business and community building since the founding of the Berlin Board of Trade. It is important to recognize where we have been but equally critical to look forward.” In his first few weeks, Ian has enjoyed meeting with staff as well as many of the volunteers who make the Chamber the success it is. He has attended numerous events including the forum on the Kitchener and Waterloo merger referendum question, Chamber Young Professionals, and regular committee meetings at the Queen Street office. Away from the office, Ian loves spending time with his two young daughters – Hannah and Abigail – and his dog Solomon. He is also an avid golfer and enjoys cooking and yoga. The Chamber Board and staff welcome Ian to his new position.

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Business Excellence Awards

2011

Save the Date!

February 17th, 2011 A Gala event to recognize Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber of Commerce members who have made exceptional contributions through their involvement and leadership for the betterment of our community. The time is rapidly approaching! Purchase your tickets online at: www.greaterkwchamber.com or by calling 519.576.5000

The following awards will be presented: Business of the Year (over 20 employees)

Business of the Year

WRIEN Award (Waterloo Region Immigrant Employment Network)

(20 employees and under)

Volunteer of the Year Award

Environment Award

Workplace Training Award

Hospitality/Tourism Award Innovation Award

Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award

Michael R. Follett Community Leader Award

Non-Profit/Charitable Award


advocacy

Hartford of the North and pension reform BY ART SINCLAIR The American city of Hartford is probably best known to most Canadians as home of the infamous Whalers National Hockey League franchise. Hockey fans will remember them for their relative obscurity and limited accomplishments. Not one of the NHL’s foremost dynasties, the Whalers are the organization where Gordie Howe retired. Other than this fact widely known among sports trivia fanatics, not much happened on the ice in Connecticut. South of the border, Hartford is the “The Insurance Capital of the World” since many major companies established a longstanding presence there. However, a New York Times article in 2003 claimed the city can no longer claim this distinction, as all but two major organizations have moved their headquarters to other centres. Ironically, in 1997, the Hartford Whalers relocated to Raleigh North Carolina and have experienced considerably more success, including an unexpected 2006 Stanley Cup win. Over the course of Canadian corporate history, Waterloo Region has become “Hartford of the North” due to the significant presence of the insurance and financial services sector. However, unlike the aforementioned American city, business here is stable and growing. On the public policy agenda, the local financial services sector and our Chamber will be increasingly active in the emerging and critically important national debate on reforms to the retirement income system. Jim Leech, CEO of the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, told a Toronto business audience over a year ago that, like free trade in the 1980s, pension reform could be the defining issue for the first decade of this century. Canadians will increasingly demand that governments provide changes for assisting rather than hindering their ability to accumulate retirement savings.

In a submission to the federal Department of Finance in April of 2010, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC) noted that up to 50 percent of private sector employees have no workplace retirement savings plan. It is subsequently no surprise that much of the current discussion has focused on ensuring that private sector employees have more access to employer-sponsored savings plans. The CCC has concluded that the current national retirement savings system is relatively sound, therefore legislators and policy makers need to focus on improvements in the “gap” areas rather than analyzing and considering fundamental change. Also, businesses need the flexibility to select retirement savings solutions that fit their organizational size and resources. Retirement income savings and income needs vary significantly, therefore a balanced and competitive approach that includes more private sector options for both employer and employee is critical for future sustainability. A report from the TD Bank Financial Group this past June also concluded there is no pension crisis in Canada – at the moment. The incidence of seniors living in poverty is relatively low and the vast majority of retirees are maintaining their standard of living. However, a significant minority – perhaps 20 to 25 percent – are not meeting the traditional benchmark of 60 to 70 percent of their pre-retirement income. The greatest “at risk” population in this respect is workers with annual salaries of $30,000 to $80,000. Clearly the public debate on the retirement income system is just commencing, with a significant number of interested stakeholders prepared to participate. Our Chamber expects to remain intensely involved in this process to ensure the perspectives of our membership are advanced to both the provincial and federal levels of government.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Both the federal and Ontario governments have initiated consultations on the portfolio. Last June, Ontario Finance Minister Dwight Duncan hosted a stakeholder meeting in Kitchener with invited groups from across the province. Our organization was represented by former Board Chair Diane Wolfenden, and many similar sessions are expected in the near future.

Art Sinclair Art Sinclair is the Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

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| DECEMBER 2010

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perspective on health care

Practice opportunity & the new generation physician BY MARY SUE FITZPATRICK The Chamber has been involved in family physician recruitment for over a decade. Our efforts are supported by passionate and committed Chamber volunteers and the generous financial support of our corporate and municipal partners. Over 135 family physicians have been recruited since 1998 and the number of people without a family physician has been cut in half, from over 40,000 to just over 20,000 today. Despite our successes, The Chamber Health Care Resources Council is concerned that the gap may widen over the next few years as population growth, retirement of existing physicians and the changing expectations of new medical graduates converge. As the Health Council considers how we can eliminate the gap, having a place to practice has emerged as a priority need. The new “norm” is that today’s young family practitioners are looking for life balance. They work fewer hours and roster fewer patients than long established physicians. The majority are also female practitioners, many of whom want to work part-time. This means that the number of practitioners needed is even larger. In order to provide them with a place to practice, we are now exploring the feasibility of building either a private or community developed medical centre that could provide a turnkey solution for 18 or more family physicians. If successful, the model could be replicated to more sites across greater K-W. It is important that the model provide physicians with an environment that is attractive to them in all stages of their

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careers so that there is a strong mentoring environment. It is also a great strategy to help existing physicians ease into retirement. Many of the Waterloo Region McMaster Medical School undergraduates are choosing family medicine. Some have started first year residencies in our K-W Family Medicine Residency Program with the desire to ultimately practice here. Many more will follow over the next few years. All have made it clear that they are looking for an established medical facility which will meet their practice style and needs. The Chamber will continue to move forward with this new strategic direction and initiatives that will ultimately solve the family physician shortage. Five years from now we want to be able to say that every resident in Kitchener-Waterloo-Woolwich has access to a family physician and the best primary care possible.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mary Sue Fitzpatrick Mary Sue is Vice President Family Physician Resources and Health Advocacy.


feature

Setting up a group benefits program BY KAREN MASON AND TERESA NORRIS-LUE As an employer, you may have already considered the advantages of providing a group benefits program. Helping employees with out-of-pocket health, dental, and disability costs can help attract and retain key individuals. It can also demonstrate that your organization genuinely cares, which leads to increased productivity and improved morale. While there are many advantages to having a group benefit program, it’s important to do your research before taking the step of implementing a plan. Some of the considerations include: • The objectives of a group benefit plan • Overall total compensation philosophy • Employee expectations • Risk tolerance level • Employee and employer cost sharing • Demographics and diverse needs of the employee group Below are a few steps to help in the gathering of information that will help you set up a group benefit plan that best fits the needs of your organization. (1) Understand Needs – Begin by understanding what your employees want in a program, and what your competition is offering. 1) Conduct a benchmarking exercise to determine what benefits other employers of the same size and industry are offering 2) Conduct an employee survey to determine the health needs, preferences and expectations of the workforce These steps can be carried out by group benefit specialists within your organization, or by working with an organization specializing in group benefit programs. (2) Understand Types of Plans - In addition to researching employee expectations and industry standards, it’s also important to understand coverage options. Traditional plans usually include life insurance, accidental death and dismemberment, disability insurance, healthcare and dental coverage. Optional benefits such as optional life, critical illness and Health Care Spending Accounts can also be considered. The size of your company may be a factor in determining the level of coverage available and amount of flexibility in the plan design. For example, some smaller organizations find association plans – such as the One Source Advantage Program – a good fit. The stable rates, comprehensive coverage and competitive pricing are attractive to many employers.

“When asked a series of questions about which they would rather have, the majority of plan members said they would prefer their health benefit plan over other types of compensation. Fifty-two percent would choose their health benefit plan over an additional cash compensation of $15,000 per year…….” Source: The sanofi-aventis Healthcare Survey 2009 Included in the One Source Advantage Program is access to an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). The EAP provides peace of mind that employees have support on the range of difficult issues they face every day. (3) Understand Service – When it comes time to interview your potential group benefit provider, we recommend you ask about: • Specific coverage options available to you, your employees and their families • Initial and future costs of the plan • Cost containment features • Management of claims and claim payments • Their communication style to ensure you get the level of service you require Doing the research ahead of time, and asking these questions up front, will help ensure you implement a group benefit program that meets your needs and the needs of your employees.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Karen Mason &Teresa Norris-Lue Karen Mason is Senior Vice-President, Group, at Equitable Life of Canada. Karen is on the Board of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce and is Associate Chair of the Chamber Health Care Recruitment Council. Teresa Norris-Lue is Vice President of Benefits at Cowan Insurance Group. She works with the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce and its members to ensure all their group benefits, retirement, and other risk management needs are met.

advocate

NOVEMBER

| DECEMBER 2010

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networking

Autumn networking PHOTOS BY ADAMSKI PHOTOGRAPHY

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1) ANGIE FELGENDREHER & SANDRA MUIR OF COWAN GREET GOLFERS AT THE CHAMBER’S ANNUAL GOLF SCRAMBLE 2) CROWD AT “SHOULD THE COMMUNITIES TALK?” NETWORKING BREAKFAST EVENT. 3) WAYNE BRABAZON, OF THE REGION OF WATERLOO AT THE REGIONAL BUSINESS TRADESHOW. 4) OUTGOING CHAIR, MARY D’ALTON PASSES THE GAVEL TO JEFF MACINTYRE.

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5) J.R. WADDELL AND DARCY PODHORNY - BOTH FROM WATERLOO INN AND JEFF MCINTYRE, AT THE REGIONAL TRADESHOW. 6) SARAH YETKINER OF TRIOS COLLEGE AT THE CHAMBER GOLF TOURNAMENT. 7) LIAISON COLLEGE DISPLAY AND CHEFS AT THE REGIONAL TRADESHOW.


networking

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8) ART SINCLAIR FROM THE CHAMBER WITH GUEST SPEAKERS TIM JACKSON, FRED KUNTZ, HERB EPP AND BENTON LEONG 9) CECIL HAYES OF SPIRITED LEADERS AT THE REGIONAL BUSINESS TRADESHOW. 10) GOLFERS AT THE 19TH ANNUAL CHAMBER GOLF SCRAMBLE HELD AT REBEL CREEK GOLF CLUB. 11) TAMI KINGDOM AND JASON KIPFER OF TD MERCHANT SERVICES

12) JEFF MACINTYRE, INCOMING CHAIR, IAN MCLEAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO AND MARY D’ALTON OUTGOING CHAIR AT THE CHAMBER’S AGM. 13) DARLENE JONES, OF THE CHAMBER, LINDA KORGEMETS OF PRICEWATERHOUSE COOPERS AND KATHRYN MCEWIN OF THE CHAMBER. 14) SOME OF THE CROWD AT THE COWAN NEW CHAMBER MEMBER WELCOME.

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new members

August 1 - September 30, 2010 Advance Construction Equipment Limited Contractors' Equipment, Service & Supplies Steven Katz, Accountant 818 Victoria Street North Kitchener, ON N2G 4G8 Email: skatz@advanceequipment.net Web: www.advanceequipment.net Phone: (519) 742-5878 Fax: (519) 742-0491

Dr. Seagrist SpaMed

Karen Wilson Interior Design Inc.

Weight Control Services Randy Jo Wilcox, Owner/Operator 185 Glasgow Street Kitchener, ON N2M 2M2 Email: info@drseagrist.com Web: www.drseagrist.com Phone: (519) 570-3330 Fax: (519) 570-1579

Interior Design Services Karen Wilson, President 121 Charles Street West, Suite C317 Kitchener, ON N2G 1H6 Email: karen@kwinteriordesign.ca Web: www.kwinteriordesign.ca Phone: (519) 578-8444

Kor Capabilities Consulting Duras Consulting

BreezeMaxWeb Advertising - Internet Bill Burgess, Regional Manager 2810 Matheson Boulevard East, Suite 200 Mississauga, ON L4C 3C7 Email: info@breezemaxweb.com Web: www.breezemaxweb.com Phone: (905) 290-1707 Fax: (416) 792-7706

Callright Marketing Services Inc. Call Centres Roberta Renna, Managing Director 1601 River Road East, Unit 22 Kitchener, ON N3C 4G1 Email: roberta@callrightmarketing.com Web: www.callrightmarketing.com Phone: (519) 894-4566 Fax: (519) 894-9262

Computer Consultants David Secord, Owner/President 329 Pine Valley Drive Kitchener, ON N2P 2V5 Email: david@duras.com Web: www.duras.com Phone: (888) 993-8727

Larrek Investigation & Research Frontline Forensic Investigation Investigators Gary Arthur, Director Business Development 145 Otonabee Drive, Suite A Kitchener, ON N2C 1L7 Email: info@frontlineforensic.com Web: www.frontlineforensic.com Phone: (519) 746-1970 Fax: (519) 746-9044

The Hive And Grove Inc. Clean Air Source Cleaning, Ducts Darrin Drake, Administrator 17A - 218 Silvercreek Parkway North, Suite 314 Guelph, ON N1H 8E8 Email: info@cleanairsource.ca Web: www.cleanairsource.ca Phone: (519) 893-1991

Courtland Professional Property Management Property Management Timotheus Oomen, Business Development Manager 332789 Plank Line Tillsonburg, ON N4G 4H1 Email: jeffcoveyduck@courtlandgardens.ca Web: www.courtlandgardens.ca Phone: (519) 688-3777 Fax: (519) 688-3710

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Management Consultants Nahla Kor, Owner 414 Havendale Crescent Waterloo, ON N2T 2T3 Email: nahla@korcapabilities.ca Web: www.korcapabilities.ca Phone: (519) 886-2606

Holistic Health Services Tiffany Lazic, Owner/President 62 St. George Street Kitchener, ON N2C 2S9 Email: hiveandgrove@gmail.com Web: www.hiveandgrove.ca Phone: (519) 571-8118

JL Equestrian Centre Inc. Horseback Riding Leslie Brooks, Owner 1110 Huron Road, RR #2 Petersburg, ON N0B 2H0 Email: LeslieBrooks@JLEquestrianCentre.com Web: www.jlequestriancentre.com Phone: (519) 696-3518

Investigators John Krug, Director Business Developement PO Box 3018, Station C Kitchener, ON N2G 4R5 Email: jkrug@larrek.com Web: http://www.larrek.com Phone: (519) 576-3010 Fax: (519) 576-4659

Larry Bridle Consultants Larry Bridle, Owner 416 Beasley Crescent West Nelson, BC V1L 5Y4 Email: lbridle@mcmaster.ca Phone: (604) 628-2422

McWilliams Moving & Storage Moving & Storage Rob Thompson, Branch Manager 215 Frobisher Drive, Unit 2 Waterloo, ON N2V 2G4 Email: rob@mcwilliamsmoving.com Web: www.mcwilliamsmoving.com Phone: (519) 725-3060 Fax: (519) 725-2898


new members

PostNet Kitchener-Centre

Shred All Limited

Digital Imaging, Printing & Photography John Funk, Owner 447 Frederick Street, Suite 100 Kitchener, ON N2H 2P4 Email: john.funk@postnet.ca Web: www.postnet.ca Phone: (519) 208-0635 Fax: (519) 570-2717

Shredding Services Jim Miller, Owner 235 Denstedt Street West Listowel, ON N4W 3W2 Email: jim@shred-all.ca Web: www.shred-all.ca Phone: (519) 418-2448 Fax: (519) 418-2449

Prestige Home Care Ltd.

Trillium College

Health Care Supplies & Service Richard Saur, Chief Executive Officer 824 King Street West, Suite 202 Kitchener, ON N2G 1G1 Email: richard.saur@yahoo.ca Web: www.prestigehomecare.ca Phone: (519) 954-0113

Schools - Academic - Colleges & Universities Cyndy Dutkiewicz, Campus Manager 111 Simcoe Street North Oshawa, ON L1G 4S4 Email: cyndydutkiewicz@bell.net Web: www.trilliumcollege.ca Phone: (888) 982-0575 Fax: (289) 222-2520

Two Men and A Truck The Movers Who Care Moving & Storage Dan Hopkins, Chief Operating Officer 245 Yorkland Boulevard, Suite 100 Toronto, ON M2J 4W9 Email: dan.hopkins@twomen.ca Web: www.twomenandatruck.ca Phone: (416) 646-0486 Fax: 1 (416) 490-1456

CRAWFORD C RAWFORD & COMPANY COMPANY (CANADA) (CANADA) IINC. NC. Craw ford h Crawford has as b been een a leading leading provider provider of of claims claims management management ssolutions olutions iin n tthe he K Kitchener/Waterloo itchener/Waterloo a area rea a and nd a across cross C Canada anada for for over over 43 4 3 yyears. ears. W We e provide provide an an extensive extensive range range of of services services iincluding: ncluding: Management Healthcare Manage ge ement Services •W orkers’ compens sa ation management Workers’ compensation •R eturn tto ow ork ffor or ccasual, asual, sshort-term hort-term a nd llong-term ong-term cclaims laims Return work and • Ergonomics • Benefits administr a ation administration CL AIMSALERT® Con Contact nttact C Centre CLAIMSALERT • After-hours answe answerr and dispatch services ne es • Compliance hotlin hotlines tiion su urveys • Customer satisfact satisfaction surveys Contact us at info@cra Contact info@crawco.ca awco.ca for more information info ormation on any of our o services. Crawford is always looking ffor Crawford or career-oriented individuals to jjoin oin our team. Please con contact ntact info@crawco.ca for more information info ormation on job oppor opportunities tunities with us. Crawford Craw wford & Company (Canada) Inc Inc. c. is an equal opportunity opportunity employer employyer

www.crawfordandcompany.ca advocate

NOVEMBER

| DECEMBER 2010

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feature

Standing Up for jobs and job-creators! BY HAROLD ALBRECHT The Federal Government is providing support for businesses and job creators across Canada through Employment Insurance reforms.

And finally, our Government will launch consultations on ways to build on the improvements we have already introduced to the system.

Recently, major steps to limit future increases in employment insurance premiums were announced. These changes will support job creation by leaving more money in the hands of both businesses and their employees.

As you recall, we have already taken landmark action to take interference out of the EI program. Previous administrations potentially exploited the contributions of workers and businesses to the system, allocating over $57 billion in surpluses in the EI Account for questionable initiatives. We have taken real action to guarantee EI premiums are only used to pay for the EI program, preventing future governments from setting rates artificially high in order to create funds for non-related purposes.

This comprehensive three-step plan will support the ongoing economic recovery and improve the employment insurance system. First, our Government will stop the expected Canadian Employment Insurance Financing Board’s increase of 15 cents to EI premiums for 2011 by limiting the maximum increase to 5 cents per $100 of insurable earnings. This will save employers and employees $1.2 billion in 2011 relative to a 15-cent increase. It also means that the 2011 EI premium rate cannot exceed $1.78 per $100 of insurable earnings – at nearly the lowest levels in 30 years.

With this solid foundation in place, our Government wants to hear from Canadians and businesses on how the EI rate setting mechanism can be even further improved to ensure more stable, predictable rates in the years ahead. We will announce specific details on these consultations shortly, and I encourage all employers to get involved.

This is on top of the estimated $9.2B in relief provided by freezing EI premiums over the last two years when it was needed most. Second, we will be limiting the maximum increase in premium rates for subsequent years to 10 cents per $100 of insurable earnings. This will save employers and employees another $600 million annually in coming years relative to the current limit. Our plan balances the genuine importance of preventing large EI rate increases, which would jeopardize our fragile economic recovery, and the unavoidable need to bring the EI account back to balance over time.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Harold Albrecht Harold Albrecht has been Member of Parliament for Kitchener-Conestoga since 2006. Prior to his political career, he operated a local dental practice for 27 years. Harold and his wife Betty reside on a farm in Wilmot Township.


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cover story

Employer sponsored retirement plans BY CHRIS DONNELLY Over the past several years, governments and pension experts have repeatedly expressed concerns about whether Canadians’ savings will provide them with adequate retirement income. Multiple causes have given rise to these concerns. Many private companies have closed or wound-up traditional defined benefit pension plans creating concerns that future workers would have insufficient pensions. As baby boomers approach retirement in strong numbers, they’ve driven increasing focus on retirement savings. A perception that many Canadians are just not saving enough has also contributed to a climate of growing concern. More recently, the market volatility and economic uncertainty caused by the global financial crisis in 2008 heightened these concerns. At market low points in March 2009, defined contribution pension assets and RRSP portfolios had declined by as much as 40% in the Canadian context. Many defined benefit plans developed significant unfunded liabilities and in some cases contributed to the insolvency of large employers. In a report prepared for Finance Ministers in December 2009, Professor Jack Mintz of the University of Calgary found that while the majority of Canadians are saving adequately for retirement, a significant minority are not saving enough. Policymakers are challenged to find a way to encourage those who are not currently saving to save more without negatively affecting the retirement savings system that is resulting in a good outcome for the majority. Over the past year, academics, regulators, unions, industry and business associations have offered options intended to help Canadians boost retirement savings. A proposal by the Canadian Labour Congress recommending that employee and employer contributions to the CPP be doubled (to 10% for employers and 10% for employees on all earnings under $94 400) attracted initial interest, but hasn’t proven attractive to pursue. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce was one of many business associations to express concerns about this proposal as it

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threatened to significantly increase the cost of hiring employees. For example, an employer currently makes a maximum annual CPP contribution of $2163 for an employee earning more than $47 200. The proposal would increase the annual employer contribution to $4327 for those employees and up to a maximum of $8652 per year for workers making over $95 000. In June 2010, Finance Ministers agreed to investigate the introduction of more modest enhancements to the CPP. The group will meet again later this year to review proposals. Finance Ministers also agreed to investigate ways to improve the regulatory system to make pensions and retirement savings more attractive to employers. Manulife and other financial services companies have strongly supported government efforts to ensure Canadians have appropriate retirement income. We are encouraged that governments continue to focus on making it easier for companies – especially small and medium sized firms – to provide their employees with pensions and retirement savings plans. Manulife’s Group Retirement Solutions operation, which is headquartered on Water Street in Kitchener, works with thousands of businesses across Canada to provide more than 600 000 Canadians with defined contribution (DC) pensions and group RRSPs. DC pensions and group RRSPs let employers offer retirement savings plans without taking on large future liabilities if financial markets decline significantly. Additionally, these plans are easier to administer than traditional defined benefit plans. Typically, larger employers will provide a DC pension while small employers will offer a group RRSP. However, improvements could be made to the existing regulatory framework to enhance both of these products. Current pension rules were designed for defined benefit pension plans, not defined contribution plans. As a result, current rules and requirements are unnecessarily complicated and costly.


cover story

Most Canadians who do not have a workplace retirement savings plan are either self employed or work for a small or medium sized business. These businesses typically do not have large HR departments with staff dedicated to managing a pension plan. Finding ways to make it easier for small and medium sized businesses and the self employed to participate in workplace savings plans should be key in any plan for reform.

businesses, especially small businesses, to offer retirement savings plans.

Improving the framework for DC pensions and group RRSPs will help the millions of Canadians already saving through employer sponsored savings plans. It will also encourage more

• Improve Group RRSPs by allowing employers to lock-in their contributions

Some Facts about Manulife in KW • Manulife’s Canadian Operations have been headquartered in Waterloo since the company merged with Dominion Life in 1984. Dominion was headquartered in Waterloo since it’s formation in 1889. • Manufacturers Life was incorporated in 1887. The name “Manufacturers” has its origins in the political platform of Sir John A Macdonald - Manulife’s first president. MacDonald’s ‘National Policy’ plan included the need for an expanded manufacturing base to broaden the market as the nation shifted from an agriculture-based economy to one of more mixed enterprises.

Specifically, Manulife along with many other companies that offer employer savings plans have recommended that governments: • Create a simplified harmonized regulatory regime for DC pension plans

• Change employment legislation to allow employers to automatically enroll new employees and automatically increase contributions at certain times while giving the employee optout • Create a new framework for DC Multi-Employer Pension Plans that is simpler for small businesses and self-employed We are hopeful that later this year the Ministers of Finance will agree to move forward with changes that will improve employer sponsored savings plans.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Chris Donnelly Chris Donnelly is AVP & Chief Regulatory Counsel for Manulife’s Canadian Division.

• Manulife now has more than 3800 employees at 4 locations in Kitchener and Waterloo. Manulife strongly supports the work of the Greater KW Chamber of Commerce. Manulife has been a member of the Chamber Board for many years and has been especially active in efforts to improve regional and interregional transit, physician recruitment and in raising funds for local hospitals. Since 1993, the Manulife Bike and Hike for Heart has raised over $3 million dollars for the St. Mary’s Regional Cardiac Care Centre.

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events

Mark your calendar BY CHAMBER STAFF

November 16, 2010

November 16, 2010

November 18, 2010

Manulife Financial Chamber Academy: IT for Small Business

Point of View: President of Sun Life Financial Canada and Sun Life Global Investments

Networking Breakfast Series - Save the date

8:00-10:00am Chamber of Commerce 80 Queen St. N., Kitchener Member: $40 pre-paid, $45 at door General Admission: $45 pre-paid, $50 at door An introduction to best practices in: selecting computers & equipment for an office; preventive maintenance; disaster recovery strategies; viruses, spyware, spam and other threats to business continuity. Title sponsor:

11:30am-1:00pm Benjamin’s Restaurant 1430 King Street N., St. Jacobs Member: $50 pre-paid, $55 at door General Admission: $60 pre-paid, $65 at door Kevin Dougherty will share his thoughts on covering health care costs, a pension plan for Canadians who don't have access to one and the real possibilities of turning the dream of lifetime financial security into reality.

7:30-9:00am Holiday Inn Kitchener-Waterloo 30 Fairway Road S., Kitchener Member: $28 pre-paid, $35 at the door General Admission: $40 pre-paid, $45 at the door Watch the website, weekly eNews and twitter.com/gkwcc for more details. Media Sponsor:

Title Sponsor:

Event Sponsor:

S

Holiday EASON PLANNER

Corporate Christmas Party - December 11th One big party for smaller size companies in Rushes Restaurant Private Christmas Party - November or December Host your own company or family Christmas gathering Christmas Day Dinner Buffet - December 25th Let us look after Christmas dinner and the cleanup! New Years Eve Dinner in Rushes Restaurant Five course dinners plus DJ music and dancing Rubys Revial New Years Eve Party One night only and back to the 80’s when Ruby’s was the place to be! New Years Day Brunch Celebrate 2011 with the finest brunch in town! www.waterlooinn.com 475 King Street N., Waterloo ON 519.884.0220 or 1.800.361.4708

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events

November 18, 2010

December 7 2010

December 9, 2010

Research In Motion Chamber Young Professionals Speed Mentoring

Rogers Chamber Connections

Research In Motion Chamber Young Professionals Networking Event

5:00-7:00pm Waterloo Inn Conference Hotel Member: $10, General Admission: $15

5:00-7:00pm Holiday Inn Kitchener Waterloo 30 Fairway Road S., Kitchener Member: $5, General Admission: $10 Exhibitors $100

Maximize your networking opportunities with other professionals, one on one, a few minutes at a time and find hidden opportunities and new connections.

Does networking intimidate you or do you thrive on meeting new people? Come out to this casual networking event with friendly faces and easy conversation.

Title Sponsor:

Title Sponsor:

5:00-7:00pm Maxwell’s Music House 220 King Street N., Waterloo Member: $5, General Admission: $10 Come out to this casual event to network and mingle with other young professionals and learn about the events that are planned throughout the new year. Title sponsor:

Host sponsor:

Host Sponsor: Host Sponsor:

November 23, 2010 Intellectual Property & Copyright Reform

December 15, 2010

Media Sponsor:

7:30-9:00am

Chamber Holiday Open House 5:00-7:00pm Chamber of Commerce 80 Queen Street N., Kitchener Member: Complimentary

Watch the website, weekly eNews and twitter.com/gkwcc for more details.

DECEMBER 31st ONE NIGHT ONLY !

NEW YEAR’S EVE

1980’s - Ruby’s was the place to be! Disco’s - DJ’s and Dancing Your Pants Off! 30 years later, we’re doing all again! Get a group together and come play! Includes Evening Buffet, Live 6 Member Band, Party Favours and Charity Donation $65 per person, plus tax & gratuity 475 King St. N.

www.waterlooinn.com Waterloo, ON 519.884.0220

1.800.361.4708 advocate

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| DECEMBER 2010

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feature

Meet the 2010/2011 Board of Directors

BACK ROW: AL HAYES - THE WALTER FEDY PARTNERSHIP, DIANE WOLFENDEN - RBC DOMINION SECURITIES, MURRAY COSTELLO - UNION GAS A SPECTRA ENERGY COMPANY, KEN WHYTE - QUARRY INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS INC., TIM SOTHERN - BDO CANADA LLP, SCOTT MURPHY - DATA PERCEPTIONS INC., DAVE JAWORSKY - RESEARCH IN MOTION, RAHIM HIRJI - MANULIFE FINANCIAL, SANDRA STONE - CONESTOGA MALL, RICK BAKER - SPIRITED INVESTORS CORPORATION, TIM STROME - REID'S HERITAGE HOMES LTD. FRONT ROW: LOIS NORRIS - DARE FOODS LIMITED, PAUL EICHINGER - COLDWELL BANKER PETER BENNINGER REALTY BROKERAGE, GINNY DYBENKO - LAURIER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS & ECONOMICS, JEFF MACINTYRE - SO THERE BUSINESS SOLUTIONS/WINEXPERT KITCHENER SOUTH, MARY D’ALTON - WATERLOO INN CONFERENCE HOTEL, BRIAN BENNETT - BME CONSULTING, ROSA LUPO - GOWLING LAFLEUR HENDERSON LLP, IAN MCLEAN - GREATER KITCHENER WATERLOO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, LINDA DANCEY - GRAND RIVER PERSONNEL LTD. NOT PRESENT: KAREN MASON - EQUITABLE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA, TREVOR STRAUSS - NEXTENERGY INC.

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feature

New Directors joining the 2010/2011 Board Linda Dancey is the Founder, President and CEO of Grand River Personnel Limited, a Staffing Recruiting company in the Kitchener-Waterloo area. Grand River Personnel's 32-year history is founded on its commitment to offering, with diversity and flexibility, professional recruiting services to the business community with which it is a proud partner.

Linda Dancey

Founder / President & CEO Grand River Personnel Limited

Rosa Lupo

Partner Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP

Lois Norris

Vice President, Finance & Administration Dare Foods Limited

Linda is a member of the Human Resources Association - Grand Valley Chapter and received her C.H.R.P. designation in 1990. Linda served as the

Chapter President during 2008/2009 and currently is the Director for Programs for the Chapter. Linda is also a Board Member with the Kitchener Waterloo Humane Society. She is an active member of the Friends of the Foundation Committee. This is a dedicated group of volunteers who spearhead RAK Day - Random Act of Kindness Day on behalf of The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation. Linda is also active within the Waterloo Regional Sales Club.

Rosa Lupo is a partner of the Waterloo Region Office of Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP and a member of the Business Law Group. Rosa practises in all areas of real estate law with an emphasis on purchase, sale and financing transactions. Rosa advises clients with respect to development, financing, leasing, purchase and sale of commercial and multi-residential projects. Rosa is actively involved in the preparation and negotiation of complex agreements of purchase and sale, joint venture agreements, commercial agreements and security documentation.

Rosa has been a long-standing active member of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce and has been a member of the Chamber’s Women’s Leadership Committee for over five years. Rosa’s involvement in the community also includes being the Vice-President and a Board Member of K-W Counselling Services and a regular lecturer at the Schlegel Centre for Entrepreneurship School of Business and Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University.

Lois Norris is Vice President, Finance and Administration at Dare Foods Limited, a privately-held family food company headquartered in Kitchener. She is a Chartered Accountant and holds a BBA from Wilfrid Laurier University. Lois has worked in several senior financial management roles in the manufacturing sector over the last 13 years, including her previous position as Vice President Finance and Chief Financial Officer at Humpty Dumpty Snack Foods. Prior to this, she was a senior manager in the

audit practice at KPMG in Waterloo, serving a broad range of clients that included the manufacturing and distribution sectors, as well as municipalities. Prior volunteer experience includes her role as Treasurer and board member of the Stratford-Perth United Way from 1994 – 1998. Lois relocated from Stratford four years ago and now resides in Kitchener with her husband and son.

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feature

Keys to a successful workplace wellness program BY SANDY DELAMERE As an employer with more than 3,000 employees in the Waterloo Region, Sun Life Financial Canada strives to promote a culture where employees can achieve optimal health, wellness, and performance. In today’s workplace environment, health and wellness programs are becoming the norm, and organizations are expected to offer this type of benefit. Workplace wellness programs not only improve employee lifestyle and productivity, but they also help you reduce absenteeism and the costs of benefit programs. The 2009 National Wellness Survey conducted by Buffett & Company Worksite Wellness shows nine out of 10 employers in Canada offer wellness initiatives. Even though organizations are offering more health and wellness programs than ever before, there still appears to be a gap between these programs and improved employee health. At Sun Life, we have implemented a number of initiatives to get the most out of our own employee wellness program.

Employee input We seek input from employees to determine what type of programs to offer. Through a wellness assessment campaign, we identify the top health risks among employees, and create program offerings that reflect these priorities and meet employees’ needs.

Communication We use a number of communication tools to ensure that all employees receive information about our wellness program. Leader messages, email, posters, desk drops, our employee intranet, and job aids for people managers are just some of the tools we use to connect with our employees.

Program delivery and support It is essential that workplace wellness programs are convenient and accessible for all employees, in both remote and onsite locations. An online health challenge, for example, allows any employee to become involved and improve their health. Sun Life also produces educational webinars, another very useful tool for workforces that are spread across the country.

It’s important to have senior leadership and management teams that are committed to the program’s success and visibly support these initiatives. Social networking tools can increase communication among participants for additional support, and employee success stories provide inspiration to keep going.

Engagement/participation Ultimately, it’s up to employees to make use of the resources that are available to them. However, employers must make it as easy as possible to get involved. For example, we use incentive awards and team competitions to encourage employee participation.

Measurement & feedback It is very important to measure program results to gauge success and identify areas for improvement. Annual employee wellness assessments and screening clinics can indicate changes in health from one year to the next. Collecting employee feedback after a program and incorporating it into the overall program measurement allows us to determine where changes need to be made to improve effectiveness, visibility, and participation. Since January, we have had more than 4,100 Canadian employees take advantage of our wellness program. In recognition of our strong commitment to improving the health of our employees, Sun Life was awarded the 2010 Waterloo Region’s Healthy Workplace Gold Award. With an effective and well-rounded health and wellness program, your organization can improve performance, save money, increase employee engagement, and help employees achieve the best possible health and wellness.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sandy Delamere Sandy Delamere is Vice-President, Human Resources, SLF Canada, responsible for translating Canada’s business priorities into human resources strategies to meet employee and business needs.

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| DECEMBER 2010

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sponsor profile

Pioneering a great customer experience BY JANET PEDDIGREW

HERITAGE DESIGNATED BMO BANK OF MONTREAL’S KING AND ERB STREET LOCATION

Since opening our doors as Canada’s first bank in 1817, BMO Bank of Montreal has been committed to the economic development of our country. From modest beginnings we now serve banking, investing and institutional clients across North America and around the world. Yet, at the heart of BMO Bank of Montreal is one goal we all work hard to realize – being the bank that defines great customer experience.

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Defining Canada This year marks the 150th anniversary of BMO Bank of Montreal’s partnership with the Kitchener-Waterloo community. As Canada’s first bank, BMO has become one of the nation’s most enduring institutions, relied upon during times of both stability and uncertainty. A key provider of capital for new businesses and financier of infrastructure projects – from


sponsor profile

Canada’s first railway to its first telegraph service – BMO has unique place as part of our national heritage. BMO Bank of Montreal has a rich tradition in KitchenerWaterloo that first started in 1860, when the Commercial Bank of Canada opened on Queen Street. Since becoming a part of the Bank of Montreal’s national network in 1922, the financial needs of local industry including farmers, flour mills and a carriage factory, have been served by our dedicated branch managers and staff.

Defining the Future of Banking Throughout this relationship, both BMO and KitchenerWaterloo have grown from humble beginnings to become recognized as pioneers of innovation on the international stage. Technological research and creativity have defined KitchenerWaterloo in the 21st century. BMO also has a strong innovative spirit and has committed itself to transforming the Canadian banking industry. BMO’s contributions include becoming the first bank to go ‘online’ between 1975-1980, connecting all its branches across the country through a centralized computer system, and in 1996, we were the first Canadian bank in to offer full service banking on the internet across North America. Our dedication to providing the best customer service experience will continue, as we become more efficient and responsive to the changing needs of customers.

Taking Action in the Kitchener-Waterloo Community At BMO, we believe that corporate responsibility is a journey best travelled in partnership with our many stakeholders. It’s a belief that stems from the understanding that the economic, social and environmental choices we make as a corporation affect the lives of our shareholders, customers, employees and communities. That means operating our business ethically and according to the principles of honesty, transparency and accountability BMO has become an active supporter of the Kitchener-Waterloo community. Our participation has included contributions to Kitchener Waterloo Counselling Services, the YMCA of Kitchener-Waterloo and Supportive Housing of Waterloo. Currently the presenting sponsor of Titanic: The Artifacts Exhibition at The Museum in Kitchener, BMO has also pledge $1.3 million to the University of Waterloo to further assist in attracting the brightest minds in Canada. With over 200 employees and 12 branches in KitchenerWaterloo, no matter what their needs, our customers can be sure they will be met by a knowledgeable professional who will sit down and help them understand our products and services, so they can confidently make the right decisions with their money. We are committed to providing every one of our customers with the best banking experience For more information about BMO visit www.bmo.com.

Defining Great Customer Service Responsibility begins with the way we conduct business. As a company, we strive to do the right thing – always. Our stakeholders expect this of us, and nothing could be more important to our success. Our business – making money make sense for millions of personal, commercial, institutional and corporate customers – is built on the trust people have in our company. For this reason, we constantly review and refine our governance standards to ensure we are maintaining the highest standards for ethics and transparency.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Janet Peddigrew Janet Peddigrew is Vice-President, BMO Bank of Montreal, Mid-Western Ontario District. Janet oversees delivery of the full range of financial services the Bank provides to personnel and commercial customers. Born in Wabush, Newfoundland and Labrador Janet completed her MBA at Dalhousie University.

advocate

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| DECEMBER 2010

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member notables

Member notables 570 News and Kitchener Rangers announce new deal 570 News and the Kitchener Rangers Hockey Club announced a new five year broadcast deal running through the 2015/2016 season. Mike Farwell, the new colour commentator for the hockey club joined the legendary Don Cameron who marks his 44th season of play-by-play with the Rangers Hockey Club.

Chamber members honoured at Women of the Year event The Rogers Oktoberfest Women of the Year awards took place in October. The awards recognize and pay tribute to outstanding women in the community in the following categories: Arts & Culture; Community Service; Health & Wellness; Entrepreneur; Lifetime Achievement; Professional; Sports & Recreation and Young Adult. A number of Chamber members were among those honoured. Linda Hendry of Hendry Coach Lines Inc. won the award for Community Service and the following Chamber members were nominated for awards: Christina Boon, Icing Inspirations; Esther Gascho, Bingemans; Megan Harris, Wilfrid Laurier University; Moni Lagonia, RBC Dominion Securities; Bessie Schenk, freelance writer, marketing, communications; Dana Shortt, Dana Shortt Gourmet; Dawne Taylor-Gilders, SNAP; Genevieve Twomey, K-W Symphony; Amy Vandenberg, CuteGecko and Yvonne Zensner, The Cake Box.

Data Perceptions Celebrates 17 years On October 21st, Data Perceptions' celebrated its 17th Anniversary. Customers, family and friends attended the event at the Grey Silo Golf Course. Data Perceptions provides IT operations consulting expertise, software development, and infrastructure services.

Morning Glory Café & Bakery celebrates 10 years Located in downtown Kitchener, Morning Glory Café & Bakery celebrated 10 years in business this fall. More than a typical enterprise, this Ray of Hope program provides a training environment for individuals that have had limited opportunity to realize their potential. You can help to strengthen the core of our community just by having lunch.

MTE named to 2010 Zweig Letter Hot Firm List MTE Consultants Inc. (MTE) was once again named to the Zweig Letter Hot Firm List. This honour recognizes the firm’s tremendous growth from 2006 – 2009. This is the second year in a row that MTE has made the List and MTE is one of only a small number of named firms with head offices in Canada. MTE is an employee-owned company providing multidisciplinary services in the fields of engineering, environmental science, toxicology and land surveying.

(continued on page 28) Member Notables are taken from local news sources and member submissions. In order to be considered “notable” an item must be an accomplishment or event that is outside of the ordinary course of business and therefore deemed newsworthy. While we would like to include all submissions, space constraints make it necessary for the Advocate editors to choose items that best fit the above criteria and are most timely.

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member notables

(continued from page 27)

Waterloo Region Record editor-in-chief accepts Suburban Newspapers of America award Waterloo Region Record editor-in-chief Lynn Haddrall accepted her award for Suburban Newspapers of America Editor of the Year at the SNA’s annual conference in September. The association, which represents more than 2,000 newspapers in Canada and the U.S., recognized Lynn, who is also editor-in-chief of the Guelph Mercury and Grand magazine, as someone who has made “outstanding contributions” to their newspaper “through strong management skills, readership initiatives, community involvement, innovation and a commitment to quality journalism.”

Access Storage celebrates its new Kitchener location On September 15th 2010, Access Storage celebrated its grand opening at the new Access Business Centre located at 50 Ottawa Street South at Charles Street in Kitchener. Canadian owned and operated, Access Storage has been providing the Greater Toronto Area with high quality, flexible, modern and secure storage facilities since 1998. With ties to the Waterloo region, Access is now able to serve Waterloo Region’s needs by providing a variety of customized storage solutions.

We make it our business to understand your business. TD Commercial Banking. Customized banking solutions to meet your unique business needs. Before we can understand how to best meet your banking needs, we want to understand your business. That’s why at TD Commercial Banking, we offer our clients the advantage of a dedicated Relationship Manager who is committed to fully understanding your business needs before recommending a customized banking solution. Your Relationship Manager is your one point of contact and there is a whole team of specialists adding expert value and support. Find out how TD Commercial Banking can give you the personal service you and your business deserve.

For more information, contact TD Commercial Banking. Karl Brecht Vice President, TD Commercial Banking 519-579-2168 karl.brecht@td.com

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Ưȷɂȶ ȽɄȳɀ ̶̰ ɇȳȯɀɁ ɇ ȳɆȾȳɀȷȳȼȱȳ˷˷˷ Ⱦ ĂĂŶĚ ŶĚ ĞŝŐŚƚ ĞŝŐŚƚ LJLJĞĂƌƐ ĞĂƌƐ ĂƐ ĂƐ Ă ZĞŐŝƐƚĞƌĞĚ ZĞŐŝƐƚĞƌĞĚ //ŶƚĞƌŝŽƌ ŶƚĞƌŝŽƌ ĞƐŝŐŶĞƌ͕ ĞƐŝŐŶĞƌ͕ ǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ ǁŝƚŚ < ĂƌĞŶ t ŝůƐŽŶ ĂƐƐƵƌĞƐ ĂƐƐƵƌĞƐ LJŽƵ LJŽƵ Ž ŚĞ ƐƐƉĞĐŝĂů ƉĞĐŝĂů ĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌĂƟŽŶ ĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌĂƟŽŶ ŽĨ ŽĨ LJLJŽƵƌ ŽƵƌ <ĂƌĞŶ tŝůƐŽŶ ŽĨĨ ƚƚŚĞ Ɖ ƉƌŽũĞĐƚ ƌŽũĞĐƚ ƌĞƋƵŝƌĞŵĞŶƚƐ ƌĞƋƵŝƌĞŵĞŶƚƐ ĂĂŶĚ ŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƚŚĞ ƉƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂů ƉƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂů ƐƵƉƉŽƌƚ ƐƵƉƉŽƌƚ ƌƌĞƋƵŝƌĞĚ ĞƋƵŝƌĞĚ ƚŽ ƚŽ ĐĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ƚŚĞ ƚŚĞ ˜ ˜Ž¤Š˜œ¡ž’œ£“£ Ž¤Š˜ ˜œ¡ž’œ£“£ ŽŽĨĨ LJŽƵƌ LJŽƵƌ ƐƉĂĐĞ͘ ƐƉĂĐĞ͘

̄̄ƝɄȳɀɇ ƝɄȳɀɇ ȲȳɂȯȷȺ ȲȳɂȯȷȺ Ƚȴ Ƚȴ ɇȽɃɀ ɇȽɃɀ ȶȶȽȻȳ ȽȻȳ ɁȶȽɃȺȲ ɁȶȽɃȺȲ ȰȰȳȳ ȽȽɃɂɁɂȯȼȲȷȼȵ˴ ɃɂɁɂȯȼȲȷȼȵ˴ ȰɃɂ ȰɃɂ ȳȳɄȳɀɇ Ʉȳɀɇ ȲȳɂȯȷȺ ȲȳɂȯȷȺ ɁȶȽɃȺȲ ɁȶȽɃȺȲ ȼȽɂ ȼȽɂ ɁɂȯȼȲ ɁɂȯȼȲ ȽɃɂ˷ ȽɃɂ˷ ƣȳɇ ƣȳɇ ȳȺȳȻȳȼɂɁ ȳȺȳȻȳȼɂɁ Ⱥȷȹȳ Ⱥȷȹȳ ȴɃɀȼȷɂɃɀȳ ȴɃɀȼȷɂɃɀȳ ȾȷȳȱȳɁ ȾȷȳȱȳɁ ȽȽɀɀ ȯɀȱȶȷɂȳȱɂɃɀȯȺ ȯɀȱȶȷɂȳȱɂɃɀȯȺ ȴȳȯɂɃɀȳɁ ȴȳȯɂɃɀȳɁ ɁȶȽɃȺȲ ɁȶȽɃȺȲ ȲɀȯɅ ȲɀȯɅ ɇȽɃɀ ɇȽɃɀ ȳɇȳ˴ ȳɇȳ˴ ȯȼȲ ȯȼȲ ɂȶȳȼ ɂȶȳȼ ɇɇȽɃ ȽɃ ȷȼɂȽ ȷȼɂȽ ɂȶȳ ɂȶȳ ɁɁȾȯȱȳ˷̅ Ⱦȯȱȳ˷̅

ŽŒ“Š—“¯“š‘ ŽŒ“Š—“¯“š š‘ šပ

ƜȳɁȷȵȼ ȳɁȷȵȼ ƚɃȷȺȲ ̗ ƪȳȼȽɄȯɂȷȽȼɁ ƪȳȼȽɄȯɂȷȽȼɁ ̗ ƣȷɂȱȶȳȼɁ ƣȷɂȱȶȳȼɁ ̐ ƚȯɂȶɀȽȽȻɁ ƚȯɂȶɀȽȽȻɁ ̗ ƨɀȽȸȳȱɂ ƨɀȽȸȳȱɂ ƥȯȼȯȵȳȻȳȼɂ ƥȯȼȯȵȳȻȳȳȼɂ ƯȷȼȲȽɅ ȽɅ Ƭ ƬɀȳȯɂȻȳȼɂɁ ɀȳȯɂɂȻȳȼɂɁ ̗ ƭ ƭȾȶȽȺɁɂȳɀɇ ȾȶȽȺɁɂȳɀɇ ̗ ƞȷ ƞȷȼȳ ȼȳ ƞƞɃɀȼȷɂɃɀȳ ɃɀȼȼȷɂɃɀȳ ̗ ƯȯȺȺ ƯȯȺȺ ȯ ƛȽɄȳɀȷȼȵɁ ƛȽɄȳɀȷȼȵɁ ̗ ƞȺȽȽɀ ƛ ƛȽɄȳɀȷȼȵɁ ȽɄȳɀȷȼȵɁ ϭϮϭ ŚĂƌůĞƐ ^ƚ͘ t͕͘ ^ƵŝƚĞ ϯϭϳ͕ <ŝƚĐŚĞŶĞƌ͕ KE EϮ' ϭ,ϲ

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| DECEMBER 2010

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Helping us make our vision possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

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Leadership Series


Choose Choose a Benefits Benefits Plan Plan that that works works for you you a nd your your employees. employees. for and Equitable Equitable Life Life速 has has proudly proudly partnered partnered with with Cowan Cowan a nd tthe he G reater K itchener W aterloo Chamber Chamber and Greater Kitchener Waterloo off C Commerce 1984 o ommerce since since 1 984 to to provide provide members members and their employees with h a comprehensive comprehensive and cost-effective group b benefits enefits program. program. Call the Chamber Concierge rge Service: Service: 1-888-333-6337 1-888-333-6337 email: chamber@cowangroup.ca roup.ca or visit: www.cowangroup.ca/osaap.ca/osaa-10

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The Advocate Magazine - November | December 2010  
The Advocate Magazine - November | December 2010  

In this November | December edition of the Greater KW Chamber of Commerce Advocate Magazine we look at how to set up your group benefits pla...