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advocate THE VOICE OF BUSINESS

J A N U A R Y | F E B R U A R Y 2 0 11

Our Time is Now! Sustained Recovery South of the Border Key to the Economic Outlook for Kitchener-Waterloo Tourism Outlook for 2011 to 2015 Waterloo’s Unconventional Collaboration for Intentional Innovation


advocate VOICE OF BUSINESS JANUARY

| FERUARY 2011

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FEATURE

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:

Sustained recovery south of the border key to the economic outlook for Kitchener-Waterloo

Art Sinclair EDITOR:

Paul Ferley

Heather Hutchings

COVER STORY

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION:

Our Time is Now!

Cober Printing Limited

Dr. John Tibbits

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PHOTOGRAPHY:

Teri Hetherington

FEATURE

Waterloo’s unconventional collaboration for intentional innovation

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FEATURE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS:

Tourism outlook for 2011 to 2015

Marlene Coffey, Laurel Davies Snyder, Tracey Desjardins, Dean Elliott, Paul Ferley, Mary Sue Fitzpatrick, Andrena Lockley-Brown, Jeff MacIntyre, Peter McFadden, Ian McLean, Art Sinclair, Dr. John Tibbits

Tracey Desjardins

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FEATURE

Working toward a barrier-free Ontario

CONTRIBUTORS:

Andrena Lockley-Brown

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Julie Tedesco

FEATURE ADVERTISING AND COPY DEADLINES:

Watershed moment for Woolwich

February 1, 2011 for March | April April 4, 2011 for May | June June 6, 2011 for July | August August 1, 2011 for September | October October 3, 2011 for November | December

Laurel Davies Snyder

departments 4

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Perception or reality

SUBSCRIPTION AND BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES:

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Jeff MacIntyre

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ADVERTISING AND SALES:

David MacLellan - dmaclellan@greaterkwchamber.com Mandy Chapman- mchapman@greaterkwchamber.com

Marlene Coffey

Ian McLean

Skilled talent shortages to increase in 2011 Peter McFadden

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

Economic growth in 2011

WRIEN UPDATE

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EVENTS

Mark your calendar

Kathryn McEwin kmcewin@greaterkwchamber.com SUBMISSION POLICY:

Proposals and articles are accepted via mail or email c/o Editor - Advocate. Please do not send originals. All contributors articles must be accompanied by a head shot in a jpg file and a 40 word author’s bio. PUBLICATIONS PERMIT:

#40026716

FOR PERMISSION AND REPRINT REQUESTS

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ADVOCACY

Political forecasts for 2011 Art Sinclair

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Greater K-W welcomes future family physicians

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EVENTS

Autumn networking

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NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS

October 1 - November 30, 2010

SPONSOR PROFILE

Heather Hutchings - hhutchings@greaterkwchamber.com

BDO Canada LLP – Accountants and Advisors

PRINTED IN CANADA BY:

PUBLICATION OF:

Dean Elliott

PERSPECTIVE ON HEALTH CARE

Mary Sue Fitzpatrick

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IN MEMORIUM

Howard (Howie) Jasper, FCA MEMBER NOTABLES

Achieving Success Chamber Members PROFILE

Chamber Star - Ian Inglis SPONSORSHIP

Chamber Sponsors

POSTMASTER ADDRESS CHANGES: C/O

ADVOCATE - PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 80 QUEEN STREET NORTH, PO BOX 2367 KITCHENER, ONTARIO N2H 6L4 The Advocate is a bi-monthly membership benefit publication of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. Advertising content and the views expressed herein are those of the contributors and do not constitute endorsement by the Chamber. The Advocate follows the Canadian Code of Advertising Standards (1990), copies are available through the Publisher. The Chamber cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur and has the right to edit material submitted. The Chamber will not accept advertising with competitor comparison claims and has the right to refuse advertising that is deemed to be false, misleading, or inappropriate.

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a message from the chair

Perception or reality BY JEFF MACINTYRE I consider myself one who likes to understand what is happening and what is going to happen. As I write this I am optimistic about the economy and the outlook for the coming year but remain cautious. The caution I have is the conflict between the positive comments most people I talk to about how busy they are and the real world out there and the possibility of business doom. A while back I was in the office of an advisor while I put the finishing touches on opening a small business. At that time we discussed how low the markets would go. Where was the bottom? The free fall of the economy was right in front of us when he said, “sure it’s bad, but remember, there is a big world out there full of people that need stuff.” What he meant was that although the markets were crashing and there appeared to be no bottom in sight, the economy must rebound just to satisfy the demand for services and products. The economy bottomed out and began the slow climb back. Over the year we rode the wave of cautious growth making sure that spending was in check with revenue. Increased expenses resulted in some tough choices. People seemed to make the necessary adjustments to lifestyle and matched expenses to income. Those who were out of jobs spent the time necessary to find employment. Employers who had right sized were again looking for good people. A shift in attitude became apparent. A move away from the doom and gloom of the recession to a cautious optimism was felt. A year ago most people commented that business could be better. Today at Chamber events I hear more and more that people are very busy. While most business owners are still trying to increase revenues, there is a general positive feel compared to a year ago. Panic was replaced with solid growth strategies.

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For many companies, inventory might be lower and prices may be reduced but money is changing hands. Not all companies are back to full strength and yet others are expanding more than ever. In late November on a whim a group of eight of us went to a restaurant only to be told they were full. One in the group made a comment that the recession is definitely over. Not all restaurants are full every night, but the signs are encouraging. On the negative side, I was driving through a business park and couldn’t help but notice the number of buildings that were vacant or for lease. The reality is that a number of companies that were integral parts of the community no longer exist. As 2011 unfolds, the opportunity to capitalize on business growth appears to be heading in the right direction. It will remain important to control what can be controlled regarding expenses and revenues. The collective voice through the Chamber and other associations will be critical to make certain that government continues to listen and assist with business progression. The hope is that the economy continues to strengthen. After all, there is a big world out there…

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jeff MacIntyre CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS Jeff MacIntyre is the owner of two small businesses in Waterloo Region. Winexpert Kitchener South is an on-premises winemaking shop. So There Business Solutions assists employers to increase profitability through market access, sales assistance, business development planning strategies, mentoring and training.


message from the president

Economic growth in 2011 BY IAN MCLEAN

Progress… steady but slow. In November, I was pleased to participate as a panelist at the WLU Economic Forecast 2011 event held at the newly opened Communitech Hub. The keynote speaker was TD Bank Chief Economist Craig Alexander. He outlined what we can expect for 2011 and beyond locally, provincially and nationally. In setting the stage for his remarks, he prefaced by stating that how you view the numbers really depends on your view of the world. To wit: is the glass half full or half empty? Mr. Alexander’s projections are that Canadian economic growth in 2011 will see about a 2% rise in GDP and a subsequent increase for 2012-2014 at about 2% per year. This tepid growth forecast is largely driven by the lagging US economy. The US accounts for over 80% of Canadian foreign trade. So to a large extent, the steady but slow economic recovery in Canada is a result of the very troubling issues facing the American economy. Massive US deficits and the housing crisis have resulted in the American business community being very cautious about reinvesting in their operations. It is worth noting that traditionally Canada fares worse during recessions than the US. The Canadian economy, and our local economy, has out-performed the US during the recession and emergence from the downturn. The good news is that our Canadian economy is indeed out of recession, is growing again and we have recovered all of the jobs that we lost. The bad news is that this growth is tepid and will not produce the kind of jumpstart in either job creation or government revenues that we have come to expect after a recession. This means that making progress in lowering the unemployment rate will be steady but very slow. It also means that tackling deficits at the federal and provincial levels will be even more difficult. Locally, the Region of Waterloo economy experienced most of the same difficulties during the recession as the rest of the country. The Region’s unemployment rate rose to over 10% at the height

of the recession. But we have seen that as the economic recovery has taken hold the unemployment rate dropped to about 8%. So the question is: what can and should we do during this long, slow economic recovery to ensure that our Region’s business community is prepared to emerge from this difficult period and compete? As a Chamber, we need to ensure that every day we keep focused on demonstrating the value of your Chamber membership. We will do this by offering an improved Members Rewards Program that helps lower your cost of doing business, by advocating on issues that affect all businesses such as the escalating costs of electricity, and offering improved networking and educational opportunities. As a Region, we need to do what we do best. Work together collaboratively and think innovatively and creatively in the entrepreneurial spirit that is our history. We need to reflect on what are the strategic investments we need to make as a community to plan for our future. And we need to be a strong voice in encouraging both the provincial and federal governments to be both innovative and forward looking as they address large deficits with difficult budget decisions. In a nutshell, as a region, province and as a country we need to be focused and serious about what we need to do and what we can afford to do. That will mean some very difficult choices have to be made. But in facing these choices, we need to make decisions that foster innovation and entrepreneurship so that all sectors of our business community – small and large alike - can thrive and grow.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ian McLean, Ian McLean is President and CEO of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

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advocacy

Political forecasts for 2011 BY ART SINCLAIR My father, who farmed in southwestern Ontario, often said that meteorologists were 99 percent correct – one percent of the time. Have you talked to anyone in London who shovelled three feet of “partly cloudy” from their driveways last December? With the preceding wisdom as a backdrop, I will now attempt to determine what may –or may not -happen in the political arena over the next twelve months. These ideas are my humble opinions and should not be used for wagering. On a related note, it is true that the Province of Ontario has a huge deficit heading into the new year, however betting on provincial elections through ProLine is probably not a serious option as a new revenue measure. One certainty is a provincial election will be held in 2011 – on October 6. This is the second “fixed date” vote the province has witnessed since the current governing Liberals changed the Election Act. The key campaign issue will probably be the HST. So far, no one in the province has demanded a referendum like our counterparts on Canada’s left coast. However, it is generally agreed that voter perspectives on this revenue measure by the fall of 2011 will have a significant impact on the returns. The other certain election issue – remember this is a guess – will be electricity. In November of 2010, Ontario voters were buried with a series of announcements out of Queen’s Park indicating no alternatives were available aside from future double-digit hydro rate increases. Granted, Premier McGuinty and Finance Minister Dwight Duncan have made it clear that cost increases are the price for Ontario becoming a global leader in green energy. How far voters are willing to accept this position will be a major factor in determining the election outcome. There is however, based on past experiences, a good chance that between now and September a new issue will be dropped on the electorate that may be central to the campaign. Obviously, due to the magnitude of the ministry budget, health care matters can always create problems for incumbent candidates. The McGuinty administration survived a confrontation over the past year with

pharmacists, and other stakeholders, on changes to generic drug pricing. There may be more stability here than the opposition parties would like. In our 2010 March/April Advocate, Mike Dearden indicated that the implementation of Full Day Kindergarten for all four and five year olds could become a landmine for the current administration. Mike identified the cost of the program in an economic downturn as a critical issue, however this could evolve into a rural/urban split. Officials from rural school boards have in the past questioned the appropriateness of placing students of the aforementioned, or younger, ages on school buses for commutes of an hour or more. If enough parents agree, this could be an issue. On the local municipal scene, with an election just concluded, the agenda will be dominated by – provincial matters. The highlight of the municipal campaign was rapid transit, in large part a result of the provincial government not delivering on their promised twothirds commitment towards the cost of building a new system. Regional staff is working on options which will be different from the plan approved by Council in June of 2009, however there may be local pressure on Queen’s Park to increase their financial commitment. You might remember that in the 2007 Ontario election there was a referendum on electoral reform. It was voted down. It is highly unlikely there will be a question this year on whether or not Ontario and Manitoba should talk about amalgamating.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Art Sinclair Art Sinclair is the Vice President Policy and Advocacy for the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce.

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perspective on health care

Greater K-W welcomes future family physicians BY MARY SUE FITZPATRICK

Chamber Plays Host to 15 Family Medicine Residents

leading edge urban centre which also affords the benefits and warmth of rural life.”

Local family physicians, business and community leaders joined volunteers of the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce this past November in hosting 15 family medicine residents and their partners from the five southern Ontario medical schools.

During their three-day community visit, residents toured our hospitals and met and spoke with local family practitioners while their partners toured our rural and urban communities and had opportunity to explore employment opportunities. This year’s family medicine residents and their partners met some high profile business and community leaders and learned more about the region’s diversity and its strong innovative and entrepreneurial spirit.

Organized by the Chamber Health Care Resources Council’s Family Physician Liaison Task Force, the annual family medicine resident weekend is a major recruitment initiative that positively engages family residents and promotes the community as a welcoming, attractive, leading edge centre of medical excellence with promising practice opportunities. “Word is getting out to health care professionals that our region is a centre of excellence and entrepreneurship offering quality of life, education, arts and culture, recreation and leisure,” said Health Council chair Bruce Antonello. “Physicians are seeing the potential for living and practising in our type of innovative,

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They were also guests of Open Text at a special luncheon at UW’s Research & Technology Park. In the high tech environment, our visitors enjoyed Kennedy’s famous Waterloo County fare while Communitech’s Iain Klugman gave them an overview of our leading-edge, collaborative and innovative communities. According to organizing committee chair Jane George of Airways Transit, this weekend has been instrumental in residents’ decisions to establish their family practices in the area. “We have had


perspective on health care

wonderful success with our recruiting weekend over the past twelve years,” said George. “With six of the visiting family medicine residents having expressed serious interest in K-W, we fully expect to see a good number of them establishing practices in K-W over the next two years.” Chamber Health Care Resources Council initiatives are made possible by the generous support and investment of: Manulife Financial, Research In Motion, Sun Life Financial, The Economical Insurance Group, Cowan, KPMG, Heffner Lexus and Heffner Toyota, The Walter Fedy Partnership, Bell, Scotiabank and the Cities of Kitchener and Waterloo and Township of Woolwich.

Chamber physician recruitment initiatives are made possible through the generous support of our corporate and community partners.

Along with these major corporate and community investors, the Chamber Health Council extends special thanks to this year’s resident weekend supporters who added the special touches that thoroughly impressed our visiting family medicine residents and their partners: the Waterloo Inn & Conference Hotel for their fine food, service and accommodation; Open Text for hosting the luncheon; Brick Brewing Company Limited for fine product and Kennedy’s Catering for a delicious taste of Waterloo County fare! Members of the Health Council’s Family Physician Liaison Task Force are to be congratulated for another successful Family Resident Weekend. Your planning and organizing efforts and your support and involvement over this important annual weekend have made it especially warm and welcoming for the visiting residents and their partners.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Mary Sue Fitzpatrick Mary Sue is Vice President Family Physician Resources and Health Advocacy.

Special thanks to our 2010 Family Medicine Resident Weekend supporters for their gifts and services that helped make the weekend welcoming for our visitors.

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networking

Autumn networking 1

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1) A GROUP OF CONESTOGA COLLEGE STUDENTS AT THE OCTOBER CYP EVENT. 2) J.R. WADDELL & BRENDON ROBINSON 3) CHAMBER PRESIDENT AND CEO, IAN MCLEAN ADDRESSES THE CHAMBER CONNECTIONS CROWD

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4) PART OF THE GROUP AT THE CHAMBER CONNECTIONS IN OCTOBER 5) SUE BENOIT, KURT WISSENT, MATT DOUGLAS


networking

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6) 7) 8) 9)

THE CHAMBER CONNECTIONS, HELD AT THE WATERLOO REGION MUSEUM BRENDAN SHEEHAN, PETER THURLEY, SARAH BACH BEN BACH & SUSAN WANG PAUL DEMARCO AND MARC MORAIS

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10) ROSS WELLS, BRIAN BAZELY AND MANDY DENNISON FORMED THE PANEL OF PAST WINNERS OF THE BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS, SPEAKING AT THE OCTOBER NETWORKING BREAKFAST 11) EDWIN OUTWATER SPEAKING TO THE GROUP AT A POINT OF VIEW LUNCHEON, SHARED HIS VISION FOR THE KITCHENER WATERLOO SYMPHONY

THE RECORD REACHES MORE ADULTS THAN THE TORONTO PAPERS COMBINED!

84,600 MORE ADULTS DAILY

TToo aadvertise dvertise oorr ppartner artner w with ith tthe he W Waterloo aterloo R Region egion R Record ecord please call 519-894-2250. 4-2250.

77,200 MORE ADULTS ON SATURDAY* *Source: NADbank速 2009

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new members

October 1 - November 30, 2010 AML Communications Inc. Kitchener Telecommunications Josh Laur, District Sales Manager 1500 Weber Street East Kitchener, ON N2A 2Y5 Email: jlaur@amlnet.com Web: www.amlcares.com Phone: (519) 893-5796 Fax: (519) 893-4382

AML Communications Inc. Waterloo Telecommunications Josh Laur, District Sales Manager 255 King Street North Waterloo, ON N2J 2Y8 Email: jlaur@amlnet.com Web: www.amlcares.com Phone: (519) 747-4141

Apex Pest Control Services Pest Control Services Mark Thomas, Business Development Manager/Technical Consultant 240 Magurn Gate Milton, ON L9T 7B3 Email: mthomas@apexpcservices.com Web: www.apexpcservices.com Phone: (888) 434-2739 Fax: (416) 483-7776

Bikram Yoga Kitchener Waterloo Yoga Instruction David Tiviluk, Owner/Director 663 Belmont Avenue West Kitchener, ON N2M 1N8 Email: bikramyogakw@gmail.com Web: www.bikramyogakw.com Phone: (519) 749-9888 Fax: (519) 749-9886

Bricas Multi-Trade Inc. Millwrights Wayne Barnard, President 169 Riverbend Drive Kitchener, ON N2B 2E8 Email: wbarnard@bricas.ca Web: www.bricas.ca Phone: (519) 741-9392 Fax: (519) 741-5536

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Client Outlook

Fastsigns

Paul Puncher Menswear

Computer Software Brenda Rankin, Vice President 295 Hagey Boulevard Waterloo, ON N2L 6R5 Email: brenda@clientoutlook.com Web: www.clientoutlook.com Phone: (519) 342-6864

Signs Rob Richmond, Owner 1305 Victoria Street North, Unit 5 Kitchener, ON N2B 3E3 Email: rob.richmond@fastsigns.com Web: www.fastsigns.com/681 Phone: (519) 743-0888

Men's Clothing & Accessories - Retail Scott Puncher, President 20 Regina Street South Waterloo, ON N2J 4W9 Email: menswear@paulpuncher.com Web: www.paulpuncher.com Phone: (519) 888-7999

Danval Inc.

Huntington Society of Canada

Phoenix Cultural Centre

Accounting & Bookkeeping Services Valeria Rigler, Owner-Director 375 Kingscourt Drive, Unit 29 Waterloo, ON N2K 3N7 Email: valeriarigler@rogers.com Phone: (519) 590-6383

Charitable & Community Organizations Bev Heim-Myers, Executive Director & Chief Executive Officer 151 Frederick Street, Unit 400 Kitchener, ON N2H 2M2 Email: info@huntingtonsociety.ca Web: www.huntingtonsociety.ca Phone: (519) 749-7063 Fax: (519) 749-8965

Charitable & Community Organizations Wendy Hua, Project Manager 618 King Street East, PO Box 366 Kitchener, ON N2G 1Y0 Email: wendy_h@phoenixculturalcentre.org Web: www.phoenixculturalcentre.org Phone: (519) 576-7472

International Association of Administrative Professionals Grand River Chapter

Market Research Rob Grein, Partner 98 King Street South Waterloo, ON N2J 1P5 Email: robg@pmgintelligence.com Web: www.pmgintelligence.com Phone: (519) 746-3997 Fax: (519) 746-6926

Dr. Dan Dalton & Associates Psychologists & Psychological Associates Dan Dalton, President 240A St. David Street North Fergus, ON N1M 2J7 Email: drdan@drdandalton.com Web: www.drdandalton.com Phone: (519) 787-1392 Fax: (519) 787-0773

Dre Designs Interior Design Services Andrea Guerriero, Owner/Interior Designer 3085 Kingsway Drive, Unit 30 Kitchener, ON N2C 2P1 Email: andrea@dredesigns.ca Web: www.dredesigns.ca Phone: (519) 580-9691

Eco-Tech Recycling Waste Management & Recycling Services Jose Palacios, President 505 Dotzert Court, Unit 2 Waterloo, ON N2L 6A7 Email: info@eco-techrecycling.com Web: www.eco-techrecycling.com Phone: (519) 886-6801

Fairway Divorce Solutions Marriage, Family & Individual Counsellors Colette Fortin, President 296 Frederick Street Kitchener, ON N2H 2N5 Email: cfortin@fairwaydivorce.com Phone: (519) 954-6240

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Associations & Organizations Teresa Doucet, President 1056 Homuth Avenue Cambridge, ON N3H 2C7 Email: tmd@bell.net Web: www.iaap-grandriver.org Phone: (519) 621-2430

McLean & Associates Consultants Hon. Walter McLean, President & Chief Executive Officer 122 Avondale Avenue South Waterloo, ON N2L 2C3 Email: walter@mcleanandassociates.ca Web: www.mcleanandassociates.ca Phone: (519) 578-5932 Fax: (519) 578-7799

PMG Intelligence

Protrend-Arrow Construction Inc. Building Contractors Uel McFall, President 330 Trillium Drive, Unit F Kitchener, ON N2E 3J2 Email: ray@protrend-arrow.com Web: www.protrend-arrow.com Phone: (519) 894-5789 Fax: (519) 894-0797

REDRAGON Oil & Gas Systems International Inc

Video Production Chrissie Rose 72 St. Leger Street, Unit 318 Kitchener, ON N2H 6R4 Email: peter@memorytree.ca Web: www.memorytree.ca Phone: (519) 742-7912

Manufacturers Prakash Venkataraman, President and Chief Executive Officer 135 Turnbull Court Cambridge, ON N1T 1C6 Email: prakash@redragon.ca Web: www.redragon.ca Phone: (519) 624-8891 Fax: (519) 624-6367

Moksha Yoga Waterloo

Ren's Pets Depot

Memory Tree Productions Inc

Yoga Instruction Ashley Keefe, Director/Owner 55 Erb Street East Waterloo, ON N2J 4K8 Email: ashley@mokshayogawaterloo.com Web: www.mokshayogawaterloo.com Phone: (519) 954-3516

Pet Food & Supplies Erin Yorke, Events Coordinator 1525 Victoria Street North Kitchener, ON N2B 3E4 Email: erin@renspets.com Web: www.renspets.com Phone: (519) 578-4133


new members

Sherwood Systems

The Robin's Nest

Vine Valuations Inc.

W2S Solutions Corporation

Audio Visual Equipment & Supplies Tim Mitchell, Vice President Operations 124 Ottawa Street South Kitchener, ON N2G 3S9 Email: tim@sherwoodsystems.com Web: www.sherwoodsystems.com Phone: (519) 745-6154 Fax: (519) 745-6679

Cafe Robin Martin, Owner 29A Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 1M2 Email: robin@therobinnest.ca Phone: (519) 497-3637

Business Valuations Christine Minelli, President 1 Hunter Street East, Suite 100 Hamilton, ON L8N 3W1 Email: Web: www.vine.on.ca Phone: (905) 549-8463 Fax: (905) 549-6020

Computer Software Madhubalan Kesavan, Managing Director 3227 King Street East, Unit 412 Kitchener, ON N2A 3Z9 Email: madhu@way2smile.com Web: www.w2ssolutions.com Phone: (226) 339-1422

The Growth Coach Coaching Keith Peers, President 210 Morningside Drive Cambridge, ON N3H 4R8 Email: k.peers@thegrowthcoach.com Web: www.thegrowthcoachofkw.com Phone: (519) 650-9030 Fax: (519) 650-9038

Verigreen Inc. Energy Consultants & Management Paul Rak, President 20 Lindsay Road Cambridge, ON N1R 7K6 Email: info@verigreen.ca Web: www.verigreen.ca Phone: (519) 653-6000 Fax: (519) 653-1016

Vista Hospitality Group Real Estate Investments Alim Adatia, Vice President Asset Management 55 King Street West, Unit 801 Kitchener, ON N2G 4W1 Email: alim@vistahospitality.com Web: www.vistahospitality.com Phone: (519) 744-4400 Fax: (519) 744-5500

New stormwater user rate coming in 2011! The City of Kitchener is transferring stormwater management funding from property taxes to a user-fee program, effective Jan. 1, 2011. This new stormwater user fee will appear on your monthly utility bill beginning in February 2011. The following chart shows how stormwater fees will be calculated for non-residential properties, based on the amount of stormwater runoff and impervious area on each property.

City staff will spend 2011 developing a credit program for non-residential property owners, with the goal of implementing the new program in 2012. More information on this program will be shared as soon as possible.

Where do I get more information? For more information on the city’s new stormwater user-fee funding model, as well as the reasons the city must increase its spending on stormwater management, please: • Visit: www.kitchener.ca/stormwater • E-mail: revenuecustomerservice@kitchener.ca • Call: 519-741-2450

This is the most fair and equitable approach to funding stormwater management since the properties that have the most impervious area and use the system more also pay more. advocate

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feature

Sustained recovery south of the border key to the economic outlook for Kitchener-Waterloo BY PAUL FERLEY The recent economic downturn in Ontario largely reflected the fallout from the sub-prime mortgage fiasco emanating from the U.S. financial system that pressured the cost-of-capital higher not only in the U.S. but in Canada as well. This deterioration in the financial system pushed the U.S. economy into the most severe downturn since the 1930s thus earning it the sobriquet “The Great Recession.” Weakness was particularly pronounced in the auto sector that resulted in Ontario experiencing a much more severe downturn in 2009 relative to most other provinces. In fact, the auto sector troubles were a prominent factor causing the Ontario economy to begin contracting in 2008, before all other provinces except Nova Scotia. The severity of the U.S. recession prompted very aggressive, and innovative, moves by both the Federal Reserve and the U.S. Administration. This in part reflected the lessons learned from the “Great Depression” of the 1930s when the policy response has since been characterized as too restrained and timid. Of the aggressive policy responses prompted by the current crisis, not all proved successful, though enough of them worked to return the U.S. economy back to positive growth by the middle of 2009. The attendant increased demand for manufactured goods, and automobiles in particular, helped send the Ontario economy back to positive growth in the third quarter of 2009 as well. However, though the return to positive growth is encouraging, the pace remains below what the U.S. economy usually generates coming out of recession. Thus the Ontario economy remains vulnerable to the risk that this pick-up in U.S. demand is not sustained. Adding to the concern about the sustainability of the U.S. recovery is that fiscal stimulus has been the primary engine of growth through the middle of 2010. However, this support will subside sharply over the second half of 2010 and through 2011. For U.S. growth to remain in the positive column, and thus sustain demand for Ontario’s exports and support for the Kitchener-Waterloo area’s manufacturing base, the private sector will need to “fill in the gap.” While there is likely to be some bumps along the way, we believe that this transition will ultimately be successful. Helping this process will be still highly stimulative monetary policy. In fact, the Fed recently added additional support on this front by expanding asset purchases by an additional $600 billion for the purchases of

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U.S. Treasuries, so-called Quantitative Easing 2 (or ‘QE2’ for short). The aim of this further policy easing is to keep bond yields low, which in turn will help keep financing cost moderate for both businesses and households. Going forward we will be watching a number of indicators for confirmation that private sector spending is indeed kicking in as expected. Chief among them will be bank lending in the U.S., which has improved to date though, at the moment, this reflects an easing in the pace of decline. As we move into 2011, we expect positive loan growth to emerge. Such will provide confirmation both of rising business confidence and the willingness of the U.S. financial system to lend. With respect to households, a disappointing development through the spring and summer was the sluggish pace of employment growth. Encouragingly greater strength has emerged early in the fall though even further gains will be needed over the remainder of this year and through 2011. Such would provide the needed income growth to sustain consumer spending. We are assuming that these supportive factors will be in place and that the U.S. economy will expand by 2.8% in 2011 after an expected 2.7% gain in 2010. A growing U.S. market will help propel growth in Ontario up 2.8% in 2011 following a projected 3.3% gain in 2010. As to the Kitchener-Waterloo area, we believe that it is well positioned to take full advantage of the improving prospects south of the border. In fact, the strong export orientation of the local economy may well allow it to outperform growth in the overall province both this year and next.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Paul Ferley Paul Ferley is Assistant Chief Economist of the Royal Bank of Canada. He is a member of the Economic Policy Committee of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and former member on the Editorial Board of Canadian Public Policy/Analyse de politiques. Paul is also Past President and Director of the Toronto Association of Business and Economics (TABE).


workforce development: WRIEN update

Skilled talent shortages to increase in 2011 BY PETER MCFADDEN Most sectors in the region experienced a slow down and in some cases significant layoffs during the recession. The technology community however continued to experience challenges finding the talent they need with the desired skill sets to help their businesses grow and compete in the global marketplace. Communitech reports that its members have an ongoing need for 2000 people with a variety of technology-based skills. Other sectors including manufacturing and in particular auto related are seeing business improve creating the need to hire employees to meet demand. Due to the recession and the negative financial impacts some boomers experienced with their retirement investment portfolios they may stay in the workforce longer than projected in 2007. At that time Statistics Canada projected that by 2010, 100% of net workforce growth would need to come from immigration. That date has been changed to reflect the impacts of the recession and now looks like 2014. The outlook for skilled talent availability in 2011 in my opinion can best be described as competitive in general and highly competitive for higher level specialized skill sets. I encourage area businesses to reflect on their talent needs over the next 12 – 18 months and be proactive in planning for and recruiting the “best” talent to meet your needs. A few tips and tools are presented below that can help and/or support chamber members in their journey to compete for the best talent and be ready to attract and retain internationally trained individuals as a component of strategic human resource planning for growth and succession. To become familiar with the education and experience levels that internationally trained individuals (ITIs) possess and their level of job readiness for the Canadian workplace, chamber members can participate in no cost networking and recruiting events. Members are invited to attend whether they are currently hiring or considering hiring skilled or professional people in the future. There is a relaxed environment in which you can meet job ready

ITIs that are interested in employment in your industry/sector and have a resume that may be of interest to you. To learn more about immigrant employment tools, supports and hiring opportunities you can start with the Waterloo Region Immigrant Employment Network (WRIEN) website at: www.wrien.com. In particular, the Employer Resource Guide can be very helpful in providing a quick overview of supports. It is available in digital version on the website or we can provide you with a hard copy. There are also a variety of videos available to assist with hiring ITIs relative to interview questions, employer best practices and other topics. Another great resource is the www.hireimmigrants.ca website and the “Roadmap” that is part of it. The above references are designed to provide you with valuable employer friendly information to assist your talent recruiting, hiring, integration and retention activities. The old adage certainly applies here “pay me now or pay me later” - in this case referring to familiarity with workforce market changes, embracing ITIs as a strategic solution, and adapting now or risking the competition speeding past. The other option is to meet with a WRIEN representative who will listen to your needs and suggest no cost solutions to access the ITI talent pool or to address other immigrant employment topics of interest to you. All you need to do is call WRIEN at 519 749-6045 to set up an appointment.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Peter McFadden Peter McFadden is the Executive Director for WRIEN and former President and CEO of the Southern Ontario Tourism Organization.

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cover story

Our Time is Now! BY DR. JOHN TIBBITS

Conestoga Expansion Will Deliver Skilled Workers and Research Solutions to Meet Community Needs When Conestoga College first opened in 1967 to provide careerbased education and training for 350 students in Technology, Business and Applied Arts programs, it operated out of a small single building and two portable classrooms. Despite the simple surroundings, the institution’s mission was tremendously important: to support the needs of the local community by providing highly skilled workers for business and industry while inspiring students to achieve their potential. Although today’s Conestoga College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning looks and feels much different from that initial structure, our core mandate remains largely unchanged, as we strive to build a better community through the delivery of education, training and applied research programs that will result in a stronger economy and a more sustainable future. With multiple campuses, more than 55,000 full and part-time students, and a full range of educational programs, Conestoga’s development has resulted from three primary driving forces. Rapid technological change over the last three decades has changed the way we work, live and play. It has also created an ongoing need for upgrading, training and new educational programs to meet constantly escalating demands for a skilled work force. Global competition means that local employers require world-class employees to achieve, or maintain, business success. Close to 80 per cent of jobs now require some form of postsecondary education. Today’s businesses require highly trained, skilled employees who are work-ready and productive immediately. A changing community – The community we serve is one of the fastest growing in Canada, with much of the growth fuelled by immigration. It is a diverse region with a comprehensive economy, featuring a range of industries with a variety of needs, from insurance and high tech to

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agriculture and advanced manufacturing. It is estimated that the population of K-W/Cambridge will increase by another 200,000 by 2031. This rapid growth and increasing diversity creates additional community needs, from health care and language skills to retraining as new industries replace more traditional ones. Our success as an institution has always rested, and will continue to rest, on our ability to serve the needs of the community. We have been tremendously fortunate to have long-established partnerships with industry and provincial associations who have been instrumental in contributing to our achievements. We’ve also had enormous support from local political leaders, such as Ministers Goodyear and Milloy, who have recognized our contributions and our potential to deliver on new solutions for a changing world.

Building for the future We have now embarked on the largest expansion in the history of the College. Projects currently underway or recently completed with the support of federal, provincial and/or regional government funding will provide many new and enhanced training opportunities in a variety of fields, making Conestoga a true leader in career-based education with an industry and community focus. Projects include: • A new Cambridge campus scheduled to open for the start of the Fall 2011 semester. This first 260,000 square-foot building will


cover story

be home to the School of Engineering and Information Technology, as well as the Institute for Food Processing Technology. The facility will incorporate some of the most advanced technologies, processes, and health and safety standards from top processing plants around the world.

We will develop and enhance Centres of Excellence in such diverse fields as: • Construction Trades • Motive Power Trades • Health and Community Services

• A new 70,000 square foot facility at the Doon campus that will open in August 2011 to provide Conestoga students with the most realistic and advanced applied learning environment for health skills training in Ontario, using the latest technology and interdisciplinary teaching methodologies. New training labs and a Centre for Health Informatics will be among the many features in this unique environment as we build the capacity to double enrollment over the next five years to meet emerging healthcare needs. • Two new centres for the Waterloo campus to provide advanced skills training featuring Ontario’s most innovative internal and external training environments - the Roofing Training Centre and the HRAC (Heating, Refrigeration & Air Conditioning) Training Centre. • A Power Centre in Ingersoll that provides training for workers in the electrical utilities powerline field, as well as energy and skilled trades programs that complement the industry. • A Motive Power Skills Training Centre in Guelph that will provide advanced training for new century technicians in the areas of truck and coach, automobiles, engines, recreational vehicles and heavy equipment. These facilities will be instrumental in better preparing our students for the workplace through more simulation opportunities, providing more career-based learning, and meeting the needs of a high skills economy, responsive to changes in labour-market needs.

• Information Technology • Alternative Energy • Welding • Food Processing We will provide applied research for small and medium-sized businesses based on industry needs and commercial objectives to help strengthen the local economy and build a more prosperous future. We will focus on the core values of accessibility, inclusiveness and quality to ensure that success is within reach for all learners. Conestoga College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning plays a pivotal role in the development and sustainability of our shared community. Fifty-three per cent of the region’s healthcare professionals are trained here. Our students win more technical skills competitions than those from any other college in the province. Our graduates have created some 240 businesses and contribute $1.3 billion each year to the region’s economy. As our community continues to develop and grow, we too must expand to ensure an adequate supply of effective and productive graduates to meet market demands for a wide range of industry and social services.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. John Tibbits

The Vision Development of our facilities and programs will continue as Conestoga evolves into a world-class polytechnic that provides multiple pathways and opportunities to meet the needs of a growing community and a diverse group of learners. We will provide increased breadth of programming, with additional degrees, upgrading and training programs, and partnerships with universities for the delivery of multi-dimensional programs.

Dr. John Tibbits has been President and Chief Executive Officer of Conestoga Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning since 1987. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree and a Diploma in Education from McGill University, a Master of Education from the University of Vermont and a Doctorate in Education from Boston University.

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events

Mark your calendar BY CHAMBER STAFF

January 13, 2011

January 18, 2011

January 20, 2011

Research In Motion Chamber Young Professionals presents Freedom 55 – A Personal Finance Plan

Manulife Chamber Academy: Fishing for Sales – How to Increase Sales

Networking Breakfast Series presents Speed Networking

5:00-7:00pm Location: Walper Terrace Hotel Member: $10 General Admission: $15 Do you have financial priorities, a budget, or understand the basics of banking, saving and investing? Title Sponsor:

8:00-10:00am Location: Chamber of Commerce Member: $40 General Admission: $45 Learn how to brand your business so that you make more sales, more easily to the client base you want. Award-winning Brand Architect will present branding in terms of sales and bottom line thinking. Please bring copies of your marketing materials

7:30-9:00am Location: Holiday Inn KitchenerWaterloo, 30 Fairway Road S., Kitchener Member: $28 General Admission: $40 Maximize your networking opportunities with other professionals, one on one, a few minutes at a time and find hidden opportunities and new connections. Media Sponsor:

Title Sponsor: Event Sponsor: Event Sponsor:

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events

January 27, 2011

February 2, 2011

February 8, 2011

Point of View with Chief of Police Matt Torigian

Women’s Leadership presents Taking the Plunge into Politics

Rogers Chamber Connections

11:30am-1:00pm Location: Waterloo Inn Conference Hotel Member: $35 General Admission: $40

11:30am-1:00pm Location: Walper Terrace Hotel Member: $25 General Admission: $30

Chief Torigian will be discussing the business principles Waterloo Regional Police are employing, including using evidence and data to measure their performance and the associated demands on police resources.

Join our panel for lunch to learn how women have prepared to get involved in politics at various levels of government, how politics have changed their life, what it takes to be successful, and tips on how you can become more involved.

Event Sponsor:

Our Panel: Brenda Halloran - Mayor of Waterloo, Catherine Fife - Waterloo Region District School Board Trustee, Melissa Durrell City of Waterloo Councillor, Moni Lagonia - City of Kitchener Councillor Candidate

5:00-7:00pm Hosted by: Chicopee Tube Park Member: $5 General Admission: $10 Title Sponsor:

Host Sponsor: TH AL EV

LEY GROUP

Media Sponsor:

Event Sponsors:

(continued on page 26)

Sunday Brunch

The MOST fabulous Brunch - right here - every Sunday from 10:30 am - 2 pm

at the Waterloo Inn, 475 King St. N., Waterloo

519-884-0220

www.rushes.ca

rushes@waterlooinn.com

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feature

Waterloo’s unconventional collaboration for intentional innovation BY MARLENE COFFEY Canada to boast three Governor General Award winning buildings for architectural excellence on one corner. This intersection will soon further display open doors to the new Centre For International Governance Innovation Campus (with Balsillie Interesting Links Development and the urban School of International landscape are a wonderful way to Manufacturing Innovation Affairs), a major Network (MIN) at: www.waterloomin.ca see the reflection of the Waterloo expansion of the economy. In 2010, Waterloo A Symphony of Design Perimeter Institute, construction values far surpassed (Urban Design Video) at: www.techtriangle.com/video_library redevelopment of the the pre-recession construction Knox Church, and the values of 2008, with numbers still entrance into the newest climbing months before year-end mixed use urban development site, the BarrelYards with the hotel tabulations. Move through the community, experience now under construction. There is other activity in the UpTown intersections such as that at Erb and Caroline Streets, and one will including the construction of the new HSBC Bank on the corner quickly recognize markers of success. Waterloo is the only City in of William and King Streets, the recently opened Bridgeport and Regina Street Lofts on Regina Street and new condominium development applications under review. Waterloo has a pervasive culture of collaboration – through harnessed entrepreneurship – which delivers in the knowledge economy. We experience this culture daily and are consistently able to perform with on-theground results.

Strategic Milestones:

• Waterloo Economic Development continues to implement the strategic document entitled, “Building New Bridges – The City of Waterloo’s 10-Year Economic Development Strategy 2008-2017”. The Strategy has become a key project within the Waterloo Economic Development Advisory Committee who is actively taking leadership in furthering this work through the Economic Summit. Identified themes for 2011 include Talent Attraction and Retention, Business Retention and Expansion, Land and Infrastructure, Market and Brand an Articulated Vision. • The City of Waterloo is also reviewing the proposed CityOwned Employment Lands Strategy, which is addressing the city’s employment land assets. The Strategy includes a broadly scoped document identifying best practices in higher density employment and a tactical document that outlines the implementation plan for bringing City-Owned Employment Lands to market in the future. • We will continue to work with community partners and stakeholders in 2011 and beyond, and thank the KW Chamber for this opportunity to share our commitment to collaboration for community.

The Economic Development Division itself actively participated in 35 partnerships and collaborations last year – and this is only one example within the municipal administration. We are practicing unconventional collaboration for intentional innovation, and we are building community. Waterloo Economic Development Core Functions: Manage the City’s Industrial Land Inventory Facilitate Development Projects Encourage Business Retention & Expansion Foster a Positive Business Environment Disseminate Economic and Community Information Manage Visitor Services Liaise and Partner with Community Stakeholders Standing Partnerships include working with: Canada’s Technology Triangle (CTT) Cities of Cambridge, Kitchener, Region of Waterloo Communitech Film KW Greater KW Chamber of Commerce Post Secondary Institutions (UW, WLU, Conestoga College) Provincial and Federal Ministries UpTown Waterloo BIA Waterloo Economic Development Committee (WEDC) Waterloo Region Small Business Centres (SBC) Waterloo Region Tourism Marketing Corporation

This is our collective success to celebrate! (continued on next page)

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feature

Tourism outlook for 2011 to 2015 BY TRACEY DESJARDINS The outlook for tourism receipts in Ontario for the next four years is forecasted to be fairly flat. The good news is Canada is faring better than many economies in the world and recovering faster than the U.S., U.K., Japan, Germany and many others. Emerging travel markets such as China, India and Brazil economies have the most projected growth and are good prospects for Ontario. Global trends that will impact tourism are: technology, women in the workforce, older population (boomers), increased immigration, eco-sensitive tourists, emerging economic powerhouses (China, India, Brazil) to name a few. Over 70% of our tourists come from Ontario and this market will remain flat, however business investment will grow at a solid pace of 9.6% in 2011 and 8.2% in 2011 thus encouraging business trips and travel expenditures.* Western Canada as a commodities market has the most forecasted growth in Canada and that reflects some opportunities for Ontario and Waterloo Region. Trip motivators for most travelers are primarily: relaxation and rejuvenation, urban experiences, overall sightseeing, cultural experiences, outdoor adventure and family connecting experiences. However, everyone is looking for fun, memorable moments that connect positively with family, friends, and work colleagues. For every hour of travel, a destination needs at least four hours of activities. Waterloo Region has tremendous cultural heritage, outdoor adventure attractions and festivals that appeal to a wide variety of travelers. We will need to package with similar trip motivators to encourage longer stays and more spending from tourists in targeted markets.

(continued from page 20) Some recent examples of Economic Development Collaborations include: Biotech Partnership Business Calling Creative Class Strategy Economic Outlook Event Employment Lands: Go-To-Market Health Sciences Cluster & Health Infomatics Conference Inquiries and Tours Manufacturing Innovation Network (MIN) Passport to Success Program Solar Innovation Networking Group (SING) Symphony of Design Video Wind Energy Partnership

I think tourism destination management done in partnership with economic development, academia, the culture/arts and technology sectors will create tremendous opportunities. I am excited to be working in a visionary, innovative and creative community with a reputation of collaboration. Collectively we can grow tourism investment, build capacity and improve existing businesses, and increase economic growth through increased visitation and spending. We can realize a better quality of life by preserving and improving the sustainability and capacities of our cultural industries, opportunities for youth employment/retention and by fostering tolerance, diversity and understanding by welcoming the world. Waterloo Region can aspire to be the most memorable, fun and welcoming destination. Service excellence is critical in setting us apart and I look forward to working with Chamber members, BIA's and other associations in Waterloo Region to raise the bar and deliver on our brand promise to be the warmest, most welcoming destination in Ontario. We can create the WOW team - Welcomers of Waterloo. *Ontario Tourism Outlook (Spring 2010)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tracey Desjardins Tracey Desjardins is the General Manager of Waterloo Region Tourism Marketing Corporation

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Marlene Coffey Marlene has served as an economic development professional in four Ontario communities – bridging economic development and planning practices. She holds two Masters Degrees, is a Registered Professional Planner, and serves as Director of Economic Development for the City of Waterloo.

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CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS

Real People Network

YYou ou are are invited invited to to join join a network net work of of young young business business people people ffrom rom across across Waterloo Waterloo Region Region who who are are sharing sharing ideas, ideas, ssuccesses uccesses and and challenges challenges in in an eeffort f for t to to help help bbusiness usiness pprosper. rosper. Network Net work aass ppart ar t of of a llarge arge and and diverse diverse ggroup. roup. W are real, real, young, young, business business people people looking looking to to transform transform Wee are eenterprise nterprise for for tomorrow. tomorrow. TToo RRegister egister for for Events Events Visit Visit www.greaterkwchamber.com w w w.greaterkwchamber.com GGET ET M MORE ORE IINFO NFO ON O EEVENTS VENTS AATT @KWCYP @ K WCY P

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HHOST OS T OORGANIZATION RGANIZ ATION


feature

Working toward a barrier-free Ontario BY ANDRENA LOCKLEY-BROWN Fifteen percent of our population self-identifies as having a disability, and for far too long much of our community has not been accessible to them. Inaccessibility comes in many forms, from steps in front of corner stores and menus in small print, to countless systemic and attitudinal barriers. The Ministry of Community of Social Services wants to put an end to the inaccessibility of Ontario and their plan to do so is made clear in the AODA. The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA) declares that all of Ontario must be barrier-free by the year 2025. This law was designed to improve opportunities for people with disabilities and is the first of its kind in Canada. There are many different kinds of barriers and therefore various steps are necessary to eliminate them. These steps are what the ministry call Accessibility Standards. The standards outline what has to be done and when.

The Customer Service Standard The first standard is the Accessible Customer Service Standard and it came into force on January 1, 2008. This standard outlines various requirements that must be met by businesses and other organizations in Ontario. For instance there is a requirement that all service animals be permitted anywhere the public is welcome (with the exception of places where they are excluded by other laws). Another requirement states that service providers must put policies and procedures in place around the accessible customer service they provide. In addition service providers must have a feedback system whereby the public may comment on the service provided. The requirement further states that service providers must train their staff, volunteers and contractors not only on the AODA as a whole but also on the topic of disability awareness and how to provide service to people with disabilities. The Independent Living Centre of Waterloo Region can help with the compliance process through consultation or staff training.

The public sector had to comply with this legislation by January 1, 2010. However, private business, non profit organizations, or any other service provider has been given an extra two years to comply with a deadline of January 1, 2012.

Beyond Barriers Independent Living Centre of Waterloo Region (ILCWR) has composed workshops to educate employees about this very important legislation. For a nominal fee ILCWR can provide anything from a one hour session, which outlines the basic facts of the legislation and its requirements, to a full day workshop including guest speakers, activities, film clips, and attention to historical and social contexts. Workshops can be delivered in many formats as each presentation is tailored to meet the needs of each group. Please contact Andrena Lockley-Brown, Public Awareness and Education Coordinator for the Independent Living Centre of Waterloo Region for more information (519)571-6788 or andrena@ilcwr.org . For more information on the AODA please visit: www.accesson.ca

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Andrena Lockley-Brown Andrena Lockley-Brown is the Public Awareness and Education Coordinator for the Independent Living Centre of Waterloo Region, a non-profit organization that has been helping people with disabilities in our Region live independently since 1982. She has been with the centre for over 10 years and coordinates several programs including the Kids on the Block and Beyond Barriers. She also facilitates a youth program for teens with disabilities.

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sponsor profile

BDO Canada LLP – Accountants and Advisors BY DEAN ELLIOTT

(LEFT TO RIGHT) DEAN ELLIOTT, OFFICE MANAGING PARTNER, AND JIM HARPER IN BDO’S NEW LOCATION IN THE BAUER BUILDINGS

BDO is the fifth largest accounting and advisory firm internationally and the sixth largest in Canada. Our firm is characterized by having offices near our clients – from our rural centres to our largest markets. BDO professionals work and live in the communities they serve. In Waterloo Region, we have a history of growth through a series of mergers with professionals and firms who have a commitment to serving clients similar to ours, including entrepreneurial, public sector and not-for-profit organizations. The most recent local mergers have been with Schilling & Laird in Cambridge (2005) and with MDKS in Waterloo (2009). BDO now has offices in Waterloo (in the new Bauer Buildings), Kitchener (the Financial Recovery Services Practice) and Cambridge with over 100 professionals providing audit, tax and a full complement of advisory services. These mergers have been instrumental in creating the strong local presence we enjoy today.

BDO’s Involvement with the Chamber BDO has been a member of the Chamber since the mid-70’s and our partners and professionals have been active participants of the

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Board and a variety of committees ever since. Jim Harper, a partner in our local practice, has held several positions with the Chamber. He was President of the Waterloo Chamber in 1987 and 1988, served on the Ontario Chamber Board as a local representative from 1989-1990 and was asked to Chair the Interim Board of Directors to merge the Kitchener and Waterloo Chambers in 1990. He became the inaugural Chair of the first Board of The Chamber of Commerce of Kitchener & Waterloo in 1992-1993, and was Chair of the Ontario Chamber of Commerce in 1997 and 1998. Greg Weiler, a BDO Tax Partner, was Chamber President in 1997-98. When asked why the commitment to the local chamber, our management team saw networking, building our brand and learning about other local business as key attributes. Added to that were opportunities to build skills such as public speaking and professional development as well as access by small businesses to group insurance and benefit plans. They found volunteering at the Chamber rewarding. One professional said she liked working with the Business Excellence Awards and bringing local companies the recognition they deserve; others found the advocacy role satisfying


sponsor profile

Early 1950’s G.H. Ward and Partners

and all found it was a good chance to give back to the community.

1973 Ward Mallette & Co.

Tim Sothern, a local audit and assurance partner, says “I’ve been 1973 involved in the BDO Ward Mallette Chamber for over 8th largest firm in Canada 6 years and have volunteered on committees and 1992 with the Board of BDO Dunwoody Ward Mallette Directors. I’ve Merger: BDO Ward Mallette and seen people join Dunwoody & Co, January 1, 1992 the Chamber as 7th largest firm in Canada they are starting off their businesses and can see how 1999 the Chamber BDO Dunwoody LLP supports them as 6th largest firm in Canada they grow in our community. It’s a tremendous local 2010 resource for BDO Canada LLP businesses and their stakeholders as well as a great advocate for our businesses with a provincial and national reach.”

Community Involvement BDO partners and staff are active members of the community in all of our locations across the country. The strength of the BDO name in its local communities is driven by the Firm’s partners and their knowledge of the local market; it is the people on the ground in these offices who best understand the needs and priorities of their community and its local businesses. The challenge we set for ourselves in making a difference is reflected in our range of corporate social responsibility activities, and our record in the community is something we are most proud of. We actively support a number of areas including the health, education, social, sports, arts & culture and economic sectors. Examples of organizations we support as a firm can be found on our webpage: www.bdo.ca/about/community along with highlights of some of our initiatives.

BDO’s most recent nation-wide initiative was the Farm Credit Canada Drive Away Hunger Campaign. BDO committed to collecting 100,000 pounds of food this year. Our offices across Canada enthusiastically embraced that goal and collected over 162,000 pounds of food which was in turn donated to local food banks. Locally, our professionals are members of over 20 committees and boards of community organizations. From public sector boards to Rotary Clubs to a number of not-for-profit organizations, BDO’s team commits their time, effort and knowledge to support our community.

Vision and Values Recently our firm did an in-depth evaluation of our vision and values and initiated a cross-Canada launch to all 95 offices. BDO’s vision and values are all about relationships – relationships with everybody that we deal with: “One Firm engaged to make a difference through valued relationships with our people, clients and communities.” We believe the values most important to us are quality in all that we do, honesty and integrity, accountability and respect for ourselves, each other, our clients and our communities.

Going Forward BDO is committed to helping our clients grow and prosper. In his role as Office Managing Partner from 2003 to 2010, Jim Harper provided leadership in developing the services we are able to offer our clients as well as growing the resources we have available to serve them. Going forward, BDO will build on that foundation and proactively serve our clients so they can continue to build on their success.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dean Elliott Dean Elliott is the Office Managing Partner of BDO’s Waterloo and Cambridge offices and sits on the Firm’s Southern/Midwestern Ontario Management Board. He recently received BDO’s C.F. Fleming Young Leader Award for his contributions to the firm, the profession and the community.

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in memorium

Howard (Howie) Jasper, FCA It was with great sadness that Chamber friends and colleagues of Past President Howard Jasper acknowledged his passing in October. A highly respected and well loved member of this community, Howie had a long and successful career as a partner with Clarkson Gordon/Ernst and Young. He was a true leader and a remarkable person, devoting countless hours in support of his profession and the community. Beyond his commitment to the Chamber, Howie devoted time to many other business and community organizations. He was Director and Officer of the Kitchener-Waterloo Community Foundation, Founding Director of Junior Achievement of Waterloo Region, Past President of the Waterloo-Wellington

Chartered Accountants Association, Past Chairman of the Waterloo-Wellington Section of the University of Waterloo Accounting Advisory Council, Chairman of the Ontario Institute of Chartered Accountants and Advisor for Big Brothers and Big Sisters of K-W. Howie brought charm and wit along with a keen intelligence to all of his relationships and his endeavours. He will be sadly missed. HOWIE JASPER

Mark your calendar (continued from page 19)

February 17, 2011

February 24, 2011

February 2011

Business Excellence Awards Gala

Networking Breakfast Series presents Entrepreneurial Business Trends

check the website for the confirmed date

6:00-10:00pm Location: Bingemans Member: $150 Member Table of 8: $1150 General Admission: $175 General Admission Table of 8: $1350 A Gala event to present 11 awards to Chamber members who have made exceptional contributions through their involvement and leadership for the betterment of our community. Title Sponsor:

7:30-9:00am Location: Holiday Inn KitchenerWaterloo, 30 Fairway Road S., Kitchener Member: $28 General Admission: $40 Steve Farlow, Schlegel Centre for Entrepreneurship and Alan Quarry, their “Entrepreneur in Residence�, will discuss business opportunities most likely to succeed, unmet market needs, and what is being taught in schools. Media Sponsor:

Event Sponsor:

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Research In Motion Chamber Young Professionals Networking Event 5:00-7:00pm Location: Members: $5 General Admission: $10 Watch the website for more details! Title Sponsor:


feature

Watershed moment for Woolwich BY LAUREL DAVIES SNYDER The Township of Woolwich is at a watershed moment and this is an exciting time to be part of the transformations occurring throughout the local economy. With a rich and long heritage of agriculture, entrepreneurship, and vey strong community involvement in shared goals, the Township is well-poised for positive change and growth. Woolwich is geographically the largest municipality in the Region, and its population of approximately 23,000 people is spread between fifteen unique settlements and highly productive farmland. The continued physical growth of the cities located to the south (Waterloo, Kitchener, and Cambridge) has direct impacts on the Township’s land use patterns, infrastructure, demographics, and business patterns. In addition, the relative proximity of Woolwich to large urban centers combined with increasing rejection of hour-long commutes to work and ability to purchase a home in a “small town” atmosphere, has led to the acknowledgement that the Township is an ideal place to live and work. In addition to these Region-specific forces of change, Woolwich’s economy – similar to those of many Canadian municipalities - is recovering from an economic recession. The sum of these dynamics raises questions of how to forecast and plan for the continued vitality of the local community economy. More importantly, answering questions of how to redefine and navigate economic transitions are key in achieving a locationappropriate, sustainable, and resilient economy. Recognizing that smaller communities experience vastly different rates of growth and decline, the Township demonstrated leadership in managing local economic issues by hiring its first Economic Development & Tourism Officer in late 2008. Although the Township had undertaken a number of valuable projects supporting the local economy in the past, the time was right to formally add Economic Development to the Township’s portfolio. An essential ingredient for successful local economic development is a holistic approach that involves all stakeholders. The Township is designing and implementing initiatives created to provide a foundation for the future. Specifically, the Business Visitation Program allows staff and business owners to talk openly about problems, challenges, opportunities, and visions for the future. The Salute to Business Event provides an evening of casual networking, a keynote speaker, and a tradeshow for anyone

involved in business in the Township. Perhaps the most significant aspect of both of these initiatives is that they allow Staff and business people the time to make personal connections, and talk openly about doing business in Woolwich. The development of these relationships will be invaluable to addressing issues and moving forward. Of course, there are a number of fundamental supporting projects that also need to be completed including: developing a business directory, compiling lists of local festivals and events, connecting with key stakeholders, finding resources to assist businesses, etc. Creating an economic development action plan and strategy rooted in local values and priorities is Woolwich’s current focus and the project is gathering momentum. In early 2010, the Township received a grant from the Federal Development Community Adjustment Fund program to complete an Economic Development Strategic Action Plan. This is an opportunity to leverage Woolwich’s existing strengths and unique position within the Region and Ontario. A Stakeholder Committee comprised of 15 community business leaders is providing the Staff Team and Consulting Team with a wealth of experience and input. Focus Groups are clarifying the reality of doing business in Woolwich and allowing the analysis to go well beyond the statistics. By the end of March 2011, the Township of Woolwich will have a new framework for local economic development built around the shared guiding principles of: ensuring lasting benefits and sustainability, maintaining a high quality of life, developing and fostering a local culture for development and partnerships, efficiently using time and resources, embracing diverse perspectives, ensuring healthy & attractive environment, and emphasizing business retention and expansion. Woolwich is at the cusp of great change. The development and implementation of a strategy that supports forward momentum while supporting local community goals and values can act as a model for other Ontario rural communities. Stay tuned.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Laurel Davies Snyder, MA, MCIP, RPP Laurel is the Economic Development & Tourism Officer for the Township of Woolwich

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member notables

Member notables Hatch Mott MacDonald Lead Engineering Firm for Windsor-Essex Parkway Engineering firm Hatch Mott MacDonald (HMM) will be the lead design firm for The Windsor-Essex Parkway. HMM is part of the Windsor Essex Mobility Group selected by Infrastructure Ontario and the Ontario Ministry of Transportation from a short-list of three consortia. The Parkway, once completed, will be the most significant single highway investment in Ontario history. The planned project is an eleven kilometer, six-lane extension of Highway 401 through the County of Essex and City of Windsor. It is estimated that 12,000 direct and indirect related jobs will be generated.

ShaughnesseyHowell Earns 8th Gold Medal ShaughnessyHowell, a Waterloo-based organization, was recently awarded their unprecedented eighth gold medal from the Canadian Society for Training and Development. The winning program was designed for the Canada Post Corporation to prepare new employees working in retail outlets. This course combined self-directed learning with hands-on classroom training and onthe-job coaching. The Canadian Award for Training Excellence (CATE), is a national recognition for companies that have developed, produced and delivered original and innovative training products.

Hagon Design Completes Major Rebranding Campaign Hagon Design, a local branding and design studio, recently completed a top-to-bottom rebranding and advertising campaign for national law firm Fraser Milner Casgrain. The campaign, including a new logo, signage, website, billboards and print advertising was designed to reflect the firm’s forward-thinking approach. The project has already been selected as a finalist for the Honouring Excellence in Legal Marketing (HELM) Award, has garnered a 300 percent in measurable web traffic, and is gaining notable mention by mainstream business press outlets.

GSP Group Celebrates 15th Anniversary On November 25th, GSP Group celebrated its 15th Anniversary at their annual open house for clients and associates at 72 Victoria St. South, Kitchener. GSP Group provides community planning, urban design and landscape architecture services. Recent award winning projects include Waterloo Square and Victoria Park Entrance.

Member Notables are taken from local news sources and member submissions. In order to be considered “notable” an item must be an accomplishment or event that is outside of the ordinary course of business and therefore deemed newsworthy. While we would like to include all submissions, space constraints make it necessary for the Advocate editors to choose items that best fit the above criteria and are most timely.

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profile

Chamber Star - Ian Inglis BY CHAMBER STAFF The Chamber Star was developed to recognize volunteers and is a way for the Chamber to show appreciation for the significant efforts of its volunteers. It is awarded to an active committee member three times a year, following a Committee Chair nomination process. We are excited to announce that Ian Inglis is the newest recipient of the Chamber Star. Ian is a member of the Chamber Connections Committee and has played an important role in the re-branding of the former Business After 5 event. Ian was part of the advisory committee that started the process and has joined the committee and is responsible for the relationship

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Ian is a full time real estate professional with Re/Max Solid Gold Realty, with extensive experience in the marketing of homes in all price ranges, including new construction, resale homes and condominium projects in the Kitchener-Waterloo and surrounding area. Ian is also a member of an International Relocation Network of sales professionals and can provide community information for locations throughout North America. Thank you Ian, for your time and your support of the Chamber, its members, and the community.

IAN INGLIS

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between the event vendors and the committee.


sponsors

Helping us make our vision possible A special Thank You to each of these Chamber Sponsors.

CHAMBER CHAIR’S CIRCLE

CHAMBER PATRON

TITLE SPONSOR

Leadership Series

CHAMBER TRUSTEE

MEDIA PARTNERS advocate

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| FEBRUARY 2011

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The Advocate Magazine - January | February 2011  
The Advocate Magazine - January | February 2011  

In this May | June edition of the Greater KW Chamber of Commerce Advocate Magazine we examine the development of Waterloo Region's internati...