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projects SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ORLANDO, FLORIDA

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HUMAN DIGNITY HEALTH CLINIC

ORLANDO, FLORIDA

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CHONGQING, CHINA

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GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

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URBAN SPLINE SPIRITUAL COMPLEX

INTERVENTION OF THE CITY WALL ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONTAINER

XI’AN, CHINA

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GUADALAJARA, MEXICO

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FLORIDA CASE STUDY HOUSE LEARNING AND CULTURAL CENTER

FLORIDA

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SAN MARTIN DE LAS CANAS, MEXICO

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LIVING IN BORNEO

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 9

awards and publications HUMAN DIGNITY HEALTH CLINIC URBAN SPLINE

ORLANDO, FLORIDA CHONGQING, CHINA

FLORIDA CASE STUDY HOUSE

FLORIDA


The project was developed based on the idea of experimentation through collaboration as an inspiring factor where the integration of different disciplines of design can be integrated through design to exchange knowledge and experience to create a new essence. The manipulation of the ground of the site was developed on the deconstruction of experimentation, where the existing knowledge is deconstructed to be brought together to a new meaning. In this context the site is extended vertically into the building. The building itself reflects the idea of collaboration where knowledge converges into a central core from which it reciprocally disperses; consequently it extends into the ground creating a symbiotic relationship. The building is divided into seven levels starting with the parking lot, which is located underground and accessed through Concord St. Following are the programs, which are arranged from public spaces to more private spaces, ending with the student studios located at the top floors. The programs are located in the center of the building thus leaving the edges open for circulation and for pinup space, with the intent of encouraging more occupiers to mingle. The


SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ORLANDO, FLORIDA

PROFESSOR:

CityLab Orlando produces:

DESIGN STUDIO:

FRANK BOSWORTH GRADUATE STUDIO I

Socially responsible globally aware, talented architects that promote innovation and change. We accomplish this by establishing a learning community that is part of the community of practice, which fosters and supports a community of creativity and design by creating a forum for sharing creative works, educating the general public, connecting students to the community and establishing an artistic culture in the city of Orlando. Provide students with resources to succeed and teaching methods and programs appropriate for the community of practice.

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DW WO

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FIRST LEVEL

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GROUND LEVEL

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SECOND LEVEL

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Lobby AIA Office Cafe Community Room Serving Kitchen Library Auditorium

SOUTH ELEVATION

7 Faculty Offices 8 Adjunct Faculty Workspace 9 Reception Area 10 Secretary 11 Administrative Director 12 Program Director 13 Unit Directors 14 Division Staff 15 Marketing and Development 16 Administrative Work Room 17 Conference Room 18 Break Room

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Valencia 1st Year Studio Valencia 2nd Year Studio UCF 1st Year UCF 2nd Year CityLab MArch 1st Year CityLab MArch 2nd Year CityLab MArch PhD Lecture Room Lecture Hall Seminar Room Student Project Archive

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THIRD LEVEL General Lab Rendering Lab Video & Animation Lab IT Offices Materials Resource Lab Lightening Lab Innovation Laboratory Construction Lab General Shop and Office


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FOURTH LEVEL

FIFTH LEVEL

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SIXTH LEVEL

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SEVENTH LEVEL

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EAST ELEVATION


INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE EDUCATIONAL SPACE ADMINISTRATIVE SPACE PUBLIC SPACE

VERTICAL LOBBY


ROOF

OPERABLE PANEL SKIN

GLAZING

SECONDARY STRUCTURE

PRIMARY STRUCTURE

GROUND

PARKING

1 Auditorium is an extruded volume located on the third level, protruding outside the boundaries of the building. It is accessed through the lobby or directly from the elevated pathway on the side of Amelia St.

The lobby is accessible through the elevated ground entrance on the second level, or from the front courtyard. The lobby is a vertical open space that runs along the whole elevation of the building, unifying and bringing people from different professional and educational background together. It also acts as an exposition space. As the levels go up, the floor slides into the building opening into the upper level. This enables people to have visual contact at all times with the art being showcased.


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HUMAN DIGNITY HEALTH CLINIC

ORLANDO, FLORIDA

DESIGNERS:

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GRETEL CASTILLO LANCE MOORE

PROFESSOR: DESIGN STUDIO:

ALBERTUS WANG VIII

overview

why containers?

The goal in this project is to design a mobile health care center that would act as a helping hand in a community of the less fortunate. We worked to develop a structure that would most efficiently meet the needs of the required program while still being able to make a positive impact on the lives of those in the surrounding communities. The proposal is an affordable solution to the homeless problems our society is facing today both state and nationwide. Allowing labor programs and seminar to be offered on site the patients can utilize their time more efficiently while waiting. Our design is site specific to the program given but we have chosen to develop a design which could be adaptable to the other locations as well. In order to follow through with flexible design we adopted a shipping container as the standard module for construction. This allows to keep construction cost to a minimum while at the same time reducing the impact to the surrounding environment.

Shipping container are designed to resist severe weather and natural conditions, which makes them one of the strongest mobile or stationary units of construction. Containers can hold up to forty eight thousand pounds and withstand winds exceeding ninety miles per hour. They can be stacked seven containers high fully loaded relaying only on the twist lock mechanism. They can be carried by truck, ship, plane, or rail. The cost is drastically lower than concrete or block construction due to the readily available quantities of shipping containers nationwide. The reuse of the containers promote the continuation of environmentally cautious projects and allow for a more efficient construction time line from start to finish; lessens weather delays, and less time to bridge in terms of financing. The design process behind using shipping containers has to be highly planned but the preset process of a prefab project allows for much greater transparency for all the trades involved including the client.


container configuration

We have developed preset container configurations which allow each one of the clinics to be tailored for the individual needs of that community. Each of these configurations is shown below: cistern, ahu, cooling tower/chiller, office, exam and dental pods. Each are rendered with the actual equipment needed for that particular configuration at its true dimensions. All preset configurations comply with Florida Building Construction 2007 Code.

cistern

The cisterns will or can be place on the upper portions of the project to collect rain off a possible super structure or roofing system. A tank inside the container could hold around 3000 gallons of water.

a.h.u

This container shows the possible configuration of an AHU unit, which would have to be custom built for this size container. There are other mobile units on the market which are a little smaller than our need.

chiller

A configuration for the cooling plant is shown above. The cooling tower is positioned across the top of the container as the chiller uses the space left underneath.


office

exam room

dental


D2

D3

D5

D2

D5

P1

P2

D3

P3 D5

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P1

A7 A7 A7 A5

A3

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M14

A1

M3 M16

M9 MH4

A8 MH1 A9

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MH3 MH5

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M10 M5 M5 M5

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M5

LEVEL ONE

LEVEL ONE MEDICAL CLINIC M1 well waiting M2 sick waiting M3 child waiting M4 weights and mesures M5 exam room M8 procedure room M9 x-ray M10 nurse station M14 cleaning room M16 janitor

DENTAL CLINIC D1 waiting D2 receptionist D3 weights and measures D4 hygenist D5 dental exam D7 lab D14 janitor P1 pick up / drop off P2 lab P3 secured storage

ADMINISTRATION A1 reception A2 consultation A3 bill payment A4 administrative assistant A5 records A6 copy A7 administrative office A8 executive assistanta A9 executive director

MENTAL HEALTH CLINIC MH1 waiting MH2 consultation room MH3 storage MH4 group consultation MH5 group storage


FLOOR PLAN

LEVEL TWO

program organization

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LEVEL THREE

social lobbies

circulation second level


north elevation

west elevation


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south elevation

east elevation


buffer screen

Given that the majority of the activities on site are of a more personal nature we needed to provide some since of privacy while promoting the use of natural light. Are solution was to create a secondary facade which supports several different types of permeable screens which can be moved or positioned depending on the nature of that program in the given area. To the right you can see an example of this secondary facade which can also double as a alternative means of circulation for the doctors or patients if needed.


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One of our first processes in the design stage was to develop a hierarchy list of the programs which where required. In doing so we have decided to adopt a open campus design each individual program occupying its own stand alone system. This allowed the stand alone room and ability to expand. We have placed all the programs used by the community on the ground level, and the more private offices on the third floor. The third floor could also double as rooms if there was an influx of patients. The second floor will be primarily used for circulation between certain levels, offering break areas but most importantly hold all the mechanical pods which will provide extra

room for duct work, wiring, pipes, etc. Each program has a large atrium or communal space(medical pictured to the left) this gave a chance to provide an area which promoted interaction between the patients and the staff. If this clinic is to help serve as a solution we can not just hand them toothpaste and expect this idea to work. We have come dangerously close to accepting the homless situation as a problem that we just can not solve. We cannot stop earthquakes, we cannot prevent droughts, and we cannot prevent all conflict, but when we know where the hungry, where the homless, and where the mentally sick exist, then we can help.


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consortium in architecture and urbanism conceptual design

Chongqing is fast emerging and growing city in Southeastern China with a rapidly increasing population, as such it needs an expansion in the undeveloped yet suburbs. The project was to create an urban spline that weaves through the programs with an interactive podium hub, which houses markets, shops, cafes engaging pedestrians, while at the same time housing approximately twenty residential tower. While accommodating the needs of the city, it was very important to take in consideration the perseverance of the beautiful landscape of Chongqing. The intent of the sustainable approach for the area is to minimize the impact of the development on the natural environment and provide a healthy, viable community for the future generation . Any efforts for the development must learn from what the existing conditions have to offer to allow most favorable conditions to sustain for a long period of time. Although urbanization demands that we develop additional human habitats, it is our responsibilities to the future and for the benefits now as well that our presence cause minimal disruption to nature. The site’s ground conditions is either moderately or extreme sloped. This is a challenge in terms of anchoring and placing infrastructure and architecture. Slope analysis (shown next page) provides us with a significant amount of information to understand which are the best locations for different residential units/buildings.


URBAN SPLINE

CHONGQING, CHINA

ARCHITECT:

ALBERTUS WANG

DESIGN SUPPORT:

GRETEL CASTILLO

LANCE MOORE

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duplex, garden house,villa distribution

slope analysis


master site plan

circulation diagram

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north west view

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paynes prairie

Professor: Tony White Design Studio: V Paynes Prairie is biologically, geologically and historically unique presenting the ideal conditions for a spiritual complex overlooking one of its serene lakes. The program is based on the teachings and philosophy of Ayurveda. Ayurveda is made up of two words: Ayu which means life and Veda which means the knowledge of. To know about life is Ayurveda. According to the ancient Ayurvedic scholar Charaka, “ayu� is comprised of four essential parts. The combination of senses, body, mind, and the soul. Based on this strong connection between mind and body the complex derives its structural organization, where each of the programs embraces one of these essential parts.


SPIRITUAL COMPLEX

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

PROFESSOR: DESIGN STUDIO:

TONY WHITE V

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Sanctuary embraces our senses. Spiritual-

ity is a source of life perceived by the senses. As such the sanctuary is positioning floating on the water facing east, to capture the light transferring it into an architectural control as a way to embrace the spiritual program. Housing embraces body, which helps assisting us in carrying out day-to-day activities. The body plays a significant role mediating the spiritual with the physical. For that purpose the housing is locates between the sanctuary and the lecture hall, and library unifying the space in between. Lecture Hall underlying our physical structure is the mind, which controls our thought processes. The lecture hall is possitioned accross the sanctuary traching into the the horizontality of the landscape. Library: Ayurveda sees that before we exist in physical form with the help of the mind and senses that we exist in a more subtle form known as the soul. The soul is the door to ourself. The library is what feeds our souls, and the soul is the door to ourselves. As such the library is strategically located at the threshold of the complex.

light

light

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pita

kappa

heavy


complex plan

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Sanctuary Visitor Housing Lecture Hall Library


One of our first processes in the design stage was to develop a hierarchy list of the programs which where required. In doing so we have decided to adopt a open campus design each individual program occupying its own stand alone system. This allowed the stand alone room and ability to expand. We have placed all the programs used by the community on the ground level, and the more private offices on the third floor. The third floor could also double as rooms if there was an influx of patients. The second floor will be primarily used for circulation between certain levels, offering break areas but most importantly hold all the mechanical pods

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sanctuary

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east elevation

north elevation


elevations

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PROFESSOR: DIANA BITZ ROBERT MACLEOD ROBINSON NANCY SANDERS PROJECTTEAM:

DESIGN STUDIO:

GRETEL CASTILLO ARIEL MARTINEZ REBECCA RAUCCI JENNIFER SZILAGYI VII

xi’an


INTERVENTION OF THE CITY WALL The wall, constructed from rice and later stone, through the labor of callused hands and sore muscles arises from the earth as an impenetrable shield. Through generations its imperfections are connected and it stands tall guarding a city’s way of life, preserving history, embracing tradition. Through time its immovable presence is embedded into the same history and culture it was designed to protect.

In the 19th and 20th century portions of the wall are removed to redirect traffic and provide bricks for new residential housing. Though eventually some bricks were recollected as part of the rebuilding process in 1984, the incident stands as evidence of the government’s susceptibility to alter the wall as modern technology impacts culture. To remove one portion of the wall, effectively disturbs its completeness, the holistic grasp on the city it guards. Yet, the wall under the intentions of its design, - to protect- is susceptible to maintenance and modifications. Hence change is valid to its development and effectiveness. Through time the wall grows and evolves into a larger more durable barrier as layers of wall are built onto itself.

XI’AN, CHINA

PROFESSOR:

FRANK BOSWORTH

DESIGN STUDIO:

GRAD STUDIO I

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The rich and unique culture of China is evident in every corner of the country but even more specifically in the former capital of China, in the city of Xi’an. Walking through the streets of the wall city one is taken by the unique structural architecture of the buildings, which are a reflection of the Confucian’s teachings along with the long respected philosophy of feng shui. Art is evident to be a driving force of the local community: writing Chinese Characters, Chinese calligraphy or shufa boasts its long history. It is one of the highest forms of Chinese art perfectly embodied the rhythm, lines and structure, serving the purpose of conveying the thoughts of the writer and displaying the abstract beauty of lines. Cultural activities are a dynamic part of the everyday life of the city wall, however as a passerby I did noticed that there was a disconnection with the main and perhaps most important cultural heritage of the city - the wall. It had fallen into the obscurity of nothingness.

housing

cultural institution

pagoda


museum

xi’an city wall


museum

The main question was how can we bring it back into the lives of people? Make them interact with the wall and making it part of the art displayed. The idea of a wall museum was established. The museum structure is located in proximity to the wall, allowing people to have a visual and somatosensory experience.


cultural institution

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A cultural hub was an integral and necessary part as a unifying hub of the cultural expression of the local community. The cultural institute position across the museum is not only a place for staged performances but also it is an open hub for improvised activities open to the public.


The housing infiltrates into the existing fabric. Entry is made from ground level and circulation folds up, into the building, elevating the housing units above the store fronts and ground level pedestrian traffic.


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Interactive & adaptive designers: Gretelit Castillo The anthropological container’s design allows to be built through an inter locking construction method, and without the utilization of hardware. The wall system can be modifiedprofessor: and assembled inAlfonso differentPerez ways to fit the needs of the William Tilson occupier or function of the container. The frame and envelope are intertwined, design studio: Grad Studio sitting on a carved based that will allow the sides of theIIIcontainer to close or open during the day /night to provide better protection from the weather. The anthropological container is elongated along the east-west to provide better protection from the sun and minimize heat gain, while the south and north sides are open allowing the flow of breeze coming from the northwest, cooling the occupants in the summer months. Although Guadalajara’s climate is not very rainy, those scarce rainy days can be celebrated by creating a double roof system that catches the rain and directs it to a pool close to the container.


ANTHROPOLOGICAL CONTAINER N N N

GUADALAJARA, MEXICO

PROFESSOR: DESIGN STUDIO:

ALFONSO PEREZ WILLIAM TILSON GRADUATE STUDIO III

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FLORIDA CASE STUDY HOUSE

FLORIDA

AIA FLORIDA COMPETITION ENTRY 2011 GRETEL CASTILLO MW BENDER ARCHITECTURE LLC. GRETEL CASTILLO LANCE MOORE

The goal in this project is construct a concept which formed multiple possibilities. This concept would work to efficiently utilize the compact lot dimensions along with the needs of the required program. The decision to use shipping containers is based on the affordable, mobile and sustainable qualities they pose. The containers are arranged in manner that would allow the utilization of the interstitial spaces in between and minimize the use for conventional construction. The container modules will be prefabricated off site therefore minimizing on site construction to just basic aluminum construction and roofing made of structural insulated panels.

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Slab on grade is used for the main living space (kitchen/living room)

only, while the shipping containers rest on permeable ballast, which will double as hardscape. There are green wall systems, which include customizable louvers, screens, and green panels that can be arranged according to program along the facades of the structure. This will act as a double facade, allowing air space between the main facade, circulating hot air away. The green wall system is fitted with a grey water irrigation system for the green modules, along with vapor misters that decrease the air temperature within the air space. The green modules will boast edible plants and seasonal flowers. The roof acts as a water harvesting system, water flows toward a water wall on one end of the main living space, flowing down the wall and into a cistern. When the cistern becomes full, the back flow valve shuts off, allowing water to flow into a reflection reservoir around the living space. The roof also houses solar chimneys that permit natural ventilation throughout the home and is solar capable.

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floor plan

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elevations

ELEVATIONS

EAST

NORTH

WEST

SOUTH

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1

2

3 5

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Rigit Insulated Panel Roof Steel Construction Optional Clerestory Conventional Construction Aluminum Construction Green Wall System


exploded diagram

EXPLODED DIAGRAM

This screen system is able to be configured with different types of panels depending on the need and programs. These are a few of the variations shown to the right.

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MASTER BEDROOM POD


container modules

OFFICE / LAUNDRY / HALF BATH POD

ONE BED / ONE BATH POD

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KITCHEN NORTH


interiors

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DINING SOUTH


The town of San Martin de las CaĂąas is located in the Tequila Valley near Guadalajara in the western pacific area of Mexico. The village is characterized by “ejidos, which is an are of communal land communally held in the traditional Indian system of land tenure that combines communal ownership with individual use for agriculture. Taking in consideration the needs of San Martin de las CaĂąas, and the importance of water serving as a catalyst for social interaction, the project is to revive the site and

establish a civic territory, a cultural and learning center that celebrated the presence of water. The approach in constructing the envelope of the program is to be adaptable local climate through permeable surface for filtration of cooling, heating and lighting. The roof structure opens to the sky through a slit of light coming from the roof and running along the whole construction manipulating certain sky views.


LEARNING AND CULTURAL CENTER

SAN MARTIN DE LAS CANAS, MEXICO PROFESSOR: DESIGN STUDIO:

SITEPLAN PROPOSAL

ALFONSO PEREZ WILLIAM TILSON GRADUATE STUDIO III

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ROOF

OPERABLE PANEL SKIN

GLAZING

STRUCTURE

GROUND


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Social integration in the city depends on the possibilities for social encounter and the exchange among people. In this sense, the use of public space, and particularly plaza, is the effective instrument for social cohesion. For this reason the plaza is the most prominent public gathering room. The plaza at the site is developed as an outdoor “room� with an amphitheater that leads to the raised building and while the space can be used for a variety of public events it is still enclosed by the existing boundaries providing enclosure and offering a sense of security.


The Docked proposal introduces a communal garden areal and marketplace that revitalizes the site and gives the residents of the ex-industrial zone a place to gather and break away from the individualistic nature of the existing context. The Docked proposal’s intentions are to be a prototypical example of the union between green space, community activity and private residence that will re-shape the nature of the living within the boundaries of the long horizontal motion that drives the community. LIGHT DIAGRAM

LIGHT DIAGRAM


LIVING IN BORNEO

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS PROFESSOR:

FRANK BOSWORTH

DESIGN TEAM:

GRETEL CASTILLO TREVOR BOYLE DIANE LINDSEY

SPONSOR:

HUNTON BRADY ARCHITECTS

DESIGN STUDIO:

GRADUATE STUDIO I

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awards and publications HUMAN DIGNITY HEALTH CLINIC URBAN SPLINE

ORLANDO, FLORIDA CHONGQING, CHINA

FLORIDA CASE STUDY HOUSE

FLORIDA


awards

URBAN SPLINE CHONGQING, CHINA

Honorable Mention for Unbuilt Projects AIA Florida, 2012

HUMAN DIGNITY HEALTH CLINIC ORLANDO , FL

Honorable Mention for the Health Care Clinic for the Homeless Design Competion AIA Florida, 2010


publications

HUMAN DIGNITY HEALTH CLINIC ORLANDO , FL

WorldGreen http://www.worldgreen.org. 2011 InHabitat http://inhabitat.com 2011

FLORIDA CASE STUDY HOUSE DESIGN COMPETITION, AIA FLORIDA, 2011

ArchDaily http://www.archdaily.com. 2011


A PORTFOLIO BY GRETEL CASTILLO gretelcastillo@att.net. TEL: 321. 961. 3584 PRINTED 2014


Gretel Castillo  

Portfolio

Gretel Castillo  

Portfolio

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