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Photo by Ryan McCoy

Health Care Careers Center


Photo by Sean Graves


Front Range Community College (FRCC)

has been enriching lives through learning for more than 50 years. We opened our doors to Grays Peak, FRCC’s Health Care Careers Center, in August 2020. Grays Peak represents FRCC’s longstanding commitment to teaching and learning excellence, to the community, and to ensuring that our graduates are well prepared to deliver high quality, compassionate care to community members. FRCC offers the only nursing program in Larimer County and also offers a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN) degree. Twelve degree and certificate programs focus on educating and training students for a variety of disciplines in the health and wellness field. In addition to nurses, the college has educated nearly 10,000 other health care professionals over the years. Disciplines include: Dental Assisting, Emergency Medical Services, Integrative Health and Massage Therapy, Practical Nurse, Medical Assisting, Nurse Aide, Patient Care Technician, and Phlebotomy. Grays Peak serves as the main facility and training center for more than 900 students pursuing health-related careers in Northern Colorado. This 61,292 square foot facility houses a variety of state-of-the-art learning spaces—including simulation suites, classrooms, labs, small group learning areas, and collaborative space to support FRCC’s health care programs. Grays Peak provides students with the high end, hands-on training that health care programs require in addition to learning in “real world” environments. This $34.4 million building was made possible in part to state funding ($26 million) as well as funding from valued donors and college reserves ($8.4 million). I invite you to visit the Larimer Campus to sit beside one of the six sculptures created by local artist Lorri Acott or to learn more about pursuing a certificate or degree in health care. Andy Dorsey, President


Grays Peak houses a variety of state-of-the-art learning spaces, including classrooms, labs, small group learning areas, and a collaborative space to support FRCC’s health care programs.


Photo by Karl Dukstein


Photo by Karl Dukstein


Specs • 61,292 square feet • Two stories • LEED Silver Certification (pending) • Design/Build by Haselden Construction and Hord Coplan Macht Architects


Two nursing skills labs (12-bed stations each), a high-fidelity simulation suite, and practice rooms are located on the first floor.


Photo by Sean Graves


Photos by Kelli Naibauer (Left) and Sean Graves (Right)


The dental suite features a 6-chair public serving clinic, skills lab, and X-ray and sterilization areas.


The Emergency Medical Services skills lab includes a nursing home simulation area and flexible simulation space.


Photo by Sean Graves


Photo by Sean Graves


The integrative health skills lab includes massage therapy and yoga space.


The kitchen suite will support FRCC’s integrative health, nutrition, and fermentation science programs.


Photo by Sean Graves


Photo by Sean Graves


The medical assisting and phlebotomy skills lab, as well as the nurse aide and medical careers skills lab, are located on the second floor.


A biology classroom with prep lab supports the health care programs.


Photo by Sean Graves


Photo by Sean Graves


General purpose classrooms, group study rooms, common areas—including collaborative workspaces—are found throughout Grays Peak. A medical capture recording system is installed in most simulation rooms, skills labs, testing rooms, and practice rooms.


The Colorado General Assembly passed the Art in Public Places Act in 1977, requiring that 1% of the construction costs of new or renovated state-owned buildings be used to acquire works of art for permanent installation at the project site. Local artist Lorri Acott was selected to create sculptures as part of the Colorado Art in Public Places program. Members of the public are invited to visit campus and to view the sculptures near the entrance to Grays Peak.


Photo by Karl Dukstein


Meet the Artist

Lorri Acott “I’m grateful for the rare opportunity to be able to create a sculpture garden filled with the art that comes from the deepest truths within me; truths about hope and about connection to ourselves, each other, and to the place that we live. The opportunity to do this in my home state and county, in the city where I lived and worked for most of my life, and at a campus that where I myself have frequented has been a powerful and fulfilling experience for me. I am proud of the result, and I hope that my works grow in relevance and in richness or meaning as the years go by. This, I believe is the test of art that is timeless.” Lorri Acott’s impressionistic figurative sculptures reside in private and public collections throughout the United States and abroad. A favorite of collectors and critics alike, Lorri’s work receives a powerful emotional response wherever it is placed.  Living in the mountains of Colorado, she has found the idea place to nurture her creative spirit. Lorri is the co-founder of DreamBigSculpture.com, a company specializing in the creation of large scale artwork for both corporate and public collections worldwide. Some of Lorri’s recent public art installations include:  “Who Rescued Who” for Hobbs, New Mexico, “First Love” and “Arc of Peace” installed in Little Rock, Arkansas, “Conversation with Myself” for the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, and “Peace” for the Geller Center in Fort Collins, Colorado. “Peace” was selected by the Michigan American Civil Liberties Union as art to change the world in 2014 and was honored by the World Citizens Artists organization in 2015.


Heartfelt Have you ever had a person actually hold your heart in their hands? The power to promote healing is ours. This six-foot bronze sculpture is placed at the building’s entrance as it represents the mission of Front Range Community College’s Grays Peak in such a beautiful way.


Photos by Sean Graves


Spirit of Renewal Rising almost three feet above the ground, this six-foot sculpture extends another two feet in height as the butterflies rise from her hands. Located adjacent to the pollinator garden, this sculpture symbolizes the transformation that students will find themselves making as they progress through their educational programs and the transformations that patients make as they navigate their health situations.


Photo by Karl Dukstein


Photos by Sean Graves (Left) and Karl Dukstein (Right)


Caring Enough to Look This three-foot piece has significant literal and metaphoric symbolism. It is a literal representation of what those in the health career fields do on a daily basis: They look closely at our physical bodies to learn the best ways to help us to be healthy and strong. The symbolic meaning is what we all hope that people will do for us as well—to care enough look and to really see the beauty in who we are.


Heart Song A large boulder is on Lorri Acott’s property. This is a place where she goes into nature to remember who she is and where she as “Sitting Rock� goes to hear her heart song. The larger than life sized figure sits on a four-foot rock; the sitting bronze figure is seven-feet tall. A stone step makes it easy for visitors to sit on the rock with the sculpture that represents connection to nature and hope.


Photos by Sean Graves


Photos by Sean Graves (Left) and Karl Dukstein (Right)


Offering Hope The power to offer hope to others is ours. In this three-foot bronze sculpture, the figure and the bird represent the offering and acceptance of hope. Front Range Community College’s Grays Peak offers hope to students who are pursuing new careers for themselves. In addition, the sculpture is intended to reflect teachers’ hope to make a difference in the lives of their students and the patients they will care for.


Welcoming Hope This three-foot bronze sculpture represents a person leaving on a journey. At the last minute hope arrives, and the figure turns to welcome it. Front Range Community College’s Grays Peak offers hope for better health and wellness for all those whose lives are impacted by teachers, staff, students, and graduates.


Photos by Sean Graves


“Birds symbolize hope in all my sculptures because of this poem by Emily Dickinson.”

“Hope is the Thing with Feathers” “Hope” is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul And sings the tune without the words And never stops—at all And sweetest—in the Gale—is heard And sore must be the storm That could abash the little Bird That kept so many warm I’ve heard it in the chilliest land And on the strangest Sea Yet—never—in Extremity, It asked a crumb—of me. Photo by Karl Dukstein


As I share my personal interpretations of meanings and symbolisms in my sculptures with you, I would like you to know that they are designed to also invite others to also interpret meanings in their own ways. In fact, one of my favorite things about my sculptures is that they seem to be able to meet people wherever they are.

People’s opinions about the sculptures will change over time, as they find new perspectives and understandings in their own lives. After they see the title of a piece, or as they come across one of the sculptures that they had not yet seen, people will have new conversations about their meaning. This is why I love to see my sculptures in the public sphere. The meaning that people find in them changes and transforms as they themselves change and transform through living their lives.


Grays Peak represents FRCC’s commitment to

providing students with the best teaching and learning experiences to promote student success and completion. It is truly our privilege to support the dreams of students who wish to be health care practitioners—and to play a role in the health and vitality of our community. There are so many individuals who played a role in making this building possible—from conception to completion, including: our design/build partners at Haselden Construction and Hord Coplan Macht; FRCC’s Facilities, Planning, and Management team; Facilities; teachers and staff; our Foundation and board members; and our valued community partners. As H. Jackson Brown, Jr. stated, “Never give up on anybody. Miracles happen every day.” Health care providers—and FRCC graduates—are needed now more than ever. To our current students and to our graduates: You will be part of many, many every day miracles. Each of you will be a healing influence in the world. What you do for others through your character, commitment, and compassion will be your legacy. Your legacy will be etched into the lives of your patients and their families forever. It’s a privilege to be able to support the health care needs of our community now—and in the future. Jean Runyon Campus Vice President Larimer Campus


Photo by Karl Dukstein


Photo by Karl Dukstein

Front Range Community College Larimer Campus Grays Peak (Health Care Careers Center) 4616 South Shields Street Fort Collins, Colorado 80526

Design By Kyle Kerns

Profile for Kyle Kerns

Grays Peak Brochure  

Grays Peak Brochure

Grays Peak Brochure  

Grays Peak Brochure

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