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RENOVATIONS

FIXTURES & FURNISHINGS • EXTREME MAKEOVERS • NEW TRICKS

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN

N O 30 :

OCT/NOV 2016

ALL THE RIGHT MOVES

Inside the Northwest’s most striking new spaces

INDUSTRY VS. GENTRIFICATION

A Portland entrepreneur builds design community in one of the city’s last true manufacturing hubs

NEXT-WAVE WORKSPACES Good design is good business


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favn sofa, 2011 jaime hayon – swan chair, 1958 arne jacobsen – made in denmark by fritz hansen

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Live event November 7 Benaroya Hall Doors at 5:30pm | Presentation at 7:00pm

2016 Jurors Kim Herforth Nielsen 3XN | Copenhagen Anna Dyson CASE, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute | New York Mimi Hoang nARCHITECTS | New York

THANK YOU TO OUR MEDIA SPONSOR

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Photo Michel Gibert. Special thanks: TASCHEN. 1Conditions apply, contact store for details. 2Program available on select items, subject to availability.

French Art de Vivre

Illusion. Large 4 seat sofa, design Lili Castilla. Pixl. Bookcase, design Fabrice Berrux. Tempus. Armchair, design Simon Reynaud. Octet. Cocktail table, design Roberto Tapinassi and Maurizio Manzoni. Manufactured in Europe.

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Rohleder Borges Architecture, Christian Grevstad Interior Design, Ben Benschneider Photography

DOVETAILGC.COM

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Walk in with Walk out with

Try out Sub-Zero and Wolf products in full-scale kitchens. Talk details with resident experts. Get a taste of all that your new kitchen can be.

subzero-wolf.com /seattle • 206-284-8400 • 1400 Elliott Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119 Hours by appointment only: Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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cont 30

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45

october-november.16

16. hello

The nitty-gritty.

SCENE 27. architecture

A lodge designed by Portland firm Hacker adds modern edge to a woodsy 40-year-old resort.

28. retail

Vancouver lighting star Lukas Peet branches into interior design.

30. happenings

News, events, and openings.

36. fashion

Carlo Scanagatta merges art and technology to create gallery-worthy silk scarves.

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38. fashion

54. Portland’s Lightning Bar Collective

42. people

58. Alinda Morris designs a kid-proof

Curator Chiyo Ishikawa explores the blurred lines between fashion and art with a blockbuster YSL exhibition. Krownlab founder Stefan Andrén is fighting to keep the manufacturing spirit alive in Portland’s Northwest Industrial neighborhood.

STYLE: RENOVATION 45. Talk about most-improved. What

scores major points for its latest eatery: a sports bar that doesn’t look like a sports bar.

yet elegant kitchen for an active family of nine.

62. sourced

Texture meets minimalism meets metals. GRAY trend-forecasts the emerging “New Nordic” style.

was once a rundown seafood shop in Vancouver’s Chinatown is now a sleek high-concept gym.

64. sourced

50. Architect D’Arcy Jones carves an industry-disrupting recording studio out of a former Railtown factory.

66. A kitchen makeover in Oregon

Who doesn’t love a little glamour? Amp it up with these timeless pieces. shows the power of punchy color.


tents 64

68. Interior designer Marianne

Simon deftly updates the bathroom of a 90-year-old Seattle house.

FEATURES 70. radical traditions

Seattle designer Brian Paquette blends the charm of a historic home with his client’s love of modern minimalism and punk rock.

76. all the home’s a stage A creative homeowner and up-foranything builder layer Old Hollywood style into a tired Portland colonial.

84. the right angles

Interior designer Jenny Martin plays with geometry in a beachside house in Victoria, B.C.

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& MORE 90. architecture

A minimalist, high-contrast kitchen in Squamish, B.C., lets the landscape take center stage.

92. workspace roundup

GRAY takes a design tour through the Northwest’s best-designed new coworking spaces. PLUS: Get the look with our handpicked products.

110. resources

Design professionals, furnishings, and suppliers featured in this issue.

114. obsession

106

On the Cover

The moody master bedroom of a Portland home renovated by homeowner Britney Renner and builder Soren Clark. SEE PAGE

76 Photographed by GEORGE BARBERIS

See why the duo behind Portland’s Pratt & Larson Tile can’t get enough of curvy white pottery.

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AR T DOESN’T ALWAYS

FIT IN A FRAME Haiku ceiling fans represent the highest achievement in design, craftsmanship and technology. When we see our fans we see something new. We see a canvas. We see a work of art.

Call us at 844-424-5848 or visit haikuhome.ca/gray16 to receive a free lookbook.

Visual Vestige Whale Bones

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Phantom Pains Support Group

Dapper Delineation


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| hello |

The Nitty-Gritty EVERY DESIGN WRITER PRAYS FOR THAT MOMENT IN AN INTERVIEW WHEN WE KNOW WE’VE FOUND THE ESSENCE OF A STORY—the nugget that elevates it from just another pretty interiors piece

into a narrative worthy of the reader’s attention. Maybe it’s a zingy quote or an inspired design move that instantly telegraphs the subject’s ingenuity. Or maybe it’s a great anecdote—seven home-schooled kids durability-testing kitchen materials (pg. 58), say, or an architect revamping a decrepit seafood shop into a high-concept urban gym (pg. 45). If an interviewee doesn’t offer enough to hang a narrative on—and let’s be honest, designers aren’t typically known for their storytelling—we can deploy certain journalistic tricks to draw out a quirky tale or the spark of personality animating a project. My favorite tactic? Get a designer to talk about a project’s “before” state. The worse a space looked before the designer waved a magic wand, the better. Decades of junk littering the floors? Dead pigeons in the rafters? Yes, please. Running counter to writers’ agendas is a strange, instinctual designers’ instinct—many are, mysteriously, masters of abstract, distancing language. Where someone else might say “a window,” an architect might say something like (and I quote affectionately from our February 2015 issue), “The glass acts almost as a veil, separating the spaces but leaving a transparent connection between interior and exterior.” So you see why I like renovations. When you’re talking about something as tactile as a rough, raw space (or even just an outdated house stuck in the ’80s; see pg. 70), even the most intellectualizing designer will break out some refreshingly, visceral language. My all-time favorite comes courtesy of Thomas Schaer of SHED Architecture & Design, who a few years ago described a cramped, white-tiled bathroom as having a “slaughterhouse vibe” before he redid it. In this issue, we turn the spotlight on a special brand of design alchemy, the transformation of that dull “before” into the golden “after.” And in our reporting, we are guided by the knowledge that design and construction are about more than just the pretty end results—they’re about the sometimes messy, often sweaty in-between. A good renovation is about the many collaborators who were critical to its success, and all the hard work they put in. That’s a story that never gets old.

Jaime Gillin, Director of Editorial + Content Strategy jaime@graymag.com

INSTAGRAM: @gray_magazine // FACEBOOK: graymag // TWITTER: @gray_magazine PINTEREST: gray_magazine // LINKEDIN: company/gray-magazine

#GRAYMAGAZINE

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Corbett dining table, $2499; Lira chairs, $499; Aurora pendant, $169. University Village 2675 NE University Village Street, Seattle roomandboard.com

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FOUNDER + PUBLISHER Shawn Williams DIRECTOR OF EDITORIAL + CONTENT STRATEGY Jaime Gillin jaime@graymag.com SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR Stacy Kendall

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER Tracey Bjerke

COPY EDITOR Laura Harger

NEWSSTAND MANAGER Bob Moenster

CONTRIBUTORS Megumi Shauna Arai Dina Avila George Barberis Jeremy Bittermann Hadani Ditmars Hank Drew Rachel Eggers John Granen Paul Grdina Alex Hayden Andrew Latreille Joshua Lawrence Jordan Moor David Papazian Hillary Rielly Allison Scheff Jacob Williamson

Lapchi Rug Design Studio 809 NW Flanders St | Portland, Oregon 503.719.6589 | lapchi.com

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©2016 Lapchi, LLC

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Craig Allard Miller Mary Ellen Kennedy

EDITOR Rachel Gallaher

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Courtney Ferris Brian Libby Alexa McIntyre Nicole Munson Nessa Pullman Lindsey M. Roberts

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No. 30. Copyright ©2016. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 5628 Airport Way S., Ste. 190 Seattle, WA 98108 Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years.

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| contributors |

CUSTOM MILLED SIDING & TRIM One of a kind for over a century. . 20 www.cedarexperts.com graymag com

MEGUMI SHAUNA ARAI megumiarai.com pg 38

GEORGE BARBERIS georgebarberis.com pg 76

SAMA JIM CANZIAN silentsama.com pg 50

HANK DREW hankdrew.com pg 114

RACHEL EGGERS pg 70

ALEX HAYDEN alexhayden.com pg 58, 70

ANDREW LATREILLE andrewlatreille.com pg 46

JOSHUA LAWRENCE joshualawrence.ca pg 84

HILLARY RIELLY pg 50

ALLISON SCHEFF allisonscheff.com pg 62, 64, 66, 68, 90


PHOTOGRAPHY / Aaron Leitz INTERIORS / Jeffrey Bilhuber ARCHITECTURE / Stephen Sullivan Designs graymag . com

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Adams Architecture

AKJ Architects LLC

BattersbyHowat Architects

Baylis Architects

BC&J Architecture

Ben Trogdon | Architects

BUILD llc

Chesmore Buck

DAO Architecture LLC

David Coleman Architecture

Emerick Architects

Envision Architecture

adamsarchitecture.net

pacific northwest architects

baylisarchitects.com

akjarchitects.com

bcandj.com

battersbyhowat.com

bentrogdonarchitects.com

These architecture and design firms are doing some of the best work in this region. They also help support our efforts to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. We’re proud to call them our architect partners. Look to them first for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more. buildllc.com

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chesmorebuck.com

emerick-architects.com

daoarchitecture.com

envision-architecture.biz


Giulietti | Schouten AIA Architects gsarchitects.net

Guggenheim Architecture + Design Studio guggenheimstudio.com

Hacker

hackerarchitects.com

HELLIWELL + SMITH Blue Sky Architecture Inc

Integrate Architecture & Planning

Iredale Group Architecture

integratearch.com

iredale.ca

blueskyarchitecture.com

Janof Architecture

KASA Architecture

Lane Williams Architects

Lanefab Design / Build

LEVER Architecture

Lyons Hunter Williams : Architecture

Malboeuf Bowie Architecture

Measured Architecture

prentiss + balance + wickline ARCHITECTS

rho architects

richard brown architect

RUF Project

janofarchitecture.com

mb-architecture.com

kasaarchitecture.com

measured.ca

lanewilliams.com

pbwarchitects.com

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rbarch.com

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rufproject.com

pacific northwest architects See their portfolios at graymag.com or link directly to their sites to learn more.

Scott | Edwards Architecture seallp.com

Stephenson Design Collective stephensoncollective.com

Tyler Engle Architects tylerengle.com

William Kaven Architecture williamkaven.com

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scene

JEREMY BITTERMANN

The lakeside bistro at central Oregon’s Black Butte Ranch is part of a new two-building lodge designed by Hacker. Dark-stained cedar clads the outside, while clear-stained cedar keeps things bright inside.

RESORT REDUX

A hidden gem in central Oregon’s Willamette National Forest, Black Butte Ranch has been a popular vacation destination for more than 40 years. In addition to the majestic mountains and sweeping meadows surrounding the resort, its guests can now appreciate another form of beauty: the newly redeveloped central lodge. Designed by Portland-based architecture firm Hacker and built by Bend’s Kirby Nagelhout Construction, the complex comprises two low-slung structures housing a restaurant, outdoor pool, locker rooms,

fitness center, and children’s activity area. Knotty cedar planks clad the interior and exterior and give form and texture to the structure’s many built-in furnishings. Expansive windows and breezeways frame the distant mountains and nearby lake. Viewed from outside, the unobtrusive lodge appears almost modest, but inside, carefully considered details and material treatments—together amounting to a contemporary refresh of Northwest modernism—elevate Black Butte Ranch to a true design destination. h graymag . com

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scene

retail |

SEE LUKAS PEET’S STUDIO AND OTHER WORK AT GRAYMAG.COM/ PEET

DESIGN FOR KICKS Written by HADANI DITMARS

For Livestock’s Toronto outpost, which opened in early 2016 (pictured above and top), as well as for 2014’s Vancouver flagship, designer Lukas Peet (right) created a versatile rail system that supports hanging shelving, mirrors, and apparel racks.

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The 29-year-old Vancouver-based designer welds his own prototypes, works with local finishers, and oversees every step of production, whether he’s creating a new fixture for ANDlight, the company he cofounded in 2013, or designing a retail environment. In every medium, his mission and mantra remain the same: “Reduction to the purest form, functionality, and playfulness.” Peet’s diverse training—he studied at the renowned Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands, designed Nike retail concept stores for RUFproject, and creates products for companies such as Roll & Hill and Umbra—informed his holistic approach to his first solo interiors projects. Tasked with designing shops in Vancouver and Toronto for Livestock, the Canadian footwear and apparel company, he’s shaped a minimalist but memorable retail experience. Modular components—including Peet’s hanging rail system and floor tables that staff can reorient to serve as apparel racks—permit the stores to be easily reconfigured to display new products or for in-shop events. To avoid strong shadows on the product, he forwent spotlights in favor of glowing LED panels that serve as shelves, wrapping sneakers and accessories in even illumination from below. The result is a pair of gallery-like spaces that are destinations for design-seekers as much as sneakerheads. h

IMAGES COURTESY LIVESTOCK CANADA; PORTRAIT BY JENNILEE MARIGOMEN

LUKAS PEET IS ENAMORED WITH THE MAGIC OF MAKING.


BIG SALE NOV 1 ST THRU DEC 17 TH

205 NW 10th Avenue Portland, OR 97209 www.kushrugs.com graymag . com

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scene

happenings |

NEXT STOP

Just south of downtown Portland, the riverfront is turning green. A formerly industrial site in the booming South Waterfront district has been transformed into a quarter-mile public park designed by Portland and Seattle–based landscape architecture firm Walker Macy, in collaboration with New York’s Thomas Balsley Associates.

Earlier this year, Tacoma Art Museum announced a major donation from the Benaroya family, including 225 works of art and nearly $14 million in funding for a new gallery space designed by Olson Kundig. “The Beauty of a Shared Passion,” on view through mid-2017, highlights works from the Benaroya Collection—and offers a peek at what’s to come from this dynamic, growing museum.

EDITORS’ CHOICE Reaching back to Seattle’s rich aerospace history, the new Brooks x Casual Industrees “Fly Casual” Fusion sneaker draws material and color inspiration from iconic plane designs of the 1990s.

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NEW TWIST

Knoll is going old school with the reintroduction of the Bertoia Two-Tone—an iteration of the classic Diamond Chair in colorblocked configurations that were originally available when the Bertoia Collection launched in 1953. Available through Hive, Portland, and Inform Interiors, Seattle and Vancouver.

TOP LEFT: COURTESY TACOMA ART MUSEUM, PHOTO BY RUSSELL JOHNSON AND JEFF CURTIS; TOP RIGHT: BRUCE FORSTER

ON VIEW


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Season Highlights BEND DESIGN

Bend, Oregon, Oct. 20 & 21 benddesign.org

MEL CARTER

The sophmore year of this dynamic conference includes conversations, tours, interactive workshops, and hands-on exhibits that celebrate all forms of design. The speaker lineup includes Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works Architecture and John C Jay of Fast Retailing.

WestEdge Design Fair Santa Monica, Nov. 3-6 westedgedesignfair.com –SPONSORED BY GRAY–

“Why I Design” at Museum of Vancouver

NOW OPEN: Brian Paquette at Home

Interiors designer Brian Paquette plants a flag in Seattle’s Central District with his new showroom. The space is a one-stop shop for all things Paquette, holding offices for his firm, a library, and a curated showroom of linens, art, accessories, lighting, and furniture by the likes of Lawson-Fenning, Apparatus, and Concrete Cat. Most significant: nearly everything in the showroom is American-made, maker-made, and responsibly sourced. “It has to be that way,” insists Paquette, who geeks out over low-waste shipping methods. “It’s not even more expensive.”

Vancouver, Nov. 4 museumofvancouver.ca AIA Seattle’s

2016 Honor Awards for Washington Architecture Seattle, Nov. 7 aiaseattle.org

–SPONSORED BY GRAY–

KATHRYN BARNARD

NOW OPEN: Foreign National

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From the team behind Seattle’s uber-popular Vietnamese restaurant Stateside comes sibling (and next-door neighbor) Foreign National, a small, dimly lit bar with a glam look and a speakeasy vibe. Designed by Callie Meyer of Barnard + Meyer, the retro Asia-inspired bar features a bevy of vintage finds, including gold swan hardware in the bathroom, a mirrored half-dome bar back, and a larger-than-life disco ball holding court in a corner. After all, elevated street eats and complicated cocktails are only made better by moody pink wallpaper, right?


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DESIGN FAIR

NOVEMBER 3-6 THE BARKER HANGAR

SANTA MONICA, CA

EXPLORE THOUSANDS OF THE LATEST PRODUCTS AND DESIGN IDEAS FOR YOUR HOME

WESTEDGE 2015

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WESTEDGE 2015

ROCHE BOBOIS

OPENING NIGHT PARTY TO BENEFIT LOS ANGELES RONALD McDONALD HOUSE A show-wide celebration with shopping, cocktails, food and entertainment Visit WestEdgeDesignFair.com for tickets and details. SUPPORTING PARTNERS:

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CHARITY PARTNERS:

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Don’t miss the West Coast debut of DIFFA’s Picnic By Design November 5 at WestEdge.

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GO Let’s

Design Trends

Professional Growth

Product Launches Networking

Events

Industry Speakers

Innovation

Inspiration

Learning Opportunities

Kitchen Bath •

We’re ready. Are you? Kick off 2017 with the ultimate destination for everything kitchen and bath. Register now at kbis.com.

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fashion |

The intricate patterns splashed across Carlo Scanagatta’s silk scarves are a mix of manipulated and repeated images and hand drawings traced with a mouse.

GRAPHIC CONTENT

Art meets science in Carlo Scanagatta’s digitally rendered scarves. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER

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designer Carlo Scanagatta takes the humble accessory seriously. “You can paint or draw a picture and hang it in a museum,” he explains, “but when you put your work on a scarf, that beauty lives out in the world.” Growing up in Rovereto, a small city in northeastern Italy, Scanagatta was exposed to artistic pursuits at a young age. His grandfather owned a marble firm, his great-grandfather owned a fabric shop, and his great-uncle Mario Radice was an internationally known abstract painter. Carlo, while artistically inclined, was also fascinated by math, physics, and chemistry. Today he combines his passions by using Photoshop to create vibrant, intricate patterns that employ concepts of scientific scale and perspective. Though he initially printed his work on photographic paper, two years ago he made the leap to silk. He sends his designs to a family-owned, women-run manufacturing facility in Como—Italy’s textile capital—where they’re digitally printed onto fabric. Each design is composed of many hundreds of mousedrawn shapes and the occasional iterative image: a collection of abstract forms that resolves itself, upon close inspection, into rich, layered detail. How does he know when a piece is complete? “When I like it and my wife likes it,” he says. “If I don’t like it, I just erase it.” h

DEREK JOHNSON

THE SCARF IS OFTEN A SARTORIAL AFTERTHOUGHT. But Seattle-based


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Chiyo Ishikawa, the Seattle Art Museum curator responsible for mounting the world premiere of “Yves Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style,” poses at the museum in a ’90s-era YSL safari suit. RIGHT: A dazzling array of jewelry from the haute couture collections.

BEHIND THE SEAMS

Curator Chiyo Ishikawa breaks the art museum mold with a trailblazing exhibition on legendary fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Portrait by MEGUMI SHAUNA ARAI

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Seattle Art Museum’s award-winning Susan Brotman Deputy Director for Art and Curator of European Painting and Sculpture. Over her 26-year-long tenure at SAM, she’s slowly been pushing the institution in fresh directions and adding fashion exhibitions to its repertoire. First came “Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion” in 2013, and the groundbreaking “Yves Saint Laurent: The Perfection of Style” opens October 11. “The success of ‘Future Beauty,’ and the unexpectedly large and new audience it attracted, made us realize that it is viable to show fashion in the right context at museums,” Ishikawa says. “I feel that any fashion we exhibit has to be sculptural and eye-catching and capture the intersection of culture and design.” The Yves Saint Laurent show ticks all those boxes. It’s a world-premiere exhibition dedicated to the life and work of the iconic French designer, presenting YSL as an avant-garde artist who created path-breaking pieces that shocked, awed, and redefined fashion’s potential. A true prodigy, Saint Laurent started his career under the tutelage of Christian Dior, was promoted to head of House of Dior at just 21, and launched his own eponymous fashion house in 1961, at age 24. For the next three decades, Saint Laurent produced some of the most notable garments of the century, including the safari jacket, the Mondrian dress, and Le Smoking, a trendsetting tuxedo-style suit for women. GRAY caught up with Ishikawa, co-curator of the exhibition, to learn more about Yves’s atelier, how the show came together, and the dress that got away. »

© FONDATION PIERRE BERGÉ – YVES SAINT LAURENT, PARIS/SOPHIE CARRÉ

FOR THE PAST YEAR AND A HALF, THREE LETTERS—SPOKEN IN AN EXCITED WHISPER—HAVE BEEN MAKING THE ROUNDS IN SEATTLE’S FASHION CIRCLES: YSL. The gossip is gratifying for Chiyo Ishikawa,


Emo

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Visit www.designlectur.es for dates and advance ticket information.

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fashion |

How did “The Perfection of Style” land at the Seattle Art Museum? Over the years, SAM has done a lot of work with various French institutions, and in fall 2014 a mutual contact put us in touch with the Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent Foundation in Paris. Their archive is one of the most complete collections of any couture designer in the world. Brilliantly, Yves began saving everything—sketches, garment swatches, inspiration boards—as soon as he started his own house. We flew to Paris to talk with the foundation about the possibility of an exhibition and found that we were all on the same page: we wanted to pull back the curtain and show the whole design process, the work that went into making the clothes as well as the man behind them.

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The foundation houses around 5,000 pieces of haute couture. How did you choose which ones to include in the exhibition? From the beginning, I knew that we wanted to present Yves as an artist. I looked for both groundbreaking pieces that showed him as an avant-garde thinker and designer and haute couture garments that showed the highest level of artistry, including exquisite tailoring and embroidery. We had open access to Yves’s full archive of work, which the foundation stores in a very specific manner—it’s grouped by material rather than color or date because for longevity’s sake certain materials must be kept away from each other. There was the most incredible wedding dress from 1965, a knitted wool shroud that covers the entire body and

head, with a hole for the face and slits for the arms. I wanted that dress—such a statement!—but it is too fragile to travel. Instead we chose a wedding dress from 1970, a multicolored silk velvet coat-style piece with appliqué letters forming the words “LOVE ME FOREVER” on the front and “OR NEVER” on the back. And, of course, there is a Mondrian dress, one of a collection of six A-line dresses composed of heavy black lines and blocks of primary color in an homage to Dutch painter Piet Mondrian. Another factor in our selection process was that we wanted a spectrum of hues, since our exhibition includes a series of rooms that progress by color. I worked closely with independent Parisian curator and fashion expert Florence Müller, who came up with that idea as a graphic demonstration of Yves’s chromatic range. What is the relationship between fashion and art? Certainly fashion falls under the heading of design, but can it truly be considered art? Art is a visual manifestation of someone’s ideas. Essentially it’s a marriage of the interior and exterior. That concept gets interesting when you apply it to fashion, because fashion is also a business, and it is consumed in a different way than, say, a painting. Clothes always have a practical application, but the best, most culturally significant designers bring

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: © FONDATION PIERRE BERGÉ – YVES SAINT LAURENT, PARIS/GUY MARINEAU ; © FONDATION PIERRE BERGÉ – YVES SAINT LAURENT, PARIS/SOPHIE CARRÉ; © GILLES TAPIE; © FONDATION PIERRE BERGÉ – YVES SAINT LAURENT / PHOTO LUC CASTEL;

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CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: Yves Saint Laurent at work in his Paris studio in 1976; an unconventional wedding gown from the Autumn–Winter 1970 haute couture collection; a pink bow on a haute couture evening gown, proving that bigger was better in the ’80s; garment storage at the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent; a pantsuit from the Spring–Summer 1967 haute couture collection.

© PATRICK BERTRAND/LES ÉDITIONS JALOU

something more to them . . . something that’s hard to pinpoint. It’s a kind of quiet brilliance, a challenge to society. This was true of Alexander McQueen, and it’s also true of Saint Laurent. Both had darkness in their pasts, and both put their personal narratives into their work. Müller talks about “the fine line between good and bad taste,” which is exemplified in YSL’s scandalous 1971 collection [inspired by the 1940s, the era of the Nazi occupation of France] and his famous 1968 evening gown, cut with a high neck and long sleeves but entirely sheer except for a ring of ostrich feathers around the hips. Why do you think there is such a fierce obsession with Yves? Why do people idolize him and his work? Yves embodied a sense of relentless creativity—a very magnetic trait. He defined modern dressing in the ’60s and ’70s, a time when women’s roles at home, at work, and on a social level were changing. He responded to those changes with his designs, and at the time some of them were intensely radical. [Le Smoking was banned from so-called respectable hotels and restaurants after its 1966 debut.] But he also defined a certain kind of elegance that didn’t rely on “traditional” feminine standards—he showed that a woman can be as beautiful in pants as in an evening gown. h

“YVES WAS THE MASTER OF MARRYING UTILITARIAN FUNCTION TO REAL ELEGANCE.”

—CHIYO ISHIKAWA, CURATOR, SEATTLE ART MUSEUM

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CAPTAIN OF INDUSTRY

One man plants a flag—and builds a design community— in one of Portland’s last bastions of manufacturing. Written by STACY KENDALL

“THIS IS A KIND OF INDUSTRIAL SANCTUARY. I WANT TO HELP IT STAY THAT WAY.” —STEFAN ANDRÉN, FOUNDER, KROWNLAB

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CLOCKWISE FROM OPPOSITE: Krownlab founder

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Stefan Andrén at the drawing board. Andrén designed his building to foster community. His eight tenants, all working in design-related fields, have access to a shared conference room in the building’s main hallway. Krownlab’s newest product, Ragnar, comes in a black brushed-aluminum finish.

IMAGES COURTESY KROWNLAB

EMBODYING THE TRUE SPIRIT OF THE NORTHWEST’S ENTREPRENEURIAL ETHOS,

industrial designer Stefan Andrén, founder of Krownlab, is on a mission to grow not only his own company, but a robust community of independent Portland designers as well. Once a senior product designer for Motorola and Nike, Andrén set out on his own in 2009 to create stylish sliding door hardware that doesn’t bust budgets. For five years, he and his small team worked out of a warehouse in Southeast Portland. As he developed his company, he watched the surrounding neighborhood evolve away from its industrial roots and become a trendy enclave of breweries and creative workspaces. “I could see the writing on the wall. The neighborhood was becoming less friendly for manufacturers, and we could be pushed out by skyrocketing rents,” says Andrén. So in 2013, he bought and refurbished a large warehouse in Portland’s Northwest Industrial neighborhood. One of the last industry-only-zoned areas close to downtown, it’s gritty, affordable, and manufacturing-friendly; trains rumble down the street delivering heavy equipment, and forklifts zip between loading docks. Ensuring that the neighborhood maintains its industrial characteristics has become a parallel passion for Andrén. To that end, he renovated his building specifically to suit other creatives— with individual open-plan offices and generous common spaces—and hand-selected tenants that suited his vision. Today eight other designfocused companies occupy the building, where Andrén is de facto mayor. “Companies all in one place, sharing knowledge, resources, and connections—it’s like an ecosystem,” he says. “I believe successes are greater when they involve collaboration. Someone might have a good bookkeeper or a tool to share. Bumping into someone can start a conversation.”

One tenant, Matthew Bietz, owner of the design studio Quartertwenty, who was enticed to move here from Krownlab’s previous building in the Southeast, says the building feels like a collective. “Most developers would section off everyone to maximize rentable space, but we all share a kitchen and conference room, and there’s great circulation inside,” says Bietz. “We often work with the building’s interior designers and architects in our own space.” Monthly happy hours don’t hurt these symbiotic relationships, either. But in a city of booming growth, gentrification’s smooth promises are ever-present, even here. The zone where Krownlab’s building sits is close to restaurants and bars, which make the location appealing. The anchor of the neighborhood, Esco Corporation, a 103-year-old foundry, recently announced that it will close its main production plant in 2017 due to decreased demand—raising the question of what will take its place. “The biggest changes in this neighborhood are yet to come,” Andrén predicts. To buffer the specter of change, he has bought the warehouse next door to his building so that he can expand when the time is right. “The most interesting and successful cities have diverse areas—not just residential and retail ones,” he says. “This is a kind of industrial sanctuary. I want to help it stay that way.” h graymag . com

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Y O U R H O M E S AY S A L O T A B O U T Y O U . W E ’ R E H E R E TO L I S T E N . Your home is a reflection of you. Ferguson’s product experts are here to listen to every detail of your vision, and we’ll work alongside you and your designer, builder or remodeler to bring it to life. Our product experts will help you find the perfect products from the finest bath, kitchen and lighting brands in the world. Request an appointment with your own personal Ferguson product expert and let us discover the possibilities for your next project. Visit FergusonShowrooms.com to get started.

©2016 Ferguson Enterprises, Inc. 0716 225917

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style renovation

“WE TURNED AWAY FROM THE SELF-CENTRIC GYM IDEA AND TOWARD BUILDING A SPORTS TEAM–LIKE ENVIRONMENT. I WANTED TO CREATE THE FRIENDLIEST, MOST OPEN, AND LEAST INTIMIDATING STUDIO I COULD.”

VALERIE LEGERE

— KEIGHTY GALLAGHER, FOUNDER, TIGHT CLUB ATHLETICS

Keighty Gallagher, founder of Tight Club Athletics, and her boyfriend, Henry Barros, pictured mid-demolition. Turn the page to see how the duo, along with Vancouver’s Ply Architecture, transformed a rundown seafood shop into a high-design gym. » graymag . com

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TEAM SPIRIT

Powering through an extensive reno in Chinatown, Ply Architecture transforms a wrecked storefront into the antithesis of the typical egocentric gym. Written by NESSA PULLMAN : Photographed by ANDREW LATREILLE

ABOVE: “This place isn’t just about slimming down—

people tell me they come for the positive energy and the camaraderie,” says Keighty Gallagher, owner of Tight Club Athletics, which opened in Vancouver late last year. The house-shaped frame over the entry desk is a playful reference to the club’s former home in Gallagher’s backyard garage.

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VANCOUVER PERSONAL TRAINER Keighty Gallagher started Tight Club Athletics four years ago, holding drop-in fitness classes in a converted garage in her own Strathcona backyard. Hers was a space for like-minded active adults, and it broke away from business-as-usual gyms. “None of our classes involved looking at yourself in a mirror,” explains Gallagher. “We turned away from the self-centric gym idea and toward building a sports team–like environment.” Word of Gallagher’s club spread quickly, and by 2015, class sizes had outgrown the old space. It was time to move, but “it was crucial to me to maintain the welcoming vibe,” says Gallagher. »


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“MOST ATHLETIC STUDIOS IN THE CITY ARE STRIPPED OF ANY HOME OR COMMUNITY FEEL. WE DIDN’T WANT TO LOOK OR FEEL LIKE ANY OF THEM.” —KEIGHTY GALLAGHER, TIGHT CLUB ATHLETICS Another top priority was to stay as local as possible, so she jumped at the opportunity to lease a former dried-seafood shop in nearby Chinatown, despite its decrepit state. Boarded-up windows and trashed interiors necessitated a full-scale renovation. Gallagher had the perfect designers for the project: one of her longtime clients, Casey Burgess, and her partner, Arnold Chan, of Vancouver-based firm Ply Architecture. They quickly grasped the atmosphere she sought. “The space needed to be really comfortable and welcoming,” Burgess explains. In December 2015, Tight Club Athletics’ new space, the Field House, opened its doors. “A field house is where a team goes to collaborate, meet up, train, and socialize,” says Gallagher. “We didn’t have to be at my place—the ‘coach’s house’—anymore.” With a pale, airy entryway and an open concept throughout, the new space keeps the spirit of the first one intact. Playful wall art—such as greenery rooted in plaster sneakers—by local firm Tinto Creative adorns the community area, where members socialize before and after workouts. The floor in the main training space, designed by Gallagher’s artist boyfriend, Henry Barros, graphically references various sports fields and courts. And a house-shaped wooden installation, echoing the silhouette of Tight Club’s original garage home, encapsulates the lobby, a tribute to where it all started. h FROM TOP LEFT: The saddle stools and marble tables in the lobby are by Gamla; the storefront windows flood Tight Club with light; Gallagher’s father, a hobby woodworker, built and installed the millwork. Her boyfriend, Henry Barros, designed the floor graphics.

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METROPOLIST SETS THE TABLE FOR GREATNESS, & invites

EVERYONE

TO COME FOR DINNER.

Calling all Real Estate Brokers: We are always on the lookout for great new faces here at Metropolist. If you have a collaborative spirit and a dedicated nature we would love to talk to you. Whether you have been in the real estate field for decades or are just contemplating a career change, Metropolist could be a great place for you to take life and career to the next level. We are Metropolist. The question remains, are you?

MetropolistGroup.com | info@metropolistgroup.com | 206-623-5118 | 2931 1st Ave S, Suite A, Seattle WA 98134 graymag . com

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AUDIO/VISUAL

Real-time social streaming. Concerts live from the recording booth. Design that’s as stellar as the sound. Is this the recording studio of the future? Written by HILLARY RIELLY : Photographed by SAMA JIM CANZIAN

JONATHAN SIMKIN WASN’T TRYING TO TURN THE TABLES ON THE RECORDING INDUSTRY when he renovated the future

home of his company, 604 Records, in Vancouver’s Railtown neighborhood. But along with architect D’Arcy Jones, he created a space that’s done just that. 604 Records is a studio that goes beyond merely capturing audio. It also creates and streams video content directly to fans everywhere, anytime—a game-changer in a world of ever-present social media. “There’s no precedent in the industry,” says Simkin. “We’re the first to offer live performance streaming, small concerts, and photo shoots that are completely integrated with the actual recording of the music.” Simkin and Jones agreed that the building, a former garment factory, had good bones when they first saw it in spring 2014. “It was solid but tired,” says Jones, who saw the potential to craft a high-tech space with a back-of-house club feel. After removing decades’ worth of clutter, Jones, along with Peregrine

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General Contracting, project manager Jennifer Watt, and Chris Potter, one of Canada’s leading acoustic consultants, carved five distinct studios out of the long and narrow space. The jewel in the crown is a live room Simkin dubbed the Cyclorama. 604’s largest and loudest studio—typically used for recording drums and piano—the Cyclorama features a stunning infinity wall that serves as a backdrop for photo shoots, music videos, and streamed live shows. Inspired by Swiss architect Valerio Olgiati’s idea that black is an extroverted color and white an introverted one, Jones balanced the two “to suit the use.” Rooms that require quiet and concentration, such as the offices and meeting areas, are white. In the lounges and staff kitchens—“spaces for chatting, brainstorming, and creating,” says Jones—everything down to the faucets is black. “The public spaces take a beating, but their toughness is familiar to most musicians. It puts everyone at ease.” »


“We needed a space conducive to the creation of art,” says Jonathan Simkin, co-founder of Vancouver’s 604 Records, who worked with architect D’Arcy Jones to shape a versatile and high-tech recording studio. OPPOSITE: The musicians’ lounge reveals the building’s raw, rough shell. LED lights illuminate the hallway; the colors can be changed depending on the mood of the artist at work.

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CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Built-in work stations are both functional and a touch of warmth in the simple, stark office spaces. Black is used throughout the project to signal public spaces. The Cyclorama’s white infinity wall is a striking backdrop for recording performances and creating visual content to share on social media. “The sound is so good in this space that you can feel it,” says Jones. h

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WINNING PLAY

The design group behind some of Portland’s hottest bars figured out the sports bar game. This is the story of the Century. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Portrait by JACOB WILLIAMSON

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Portland’s new Century Bar is located in what was formerly a mom-and-pop printing facility. The space is divided into five sections, including a stadium area with a glam bar (below), a front bar (bottom), a rooftop deck, an outdoor patio with a fire pit, and a private event area. OPPOSITE: Designer and entrepreneur John Janulis bellies up to the bar.

DINA AVILA

TELL MOST PORTLANDERS THAT YOU’RE HEADING TO A SPORTS BAR ON SANDY BOULEVARD and they’re likely to think of cheap beer, not high design. For designer John Janulis and his team at Lightning Bar Collective, overturning this stereotype was only half the challenge he addressed with Century Bar, which opened in June. “We’ve been wanting to do a sports bar,” he notes, “but the big question has always been: How can it survive when no big games are on?” A veteran of the industry (his studio also designed and owns Portland’s Jackknife, Victoria Bar, Sweet Hereafter, and the Bye and Bye), Janulis answered his own question by creating “a space that works for everyone, whether you want to get drunk and cheer on the Timbers or enjoy a cocktail on the patio on a first date.” »

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renovation | In the stadium bar, hidden strips of LED lighting are programmed with the colors of favorite teams, and five 11-foot projector screens descend at the push of a button for larger-than-life game viewings.

Patrons enter through the small front room, with its quartz-andmahogany bar and garage doors that open to the patio in warm weather. On game days, the action is in the back bar, which boasts a coffered ceiling and three-tiered mahogany stadium bleachers surrounding drop-down screens. Modeled on a vintage wooden bench Janulis found in a local antique shop, the bleachers are a prime example of LBC’s design process: “We find one or two key pieces and build the rest of the space off them. This bench had such a classic, elegant look—it was the perfect jumping-off point.” With a few right moves, anyone can open a great sports bar, but it takes a deft design hand to make it equally desirable for weddings and formal events, both of which Century has hosted. “We’re not the anti-sports sports bar,” says Janulis, “but we sure don’t look typical. People who love football or hockey appreciate a well-crafted space as much as people in the field of design.” h

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JACOB WILLIAMSON

“WE’RE NOT THE ANTI-SPORTS SPORTS BAR, BUT WE SURE DON’T LOOK TYPICAL. PEOPLE WHO LOVE FOOTBALL OR HOCKEY APPRECIATE A WELL-CRAFTED SPACE AS MUCH AS PEOPLE IN THE FIELD OF DESIGN.” —JOHN JANULIS, DESIGNER AND ENTREPRENEUR


2 0 2 9 2 N D AV E . SEAT T L E , WA 9 8 1 2 1 T. 2 0 6 .4 4 8 .3 3 0 9 WWW. AL C H EM Y C O L L EC T ION S .C OM

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LEFT AND BELOW:

The eat-in kitchen is the command center of a Seattle home renovated by architect James Brown Wilhelm, Level Contracting, and Alinda Morris Interior Design. Here the ninemember Haney family crowds around the spacious island for meals and gathers at the Pottery Barn table for homeschooling lessons. The rough-sawn oak cabinetry from WoodWorks Cabinetry & Design resists wear, while white finishes above (safely out of reach of little hands) keep things bright.

CHILD-PROOF

Written by JAIME GILLIN : Photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

“HERE ARE THE COUNTERTOP SAMPLES—GIVE THEM TO THE KIDS TO PLAY WITH AND SEE IF THEY CAN DESTROY THEM.” That’s the

challenge interior designer Alinda Morris gave her clients Meg and Stefan Haney when they hired her to revamp the kitchen and other living spaces in their Seattle home. It’s not your typical approach to material selection, but when you’re designing interiors for a family of nine—including seven home-schooled kids—durability is no joke. Meg took the test seriously. “We attempted to beat them up, dent them, scratch them, and get everything dirty to see if it would clean easily,” she recalls. “I put the samples on the floor and made sure we walked all over them. Anything that couldn’t resist damage was dismissed.” »

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BDANTIQUES.COM 206.566.6973 59 1911 FIRST AVE SOUTH SEATTLE, WA 98134 graymag . com


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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: As part of the renovation, the design team and builder opened up the “formerly hobbity” center of the home, as the homeowner puts it, to create a double-height dining area. The family uses the chalkboard wall every day. The cheery ladder, with yellowpainted landings, wood pallet cladding, and steel steps, leads to a rooftop patio, a favorite hangout spot for the seven Haney kids.

Those that made the cut were products that balanced good looks with proven indestructibility. In the kitchen, that meant dense red oak cabinets darkened with a chemical reaction, not a stain, so the wood won’t show chips or scratches. Floors throughout the ground floor are either concrete polymer or equally tough hardwood from Kentwood. A climbing ladder clad with weathered, pre-scuffed wood salvaged from shipping pallets leads to a rooftop patio; its steel step inserts, as well as the home’s main staircase, were designed and installed by Meg’s metalworker brother, Jonathan Jankovic. Throughout the collaborative design process, Morris steered the Haneys toward low-maintenance choices. “Meg dreamed of an allwhite kitchen,” Morris recalls. “I couldn’t bring myself to do that. It just wasn’t practical. Instead, we went white on the upper cabinets and tile but kept everything within the kids’ reach a rustic, roughsawn oak.” It was a good save, and critical to Morris’s overarching— and successful—mission: to create a home that looks as good messy as it does clean. Now that’s some design magic. h

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wate r wo r ks .c o m / k itch e n

all the necessary ingredients

AVAILABLE AT CHOWN HARDWARE 333 NW 16TH AVE | PORTLAND, OR | 800.452.7634 12001 NE 12TH ST | BELLEVUE, WA | 800.574.4312 WWW.CHOWN.COM graymag . com

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The Look:

NEW NORDIC

Elegant minimalism. Subtle textures. An emphasis on functionality. These are the fundamental components of the New Nordic look. With its earthy tones punctuated by polished metallics, it speaks to the Pacific Northwest design ethos—particularly our love of simple luxury.

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1. Cloud tile in Duals, available from Ann Sacks, Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver, annsacks.com. 2. Noon Series porcelain tile, available from Thompson Tile & Stone, multiple PNW locations, thompsontile andstone.com. 3. Ultracompact Surfaces Dekton by Cosentino  countertop in Trilium, available from Cosentino, Kent, WA; Burnaby, B.C.; and Tualatin, OR, dekton.com. 4. Cascade Rug by Calvin Klein, available from EWF Modern, Portland, ewfmodern.com. 5. Old White wall tile, available from Porcelanosa, Seattle, porcelanosa-usa.com. 6. 45° collection vanity, available from Blu Bathworks, Vancouver, blubathworks.com. 7. Black Bubble mug, available from Mazama Wares, Portland, shopmazama.com. 8. NativeStone Concrete Farmhouse Sink by Native Trails, available from Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery, multiple PNW locations, fergusonshowrooms .com. 9. Mountain knob and cup pull in natural bronze by Schaub & Company, available from Builders’ Hardware & Supply, Seattle and Bellevue, WA, builders-hardware.com. 10. Faces stone bathtub, available from Porcelanosa, Seattle, porcelanosa-usa.com. h


Milgard Essence SeriesÂŽ French-Style Sliding Doors Designed to perfectly complement the rich, warm wood interiors of Essence windows, the new Essence Series sliding patio door is built with solid wood and a durable fiberglass exterior. This beautiful door offers effortless operation and superior performance for years to come. They have a solid wood interior with no visible fasteners and the exterior is available in 16 powder-coated colors. Like Essence windows, this new patio door is backed by the Milgard Full Lifetime Warranty including Glass Breakage Coverage.

2425 NW Market Street, Seattle WA 98107 Showroom hours are M-F 8 AM to 5 PM and by appointment. (206)789-1122 • lundgrenenterprises.com graymag . com

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The Look:

ON-TREND TRADITIONAL

Timeless warmth and classic shapes, with an eye toward enduring trends, are the signatures of the best traditional design happening now. With clean lines balancing out touches of opulence, it’s a perfect fit for modern tastes. Edited by ALLISON SCHEFF 3

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1. Archives sconce by Progress Lighting, available from Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery, multiple PNW locations, fergusonshowrooms.com. 2. Brushed Herringbone wallpaper by 17 Patterns, available from AnneStarr, Vancouver, annestarr.ca. 3. Brass Bell light by Patrick Zulauf, available from Ligne Roset, Seattle, ligne-roset.com, and Livingspace, Vancouver, living space.com. 4. Tolson Rounded Rectangle pivot mirror, available from Rejuvenation, Seattle and Portland, rejuvenation.com. 5. Vintage washbasin with splash by Stone Forest, available from Chown Hardware, Portland and Bellevue, WA, chown.com, and the Fixture Gallery, multiple PNW locations, thefixturegallery.com. 6. Savoy tile in Anna Bevel, available from Ann Sacks, Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver, annsacks.com. 7. One Decorative faucet with white Carrera handles by Kallista, available from Keller Supply Kitchen & Bath Showcase, multiple PNW locations, kellersupply.com, and Cantu Bathrooms and Hardware, Vancouver, cantubathrooms.com. h


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MODERN HERITAGE

Written by ALLISON SCHEFF : Photographed by DAVID PAPAZIAN

DESIGNING IN A NEW, BLANK-SLATE SPACE HAS ITS APPEAL. BUT VICKI SIMON IS EVEN MORE PASSIONATE about preserving the character of the

older homes she renovates. So when a young family in Gladstone, Oregon, asked the interior designer to create a colorful kitchen in their historic home, her instinct was to work within its existing architecture, rather than swing a sledgehammer to force open the layout. With a clever reimagining of the space, the home feels lighter, brighter, and ideally suited to its energetic inhabitants. Simon cleverly arranged the kitchen’s functional elements in one zone, fitting the range, hood, sink, and dishwasher into just 8 linear feet. She deftly condensed storage and small appliances into a built-in wall unit on the far side of an original archway, using exposed brass hinges and moldings that mimic the original cabinetry. The freestanding, butcher block–topped island, built by Urban Industrial NW, doubles as a prep area and a dining surface and can be moved easily to fit the needs of the day. As for that happy, apple-y paint? Simon’s clients wanted color in their kitchen, and she was delighted to oblige. “I chose green because the color is very similar to the trim in my parents’ kitchen,” the homeowner says. “The color ties in nicely with the funny little character of the house. It certainly has a personality.” h

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: In a shallow space near the entry of a Gladstone, Oregon, kitchen designed by Vicki Simon Interior Design, cabinetry built by Maple Key holds dishes, pantry items, and a coffee station. The marble countertop peeks out even when the doors are shut. The cheerful color is Yellow Green by Benjamin Moore. The refrigerator is snugged perfectly into the nook that previously held the range.


Simon tucked the range, hood, sink, and dishwasher into a spot formerly occupied solely by dish storage. The floating custom island, with a butcher-block top, does double duty as a work station and dining table. Stone tile in a herringbone pattern extends the backsplash all the way up the walls, adding a sense of scale. The brass fixtures are from Schoolhouse Electric.

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PRACTICAL LUXURY

Written by ALLISON SCHEFF : Photographed by JOHN GRANEN

WHEN THEIR HISTORIC 1924 HOME IN SEATTLE CAME DUE FOR A REFRESH, a family of five called on

A ball-foot brass washstand by Palmer, with a custom train rack, perches atop New Ravenna Newman stone mosaic tiles in a Seattle bathroom renovated by Marianne Simon Design. The glass enclosure in the adjoining shower keeps sightlines clear. The wall tiles, faucets, glass shelves, and shower fittings are all by Waterworks.

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interior designer Marianne Simon. Her mission in the bath shown here—used by the homeowners’ three sons— was to create a space that “not only looks classic and timeless but is handsome and functional,” she says. She maximized every inch of the 45-square-foot room, fitting a brass washstand by Palmer, two Bates sinks, and three RH medicine cabinets into a single corner. The metal and mirrored surfaces produce the illusion of more space, as does the small-format wall tile in a bright, pale palette and the transparent glass shower door and shelves. The finishes exude warmth and luxury, but they’re eminently practical, in deference to the boys who use the space every day. This is timeless design: a kids’ bathroom that’s simultaneously elegant, hardwearing, and all grown up. h


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REASONS

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radical traditions A DESIGNER AND A HOMEOWNER ARE RIGHT IN TUNE—BOTH IN THEIR LOVE OF PUNK ROCK AND IN THEIR GOAL OF RESCUING A HISTORIC SEATTLE COTTAGE FROM ’80S DESIGN PURGATORY. Written by RACHEL EGGERS : Photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Brian Paquette Interiors construction: Peak Contractors

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Designer Brian Paquette drew on his art-school education while curating pieces for a home he redesigned in Seattle’s Magnolia neighborhood. A dreamy yet haunting Megumi Shauna Arai photograph hangs above the Paquette-designed mohair sofa in the living room. Lighting throughout the room is by Apparatus, Workstead, and Arteriors, and the set of chairs is from Lawson-Fenning. graymag . com

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BELOW LEFT: Constructed in 1932, the whitewashed brick home had a natural coziness that Paquette didn’t want to lose. BELOW RIGHT: The original kitchen fixtures had to go, but Paquette retained the copper hood and repainted the cabinets in Down Pipe by Farrow & Ball.

“it

was very ’80s,” the Seattle-based founder of Brian Paquette Interiors says with a laugh. “Maroon and pink carpets, a kitchen covered in Portuguese tile and terra cotta, yellow paint everywhere—eesh.” Paquette’s talking about the “before” state of a recent project: a whitewashed brick home set charmingly atop a hill in Seattle’s Magnolia neighborhood. Built in 1932, the house boasted a stellar view of Elliott Bay and plenty of character, but it cried out for a thorough—and thoughtful—renovation. Brandon Ebel, president of Seattle’s Tooth & Nail Records, purchased the four-bedroom home in 2014 for himself and his three kids, ages 12, 10, and 7. The cottage was a big stylistic change for Ebel, who’d previously lived in large, modern spaces. “I go to New York on business a lot, and I love the Mercer and SoHo Grand hotels,” he says. “I like old buildings with a modern vibe that are comfortable and not too austere.” Ebel sought that balance in his new home, envisioning a cozy

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family retreat in which he could still comfortably entertain. He’d seen Paquette’s work in an acquaintance’s living room and admired its thoughtful arrangement. He and the designer met and clicked right away, bonding over their shared love of music (they still go to punk shows together). The design challenge, says Paquette, was to modernize the home while embracing its distinctive details. He kept the arched entryways, original doorknobs, and narrow leaded-glass windows intact and refinished the fir floors. The kitchen he gutted save for the original cabinets, now painted a dark gray-blue, and the richly patinaed copper hood. In the main bathroom, he replaced a giant jet tub with a glass-walled shower and covered the floors and walls in hexagon-tiled marble. But he left the original mirror, streaked with desilvering, alone. “I never try to bulldoze over the past,” says Paquette. “It’s fun to find ways to incorporate elements from all periods of a home’s life.” When it came to selecting new items, Paquette chose an assemblage of objects that feel as if they were gathered organically over a lifetime of changes, moves, and travel. »


“My work is either a study in neutrals and textures or it looks like a clown exploded. I don’t like anything in the middle.” —BRIAN PAQUETTE, DESIGNER

Original details—the arched entry, the leaded-glass windows— are juxtaposed against Paquette’s modern additions: custom neutral ombré curtains by Zak+Fox, a Lindsey Adelman chandelier, and a glossy black dining room table and Italian-vibe chairs with cocoa butter–colored leather padding, custom-made by Nickey Kehoe. The wallpaper is from Paquette’s 2015 collection for Studio Four NYC; its hand-drawn design was inspired by the pattern of a crumbling tile floor in a café in Nantes, France. graymag . com

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But in fact, Ebel previewed the items only in photos; Paquette says his client didn’t “see in person or sit in anything before it arrived. I mean, that takes a lot of trust.” Paquette specializes in this full-service design process—perfect for busy creatives like Ebel—and he doesn’t show clients endless swatches or work piece by piece. He reveals the full vision all at once. That vision came together as he outfitted Ebel’s home, channeling the client’s aesthetics and recalling their conversations about music, life, and art. “The Megumi Shauna Arai photo in the living room was the first ‘ah-ha!’ moment in the house,” says Paquette. “It’s aesthetically pleasing, of course, but the story behind the photo is actually about loss and moving on.” Paquette also chose a piece by Joe Rudko, whose artwork for

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Death Cab for Cutie’s 2015 album Kintsugi he and Ebel both admired. “In fact,” says Paquette, “the first concert Brandon and I saw together was Death Cab, at the Crocodile.” The predominant mood of the house is restraint. Paquette’s design philosophy eschews a clutter of objects and makes what is included—Roman blinds by Edit made of colorful hand-painted fabric for the girls’ room; a vintage-inspired Thomas O’Brien light in the powder room; hand-selected Heath Ceramics dishes in the kitchen—stand out all the more. “I’m interested in design down to the smallest detail,” says Paquette. “I’ll even pick out a client’s soap and hand towels.” The result: rooms that feel lived in, utterly unfussy, and yet obviously cared for. Like the best version of yourself. h


BELATHÉE PHOTOGRAPHY

The kids’ rooms get the same luxe treatment as the rest of the home— with custom-made headboards and original artwork—but the West Elm midcentury-style dressers nod to the practical. The various patterns of the Roman blinds throughout the home—with textiles by Edit, Lindsay Alker, Zak+Fox, and Clarence House—are seen again in cushions scattered around the rooms. “I like a lot of pattern,” says Paquette. “I was inspired by decorators like David Hicks.” OPPOSITE: The master bedroom is a symphony of earthy textures: a sage velvet “shelter” headboard by Cisco Home, grass-cloth wallpaper, and graphic textiles. “Here I wanted everything warm and soothing—just tone on tone on tone,” says Paquette. He custom designed the nightstand; the custom rug is by the Rug Company, and the chair is from Cisco Home.

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE: Tailored but with a relaxed atmosphere, the living room in a renovated Portland home invites visions of sparkling cocktail parties and intimate gatherings. Homeowner and stylist-designer Britney Renner has an affinity for mixing neutrals and metals and peppering surfaces with intriguing artistic bibelots, and it’s on full display in this room. The tan leather daybed is from CB2, the rug is from West Elm, and the coffee table is from Crate and Barrel. The arched bookshelves and charcoal daybed are from Four Hands. The formerly fusty fireplace got a sleek makeover with Carrera marble from Pental Granite & Marble, a vintage horse bridle–patterned fireplace screen, and a sunburst mirror from Abbyson Living.

DESIGN TEAM

interiors: House of Jude; Rose Bean Events & Design construction: Clark Built

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ALL THE HOME’S A STAGE

A set designer and an adventurous builder take an unscripted approach to a Portland remodel—and turn out refined interiors worth a standing ovation. Written by STACY KENDALL : Photographed by GEORGE BARBERIS

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ritney Renner knows how to create a look and a mood. She’s a pro stylist with a corporate-event design company who specializes in set design and high-end event rentals. However, the spaces she usually creates last only the length of a party, followed by immediate dismantling. Designing a space that’s meant to last—her own home, that is—was an entirely different challenge. After she and her husband, Adam, bought a 1960 colonial house in the hills of southwest Portland, she considered asking someone else to handle the interior design. “I was worried about pulling it off while working full-time at my business,” she admits. “But deep down I knew that I wanted to control how it came together.” So she sought out a creative ally in Soren Clark, an especially collaborative builder, and that gave

her the confidence to tackle the project herself. They worked together in an unusually casual and off-the-cuff way. Britney sketched out her ideas; Clark gave feedback and made them happen. “Adam and Britney were very communicative,” says Clark. “It was an organic process.” Over the course of a year, the 3,500-square-foot house took shape as Clark’s team combined two upstairs bedrooms into a master bedroom and removed a wall in the kitchen to open it to the family room. Meanwhile, Britney layered in an elegant mix of custom woodworking, metal finishes, dark paint, and dramatic artwork. The feedback from guests has been so overwhelmingly positive that the Renners plan to launch their own interiors company, House of Jude. Still, a stylist’s change-it-up habits die hard, even in one’s permanent home. “Every single day I move something around, however small,” Britney says. “It’s always a work in progress.” » graymag . com

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“I’m a firm believer in the 80/20 rule of interior design,” says Britney. “You have to go 80 percent modern and 20 percent traditional—or vice versa—to make a room work. Too much similarity is boring.” To that end, she swathed her formal dining room in the soft glow of Scalamandré’s Gold Moiré wallpaper, which contrasts with the midcentury stylings of the modern Industry West chairs. OPPOSITE: A Brutalist-inspired sideboard by Noir adds edgy texture. The white marble lamp is from West Elm, and the sunburst mirror is by DwellStudio. »

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The Renners’ showstopper of a kitchen features suspended brass-finish open shelving, cabinets painted in Farrow & Ball’s Lamp Room Grey and Black Blue, and an expansive PentalQuartz Calacatta island with a waterfall edge. The brass hardware is from Schoolhouse Electric. »

“I LIKE A FEW OVERSIZED PIECES IN EACH ROOM. LARGE PENDANTS OVER A KITCHEN ISLAND OR INDUSTRIAL-SIZED APPLIANCES IN A SMALL-SCALE KITCHEN CAN MAKE THINGS FEEL UNUSUAL AND INTERESTING.”

—BRITNEY RENNER, HOMEOWNER

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The glamorous office features a vintage desk and, behind it, signed Robert Longo prints, a gift from Adam that pays tribute to Britney’s nostalgic love for 1980s New York, where she used to live. The diminutive room is completely paneled in stained white oak, which gives it a jewel box–like feel. The rug is from West Elm. OPPOSITE: The door of a tiny first-floor powder room opens to reveal the unexpected drama of Cole & Son’s Palm Jungle wallpaper, a selection inspired by Britney’s admiration of the iconic palm print in the Beverly Hills Hotel. The sink and faucet are by Kingston Brass. h

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DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Jenny Martin Design construction: Jake Grypma Custom Woodworks engineering: Stantec architectural design: Studio DB3 landscape: Jonathan Craggs Garden Design millwork: Windebank Woodwork + Design cabinetry: Jason Good Custom Cabinets

A Victoria, British Columbia, home with interiors by Jenny Martin Design pairs industrial-inspired aesthetics with rustic influences drawn from the house’s Cadboro Bay site. Stainless-steel railings complement a fan-shaped system of exposed steel I-beams and fir trusses. A sliding glass wall system from Westek Windows & Doors recesses completely, connecting the living area to the patio. Martin commissioned custom noise-baffling panels from Acoustics West to mitigate sound bouncing off the home’s many hard surfaces. The sofa is from Flexform and the chair and ottoman are from B&B Italia.

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the right angles

A unique Japanese fan–shaped house on Vancouver Island makes the most of a triangular site’s epic views. Written by JORDAN MOOR : Photographed by JOSHUA LAWRENCE graymag . com

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ere’s a puzzle: A beachside site shaped like a scalene triangle needed an elegant building solution to address its terrestrial shortcomings. Builder Jake Grypma Custom Woodworks, a team of engineers, and architecture firm Studio DB3 collaboratively solved the challenge with a 4,000-square-foot house with nearly 360-degree views of Cadboro Bay. The genius design radiates from a single point on the site’s northwest edge, expanding out in every sense, from its 20-foot-high ceilings to its views of distant Discovery and Chatham islands beyond its living room windows. They poetically dubbed the solution “origami on the beach” because of the house plan’s resemblance to a Japanese fan. Interior designer Jenny Martin came on board early in construction, adding her own eye for angularity and drawing her influences from both the rugged landscape and the home’s exposed steel I-beams and fir trusses. To further echo the natural setting, her interiors deploy raw concrete floors, hand-sculpted glass, and ashy, beach fire–inspired tones. In the open-plan living room, plush contemporary furnishings counterbalance the crisp minimalism of the raked, vector-like overhead beams. “My clients had a lot of great furniture from their previous homes,” says Martin. “The biggest design challenge was to create seamless transitions among the spaces—figuring out where the floor patterns should stop and start, for example. The angular design was an opportunity to sketch interesting lines in the house, creating a composition that switches from hardwood to concrete and back again.” Upstairs, light shimmers through the treetops that screen one of the home’s two master suites (they’re identical in layout but located on different levels to offer either sea- or sky-level views). The upstairs bedroom reveals a Japanese aesthetic in its clean lines, deep soaking tub, and diagonally set oak flooring running seamlessly between bedroom and bathroom. “The clients became quite attached to the Zen feeling of the space,” says Martin. “With the elevation, you really have a feeling of being above it all: looking over the bed, down through the trees, and out toward the water.” That tree-fort sense of escape is enhanced by the site’s landscaping. Oak and arbutus trees soften the southeastern winds coming off the Strait of Juan de Fuca and serve as a strategic filter for shade and sunlight in all seasons. “The house is a sanctuary for us,” says the homeowner. “Not a day goes by that we don’t feel lucky to live here.” »

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE: The homeowners love to entertain, so Martin planned the kitchen with professional fixtures and plenty of space for prep and gatherings. The open-plan area features Hakwood floors, a BlueStar range, a Miele fridge and dishwasher, Caesarstone quartz countertops, and lacquered millwork by Windebank Woodwork + Design. A stainless-steel column in the center of the island conceals the sink’s plumbing, and the entire kitchen is illuminated by Niche Modern pendant lights, Tech Lighting cable lights, and Russell Lighting sconces.

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE:

Hakwood European oak floors extend from one of the home’s two master bedrooms to its en-suite bathroom. The dual vanity sink and soaking tub are from Wetstyle’s Cube collection, outfitted with Aquabrass hardware. A Japanese-style platform bed, designed by Martin and built by Jason Good Custom Cabinets, furthers the Asian aesthetic. The foliage of oak and arbutus trees surrounding the house offers privacy. h

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NATURE & NURTURE

Written by ALLISON SCHEFF : Photographed by PAUL GRDINA

WHEN ARCHITECTS BECOME THEIR OWN CLIENTS,

Minimalist design in a Squamish, British Columbia, kitchen puts the focus squarely on the unobstructed views of Stawamus Chief mountain. Cabinetry and pulls are from Ikea, the dining room table and chairs are from Country Furniture, and the pendants are from EQ3 and Bocci.

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they can fully express their personal tastes and proclivities. Witness the home that Andreas Kaminski and Jayne Song of AKA Architecture + Design created for themselves in Squamish, British Columbia. Here the couple’s high-contrast, minimalist kitchen showcases their firm’s guiding principles: clean lines, spare design choices, and an embrace of each home’s unique natural environment. Wherever possible, the design is streamlined; the kitchen’s exhaust fan is hidden in a row of white Ikea cabinets, cabinet pulls are subtle tabs, and a frosted glass window serves as a backsplash. White Caesarstone quartz countertops around the kitchen’s perimeter contrast with the dark window frames, while the island’s light-gray countertop creates an easy gradation between the strong black and white tones. Large windows grant unobstructed views of the Stawamus Chief, a granite dome in the Coast Mountains. The expanse of glass and the serene design exert a magnetic pull on the home’s inhabitants. “We often gather in the kitchen to observe birds, beavers, bears, and other wildlife,” says Song. “We’ve enjoyed front-row seats to double rainbows, spectacular thunderstorms, and many peaceful evenings.” h


interior design

MAISON INC Award-winning interior design.

Si n ce 20 0 1

Full service kitchen/bath design.

1611 NW Northrup

Por tland

Custom furnishings and cabinetry.

503.295.01 51

maisoninc.com

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WORK AROUND

The Northwest’s best-designed coworking spaces reflect the shifting zeitgeist.

DID YOU GET THE MEMO? The way we work is changing, and where we work is, too. Rising numbers of creative entrepreneurs and freelancers, along with advances in seamless mobile technology and team communication apps, have sparked interest in nontraditional office settings, particularly coworking spaces. Just as bigger, more established companies have embraced design as a critical tool for employee recruitment and retention—people want to work in memorable, functional, well-considered spaces—shared workspaces, too, have stepped up their design game to attract discerning solopreneurs and startups. From boosting productivity to fostering creative collaboration, the best new workspaces prove that good design is good business. Here we present six of the Northwest’s unique new coworking spaces—all as culturally compelling as they are aesthetically appealing—plus companion product roundups that capture the fun, future-focused spirit of their interiors. »

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CHRIS EDEN WITH EDEN PHOTOGRAPHY

At Seattle’s Coterie Worklounge, an elegant shared workspace in a former bank, a variety of private nooks and meeting spaces are available to members on a first-come, firstserved basis.


W O R K S P AC E WITH INSCAPE

THE NEW WAY TO WORK CONTRACT GRADE • MODERN STYLE • WESTELMWORKSPACE.COM NOW OPEN IN SEATTLE, BY APPOINTMENT • SEATTLE @ WESTELMWORKSPACE.COM COMING SOON TO PORTLAND • PORTLAND @ WESTELMWORKSPACE.COM for information on both showrooms, call 206.267.1597

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“COWORKING SPACES ARE POPULAR BECAUSE THEY ALLOW INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS TO GET HEAD-DOWN TIME WITHOUT FEELING ISOLATED. PEOPLE CRAVE THAT ‘ALONE TOGETHER’ EXPERIENCE.” —JOSLYN BALZARINI, INTERIOR DESIGNER, B+H ARCHITECTS

COTERIE WORKLOUNGE DISTINGUISHING DESIGN: Carved out of a former bank in the heart of downtown Seattle, Coterie Worklounge is a grown-up version of your typical millennial coworking space. Founded by Seattle entrepreneurs Leah Richmond and Su-Zette Sparks, the 11,516-square-foot, two-level establishment exudes a comfortable yet elegant feel. Picture a grand residence with a sweeping staircase, clusters of leather furniture, an ornate chandelier over the in-house bar, and coffered ceiling beams painted French gray. Now picture it filled with businesspeople bent over their laptops. Coterie has no reserved desks or offices, so there’s a communal vibe and plenty of opportunities to meet—and be inspired by— other members working across a variety of creative fields. »

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CHRIS EDEN WITH EDEN PHOTOGRAPHY

DESIGNED BY: B+H Architects; built by My-Way Construction


Everybody should love their work chair.

Portland Seattle Orange County Los Angeles

503.205.2200 206.435.7700 949.724.9449 310.726.9067

interiorofficesolutions.com graymag . com

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THE CLOUD ROOM DESIGNED BY: Graham Baba Architects with interiors by Dunn + Hobbes

Cloud Studios

One floor below, the new Cloud Studios, designed by Best Practice Architecture, offers Cloud Room members a podcast recording studio and seven band practice rooms with raw, punky interiors that reference the building’s 30-year history as a mecca for Seattle bands.

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FROM TOP: SHOAL FAZLUDDIN; RAFAEL SOLDI

DISTINGUISHING DESIGN: The brainchild of local developer Liz Dunn of Dunn + Hobbes, the Cloud Room—set in a loft-like space in Capitol Hill’s Chophouse Row building—has become a perch for many Seattle creatives (GRAY staff included). Atypical workspace features, such as a BBQ and firepit on the deck and a white baby grand piano in the lounge, mark an environment that’s as conducive to play as it is to work. A section of reserved desks offers fixed addresses for members while communal tables and lounge areas allow for a musical-chair approach to the workday. Sprinkled amid the West Elm and Herman Miller furniture are locally sourced accents, including wallpaper by Brian Paquette and Disc Scraplights by Graypants. A diverse member roster fosters a cross-disciplinary, friendly mood; here, you’re as likely to sit next to a choreographer as a computer programmer. »


We believe in the power of design to inspire people to do their best work.

Knoll Seattle 1200 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2000 Seattle, WA 98101 206 652-2786 | knoll.com graymag . com

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“OUR OPEN PLAN WAS A DELIBERATE DECISION. THE AVIARY IS ABOUT COMMUNITY, WHICH DOESN’T HAPPEN BEHIND CLOSED DOORS.” —ANDREA MCLEAN, COFOUNDER AND INTERIOR DESIGNER

THE AVIARY

DISTINGUISHING DESIGN: McLean and Cheung Boyland met 13 years ago in architecture school. Working in open studios as students—“intense and stressful, yet inspirational and social,” says McLean of those years—informed their approach to the Aviary. The 1,800-square-foot space, a former art gallery on a burgeoning East Vancouver block, is designed explicitly to lure creatives with its open plan and thoughtful perks. Unique amenities include ample pin-up space for mood boarding and project overviews, rolls of tracing paper in the meeting room, a reading lounge with design books and periodicals, and a design and resource library complete with the latest material samples, including stone, tile, and wood. To promote socializing and collaboration, the Aviary hosts workshops dedicated to jewelry-making, calligraphy, and other artistic pursuits. The street-level gallery window displays members’ work; a recent exhibit featured artist Zoë Pawlak, woodworker Jeff Martin, and lighting designer Matthew McCormick. »

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PHOTOS COURTESY EMA PETER; STYLING BY LAURA MELLING

DESIGNED BY: Cofounders Andrea McLean, an interior designer, and Stella Cheung Boyland, a designer trained in architecture and engineering


Welcome to the Era of Ideas.

The Catalyst Loft is an innovation environment for the future of workplace. Accelerating the transformation of workplace into the most engaging places for people to work, learn, heal, collaborate and generate ideas, we are‌ www.catalystactivation.com/the-loft

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KABUNI HOUSE DESIGNED BY: Ryleah Resler, Tina Dhillon, and Brooke Hatfield; built by Turner Construction DISTINGUISHING DESIGN: Vancouver’s futuristic 3,000-square-foot Kabuni House is uniquely geared towards designers, makers, architects, artists, and realtors. The open-plan office provides the latest technology (such as computers and tablets loaded with cutting-edge design software) for client and team presentations, and features the one-of-kind, holographic Dream Room, a 3D-projected space that lets you play with home furnishing products from the Kabuni app’s catalogue in a virtual setting. Entering the two-story space, guests are greeted with furniture vignettes and art installations—a chance to check out local wares IRL.

L’ATELIER DESIGNED BY: MaK Interiors; built by Fifth Element Construction DISTINGUISHING DESIGN: Amber Kingsnorth of Vancouver’s MaK Interiors forwent Gastown’s typical “darker style” in her design of L’Atelier, opting instead for a brighter look she calls “happy industrial.” Here, that means mint-hued custom lighting from Barnlight Electric, sunny yellow Bend chairs, and navy blue upholstery and accent walls. Together with a fleet of Herman Miller Sayl chairs and Steelcase file cabinets outfitted with padded tops for impromptu deskside meetings, L’Atelier aims to attract “all kinds of design-savvy entrepreneurs,” says Kingsnorth. “We wanted to create a space that they would be proud to show off and call their own.”

CENTRL OFFICE DISTINGUISHING DESIGN: “We wanted furniture you could see in your house as easily as you’d see it in an office,” says Amy Sorensen, Centrl Office’s associate community manager. To that end, modular couches and ocean-blue velvet cube chairs pepper the 22,000-square-foot space, which spans two floors of the newly renovated 1940s GE Supply Building in Portland’s Pearl District. Exposed bow trusses, polished concrete floors, custom private phone booths, and glass-and-steel “cubicles” complement the building’s industrial aesthetic. This fall, Centrl will expand to a second location on the east side, in the striking Works Partnership Architecture–designed Block 75 building. h

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FROM TOP: JENNILEE MARIGOMEN; FREE ADMISSION PHOTOGRAPHY; HOLLY ANDRES

DESIGNED BY: Don Mutal and Path Construction


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The Look:

MINIMAL

No distractions here—just pure, enlightened motivation with the look of the moment.

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1. Bianco pendants, available from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, Portland, mgbwhome .com. 2. Wire planters by Norm Architects, available from Design Within Reach, Seattle and Portland, dwr.com. 3. LessThanFive chair by Coalesse by Steelcase, available from OpenSquare, Seattle, open-sq.com. 4. Fern chair by Hayworth, available to the trade from Interior Office Solutions, Seattle and Portland, interioroffice solutions.com. 5. Prism lounge chair and ottoman by David Adjaye for Knoll, available from Livingspace, Vancouver, livingspace.com. 6. Centro Desk, available from Alchemy Collections, Seattle, alchemycollections.com.


Architectural Planters for Commercial and Residential Applications Full Design Services Available 517 E Pike Street Seattle WA 98122 206.329.4737

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The Look:

MODERN

1. Urban wall clock with stand by Lemnos, available from Ă–rling & Wu, Vancouver, orling andwu.com. 2. Kaari shelf by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Artek, available from Inform Interiors, Seattle and Vancouver, informseattle.com and informinteriors.com. 3. Ode floor lamp by Industrial Facility for Herman Miller, available from Hive Modern, Portland, hivemodern. com. 4. Standard SR chair, ProuvĂŠ RAW Office Edition by G-Star RAW + Vitra, available from Inform Contract, Vancouver, inform contract.com. 5. Modern credenza by West Elm Workspace, available to the trade from Objekts, Seattle, objektsllc.com. 6. Desk 1017, available from EWF Modern, Portland, ewfmodern.com.

Get down to business with midcentury style that nods to the heyday of the workplace.

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Clamp Chair Andreas Kowalewski SAVVYCD.COM

206.860.7600

DESIGNS OF STAINLESS STEEL

www.karcher-design.com 844.858.2033 graymag . com

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The Look:

GLAM

All work and no style make for a dull room. Genteel details with a dash of drama are the antidote to monotony.

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1. Wade lamp by Arteriors, available from Maison Inc., Portland, maisoninc.com. 2. Ethereal rug by Tamarian Carpets, available from Driscoll Robbins, Seattle, driscollrobbins.com. 3. Judy Bust Statue, available from CB2, Vancouver, cb2.com. 4. Marsden chair by Lawson-Fenning for RH Modern, available from RH Seattle, the Gallery at University Village (opens November 2016), rhmodern .com. 5. Reclaimed American elm table with whitewash finish and satin brass base, available from Urban Hardwoods, Seattle, urbanhardwoods.com.

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HOME FURNISHINGS SHOWROOM INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES ORGANIC MODERN AESTHETIC

EWFMODERN.COM

1122 NW GLISAN ST., PORTLAND, OR 97209

T. 503.295.7336

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HOT. NEW. NEXT. REASON TO SUBSCRIBE NO. 31:

Issue releases December 2016. We’ll deliver it to your mailbox. Subscribe online by Nov. 4. graymag.com

#GRAYMAGAZINE

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| resources | 27. SCENE Black Butte Ranch Sisters, OR blackbutteranch.com

42. PEOPLE Krownlab Portland krownlab.com

Hacker

Urban Industrial NW

Westeck Windows & Doors

Vicki Simon Interior Design

Windebank Woodwork + Design

Portland (503) 737-8541

Vancouver, B.C., Kirkland, WA, and Victoria, B.C. westeckwindows.com

Portland vickisimoninteriordesign.com

Victoria, B.C. windebank.ca

68. RENOVATION Marianne Simon Design

90. RENOVATION AKA Architecture + Design

Vancouver plyarchitecture.com

Bellevue, WA mariannesimondesign.com

Squamish, B.C. aka-arch.ca

Livestock Vancouver deadstock.ca

Tight Club Athletics Vancouver tightclubathletics.com

Toth Construction

Caesarstone

Lukas Peet Design

Tinto Creative

Portland hackerarchitects.com

Kirby Nagelhout Construction Bend, OR kirbynagelhout.com

44. RENOVATION Gamla Bowen Island, B.C. gamla.ca

Ply Architecture 28. RETAIL

Vancouver lukaspeet.com

30. HAPPENINGS AIA aia.org

Bend Design 2016 Bend, OR benddesign.org

Brian Paquette at Home Seattle brianpaquetteinteriors.com

Vancouver tintocreative.com

50. RENOVATION 604 Records Vancouver 604records.com Vancouver darcyjones.com

Peregrine General Contracting Vancouver pgcenterprises.com

Foreign National

Seattle foreignnationalbar.com

Portland centurybarpdx.com

Museum of Vancouver

Lightning Bar Collective

Vancouver museumofvancouver.ca

Portland lightningbarcollectivepdx.com

Tacoma Art Museum Tacoma, WA tacomaartmuseum.org

Walker Macy

Portland and Seattle walkermacy.com

WestEdge Design Fair Santa Monica, CA westedgedesignfair.com

36. FASHION Carlos Scanagatta Seattle carloscanagatta.com

38. FASHION Seattle Art Museum Seattle seattleartmuseum.org

58. RENOVATION Alinda Morris Interior Design Gig Harbour, WA alindamorrisinteriordesign.com

Kentwood

Seattle (206) 604-5532

76. ALL THE HOME’S A STAGE Clark Built Portland clarkbuilt.net

Portland and Seattle pentalonline.com

Rose Bean Events & Design Portland rosebeanevents.com

84. THE RIGHT ANGLES B&B Italia Seattle bebitalia.com

Caesarstone Burnaby, B.C. caesarstone.ca

Level Contracting

Jason Good Custom Cabinets

Seattle levelcontracting.com

Victoria, B.C. jasongoodcabinets.com

Wood-Works Cabinetry & Design

Jenny Martin Design

Seattle woodworksseattle.com

hakwood.com

Victoria, B.C. jennymartindesign.com

Jonathan Craggs Garden Design Victoria, B.C. jcraggsgardendesign.com

66. RENOVATION Maple Key Portland 503-201-2551

Vancouver eq3.com

True Pacific Construction Squamish, B.C. truepacificconstruction.com

Peak Contractors

Vancouver kentwoodfloors.com

Portland schoolhouseelectric.com graymag graymag. .com com

Seattle brianpaquetteinteriors.com

Hakwood

Schoolhouse Electric

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70. RADICAL TRADITIONS Brian Paquette Interiors

Pental Granite & Marble 54. RENOVATION Century Bar

Burnaby, B.C. caesarstone.ca

EQ3

D’Arcy Jones Architecture

Brooks Running Company Seattle brooksrunning.com

Seattle tothconstruction.com

Russell Lighting Burnaby, B.C. russell-lighting.com

Studio DB3

North Saanich, B.C. studiodb3.ca

92. WORKSPACE Best Practice Architecture Seattle bestpracticearchitecture.com

B+H Architects Seattle bharchitects.com

Centrl Office

Portland centrloffice.com

Coterie Worklounge Seattle coterieworklounge.com

Dunn + Hobbes

Seattle dunnandhobbes.com

Fifth Element Construction Vancouver fifthelementconstruction.ca

Graham Baba Architects Seattle grahambabaarchitects.com

Kabuni House Vancouver kabuni.com

L’Atelier Vancouver Vancouver ateliervancouver.com

- Interiors MaK Vancouver makinteriors.ca

My-Way Construction Redmond, WA my-wayconstruction.com

Path Construction Portland (503) 302-6286


HOTEL LUCIA Portland

HOTEL DELUXE Portland

SENTINEL Portland

HOTEL MURANO Tacoma

HOTEL MAX Seattle

HOTEL THEODORE Seattle - Summer 2017

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| resources | The Aviary Vancouver theaviary.ca

The Cloud Room

114. OBSESSIONS Pratt & Larson Tile Portland prattandlarson.com

Seattle cloudroomseattle.com AD INDEX

8. AIA 102. WORKSPACE Alchemy Collections Seattle alchemycollections.com

Design Within Reach Seattle and Portland dwr.com

Driscoll Robbins Seattle Driscollrobbins.com

EWF Modern

Portland ewfmodern.com

Hive

Portland hivemodern.com

Inform Contract Vancouver informcontract.com

Inform Interiors

Seattle and Vancouver informseattle.com informinteriors.com

Interior Office Solutions Seattle and Portland interiorofficesolutions.com

Livingspace

Vancouver livingspace.com

Maison Inc.

Portland maisoninc.com

Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams Portland mgbwhome.com

Objekts

Seattle objektsllc.com

OpenSquare Seattle open-sq.com

Örling & Wu

Vancouver orlingandwu.com

RH Modern

Seattle rhmodern.com

Urban Hardwoods Seattle urbanhardwoods.com

West Elm Workspace westelmworkspace.com

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aia.org

57. Alchemy Collections Seattle alchemycollections.com camerichseattle.com

37. American Indian College Fund americanindiancollegefund.org

2. ATG Stores atgstores.com

59. Big Daddy’s Antiques Seattle bdantiques.com

107. Builders’ Hardware & Supply Seattle and Bellevue, WA builders-hardware.com

99. Catalyst Workplace Activation

Seattle catalystactivation.com/the-loft

61. Chown Hardware

Portland and Bellevue, WA chown.com

39. Design Lecture Series Seattle designlectur.es

7. Design Within Reach

4. Hive

9. Roche Bobois

19. Hoedemaker Pfeiffer Seattle hoedemakerpfeiffer.com

17. Room & Board

109. IDS Toronto

47. Royal Building Products

Portland hivemodern.com

interiordesignshow.com

95. IOS

Seattle and Portland interiorofficesolutions.com

20. Issaquah Cedar & Lumber Issaquah, WA cedarexperts.com

105. Karcher Design karcher-design.com

35. KBIS kbis.com

97. Knoll Seattle knoll.com

105. Kozai Modern Vancouver kozaimoderntrade.com

29. Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushrugs.com

18. Lapchi Rug Design Studio Portland lapchi.com

69. Lindal Cedar Homes lindal.com/systems Available through:

Seattle duckys.com

107. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com

115. The Fixture Gallery Multiple locations thefixturegallery.com

44. Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery Multiple PNW locations fergusonshowrooms.com

14. Haiku by Big Ass Solutions haikuhome.ca/gray16

Seattle savvycd.com

21. Schuchart/Dow Seattle schuchartdow.com

53. The Shade Store Seattle and Portland theshadestore.com

26. Turgeon Raine Jewelers Seattle turgeonraine.com

11. 65. Sub-Zero and Wolf Available through:

Bradlee Distributors Seattle subzero.com/seattle

Arnold’s Appliance arnoldsappliance.com

Basco

bascoappliances.com

Eastbank Contractor Appliance eastbankappliance.com

Judd & Black Appliance juddblack.com

31. Tufenkian

116. Urban Hardwoods

Seattle lundgrenenterprises.com

103. Ducky’s Office Furniture

105. Savvy Cabinetry by Design

Seattle Cedar Homes

warmmodernliving.com

15. Distinct Interiors

Seattle dovetailgc.com

expressionofwow.com

Portland tufenkianportland.com

lindal.com/seattlecedar

10. Dovetail General Contractors

Seattle roomandboard.com

Warmmodern Living Bellevue

Seattle and Portland dwr.com Vancouver distinctinteriors.net

Seattle and Portland roche-bobois.com

63. Lundgren Enterprises

107. Madera Furniture Company Tacoma, WA maderafurnitureco.com

91. Maison Inc. Portland maisoninc.com

49. Metropolist Real Estate

Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles urbanhardwoods.com

33. Van Gogh Designs Surrey, B.C. and Mississauga, ON vangoghdesigns.com

34. WestEdge Design Fair Santa Monica, CA westedgedesignfair.com

93. West Elm Workspace Seattle and Portland westelmworkspace.com

Seattle metropolistgroup.com/real-estate

99. ZINC Art + Object

101. Opus Hotel

ZINC contemporary

Vancouver opushotel.com

6. Parterre

Seattle parterreseattle.com

111. Provenance Hotels provenancehotels.com

103. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com

Edmonds, WA

Seattle zincartobject.com


| market | THE ULTIMATE BUYER’S GUIDE

Fran’s Chocolates

ZINC Art + Object / ZINC contemporary

Considered one of the best chocolatiers in the U.S., Fran’s Chocolates offers elegant presentations of award-winning chocolates for every occasion. Each confection is handmade in small batches with the finest local and organic ingredients to reflect a passion for exquisite flavors and the pure taste of chocolate. Visit us online or at at one of our four Seattle-area retail stores: Downtown, Georgetown, University Village, and Bellevue.

ZINC Art + Object: Modern furniture, contemporary art, and curated gifts. Located in the waterfront town of Edmonds, just 15 minutes from Seattle. NEW! ZINC contemporary gallery, located in Seattle’s Pioneer Square. Join us August 4th from 5–9 pm for a reception celebrating our inaugural exhibition, VERGE.

franschocolates.com

Stillwater Dwellings Rooted in contemporary Pacific Northwest design, Stillwater Dwellings’ homes are built using a systems-based sustainable construction method that provides design flexibility and cost predictability. The Stillwater team is with you every step of the way, from determining building site feasibility to personalizing finish options. Start with one of over 20 floor plans available, or have us design a custom home just for you. 3950 6th Avenue N.W., Seattle, WA 98107 | (206) 547-0565 stillwaterdwellings.com

ZINC Art + Object, 3rd & Main, Edmonds, WA ZINC contemporary, 119 Prefontaine Pl. S., Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA Visit ZINCArtObject.com for hours, shopping, and event schedule.

not2big® React. Reduce. Rethink. Recycle. Relax. At not2big, we build modern artisan furniture and accessories one piece at a time. Handcrafted and individually numbered, no two pieces are exactly alike. Our designs combine the warmth of wood with a creative mix of other materials to produce timeless furniture that is functional and beautiful. Whether you choose an in-house design or a custom piece, it will be a true original. Our goal is to inspire, delight, and surprise, bringing our clients a personalized experience and providing them with a unique product not available anywhere else. We’re rethinking how furniture is made. (425) 503-0710 | not2big.com

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| obsession |

WHY I COLLECT WHITE ARTS AND CRAFTS POTTERY By MICHAEL PRATT, COFOUNDER, PRATT & LARSON TILE Photographed by HANK DREW

“My wife, Reta, and I started collecting white Arts and Crafts pottery in the early ’80s, around the time I transitioned from being a studio potter to a tile maker. We were drawn to its aesthetic—especially to curvilinear, fluted pieces with handles that seem to flow off them rather than looking tacked on. These vessels are all about the strength of their silhouettes: their ogee curves and their long, graceful straight lines. They continue to influence our tile designs, and we refer to them when we make fluted curves, shims, and architectural moldings. They reflect the notion that pervades our design outlook: Keep it focused; keep it simple.” h

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WHAT’S YOUR DESIGN OBSESSION? Write to us at submissions@ graymag.com See others at graymag.com/obsession


ELEVATE YOUR BATH

STATELY & CLASSIC

A tribute to the art of decorative detail perfected by the skilled artisans and A tribute to the art of decorative detail perfected by the skilled artisans and craftsmen at the turn of the century. The St. George Collection is stately, sculptural, craftsmen at the turn of the century. The St. George Collection is stately, and and well-proportioned. St.balance George bathroom fixtures marry flowing curves with Style substance strike a perfect in the bathroom faucet collections from American StandardÂŽ. sculptural, and well-proportioned. St. George bathroom fixtures marry sculpted to provide that classic architectural St. George collection Our faucets ridges are engineered to look beautiful and function flawlessly.feel. Worry-free, drip-free and built to last, flowing curves with sculpted ridges to provideand thatbathrom classic architectural feel. products include toilets, freestanding bathrubs, sinks. Come in today all of our bathroom faucets are covered by our Limited Lifetime Warranty on function and finish. Designed St. George collection products includekitchen toilets,&freestanding bathtubs, and to speak with one of our knowledgeable bath consultants. to create an elegant and luxurious bathroom focal point, our freestanding tubs come in a variety of styles bathroom sinks. Come in today to speak with one of our knowledgeable and are made to fit in the space of an average-sized bathroom. kitchen & bath consultants. Tigard Showroom Bendone Showroom Salem Showroom Eugene Showroom Come in today to speak with of our knowledgeable kitchen & bath consultants 7337 S.W. Kable Lane 503-620-7050

20625 Brinson Blvd. 541-382-1999

2710 S.E. Pringle Rd., #110 503-779-2882

110 N. Garfield 541-688-7621

Seattle Showroom Pacific Showroom 8221 Greenwood Ave. N. 703 Valentine Ave S.E. 206-632-4488 253-299-7156

See our new website THEFIXTUREGALLERY.COM

at Consolidated Supply Co.

Like us on Facebook

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FINE FURNITURE FROM SALVAGED TREES

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SEATTLE

SAN FRANCISCO

LOS ANGELES

URBANHARDWOODS.COM

GRAY No. 30  

Pacific Northwest Design

GRAY No. 30  

Pacific Northwest Design