Page 1

INTERIORS • ARCHITECTURE • FASHION • ART • DESIGN ™

INTERIOR DESIGN SHOW WEST

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest

2015

PREVIEW GUIDE

ISSUE NO. 23:

A STUDY IN CONTRASTS FURNITURE meets FASHION URBAN DEVELOPMENT meets DECAY ART meets NATURE TRADITIONAL meets MODERN

MINIMA

LISM

meets O

PULEN

RE

FIN

ED

me

ets

RU

S

BL

A

CK

ee

m ts

H

W


bloomy armchair, 2002 patricia urquiola - supernatural chair, 2005 ross lovegrove - made in italy by moroso

please inquire about our A&D trade program


moroso carl moroso hansen carlvitra hansen fritz hansen vitra fritzkartell hansen bensen kartell herman bensenmiller herman knoll miller flos knoll artekflos artifort artekfoscarini artifort moooi foscarinimontis moooi and montis more!and more!


MAXALTO IS A B&B ITALIA BRAND. COLLECTION COORDINATED BY ANTONIO CITTERIO. WWW.MAXALTO.IT

B&B ITALIA AND MAXALTO STORE SEATTLE BY DIVA GROUP: 1300 WESTERN AVENUE SEATTLE, WA 98101 - T. 206.287.9992 WWW.DIVAFURNITURESEATTLE.COM - SEATTLE@DIVAFURNITURE.COM

4

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

p.c. studio - photo tommaso sartori

DIVA GROUP


Open Monday - Friday 9-5 4129 Stone Way N, Seattle, WA 98103 Appointments: (206) 388-0762 Service & Installation: (206) 633-1700

bestplumbing.com GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

5


Amanda Hamilton

Orlando Soria Sat Sept 26, 3pm, Caesarstone Stage

Complimentary trade registration now open Purchase your tickets online at IDSwest.com

Tommy Smythe Sun Sept 27, 1pm, Caesarstone Stage

#IDSwest Vancouver Convention Centre West

6

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Sholto Scruton

Jonathan Adler Potter, Designer and Author Sat Sept 26, 1pm, Caesarstone Stage

Ben Barber

Thurs Sept 24 Opening Night Party Sponsors

Fri Sept 25 Miele Trade Day

Sat Sept 26 General Admission

Sun Sept 27 General Admission Produced by

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

7


cont 36

47

60

august september.15

12. hello

Local pride.

SCENE

25. news

Japanese artist Chiho Aoshima’s solo exhibition at the Seattle Asian Art Museum pulsates with contrasting themes of hope and destruction.

26. news

Catch design news, see why quilts are in, find new sources for modern ceramics, and check out the style rules four designers would never break.

34. profile

Martha Sturdy, grand dame of artistic furniture and accessory design, has a new collection inspired by a ubiquitous material on her Pemberton, B.C., farm.

8

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

36. news

Snøhetta, the Oslo and New York– based architecture firm, reveals a plan to transform a derelict parking lot in Portland into a lively public market.

40. context

From America to Cuba to China, architectural photographer Nic Lehoux uncovers the hidden beauty and complexity within dystopian landscapes.

STYLE 47. shop

Something new for Seattle’s Capitol Hill: a men’s sneaker shop run by two shoe-obsessed New Yorkers and designed by architecture firm Best Practice.

51. fashion

A triumph of fashion and furnishings: 10 local designers’ fall 2015 creations, shot at the Bellevue Arts Museum’s “The New Frontier” exhibition, push Northwest style forward.

60. interiors

Lake views and sleek lines reanimate a Lake Oswego home made over by Vanillawood.

FEATURES 100. dark star

Opulent design, black walls, and miles of marble distinguish a moody, inwardlooking home in the Portland hills.


tents 100

106. trust the process

An artist-and-producer couple take an intentionally hands-off approach to the design of their new White Rock home.

114. island spirit

A rustic British Columbia cabin is transformed into an elegant family compound by architect D’Arcy Jones.

BACK OF BOOK 121. the new traditional

Modern proportions, fresh interior concepts, and streamlined forms put a new shine on traditional design. Take inspiration from four homes and eight pieces that update the concept of “classic.”

146

154

146. architecture

154. architecture

Fashion meets furniture. Northwest design stars shine brightly in GRAY’s exclusive shoot. Top, Portland Garment Factory; pants, Lift Label; ring, Casa Malaspina. Captain’s chair by Phloem Studio.

A hilltop Oregon home is built with the greenest of design goals: longevity.

It’s no movie set—this Olson Kundig– designed workspace really is where lawyers and cybercrime experts hunt down online scams and predators.

158. resources

Your guide to the designers, shops, furnishings, craftspeople, and suppliers featured in this issue.

162. my northwest

Kate Harmer of Hum Creative finds community and design inspiration in Seattle’s Pioneer Square.

On the Cover

SEE PAGE

51

142. architecture

Blackwell Architectures’ modern design for a Vancouver horse stable should win Best in Show. GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

9


25 W

AR

YEAR

WWW.DEKTON.COM

RAN

T

Y

RAFA NADAL

DEKTON. UNLIMITED. INDOOR & OUTDOOR SURFACES

COLOR SHOWN: COUNTERTOPS & FIREPLACE AURA FLOORING ZENITH

To be the best you have to play without limits while outplaying the competition. That’s why DEKTON is for those who strive for the best of the best. It is the clear option for indoor and outdoor spaces, including kitchens, flooring and walls. DEKTON offers unprecedented performance by being stain, scratch, scorch, and UV resistant. Availabe in large format slabs - allows for integrated design.

DEKTON IS UNLIMITED Cosentino Center Vancouver 152-8518 Glenlyon Parkway V5J 0B6 Burnaby, BC (604) 431-8568

10

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

11


hello

BELATHÉE PHOTOGRAPHY

local pride

“The Northwest has the hard-to-obtain cool factor. And as long as we are really immersed in an honest life that does not follow trends and keeps its rebellious spirit, the Northwest will maintain a style identity all its own.” —MICHELE ANDREWS, STYLIST (SEE GRAY’S FASHION STORY, PAGE 51)

When a pair of New Yorkers moved to Seattle, they realized their longtime fantasy project: opening a high-design men’s shoe shop (Likelihood, profiled on page 47). They had an aesthetic in mind: “Simple, warm, and classic, with pockets of quirkiness.” For us at GRAY, that description resonates—if we had to encapsulate the essence of Pacific Northwest design right now, in eight words, we couldn’t do much better. It’s an exhilarating moment for design on the Left Coast. For a long time, the spotlight has been fixed on this region’s food culture. Now a parallel fascination with its design community has emerged. Pacific Northwest designers, working across a broad range of disciplines—from furniture to architecture to fashion— are commanding the global stage. They are not only participating in the conversation but leading the way, with a distinctive style, an inventive spirit, and a veneration of the handcrafted that’s all their own. Building something fresh doesn’t always mean breaking new ground. This issue of GRAY celebrates the creatives who plumb the past to develop breathtakingly new interpretations and forms. Whether they are remaking quilt design (page 32), re-envisioning a derelict parking lot (page. 36), reshaping the local fashion scene (page 51), or redefining regional architecture with unabashed opulence (page 100), they are the modern design vanguard, and we are proud to call them locals. For a deep dive into the West Coast design scene, we hope you’ll join us at Interior Design Show West in Vancouver from September 24 to 27, where designers from near and far will come together to showcase their work (see page 67 for our exclusive preview guide). As we did last year, GRAY will have its own corner of the show floor, with our stunning GRAY Conversations Stage and Lounge designed by Jen Hawk of Occupy Design. Come join the conversation!

Jaime Gillin, Editorial Director jaime@graymag.net

Overheard on social media “...I THOUGHT I’D CHALLENGE MYSELF TO CREATE THE LARGEST COLOR SPECTRUM I COULD FROM WHAT WAS CURRENTLY ALREADY IN MY KITCHEN. #FOODGRADIENTS —@WRIGHTKITCHEN

12

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

Follow us #GRAYMAGAZINE

FACEBOOK graymag INSTAGRAM gray_magazine PINTEREST gray_magazine TWITTER gray_magazine


A MERICAN - MADE CL ASSIC CO NT E M PO R A RY H OM E F U R NIS H IN GS

Macalester sofa, $2499; Chilton cocktail table, $1799; Chamber lamp, $649. University Village 2675 NE University Village Street, Seattle roomandboard.com GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

13


FOUNDER + PUBLISHER

Shawn Williams shawn@graymag.net EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Jaime Gillin jaime@graymag.net SPECIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR

Stacy Kendall stacy@graymag.net EDITOR

Rachel Gallaher rachel@graymag.net EDITOR AT LARGE

Lindsey M. Roberts lindsey@graymag.net LANDSCAPE AND CULTURE EDITOR

Debra Prinzing debra@graymag.net MARKET EDITOR

Jasmine Vaughan jasmine@graymag.net ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Nicole Munson nicole@graymag.net ASSISTANT EDITOR

Courtney Ferris courtney@graymag.net PORTLAND CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Brian Libby COPY EDITOR

Laura Harger ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER

Tally Williams INTERNS

Laura Aguilera-Flemming, Nessa Pullman CONTRIBUTORS

Timothy Aguero, Michele Andrews, William Anthony, Tracey Ayton, Lincoln Barbour, Ali Bayse, Belathée Photography, Sama Jim Canzian, Lauren Colton, Josh Dalquist, Andrew Doran, Erinn Gleeson, Jon Jensen, Nic Lehoux, Aaron Leitz, Sarah Morse/ Heffner Management, Janis Nicolay, David Papazian, Josh Partee, Ema Peter, Charlie Schuck, Nate Watters, Jamyrlyn Wright Mallory ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Craig Allard Miller Erica Clemeson

ADVERTISING: shawn@graymag.net SUBMISSIONS: submissions@graymag.net SUBSCRIPTION: subscriptions@graymag.net No. 23. Copyright ©2015. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 19410 Hwy. 99, Ste. A #207, Lynnwood, WA 98036. Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years

Subscribe online at graymag.net

14

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Torsion >> Dark Bronze with Mahogany Blades

Design Cool by

Celebrating the modern idiom modernfan.com GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

15


Gray_Aug-Sept_CHWN_3.5625-9.75.pdf

1

6/30/2015

11:06:29 AM

contributors

C

TIMOTHY AGUERO aguerophoto.com pg 25

WILLIAM ANTHONY wmanthony.com pg 36

TRACEY AYTON traceyaytonphotography.com pg 142

LINCOLN BARBOUR lincolnbarbour.com pg 126

BELATHテ右 PHOTOGRAPHY belathee.com pg 47

SAMA JIM CANZIAN silentsama.com pg 114

ANDREW DORAN andrewdoran.com pg 106

ERINN GLEESON pg 121

LAURA HARGER lauraharger.com copy editor

JON JENSEN jonjensenphotography.com pg 146

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Quality Products at Every Price Level Decorative Plumbing

Steam/Bathtub

Door Hardware Cabinet Hardware

Oregon 333 N.W. 16th Avenue Portland, Oregon 800-452-7634

Lighting Bath Accessories

Washington 12001 N.E. 12th St. #38 Bellevue, Washington 800-574-4312

www.chown.com

16

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Photo Michel Gibert. Special thanks: TASCHEN, Wall sculpture : Alban Lanore, Wallpaper : www.arte-international.com. 1Conditions apply, contact store for details. 2Program available on select items, subject to availability.

l’art de vivre

by roche bobois

Manufactured in Europe.

Track dining table, design Luigi Gorgoni Track sideboard, design Luigi Gorgoni Kasuka chairs, design Roberto Tapinassi & Maurizio Manzoni SEATTLE - 1922 Fourth Avenue - Tel. (206) 332-9744 - seattle@roche-bobois.com PORTLAND - 1025 SW Washington Street - Tel. (503) 459-0020 - portland@roche-bobois.com

∙ Complimentary 3D Interior Design Service ∙ Quick Ship program available (1)

(2)

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

17


contributors

NIC LEHOUX niclehoux.com pg 40

AARON LEITZ aaronleitz.com pg 131

BRIAN LIBBY portlandarchitecture.com pg 146

JANIS NICOLAY janisnicolay.com pg 121

DAVID PAPAZIAN papazianphoto.com pg 100

JOSH PARTEE joshpartee.com pg 60

EMA PETER emapeter.com pg 106

CHARLIE SCHUCK charlieschuck.com cover, pg 51

NATE WATTERS natewatters.com pg 162

18

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Interlam is the innovator and the leading manufacturer of architectural wall panels and components. The Interlam advantage is achieved by assembling unique designs, the best materials, and using them in the most innovative ways. Connect with us: www.interlam-design.com | 1-800-237-7052 #surfacesredefined

Shown here:

SOT 002x4 in customer speciied white.

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

19


Adams Architecture adamsarchitecture.net

AKJ Architects LLC akjarchitects.com

Architecture Building Culture architecture-bc.com

pacific northwest architects These architecture and design firms are doing outstanding work in this region. They also support GRAY and our efforts to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. Please contact them for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.net or link directly to their sites to learn more.

FIELDWORK Design & Architecture fieldworkdesign.net

Gelotte Hommas Architecture gelottehommas.com

Guggenheim Architecture + Design Studio guggenheimstudio.com


Baylis Architects

BC&J Architecture

Beebe Skidmore Architects

Ben Trogdon | Architects

Castanes Architects

Chesmore Buck

DeForest Architects

Emerick Architects

FabCab

Iredale Group Architecture

Janof Architecture

KASA Architecture

baylisarchitects.com

bentrogdonarchitects.com

deforestarchitects.com

iredale.ca

bcandj.com

castanes.com

emerick-architects.com

janofarchitecture.com

beebeskidmore.com

chesmorebuck.com

fabcab.com

kasaarchitecture.com

GRAY ISSUE No. EIGHTEEN

23


Lane Williams Architects

McLeod Bovell Modern Houses

Potestio Studio

mcleodbovell.com

potestiostudio.com

Prentiss Architects

rho architects

richard brown architect

SHAPE Architecture Inc.

Skylab Architecture

Stephenson Design Collective

lanewilliams.com

prentissarchitects.com

shape-arch.ca

STUDIO-E Architecture studio-e-architecture.com

rhoarchitects.com

skylabarchitecture.com

Workshop AD

workshopad.com

rbarch.com

stephensoncollective.com

pacific northwest architects Visit their portfolios at graymag.net or link directly to their sites to learn more.


604.764.7606 kbcdevelopments.com


24

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


scene

news Fantasy World The Seattle Asian Art Museum illuminates Japanese artist Chiho Aoshima’s dark visions. Photographed by TIMOTHY AGUERO

Artist Chiho Aoshima at the Seattle Asian Art Museum, pictured in front of Takaamanohara, an animated video collaboration with New Zealand animator Bruce Ferguson, which had its world premiere this past April.

At first glance, the works of Japanese artist Chiho Aoshima appear slightly sinister, like dark fragments of an animated fantasy world. Beautiful women in couture gowns have malevolent red eyes, undulating skyscrapers sport alien faces, and bones and skulls crop up here and there. But look closer and you’ll discover a sense of innocence and curiosity in the bright colors, youthful figures, and abundance of vivid flora. That’s the point, says the 41-year-old Kyoto-based artist, who recently visited Seattle for the opening of her solo exhibition “Chiho Aoshima: Rebirth of the World,” on view at the Seattle Asian Art Museum through October 4. “I am trying to use the darkness to emphasize the lighter side of my work,” she says through a translator, “and to express something that is more bright, positive—and hopeful.” Aoshima’s jarring juxtapositions will haunt you—in a good way—long after you leave the galleries. ❈

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

25


scene

| happenings

1

EVENTS August 19–22

EXHIBIT

HOT DATES Edited by NICOLE MUNSON

26

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

Through October 4

(3) A museum’s redesign should be as stunning as the works inside its new building. The Vancouver Art Gallery clearly understands this point: in 2014, it chose the Pritzker Prize–winning Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron to design its new location, half a mile from its former site. To introduce the architects to the city, the gallery is mounting “Material Future: The Architecture of Herzog & de Meuron” to showcase the firm’s pivotal works and highlight the philosophies behind this coveted Vancouver commission. ›› vanartgallery.bc.ca

The Industrial Designers Society of America celebrates the golden anniversary of its international conference in Seattle. GRAY is a proud media sponsor of “Future of the Future: The Next 50 Years”—four days of workshops, events, lectures, and gatherings of design professionals and enthusiasts, including a GRAY Conversation about the social impacts of graphic design on August 20. Come, learn, listen, and discuss the future of design. ›› idsa.org #IDSASeattle15

September 10–20

(1) Get ready, Portland: For 10 days, the city will teem with surprising and unforgettable art, thanks to Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s Time-Based Art Festival. Live performances, installations,


2

“THIS EXHIBITION CHARTS THE HISTORY OF THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY AS WELL AS THE TRAJECTORY OF ITS FUTURE GROWTH. IT IS AN EXCITING PRELUDE TO THE UNVEILING OF HERZOG & DE MEURON’S CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF THE NEW BUILDING— A LANDMARK PROJECT THAT WILL ACT AS A CATALYST FOR THE CITY OF VANCOUVER AND BEYOND.” —KATHLEEN S. BARTELS, DIRECTOR, VANCOUVER ART GALLERY

September 12–25

(4) Design is a constant in our everyday lives, so “Design for Equity”—this year’s theme for Design in Public’s Seattle Design Festival—urges viewers to use design for social justice and human equality. The festival opens with a block party in Occidental Park and features lectures and workshops by industry professionals. ›› designinpublic.org #SDF2015

3

September 24–27

(2) More than 35,000 design enthusiasts and professionals visited Vancouver for last year’s Interior Design Show West, the Left Coast’s largest design trade show, now sponsored for the third year in a row by GRAY. Don’t miss the engaging discussions and demonstrations on the GRAY Conversation Stage, “The New Frontier” mini-exhibition (featuring a selection of work from the Bellevue Art Museum’s recent show of the same name), or the Portland Pop-Up, where you can buy objects from Portland-based designers. » ›› idswest.com #IDSwest

TREVOR DYKSTRA

exhibits, and pop-up gallery spaces featuring artists and performers from around the globe will flourish throughout the city. On September 19, the 20th-anniversary “Party Like It’s 1995” dance fest draws the revelry to its peak. ›› pica.org

4

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

27


| happenings

1

BOOK (1) Naked coffee tables rejoice! Liaigre: 12 Projects, the new oversized tome from French interior designer Christian Liaigre, is the pièce de résistance in any well-stocked book stack. Detailing 12 of the illustrious creator’s recent global projects, ranging from New York townhouses to South Korean clubs to award-winning luxury yachts, every page proves that Liaigre is the master of classic and elegant interiors that will never go out of style. Christian Liaigre collection available through Susan Mills Showroom, Seattle, and Inform Interiors, Vancouver. ›› susanmills.com ›› informinteriors.com

Ligne Roset’s range of furniture and accessories, all handpicked for the Vancouver market, shines in Livingspace’s newly expanded “shop within a shop.”

OPENING (2) If you’re searching out that unique Portland experience everyone keeps talking about, odds are you’ll find it at MakerFlat, a shortterm rental guesthouse kitted out by some of the city’s best and brightest designers and makers. It’s the brainchild of Bryan Scott, owner of Zenbox Design, who wanted to celebrate and promote the city’s flourishing art and design culture. So his studio coordinated more than 27 makers and designers, from emerging artists to established bigwigs, to collectively furnish the flat. If you fall in love with an item—the table by Woock Design Studio, say, or a pendant light by Kayla Burke Design—just take it home: every locally made treasure in MakerFlat is for sale. ›› makerflat.com

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

(3) Ligne Roset is moving up—or down, in this case, from the second to the main floor of Livingspace in Vancouver. Ligne Roset’s newly doubled 3,000-square-foot “shop in a shop” prominently showcases the French contemporary brand’s range of furniture and accessories. The offerings are tailored for the Vancouver market, with a West Coast– friendly focus on “wool instead of linen and colors that are not too flashy,” as Executive Vice President Antoine Roset, the great-greatgrandson of the company’s founder, noted at the launch of the new space this June. For GRAY’s exclusive interview, see graymag.net. ›› ligne-roset.com

(4) The latest in the wave of boutique accommodations washing over Portland, Hotel Eastlund captures the vivacious energy of the city’s thriving Eastside. Hits of orange connect the hotel’s exterior to the décor within, reflecting Holst Architecture’s holistic approach to both architecture and interior design. Studio Art Direct founder Janelle Baglien curated and commissioned the artwork—including original pieces from London photographer Terry O’Neill and Australian artist Loui Jover—throughout the hotel’s 168 guest rooms. Altabira City Tavern, the rooftop restaurant and bar helmed by chef David Machado, focuses on regional cuisine. With this much cool packed into one space, we won’t blame you if you never venture outside. ›› hoteleastlund.com

4

3

28

2

MARK SELEEN

JONATHAN HOUSE

scene


WING-YEE LEUNG

Chophouse Row, Seattle Before tech companies and boutique shops moved into Seattle’s Capitol Hill, the area’s Chophouse building was a warren of practice studios for prominent bands such as Presidents of the United States of America. Two decades later, creative spirit still hums in the recently opened Chophouse Row, a mixed-use building from developer Liz Dunn of Dunn + Hobbes. A collaboration among SKL Architects, Graham Baba Architects, and Ma Wright Structural Engineers, it features concrete floors and an exposed steel frame that weaves through the original Chophouse structure. Its active, pedestrian-friendly alley and courtyard boosts foot traffic with shops such as Niche Outside and ice cream–and–cheese purveyor Kurt Farm Shop. Upstairs, workspaces are busy with designers, photographers, tech gurus—and GRAY’s editors, who recently relocated to the Cloud Room, a high-design social club and coworking space. ›› cloudroomseattle.com

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

29


scene

| dispatch

word q.

A query for the creative class

RULES WERE MADE TO BE BROKEN—BUT IS THERE ONE DESIGN LAW THAT YOU SHOULD NEVER MESS WITH?

“Our only real rule is that good design begins with a

STRONG CORE CONCEPT—

that’s the root of all decision-making on the project, and it allows us to edit with conviction. After that, anything goes.” Matt McLeod, designer, pictured with partner Lisa Bovell, McLeod Bovell Modern Houses, mcleodbovell.com

“DURING ART AND DESIGN EDUCATION, YOU LEARN RULES SO THAT YOU KNOW WHEN TO BREAK THEM. NOW WE HAVE JUST ONE RULE, AND IT IS ENCAPSULATED IN OUR TAGLINE: ‘WE MAKE YOUR WORLD FUN TO LIVE IN.’” Laura Zeck, interior designer, Zinc Art & Interiors, zincartinteriors.com

“Balance is critical to composition. With every piece I design, I look for general symmetry in the object’s visual weight. Even in asymmetrical designs, each shape, pattern, or texture needs a counterpart, creating a composition that is both dynamic and balanced.” Emily Counts, jewelry designer, St. Eloy, st-eloy.com

gray loves

Art and function merge seamlessly in a new collaboration between Vancouverbased furniture designer Jeff Martin and Montreal-based artist Zoë Pawlak. The lacquered and oxidized maple credenza, designed and built by Martin, showcases an oil landscape that Pawlak hand-painted on its cabinet doors.

30

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

Maple, lacquer, and powdercoated steel credenza, $9,800, through zoepawlak.com and jeffmartinjoinery.ca. Custom orders available.


CHARLIE & LEE | Vancouver Selling only independent, local, and ethically sourced merchandise, this Chinatown shop takes both sustainability and style seriously. Current Vancouver ceramic artists on rotation at the boutique include Lindsey Hampton, Tara Dwelsdor, and Maggie Boyd. Hanging Planter by Maggie Boyd Ceramics, from $38 at Charlie & Lee, Vancouver, charlieandlee.com.

SOURCED

locally made ceramic objects

REBECCA MCCOLGAN FOR STORE PHOTOS

Contemporary pottery is having a moment. Today’s fired pieces flaunt clean lines, matte finishes, and patterns that hint at postmodernism. Here’s where to find some of the best.

Dot Mug and Dash Cup by Alexandria Cummings, from $24 at Johan, Portland, shopjohan.com.

JOHAN | Portland Elevating PDX’s style game since its “secret” opening in May (search #shhhshop), Laura Housegard’s Johan shop is a hand-selected motherlode of modern indie clothing and home goods. The store carries the much-followed ceramic work of Vancouver’s Lindsey Hampton as well as the charismatic creations of Portland’s own Alexandria Cummings. shopjohan.com

STATION 7 | Seattle Open since June 2015, the aptly named Station 7 (housed in a 1920s-era firehouse) carries found objects alongside locally made art and statement jewelry. The community-based marketplace currently hawks hand-thrown ceramics crafted by Seattle artist Eric Saeter and minimalist pieces by Parson’s alum Sarah Kaye. station7seattle.com GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

31


scene

| trends

Zig Zag Black, a quilt by Megan Callahan that incorporates segments of hand-dyed fabric, shows why Callahan is a star of minimal quilt design. She had just graduated from RISD when Matter in New York City commissioned a collection and brought her work to the national stage in 2011. For more old-meets-new inspiration, see page 121.

SEE WORKS BY ALL THREE ARTISTS AT GRAYMAG.NET

quilts are a thing again Modern quilts that look like minimalist paintings or subvert the traditional with abstract, bold graphics are the new and exciting textile. In the Pacific Northwest, it’s the electrifying juxtaposition of a centuries-old craft and unexpectedly contemporary treatments that’s caught our attention, and these three local artists are sewing it up.

32

DIANE THOMPSON

MEGAN CALLAHAN

KIRSTEN SOUTHWELL

Vancouver Diane Thompson has been enthralled by textiles since her grandmother taught her to sew at the age of eight. She founded Clothlab in 2011 to offer her collection of bright and bold quilted pillows and quilts, technically challenging assemblages that put a fresh spin on both new and age-old patterns. Her newest, Barr Star, is loosely inspired by a 100-year-old quilt made by her great-grandmother that Thompson only recently discovered. ›› clothlab.com

Seattle Born into a family that loves road trips, Megan Callahan mines influences from places and cultures all over the country as well as her research into quilt-making traditions. Since her recent move to Seattle, she’s tapped new veins of creativity: “There is a great design community here, incredible manufacturing resources, a rich quilting community, and a good mix of art and industry that plays a large role in my work.” ›› megcallahan.com

Portland Kirsten Southwell’s first quilt designs were sparked in 2014 when she noticed a “quilted” landscape pattern spreading out below her on a flight to Toronto. She translated that pieced-together effect into a quilt and then made additional ones for friends, crafting Memphis Group–like compositions with geometric shapes and muted colors. Southwell exhibited her work at this year’s WantedDesign in New York City. ›› kmsouthwell.com

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

33


scene

| profile

“The Fluid Collection is intended to make your whole environment an art project, instead of art remaining separate and precious.” —MARTHA STURDY

the nature of design

The newest collection by venerable designer-artist Martha Sturdy draws inspiration from an unlikely source.

Vancouver-based designer and artist Martha Sturdy’s new Fluid Collection launched this March. The four built-to-order pieces have steel frames, which Sturdy’s studio staff coat in a dark charcoal–hued resin. Sturdy herself embellishes each one, drizzling white paint across the top.

34

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

RAEFF MILES PHOTOGRAPHY; PORTRAIT: CLAUDETTE CARRACEDO PHOTOGRAPHY

Sturdy is in a contemplative mood these days. At 73, the ever-energetic designer is more interested in talking about subtle differences in shades of moss on her 250-acre farm than about hot-and-happening design trends. She’s never followed others, anyway. Sturdy first shot to design stardom in the ’80s with sculptural jewelry designs and then expanded her profile with home goods for her eponymous label and with installations for clients such as Louis Vuitton. Though Sturdy also works in metal and wood, she’s best known for her luminous cast-resin pieces. Her newest designs—a dining table, coffee table, bench, and steel-plate “canvas,” together dubbed the Fluid Collection—show that she’s working with her favored material in a wilder, free-handed manner. Their kinetic, high-contrast patterns were influenced by the snow-scattered round hay bales that Sturdy observed on her private farm in Pemberton, British Columbia. Yet only when she took a closer look did inspiration strike: “If you blow up a photo of hay, it’s like a microcosm of sculpture—yet we don’t even appreciate it as sculpture because we’re too busy being busy,” says Sturdy. “Inspiration is there for the taking if we are wise enough to appreciate it.” h


inter ior design maisoninc.com

 maison inc 1611 nw northrup

portland

503 295 0151

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

35


scene

| news

“We have to make a choice: Are we making cities for cars or are we making cities for people? We have to balance these two worlds, but I believe that people are the primary value of a city.” —CRAIG DYKERS, FOUNDING PARTNER, SNØHETTA

FIRST TO MARKET Written by COURTNEY FERRIS Photographed by WILLIAM ANTHONY

Walking the west Morrison bridgehead in downtown Portland isn’t for the faint of heart—the traffic is loud and fast, and the shadowy parking lots are, to put it mildly, grungy. Yet it’s this site that the James Beard Public Market foundation has set its sights on for years, imagining a great pedestrian-based future—one that connects Portland’s people to food, the waterfront, and public spaces. Today that vision is one step closer to reality. The longdreamed-of project—a year-round daily market named for the legendary Portland-born chef anointed the “dean of American cookery” by the New York Times—is picking up steam. In the past two years alone, the foundation has secured millions in pledged donations and obtained the design services of renowned Oslo and New York–based firm Snøhetta, which is collaborating with local firms SERA Architects, Mayer/Reed, Studio Jeffreys, and Interface Engineering.

36

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

If all goes according to plan, the James Beard Public Market will open in 2018, its sweeping roofline serving as an iconic gateway into downtown Portland and a gathering space that brings the city’s innovative food culture into its waterfront core. Soaring wood-clad ceilings and an expansive steel truss framework reminiscent of local bridge struts will shelter more than 60 permanent vendors, a full-service restaurant, and a teaching kitchen, all spotlighting Oregon’s bounty and promoting sustainable agricultural practices. Outside, a pedestrian-focused street to the west and the reconfiguration of two bridgehead ramps will ensure safe, easy access by foot. On the eve of Snøhetta’s big design reveal, GRAY sat down with the firm’s founding partner, Craig Dykers, and project director, Nathan McRae, to talk shop about the proposal and the challenges and future of this unique site.


OPPOSITE: Snøhetta architects Craig Dykers (left) and Nathan McRae stand in the downtown Portland parking lot that will become the much-anticipated James Beard Public Market. RIGHT: A view of the site today reveals barriers such as bridge ramps that hinder pedestrian access. BELOW: Snøhetta’s proposed design realigns the Morrison Bridge ramps and introduces a pedestrian-friendly road to the west to make the new market safely accessible for those arriving on foot.

Which aspects of Portland and the site inspired your design? C.D.: Portland is a collection of really interesting places, but it’s missing links among these places. In designing the market, we thought about building physical and metaphorical bridges between the east and west parts of the city and creating links between the districts to the north and south and to the waterfront. We don’t want to make a building that segregates or separates areas of the city—we want to create connections. The site itself is a gateway—visitors drive over the Morrison Bridge into Portland. Our design allows Portland to display itself to guests with a more meaningful site than the right-lane merge sign that’s currently there. What are the site’s greatest challenges? C.D.: Acoustics and creating comfort for visitors. When people come here, we don’t want them to feel encumbered by traffic, pollution, and all the other issues related to vehicular transport. We also want the building sustainably designed so that it won’t require much energy to operate.

Making an efficient and resourceful building—especially one that’s attractive from a distance and has a sculptural identity that invites people in—is always a challenge. Let’s talk about the bridgehead and ramps. Portland, like most cities, grapples with utilizing space under viaducts and managing large transportation infrastructure. How does your design address these issues? C.D.: We’ve dealt with these issues many times. We were the architects for the reconstruction and redesign of Times Square in New York City, for example: one of the most complex traffic hubs in the city, with 330,000 people passing through it each day. It was a hard place: dirty and uninviting. The solution? Remove vehicular traffic from Broadway. » GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

37


scene

| news

RIGHT: A rendered site plan of the proposed market includes reconfigured ramps and outdoor market space. BELOW: The James Beard Public Market will include more than 60 vendor stalls staffed by Oregon producers, as well as restaurants, open seating, and a green roof that will split and fold, forming large clerestory windows to let in natural light.

The first question was “How can you do that? That will create madness in the center of the city!” But we closed off the street, and now traffic runs smoothly and the pedestrian experience is vastly improved. N.M.: Pedestrian access to the Portland site is currently cut off. To make the market work—to make it permeable, porous, and accessible—it’s critical to reconfigure the Morrison Bridge ramps. C.D.: We considered many options for the ramps to find the best possible solution. We have to make a choice: Are we making cities for cars or are we making cities for people? We have to balance these two worlds, but I believe that people are the primary value of a city. Portland is known for its history of successful urban planning, yet the city struggles to connect to the Willamette River. How does your proposal create this link? N.M.: The market’s façades are porous, including along Naito Parkway [the four-lane road that currently hinders access to the riverfront park]. The glazed façade provides a visual connection and also utilizes large operable panels to open directly out onto a broadened sidewalk. Along with

38

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

curb extensions and a planted median, this makes the parkway less of a barrier and encourages movement to the waterfront park. Now the park can serve as the market’s front yard—people can get food and walk out to the river to enjoy it. This site has seen many proposals in the past, yet nothing has come to pass. What are the next steps in making this proposal a reality? N.M.: We must work with the county on some critical steps of building in and around the ramps and the bridge. The market needs the support of the city of Portland to reshape those ramps. C.D.: Keep in mind that this isn’t the only substantial redevelopment site in Portland—others are nearby. Thinking of the waterfront as a whole, rather than thinking of each site in a piecemeal manner, will help Portland move forward. If you see things in isolation, you become myopic. When you become myopic, you grow reticent, and when you grow reticent, you get critical—and then everyone starts yelling. h


GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

39


scene

| context

PALACE THEATER, GARY, INDIANA, 2008

I took advantage of a professional job in nearby Chicago to shoot this theater, which closed in the mid-1970s. The last performance was by the Jackson 5; their name is still on the roster outside. Gary is a poster child for the decline of middle America and the industrial-manufacturing economy that built this country. The entire infrastructure of the city has disintegrated, leaving abandoned hotels, hospitals, post offices, and public works buildings. It’s representative of the modern ghosts of America, quiet in their shameful abandonment. It is now the realm of drug gangs, who use these buildings for their business. More than once, I have been confronted by them. They are the biggest risk in exploring these modern ruins.

40

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Modern Ruins Photographer Nic Lehoux trains his lens on the world’s most dystopian landscapes.

PACKARD AUTOMOTIVE PLANT, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, 2014

Since 1995, Point Roberts, Washington–based photographer Nic Lehoux has crisscrossed the globe, shooting jawdropping, cutting-edge contemporary architecture for top designers and publications. He’s on the road approximately 150 days a year. The past two months alone have taken him from Afghanistan, where he photographed a school designed by the late Bob Hull, to New York City, where he shot the new Whitney Museum by Renzo Piano. Wherever he goes, he goes deep. For the past 15 years, he’s been engaged in a parallel personal project: documenting

I spent an entire crisp winter day documenting this massive relic of the auto industry: an abandoned plant that has been inactive since 1958. Emblematic of the collapse of Detroit, it is now being bulldozed and repurposed. Its ease of access—I just walked in— gave me a chance to thoroughly document the enormous milelong campus before its total demise.

“the dystopia of our built environment,” as Lehoux puts it. Here he shares images and insights from his unconventional explorations outside the scope of his official assignments, when he turns his camera away from glossy architectural commissions to seek out their opposite: the ruined places that reveal the underbelly of progress. » GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

41


scene

| context

APARTMENT ENTRANCE IN THE BACK STREETS OF HABANA VIEJA, HAVANA, CUBA, 2012

My Dystopia series is not only about the exploration of ruined buildings and landscapes—it also poses questions about the delicate subsistence of people all over the world. On a trip my family made to Cuba in 2012, we explored the back streets of Havana to capture the essence of the city. This image is emblematic of the precarious living situations and complex textures that abound here: the years of peeling paint and worn but functional systems that are a tribute to Cubans’ ingenuity in maintaining their infrastructure. Dystopic states are always in flux: With the opening of the floodgates to Cuba, Havana will be drastically modernized and changed forever.

42

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


PARQUE JOSÉ MARTÍ, HAVANA, CUBA, 2012

As I set up this photograph in a half-collapsed stadium, I had to position my tripod between holes in the concrete and rebar. A baseball game was going on, and a player, Everardo González, took a break between innings to read the daily paper. We exchanged a few words about scores and field conditions, and he went back to his reading. What is striking and most interesting in the study of dystopia is how people survive—and even thrive—in these environments. Gonzalez thought nothing of the dangerous, gaping holes in these concrete seats.

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

43


CHILDREN IN HOUSING COMPLEX, CHONGQING, CHINA, 2013

A benefit of my commissions to document significant buildings and projects in China is the incredible access that allows me not only to do the work at hand, but also to photograph the exorbitant scale of Chinese-style redevelopment. In 2013, I spent a week in Chongqing, said to be the fastest-growing and most populous city in the world. Millions of people are being displaced from rural villages into high-density ghettos throughout China, and their local textures and personalities can quickly color the otherwise bleak landscape. Despite the poor hand these populations are dealt, life goes on.

44

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


scene

| context

“AS WE ENTER A POST-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY, MANY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENTS WE CREATED IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES ARE IN THE PROCESS OF SLOW DISINTEGRATION, WHETHER THEY’RE INDUSTRY TOWNS STRUGGLING TO FIND A NEW PURPOSE OR STEADILY DECLINING AGRICULTURAL AREAS ADAPTING TO CREEPING URBANIZATION.’’ —NIC LEHOUX, PHOTOGRAPHER

DESTRUCTION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF A CITY, PINGDU, CHINA, 2013

Pingdu has been entirely razed to make way for a new city with 10 times the population. Symbolically, a lone commercial street was left standing— was it to maintain an artificial sense of normalcy? This transitional wasteland will soon be part of a brand-new aseptic city that eclipses Western proportions and even Western ambitions. h GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

45


The Barker Hangar, Santa Monica, CA October 22–25, 2015 | westedgedesignfair.com

DESIGN FAIR

THE WEST COAST’S PREMIER CONTEMPORARY DESIGN EVENT

ROYAL BOTANIA

4 DAYS

OF DESIGN-INSPIRED SHOPPING, PROGRAMMING + ENTERTAINMENT ON SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA’S COAST For event details and tickets, visit WESTEDGEDESIGNFAIR.COM. Enter promo code GRAY to receive $5 off the admission price.

From left: WestEdge Opening Night Party, Jenn-Air, Resource Furniture, Martyn Lawrence Bullard & Kathryn M. Ireland, Zia Priven, and Sorelle Fine Arts

SPONSORED IN PART BY:

CONNECT WITH US:

westedgedesignfair

westedgedesign

westedgedesign

westedgedesign


style

shop Shoe In

Two New York City transplants debut a one-of-a-kind shoe shop in Seattle. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by BELATHÉE PHOTOGRAPHY

Daniel Carlson and Aaron DelGuzzo stand in the center of Likelihood, the men’s shoe boutique they recently opened on Capitol Hill in Seattle after previous careers in sales and marketing. With the help of architect Ian Butcher, the duo enlisted as many local craftspeople as possible, including Nick Yoshihara of Yoshihara Furniture, who designed and fabricated the walnut-veneer sales counter, and Big Leaf Manufacturing, which made the luxe white leather curtain. »

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Best Practice Architecture construction: Method Construction

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

47


style

| shop CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT:

The neon artwork I Called Shotgun Infinity When I Was Twelve is by artist Kelly Mark and was fabricated by Noble Neon. The metal rack is by Troy Pillow. Stadium seating lures customers to interact with the shoes. Best Practice Architecture designed the hexagonal lights and Pillow fabricated them. Vertical cedar slats partially reveal a mezzanine storage area, and allow salespeople to continue chatting with customers. The shop sells men’s shoes from brands including Norse Projects, Eytys, Spalwart, Adidas, Puma, and New Balance.

“A COMPOSITION OF SUBTLE, DYNAMIC DETAILS ENCOURAGES CUSTOMERS TO EXPLORE THE SPACE AND FIND SURPRISES AND PERHAPS A LITTLE WHIMSY.”

—IAN BUTCHER, ARCHITECT

48

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

After living in New York City for just shy of 20 years, partners Daniel Carlson and Aaron DelGuzzo had developed a taste for the finer things in life, including an enduring love of shoes. The duo had talked for years about opening a men’s shoe boutique. This past May, three years after moving to Seattle, they finally put their plan into action and launched Likelihood, a shop as stylish as its offerings. “We wanted an interior aesthetic that is simple, warm, and classic, with pockets of quirkiness,” Carlson explains. “Shopping for shoes should be fun, a discovery of beauty and craftsmanship up close.” Enter Ian Butcher, founder of Best Practice Architecture. When he took on the project, the Capitol Hill storefront was raw, undeveloped space. Using a simple material palette of concrete, wood, and white paint helped him to achieve the clients’ design goals. Stadium seating displays rows of shoes and invites customers to climb the steps and investigate. Butcher also took advantage of the space’s high ceilings to insert a cedar-slatted mezzanine that doubles the shop’s storage capacity. Other eye-catching elements include a walnut-veneer sales counter by Nick Yoshihara, custom hexagonal tube lights fabricated by Troy Pillow, and the kicker: I Called Shotgun Infinity When I Was Twelve, a neon sculpture by Toronto-based artist Kelly Mark. It’s all in stride with the shop’s optimistic aesthetic. “Likelihood means the promise of something good that’s about to happen,” Carlson says. “Our shop is as much about the outlook as the outfit.” h


S I E R R A

R E D

SHOP SHOWROOM EXCLUSIVES AND OUR FULL PROGRAMMED LINE IN OUR PORTLAND SHOWROOM. D I S C OVE R C LOS EO UTS, O N E- O F-A-K I N D S A N D S E M I - A N T I Q U E S AT S A V I N G S U P T O 6 5 % IN OUR OUTLET SHOWROOM.

A R T I S A N

C A R P E T S

&

P O R T L A N D

O U T L E T

5 1 5 N W 1 0 t h ( a t G l i s a n ) , Po r t l a n d , 972 0 9 Monday - Friday 8:30am to 5pm, Saturday 11am to 5pm T U F E N K I A N P O R T L A N D . C O M

|

5 0 3 . 2 1 2 . 4 5 6 9

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

49


COME VISIT OUR CALLIGARIS S T U D I O TO D AY !

ALCHEMY C O L L E C T I O N S MODERN

FURNITURE

+ 50

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

STORE

2 0 2 9 2 N D AV E . SEAT T L E , WA 9 8 1 2 1 T. 2 0 6 . 4 4 8 .3 3 0 9 WWW. AL C H EM Y C O L L EC T I O N S.C OM 9 0 9 WE ST E R N AV E . SEAT T L E , WA 9 8 1 0 4 T. 2 0 6 . 6 8 2 .7 5 7 5 WWW. C AM E R I C H SE AT T L E. C OM


style

| fashion

Written and produced by RACHEL GALLAHER Photographed by CHARLIE SCHUCK Stylist MICHELE ANDREWS Photography assistant LAUREN COLTON Production assistant MEG WALLICH Model SARAH MORSE, HEFFNER MANAGEMENT Assistant stylist JOSH DALQUIST Makeup and hair JAMYRLYN WRIGHT MALLORY

rebel rebel The Northwest is awakening from its decades-long sartorial flatline with renewed verve. Taking cues from global style (kimonos, tunics, men’s work jackets), regional designers are infusing their collections with an increasingly edgy sophistication while preserving the relaxed essence of how Northwesterners dress. Using the Bellevue Arts Museum’s exhibition “The New Frontier: Young Designer-Makers in the Pacific Northwest” as a backdrop, co-curator and photographer Charlie Schuck and stylist Michele Andrews (who selected pieces from a high-caliber crop of Fall–Winter 2015 collections) highlight how designers in all disciplines are shaping a regional look that’s fresh and self-reflective—proving that in all forms of design, the Northwest leads, not follows. »

“The Northwest has the hard-to-obtain cool factor,” says Seattle stylist Michele Andrews. “And as long as we are really immersed in an honest life that does not follow trends and keeps its rebellious spirit, the Northwest will maintain a style identity all its own.” Navy kimono jacket, Priory of Ten (Vancouver), pearl drop earrings, Faris (Seattle); white button-up shirt, Lift Label (Portland); blue pleated dress, Uniform, a capsule collection by Nico Malin & Cailyn Embring (Seattle). GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

51


Black, grays, and blues are a standard layering palette in the Northwest, but this pale-pink dress shows off our favorite new neutral. Dress, Portland Garment Factory (Portland); cashmere coat, Schai (Bellevue, Washington); black mock neck top, Silvae (Seattle); Face earrings, Casa Malaspina (Vancouver); oxford slides by Ter Et Bantine, available at Baby & Company (Seattle). Waterbased lamp and Florist chair, Knauf and Brown (Vancouver). OPPOSITE: A youthful navy jumper looks all grown up over a luxe turtleneck. Seattle designer Erich Ginder’s Warez Rose wallpaper features a digitized floral motif in the background. Gray turtleneck, Schai; dress, Silvae; Face drop earrings, Casa Malaspina; fan earrings, Faris. 

52

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


style

| fashion

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

53


“In the Northwest, our point of view is strong and ever-evolving. Design concepts are shared among our interiors, objects, accessories, and clothing,” says Andrews. Light gray mock neck top, Silvae; black layered vest, Schai; black pants, Lift Label. Brass Lift trivet, Fruitsuper Design (Seattle). OPPOSITE: A custom necklace by Faris blurs the line between fashion and design. Black Book dress, Lift Label; turtleneck, Schai. Piece Frame Cluster light, Iacoli & McAllister (Seattle). »

54

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


style

| fashion

“We have all levels of design in the Northwest. You can examine them separately, but when you curate them together, they coexist beautifully and synergistically.” —MICHELE ANDREWS, STYLIST

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

55


style

56

| fashion

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


The interior of Night Blooming, a 2014 reclaimed-wood sculpture by Taiji Miyasaka (in collaboration with David Drake), is fraught with moody atmosphere. Northwest summer weather extends well into September, rendering the no-whiteafter-Labor-Day rule moot. White vest and pants, Uniform; white poplin top, Maiden Noir (Seattle); sandals by Malene Birger, Baby & Company. OPPOSITE: Layered garments take on architectural gravitas. Black kimono, Lift Label; navy jacket, Silvae; white blouse, Priory of Ten; denim pants, Lift Label; sandals, By Malene Birger. Geometry sculptures, Aleph Geddis (Orcas Island, Washington). Âť

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

57


style

| fashion A classic camel coat never goes out of style. “In the Northwest, timeless fashion merges with our interest in the clean and modern, and it suits our pragmatism because our often-inclement weather keeps us grounded,” says Andrews. Algae earrings, Casa Malaspina; cashmere camel coat, Schai; white dress, Uniform; black silk–and–wool dress, Wyatt Orr (Seattle). Mirrored table, Aleksandra Pollner (Seattle). h

58

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


I N S P I R AT I O N • P A S S I O N • I N NOVA T I O N • P E R F O R M A N C E • D E D I CAT I O N

Anne Decker Architects • BETHESDA RESIDENCE

CONTEMPORARY DESIGN, TIMELESS COMFORT We craft our windows and doors with aesthetic value that endures — just like the long-lasting performance of all our products. We look forward to helping you realize your vision. Contact your Loewen Window Center or get inspired by visiting www.loewen.com

THE LOEWEN WINDOW CENTER OF SOUTH SOUND

THE LOEWEN WINDOW CENTER OF SEATTLE

5501 75th Street West Tacoma, WA 98499 P. 253.473.7477 sales@soundglass.com

5961 Corson Avenue South #100 Seattle, WA 98108-2611 P. 206.782.1011 www.windowshowroom.com

5102 Auto Center Way Bremerton, WA 98312 P. 800.468.9949 www.soundglass.com

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

59


style

| interiors

Modern Metamorphosis

A Lake Oswego lodge goes from faux-rustic to truly refined. Written by STACY KENDALL : Photographed by JOSH PARTEE

p

icture this: a lodge featuring knotty pine walls, a river rock fireplace, and wall-to-wall carpeting. Sounds like a cozy ski cabin, but that’s a far cry from what owners Sara and Bryan desired when they purchased this 5,100-squarefoot Lake Oswego home in 2013. Instead the couple— based in Las Vegas but moving to Oregon for his sports marketing job—envisioned a clean, modern, openconcept abode that would exploit the home’s stunning lake views. At the suggestion of their real estate agent, the couple reached out to Vanillawood and immediately felt an affinity with the design-build firm’s owners, Kricken and James Yaker. As Bryan settled into corporate housing and his new job in Portland, Sara, a former interior designer, stayed

60

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

in Las Vegas with their four kids and collaborated on the remodel long-distance. “I would FaceTime her and slowly walk around the house so she could see the progress,” says Kricken. Once construction began, Sara flew to Oregon every couple of weeks to walk the site and okay the selection of fabrics and materials in person before Vanillawood applied them. Today the sleek house belies its faux-rustic roots. The modern kitchen is anchored by cabinets in au courant contrasting finishes—the uppers are clad in walnut and the lowers gleam with high-gloss white automotive paint, Vanillawood’s hallmark treatment. Nearly every appliance is hidden behind panels to allow for clean, clutter-free »


DESIGN TEAM David Trubridge’s Coral light casts a glow in the dining room of a Lake Oswego home renovated by Vanillawood. Four molded fiberglass chairs from Room & Board and two Louis Ghost chairs by Kartell surround a Ventura dining table, also from Room & Board. OPPOSITE: To make the first floor both expansive and cohesive, Vanillawood replaced the wall-to-wall carpet with walnut flooring and added large storefront windows that slide into the wall, opening the room fully to the outside deck. The clients furnished the living room with pieces from their former house, and Vanillawood added two vintage Milo Baughman side chairs reupholstered in embossed faux leather and Kelly Wearstler’s Bengal Bazaar fabric.

interiors: Vanillawood kitchen design and construction: Vanillawood construction: First Cascade Corporation

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

61


style

| interiors

LEFT: Mixing materials and keeping the proportions generous make the kitchen look modern. Glass-fronted cabinets above the refrigerator and pantry doors lend visual lightness and a decorative element. The stainless-steel toe kick makes the cabinets appear to hover above the floor. BELOW LEFT: To free the original house from its lodge-like trappings, the team replaced a massive rock fireplace with a streamlined wall featuring walnut built-ins and a fireplace by Montigo. BELOW RIGHT: A customdesigned walnut vanity by Vanillawood is surrounded by Cole & Son’s Woods wallpaper, which extends 10 feet to the ceiling. “People think it’s the coolest room,” says Sara. »

62

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Fresh is everything.

The science of freshness meets the art of concealment in the all-new line of Sub-Zero integrated refrigeration. Now with Sub-Zero’s most advanced food preservation technology and offered in a greater range of sizes than ever, integrated refrigeration merges seamlessly into the dÊcor of any room.

subzero.com GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

63


style

| interiors

Previously, the master bathroom felt closed off and lacked a lake view. By expanding the room over the first floor, Vanillawood created an airy, spa-like space. Custom walnut vanities designed by Vanillawood are topped with pulls from Chown Hardware. Moooi’s Random Light hangs above the freestanding tub. A dramatic expanse of honed limestone tile from Pental Granite and Marble runs wall to wall.

workspace—key for a busy family of six. The new 9-footlong marble-topped island, designed to encourage casual dining and provide homework space for the children, is the workhorse of the room. The rest of the first floor has a completely open plan. Everything is oriented toward a massive wall of storefront windows facing the lake. “I liked the look of the horizontal mullions, which add a bit of interest to the windows,” explains Sara, who suggested the feature. “The slight industrial feel is modern but warm.” When the weather cooperates, the family can slide the huge panes into pockets hidden in the walls. “We have 80-foot-tall trees next to the house that come right up to the windows,” says Bryan. “They bring an organic effect into the modern interior.” Vanillawood opened up the upper-level floor plan as well. The small, viewless master bath was remodeled to gain needed floor space, daylight, and an expansive lookout

64

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

over the lake. Vanillawood, along with builders First Cascade Corporation, bumped out a wall over a first-floor gable, added floor-to-ceiling windows to encase the new freestanding bathtub, and brought in custom-designed walnut vanities that float above the honed limestone floor. The whole process was a model of efficient communication and collaboration. The couple’s and the firm’s design tastes were so in sync that decision-making was smooth despite the distance. This—and the fact that “Sara is on top of things like no other,” as Kricken says—enabled the project to wrap up just five months after it began. “We weren’t onsite for many important installations,” says Sara. “So to walk into the house at the end and see how beautiful it was—that was amazing.” h


“We weren’t onsite for many important installations. So to walk into the house at the end and see how beautiful it was—that was amazing.” ` —SARA, HOMEOWNER

The custom bed in the serene master bedroom is upholstered in gray wool, and the chandelier, sourced from Vanillawood’s retail shop, is handmade by Brazilian artist Isa de Paula Santos. GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

65


Unmatched Strength, Durability and Beauty. BLANCO SILGRANIT速 Sinks.

BLANCO SILGRANIT速 is a unique, patented composite material unlike any other sink material available. Made of 80% natural granite, SILGRANIT速 combines the textural beauty of nature with unmatched strength and durability. With seven universally appealing colours, SILGRANIT速 sinks transcend the trends.

USA:

CANADA: www.blancocanada.com

66

GRAY ISSUE

.

No

www.blancoamerica.com

TWENTY-THREE

Made in Canada Engineered in Germany


@IDSwest #IDSwest

WELCOME TO IDSWEST, THE LARGEST CELEBRATION OF DESIGN ON THE WEST COAST! We are honoured to welcome the designers, artists, makers, and design-centric brands who have come together in Vancouver to showcase their current works, concepts, and products. IDSwest is an incredible opportunity for dialogue about the way in which the West Coast’s people, resources, and natural beauty have influenced its culture of design. The Pacific Northwest has experienced a major design boom that has been especially embraced here, in Vancouver. We are proud to spotlight this region’s abundance of creative and collaborative energy, and invite you all to celebrate our region’s tremendous talent while we join the design conversation globally, on the world stage. IDSwest showcases not only a diverse selection of features and installations, but also some of the design world’s most notable and talented personalities. In particular, we would like to extend tremendous appreciation to the exhibitors, sponsors, special guests, and speakers, all of whom are here to share their passion with you. We encourage you to take advantage of their knowledge and their expertise! On behalf of the many individuals who have tirelessly worked to bring you the 11th annual Interior Design Show West, thank you for joining us! JODY PHILLIPS, IDSWEST SHOW DIRECTOR

MAJOR SPONSORS

Vancouver Convention Centre West 1055 Canada Place, Vancouver, B.C.

THE PARTY ON OPENING NIGHT Thursday, Sept. 24 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. Sponsored by Inform Interiors MIELE PROFESSIONAL TRADE DAY Friday, Sept. 25 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Design professionals only) GENERAL ADMISSION Saturday, Sept. 26, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 27, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. TICKETS Now available for purchase online at idswest.com, or available at the onsite ticket center Join us next year at IDSwest from SEPTEMBER 22–25, 2016


Be the first to know the 2016 Color of the Year! Stop by Benjamin Moore Booth 531 to sign up for our Color Trends 2016 announcement, and to learn about the latest in color and finish innovation. © 2015 Benjamin Moore & Co. Benjamin Moore and the triangle “M” symbol are registered trademarks licensed to Benjamin Moore & Co.


SHOW DETAILS INTERIOR DESIGN SHOW WEST IS PRODUCED BY INFORMA CANADA

CHARITABLE PARTNER Now in its 10th year, Out in Schools is an invitational film education program, offering students the chance to develop and deepen their understanding of the experiences of LGBTQ youth, the impacts of discrimination and exclusion, and what they can do to foster cultures of inclusion within their classrooms and schools. Out in Schools workshops have planted the seeds of belonging for our queer youth throughout the province in more than 33 school districts with nearly 60,000 students. Donate to Out in Schools by purchasing tickets online or onsite.

COAT CHECK Located outside the entrance to the IDSwest show floor, you will find a coat check offered by donation, with proceeds benefiting Out in Schools. CASH An ATM machine will be available on-site for your convenience.

FOOD + BEVERAGE Thursday: 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. | Friday: 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Saturday: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. | Sunday: 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. THE BON ACCORD BISTRO by Union Wood Co. Under a canopy of vintage string lights, the Bon Accord Bistro at IDSwest will operate for all four days of the show and offers a spot to recharge or to have a quick meeting with a client before touring the show. THE BAR Always the central hub of IDSwest, you can’t miss the Parklife Bar by Evoke. Come visit us for a sip or chat! It’s a great place to catch up on all things design.

MEDIA SPONSORS

PRESIDENT INFORMA EXHIBITIONS, NORTH AMERICA Rick McConnell VP, INFORMA CANADA Judy Merry judy.merry@informacanada.com SHOW DIRECTOR Jody Phillips jody@idswest.com EXHIBIT SALES MANAGER Trish Almeida trish@idswest.com EVENT MANAGER Bronwyn Gourley-Woo bronwyn@idswest.com EVENT COORDINATOR Hannah Ungar hannah.ungar@informa.com OFFICIAL SHOW PREVIEW GRAY Magazine info@graymag.net GRAPHIC DESIGN Sali Tabacchi PR SERVICES Heth PR info@hethpr.com

COVER IMAGE DESIGNED BY SALI TABACCHI


25 W

AR

YEAR

WWW.DEKTON.COM

RAN

T

Y

RAFA NADAL

DEKTON. UNLIMITED. INDOOR & OUTDOOR SURFACES

COLOR SHOWN: COUNTERTOPS & FIREPLACE AURA FLOORING ZENITH

To be the best you have to play without limits while outplaying the competition. That’s why DEKTON is for those who strive for the best of the best. It is the clear option for indoor and outdoor spaces, including kitchens, flooring and walls. DEKTON offers unprecedented performance by being stain, scratch, scorch, and UV resistant. Availabe in large format slabs - allows for integrated design.

DEKTON IS UNLIMITED Come and see us at IDS West, booth #603 Cosentino Center Vancouver 152-8518 Glenlyon Parkway V5J 0B6 Burnaby, BC (604) 431-8568


THE PARTY ON OPENING NIGHT

PRESENTED BY INFORM INTERIORS

VANCOUVER’S DESIGN PARTY OF THE YEAR KICKS OFF THE IDSWEST EVENT IN TRUE STYLE. The Party on Opening Night provides an opportunity for both the trade and general public to explore our features, entertainment and exhibits. All exhibits will be open for business and the wine will be flowing. Enjoy a night celebrating Vancouver’s exceptionally talented design industry at IDSwest 2015.

Thursday, September 24 6 p.m. – 10 p.m. | 19+

PARKLIFE BAR By EVOKE

INTERNATIONAL DESIGN

Formed in 2001 by Robert Edmonds and David Nicolay, EVOKE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN incorporates conceptual thinking, spatial and interior design and graphic design to ensure consistent and coherent branded environments for its clients. It is this dynamic of spatial and graphic design which makes Evoke one of the most ‘in-demand’ design firms in Vancouver. Evoke’s Parklife Bar is set to be an expression of Vancouver as an intersection of design, craft, technology, and nature.

The Official Sound of IDSwest


Unmatched Strength, Durability and Beauty. BLANCO SILGRANIT® Sinks

BLANCO CANADA at IDSwest 2015 VIP Program Sponsor and Proud Presenter of Sunday’s Main Stage Programming and GRAY Conversations.

Join our kitchen design conversation and participate in our show exclusive product giveaways. #RethinktheSink @blancocanada

www.blancocanada.com


IDSWEST STAGES

The central CAESARSTONE STAGE at IDSwest15 will be designed by HCMA Architecture + Design. HCMA is a firm of over 50 staff members that has been recognized internationally and nationally for service and design excellence. The studio environment in both their Vancouver and Victoria offices, intentionally open to foster dialogue and problem solving, supports their collaborative approach. This approach has been applied to the concept design for this year’s stage, which uses the shape of a circle to gather people together, and break the grid established by the existing exhibit booth layout. The hanging panels that define the perimeter of the circle recall the draped canopy of a willow tree, and are gathered together at strategic points to allow access and views to the events within.

DROP IN AND ENJOY INFORMATIVE, ENTERTAINING, AND INSPIRING PRESENTATIONS ON OUR STAGES. STAGE The Caesarstone Stage is the source for inspiring and educational keynote lectures from local and international experts in the design industry. At IDSwest we are excited to host an esteemed group of designers and design industry professionals on the Caesarstone Stage for both the Azure Trade Talks and consumer presentations.

THE GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE Once again, GRAY is the exclusive media sponsor of one of the most anticipated elements of the show: the GRAY Conversations Stage. Hosted and moderated by GRAY, this unique show highlight will feature on-topic, dynamic discussions with creative thinkers— providing a more intimate experience for both trade and design enthusiasts.

The intimate and inviting GRAY Conversations Stage and Lounge were designed by Jen Hawk of Vancouver-based Occupy Design. Inspired by highend hospitality design and channeling a West Coast organic-modern sensibility, the spaces “celebrate the raw beauty of the Pacific Northwest,” says Hawk. Live greenery “chandeliers,” shou sugi ban (charred wood) planters, and concrete and copper details create a luxurious, comfortable environment that draws the audience close and invites them to be a part of the Conversations.


ART, DOMESTICATED. New 2015 Collection www.caesarstone.ca | 5130 Cosmopolitan White

5133 5134 Symphony Grey Urban Safari

5212 Taj Royale


SPEAKER SCHEDULE FRIDAY KIRSTEN MURRAY Olson Kundig | Seattle

& THE

PROFESSIONAL TRADE DAY TRADE TALKS

Presented by: AFBC

Friday 12:00 p.m. CAESARSTONE STAGE *Submitted for AIBC/IDCEC accreditation

ROB FORBES

Studio Forbes | San Francisco Presented by: Inform Interiors

Friday 8:30 a.m. Trade Breakfast CAESARSTONE STAGE *Submitted for AIBC/IDCEC accreditation – purchase tickets online at IDSwest.com *Continental breakfast will be served

Rob Forbes is best known to the public today as a design advocate, stemming largely from his accomplishments at Design Within Reach, the company he founded in 1999, and at PUBLIC Bikes, founded in 2008. Rob sits on numerous nonprofit boards and is known equally as an artist, business entrepreneur, specialty retailer, photographer, and writer. His first book, See for Yourself, was published in May 2015.

Kirsten R. Murray is a principal and owner of Seattle-based architecture firm Olson Kundig. For over two decades she has focused on a broad range of project types including mixed-use, private residential, adaptive reuse, workplace, and urban design. Her current and recent projects include a master plan and expansion of Heritage University as well as several urban mixed-use buildings in Seattle, Vancouver, and Los Angeles.

ROY MCMAKIN

Domestic Architecture; Domestic Furniture | San Diego and Seattle Presented by:

Friday 1:30 p.m. GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE *Submitted for AIBC/IDCEC accreditation

JASON MILLER

Roll & Hill | Brooklyn Presented by:

Friday 11:00 a.m. GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE *Submitted for AIBC/IDCEC accreditation

Jason Miller is a Brooklynbased designer and the founder of Jason Miller Studio and the acclaimed lighting company Roll & Hill. Earlier in his career, Jason spent time in both the art and advertising worlds, but soon realized he preferred making things to documenting them. His designs—such as a mirror whose photographic surface recalls a painted landscape—reflect his early preoccupations, but each is a functional object, with a kind of beauty and wit. Since it was founded in 2010, Roll & Hill has cultivated strong relationships with its designer-collaborators and introduced a fleet of stunning and innovative lamps to market.

Known for bridging the gap between art, architecture, and design, Roy McMakin has been creating furniture–art objects since 1979. Although he launched his career in Los Angeles, the Wyoming-born artist moved to Seattle in 1994, where he established his architecture firm and custom-built furniture and manufacturing studio. Interested in the sculptural and emotional pull of objects, McMakin noted in a 2010 personal essay that he sees “the job of an artist as that of a philosopher of visual experience.” His work has been the subject of multiple solo exhibitions, including at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles and the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle.

HOW TO GET PUBLISHED Friday 4:00 p.m. GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE *Submitted for AIBC/IDCEC accreditation

What does it take to land a story in a design publication? In an enlightening, empowering session geared toward designers, architects, and other industry professionals, GRAY, AZURE, and Metropolis magazine editors, along with a panel of public relations pros, will share insider tips on how to successfully pitch projects to design publications, and how to tell your unique design story in a compelling way. Bring your questions!


PHILIPPE MALOUIN

Philippe Malouin | London Presented by:

Friday 3:00 p.m. CAESARSTONE STAGE *Submitted for AIBC/IDCEC accreditation

Canadian Philippe Malouin holds a bachelor’s degree in Design from the Design Academy Eindhoven. Philippe lives and works in London, where he operates his design studio and teaches Platform 18 alongside Sarah van Gameren at the Royal College of Arts. Philippe has won the W Hotels ‘Designer of the Future’ Award and the Wallpaper ‘Best Use of Material’ Award.


SPEAKER SCHEDULE SATURDAY LEFT COAST LUXURY Presented by:

Saturday 2:00 p.m. GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE

THE LA EXCHANGE Presented by:

Saturday 11:30 a.m. CAESARSTONE STAGE

Annabel Inganni, Wolfum | LA Gaurav Nanda, Bend | LA Tracy Hiner, Black Crow Studios | LA Eric Trine, Eric Trine | LA Jory Brigham, Jory Brigham | LA Brendan Ravenhill, Brendan Ravenhill | LA In a Pecha Kucha-style format based on 20 slides x 20 seconds, 6 leading designers based in and around Los Angeles will present their body of work and reveal what about Los Angeles influences their business, their process, and the city’s design culture.

MAKING IT WORK: ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN CONTEMPORARY PRODUCT DESIGN Saturday 12:30 p.m.

Robert Bailey, Robert Bailey Interiors | Vancouver Jenni Finlay, Finlay and Kath Inc. | Vancouver Mitchell Freedland, Mitchell Freedland Design | Vancouver Jeff Martin, Jeff Martin Joinery | Vancouver The West Coast knows luxury. We love luxurious spaces, materials, and experiences, and we do them in our own way. What are the forces at work that shape our understanding of what luxury means today? How does the left coast stand out from global concepts of luxury that have been entrenched for much longer? Our panelists, who each have a different perspective on how the idea of luxury is expressed in the Pacific Northwest, discuss what’s relevant and what’s not when it comes to true richness in design.

ORLANDO SORIA

Homepolish | Los Angeles

Saturday 3:00 p.m. CAESARSTONE STAGE

Homepolish West Coast Creative Director Orlando Soria is an interior designer who lives in Los Angeles, California. After starring on an HGTV show with Emily Henderson and working alongside her for four years, Orlando joined the ranks of Homepolish in 2013. A graduate of Cornell and The University of Pennsylvania, Orlando spends his free time writing on his design and lifestyle blog, Hommemaker.com

GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE

Zoe Garred, 18 Karat; Fleet Objects | Vancouver John Hogan, John Hogan Designs; Ballard Assembly | Seattle Ben Klebba, Phloem Studio | Portland Matthew McCormick, Matthew McCormick Design | Vancouver It’s no secret that the Northwest is fast becoming a design mecca. Led by a vanguard of young creatives, this regional design movement is garnering international attention for everything from lighting and furniture to objects that straddle the blurry line between art and design. We’ll dig into the minds of young makers to discuss how they got into the industry, why authenticity is important, what role technology plays in a craftbased career, and how they stay relevant in an ever-changing market. The panel includes designers featured in the Bellevue Arts Museum’s exhibition “The New Frontier: Young DesignerMakers in the Pacific Northwest,” bringing an honest look at what it takes to make it in this competitive industry.

HOSPITALITY: DESIGNING PLACES TO EAT, DRINK, AND STAY Saturday 4:00 p.m. GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE

Justin Kane Elder, Electric Coffin | Seattle Michelle Linden, atelier drome architecture | Seattle David Nicolay, Evoke International Design | Vancouver Craig Stanghetta, Ste. Marie | Vancouver Kevin Valk, Holst Architecture | Portland What makes a restaurant great? What draws you back to a hotel over and over again? Join industry professionals as they discuss their approaches to designing hospitality projects— from popular boutiques to the hottest new bars and hotels— and learn how they work with clients to create an unforgettable customer experience. After this panel you’ll never look at your favorite restaurant the same way again.


JONATHAN ADLER

Jonathan Adler | New York Saturday 1:00 p.m. CAESARSTONE STAGE

In the early ‘90s, Jonathan Adler launched his company to create pottery he couldn’t find anywhere else. In the years since, and with a motto of “If your heirs won’t fight over it, we won’t make it,” Adler has expanded his offerings to include bedding, furniture, decorative objects, textiles and accessories, and interior design. The international brand now boasts over 25 stores around the globe, with covetable items that exude energy, glamour, irreverence and wit.


SPEAKER SCHEDULE SUNDAY PRESENTED BY BLANCO

KITCHEN DESIGN & TRENDS Presented by: BLANCO

ALYKHAN VELJI

Alykhan Velji Designs | Calgary Presented by: BLANCO

Sunday 2:00 p.m. GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE

CAESARSTONE STAGE

Joseph Herrin, AIA, Heliotrope Architects | Seattle and Portland Patricia Gray, Patricia Gray Inc. | Vancouver Arne Salvesen, CKD, Inform Interiors | Vancouver

Aly has been involved in the design industry for eleven years, specializing in both residential and commercial design. Having appeared on shows such as HGTV’s “Designer Superstar Challenge” and “The Style Dept,” City TV’s “My Rona Home,” and most recently CTV’s “The Marilyn Denis Show,” Aly has become a go-to design, décor, and lifestyle expert. Mixing different furniture styles from modern to traditional and using pattern and texture have become one of his signature statements.

This special kitchen-focused discussion spotlights how the best kitchens are being designed and laid out, and reveals the freshest looks in kitchen design today, framed within the context of real spaces designed by our panel of experts. Sub-topics will include the latest innovative appliances; fresh ways to think about workspace and storage; and what the future holds for this workhorse of a room, from a residential perspective as well as in the realm of restaurants. Come away with insight on the most important room in the house, ensuring that your own project won’t miss the mark.

TURN YOUR CREATIVE DREAMS INTO REALITY

COREY KLASSEN, CKD, CBD

Sunday 11:00 a.m.

Sunday 12:00 p.m. GRAY CONVERSATIONS STAGE

Jennifer Hawk, Occupy Design | Vancouver Carrie Hayden, Hayden Collective | Seattle Brian Paquette, Brian Paquette Interiors | Seattle Reisa Pollard, Beyond Beige Interior Design | North Vancouver So you’ve got good taste and a natural eye for style—now what? You need more than that to build a legitimate design brand—to open a retail store or restaurant, become a fulltime designer, or create a product. People who have managed to turn a born-with-it talent into a living discuss ways to take your point of view to the next level and translate it into a real business. They discuss turning points in their lives and careers that signaled the leap from having an idea to making a full-on brand. They share must-haves and never-dos in the business of design, and what it takes to build a brand in today’s multi-faceted market.

DESIGN LABS

Cast your own Campfire Candle with Portland’s Revolution Design House at GRAY Design Labs. ››

Corey Klassen Interior Design | Vancouver Presented by: BLANCO

Sunday 3:00 p.m. CAESARSTONE STAGE

Corey Klassen is a Certified Kitchen Designer (CKD), Certified Bathroom Designer (CBD), and the principal designer at the Vancouver-based firm Corey Klassen Interior Design. Residential design has been Corey’s passion for over 20 years. He has worked in visual merchandising, set decoration, and luxury furniture sales and has a strong background in visual communication and graphic design. Corey believes in creative collaboration with a holistic approach to design and living. He believes it is not the designers’ role to have a style, but rather that “it is our position to mirror our client and project their vision into reality with options, concepts, and understanding.”

Experience the design process through the hands of makers at the inaugural GRAY Design Labs, debuting at this year’s GRAY Conversations Stage and Lounge. Join Pacific Northwest artisans and designers as they talk about their products, demonstrate their craftsmanship, and even let you try your hand at the creation process. Stop by the GRAY Conversations Stage and Lounge for the full Design Labs lineup.


TOMMY SMYTHE

Designer and Television Personality | Toronto

Presented by: BLANCO

Sunday 1:00 p.m. CAESARSTONE STAGE

Tommy Smythe’s contagious enthusiasm and fun-loving approach to renovation and decorating have made him an international design media favorite. His appearances alongside Sarah Richardson on HGTV as well as his frequent guest spots on “The Marilyn Denis Show“ have brought his singular style and wit to an everexpanding audience across North America. Authenticity, integrity, quality, and craft are the focus of his work for private clients as well as the content he delivers through popular speaking engagements in Canada and the U.S.


PRODUCT PREVIEW

1

2

3

4

1. DELPHINE RUG by Wolfum & Burritt Bros. This handmade wool rug is a collaboration between local flooring fashion house Burritt Bros. and California-based textile line, Wolfum. wolfum.com; burrittfloors.com 2. GALAXIA PENDANTS by Illuminata Art Glass Design Creating dynamic custom lighted glassworks and art forms for function, Illuminata Glass is based in the vibrant glass community of Seattle, Washington. illuminataglass.com

4. STATUARIO NUVO 5111 by Caesarstone The classic and multi-colour Timeless Colour Collection ranges from salt-andpepper motifs to vivid colour blends, ideal for a variety of residential and commercial applications. caesarstone.ca

3. QUATRUS by BLANCO This smart and innovative sink solution allows you to customize your sink for your individual lifestyle needs with an Ash Cutting Board, Multilevel Grids, and a Sink Workstation. blanco-germany.com

5. MAXIME DINING CHAIR by Jonathan Adler Super-minimalist and sculptural, the Maxime Dining Chair’s brass metal base and crisscross back add a dose of hard glamour, while the rich fabrics and soft curves nod to mid-century chic. jonathanadler.com

5


Naturally more relaxing We are proud to present our new ionian bath, the perfect balance of style and comfort. Its naturally white, smooth form is created from our signature Volcanic Limestone™ material, ENGLISHCASTŽ. A truly stunning addition to a world class collection.

Discover the ionian at IDS West, Vancouver, September 24-27. (Booth 1337)

To find your nearest Victoria + Albert dealer, visit www.vandabaths.com Featured product: ionian


PRODUCT PREVIEW

6

7

10 8 9

6. 30” RANGE by Miele Mimicking the functionalities of a smart phone, the new M Touch user interface from Miele allows the user to swipe through menus, toggle through temperatures, or search for a favourite dish using the search function—all at the touch of a finger. miele.ca 7. THE STUDIO ACTIVATE™ TOILET by American Standard The Studio ActiVate™ Toilet has a crisp, modern design and uses a smart sensor to flush the toilet with just a wave of the hand. americanstandard.ca

8. NET CHAIR by Merkled The Merkled Net Chair uses the texture and strength of knotting in combination with a machined and welded steel frame to create a minimal, flexible, and comfortable seat. merkled.com 9. INTERTIDAL DEPLOYMENT OBJECTS by Something Like This Design These objects are assembled from ceramic pieces that were submerged in the ocean, allowing barnacles and other sea life to attach to their surfaces. somethinglikethisdesign.com

10. BLOOM STYLE NO. 3 by mth woodworks This design shows off the sculptural element of our beautiful Western Red Cedar trees. Together they create a beautiful coffee table or shine individually as a stool or side table. mthwoodworks.ca


DELICIOUSLY MOIST AND MOUTH WATERING.

PERFEKT COMBINATION The AEG ProCombi Steam Oven’s unique combination of steam and hot air delivers perfect results, at settings of 100%, 50% and 25% humidity. Keeps nutrients in and steams fish and vegetables to perfection. Elevate conventional baked and roasted dishes to new heights with ThermC°, our unique True Fan Convection airflow system, and grill for a irresistible texture, taste and colour. Visit euro-line-appliances.com or a premium appliance retailer to see for yourself!

871 Cranberry Court, Oakville, ON L6L6J7 | 905.829.3980 2912 West 4th Avenue Vancouver, BC V6K 1R2 | 604.235.3980

euro-line-appliances.com


SHOW FEATURES

Maker is a curated area of IDSwest dedicated to makers showcasing their products and designs. The designer-makers featured in this exhibition work in independent, all-inclusive studios that enable them to be involved in every aspect of the design process, from design conception to production and even distribution.

Maker

Studio North is the marketplace showcasing custom work and limited-edition collections to the design industry, media, and a discerning design audience. Canadian and international designers of the highest calibre present one-off and custom collections of furniture, lighting, glass, ceramics, textiles, and surface design.

IDSwest is once again pleased to present Prototype—a showcase of North America’s next generation of designers. With new ideas for the residential market, this twice-juried platform features products that are not currently in production. The group of participants features professional designers and students who will be presenting both to-market and conceptual works. You don’t want to miss this curated selection of innovative designs.

T COLLEC

Collect is a unique experience allowing attendees to view a curated selection of modern and contemporary fine art features. Collect not only provides a platform for local and international artists and galleries, but also offers a place to network with a diverse group of fellow creatives.

The Open Studio installation will feature the concepts of a selected group of designers based on a singular theme of Workspace. With 1,600 square feet of prime exhibition space and 10 hand-picked designers and design firms, the Open Studio exhibit is sure to inspire with both functional and conceptual Workspace installations. The participating designers include: Alda Pereira Design, DesignLaB Interiors, Gaile Guevara, Gillian Segal Design, heather ross {natural eclectic}, Kalu Interiors, Marie Joy Design, PURE by Ami McKay, Riesco & Lapres Interior Design, and Union Wood Co. Visit Open Studio at IDSwest to vote for your favourite design, with donations to benefit our charitable partner Out in Schools.


semihandmade Their system. Our doors. Your home.

Continental US / Canada Shipping

semihandmadedoors.com


SHOW FEATURES

YOUNG DESIGNER-MAKERS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST Created by: Bellevue Arts Museum Co-curated by: Charlie Schuck and Jennifer Navva Milliken

The New Frontier installation at IDSwest will feature several pieces by designers who are participating in the larger exhibit of “The New Frontier” on display from April 17 – August 16, 2015 at Bellevue Arts Museum in Bellevue, Washington. The exhibition displays designs by young, local designer-makers to spark a conversation about the creation and conception of objects and products, who they are made by, and how the designs represent this distinct region.

Presented by:

Media sponsor:


cottage, reinvented.

Gray Magazine Sept 2015.ai

1

2015-07-14

11:53 AM

C COREY KLASSEN INTERIOR DESIGN Lollisoft Bunk Bed | Circe Sofa/Queen Bed | Cristallo Coffee/Dining Table

C

Living room + dining for eight + bedroom for four = one powerfully functional space. 60+ customizable, transforming systems maximize every square foot in any room – large or small. Circe and Lollisoft are designed and made in Italy by : the global leader in transformable furniture design for more than 50 years. Exclusively from Resource Furniture.

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

FULL SERVICE INTERIOR DESIGN a:314 - 525 Seymour St., Vancouver BC p:604.565.2159 | e:design@coreyklassen.ca w:http://coreyklassen.ca

861 Richards Street | Vancouver, BC 604.681.0104 | vancouver@resourcefurniture.com resourcefurniture.com Toronto | Vancouver | Calgary | Montreal New York | Los Angeles | San Francisco | Mexico City


SHOW FEATURES

The LA Exchange, designed by Falken Reynolds Interiors, will feature the city of Los Angeles. The exhibit is curated by Design Milk, a design blog founded by Jaime Derringer that features interior design ideas, architecture, modern furniture, home dĂŠcor, art, style, and technology. It will include an invited group of designers from the Los Angeles area that are at the forefront of design in North America, including Bend, Black Crow Studios, Brendan Ravenhill, Eric Trine, Wolfum, and Jory Brigham.

curated by

Design Milk is an online magazine founded by Jaime Derringer, an expert on design trends who consults and speaks about design, blogging, and social media. Ideas and insights by Design Milk have been featured in notable publications including the Los Angeles Times, Time Out New York, and Dwell magazine. Falken Reynolds is a design duo based out of Vancouver, B.C. that strives to incorporate the unique lives of each client in creating inspiring and inviting spaces. Chad Falkenberg and Kelly Reynolds use their complementary expertise and the principles of relevance, balance, and the unexpected to design creative custom interiors.

Presented by:

The District is the marketplace for designers to show and sell to discerning consumers and industry insiders. The cash and carry neighbourhood will feature fresh collections of design products for the home.

Visitors will have the chance to purchase unique items directly from the Portland Pop-Up neighbourhood designed by Vancouver-based interior design studio Port and Quarter, featuring Portland-based talent. Presented in partnership with Design Week Portland.


JONATHAN ADLER POP-UP SHOP

IDSwest is pleased to be featuring a unique Jonathan Adler pop-up shop showcasing his latest collection, including a selection of furniture and decorative accessories designed to style your home with Modern American Glamour. Visitors are invited to browse the shop, choose must-have exclusive items, and purchase right on the show floor.

Interior Jan 21-24 Design 2016 Show Toronto

Presented by

Design Changes Every Thing. Canada’s Design Fair Metro Toronto Convention Centre North Building

InteriorDesignShow.com IDS16_Gray_quarter_pg_ad_1.indd 1

2015-07-15 3:12 PM


SHOW FEATURES

IDSwest Ticket Centre The IDSwest Ticket Centre will be featuring a backdrop crafted by Timber Tiles, a company launching at IDSwest that uses local wood waste and transforms it into “green” contemporary wooden tiles. The design that will be showcased at IDSwest is a joint effort between Mark Anson and Dear Human. The Ticket Centre will truly be a collaborative effort, with the contribution of hand blown glass pendants from Illuminata Art Glass Design’s Julie Conway. These designers will come together to create this year’s Ticket Centre that is just the beginning of the design talent featured at IDSwest 2015.

Off the Wall/ Off the Loom IDSwest presents Off the Wall/Off the Loom. This tactile feature will showcase what’s next in textiles and wallcoverings, with a focus on craftsmanship and design. This feature will highlight designers and manufacturing studios that produce wallpaper, weavings, fabrics and textile accessories, rugs, window coverings, and wall hangings.

Modern Kid Modern Kid is an exhibit in contemporary design for children. Collage Collage, a Vancouver-based workshop, store and studio that seeks to inspire creativity for the whole family, will participate in the feature. They will be installing one of their fun and colourful vignettes, running a small version of their shop and providing a familycentric creative activity to engage with IDSwest’s young visitors. Visit Modern Kid to explore the best in innovative design that fosters child development, materials that are organic and non-toxic, and products that are multifunctional and uniquely crafted.

Dinner by Design Dinner by Design is a three-dimensional dining installation produced by The Social Concierge in partnership with IDSwest that brings together local and global designers to create extraordinary dining environments. This highly anticipated feature of IDSwest will present installations that range in style from the lavish and romantic to the outrageous and whimsical—all seeking to awe, inspire and delight.


BUYERS GUIDE

SEE THESE COMPANIES DURING IDSWEST JIA Floor Innovation What separates us from other retailers? We manufacture what we sell. We also serve the design community with custom-made orders. Unlike at other retailers, you do not have to order your rug out of a catalog. After all, when purchasing an area rug you’re not simply buying a home accessory—you’re making a statement. Make your statement at Jia today! Whether it’s a handknotted rug, exclusive design, or custom-made for your business, we can help. Call for information and special packages for the design trade. jiafloorinnovation.ca 604.821.1180

ox + monkey ox + monkey is a collaboration between Jeremy Clement and Kez Sherwood. Since 2010, they have worked together designing, developing, and specializing in high-quality small-batch and custom metal work. Inspired by the Japanese Ofuro, the SOAK is a two-person, outdoor wood-fired soaking tub with a propane heating option. Designed to create an intimate and restorative experience, the SOAK connects users with the healing properties of water. It is made with a commitment to quality, utilizing specialized fabrication methods and TIG welding. It features an innovative side-accessed stove fully integrated into a marine-grade aluminum body, with locally harvested Red Cedar components and a stainless steel stove pipe.

Merkled Studio Merkled Studio is a design and manufacturing company that focuses on creating contemporary furniture, fixtures, and small-run products for both residential and commercial spaces. Shown: Merkled Coat Hooks available in 8 modern colors merkled.com @merkledstudio

oxandmonkey.ca 604.740.7220

let’s talk design

INTERIORS • ARCHITECTURE • FASHION • ART • DESIGN ™

INTERIOR DESIGN SHOW WEST

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest

Your life is constantly in motion, and so is design. Your magazine for cutting-edge, beyond-the-ordinary design across all disciplines is GRAY.

ISSUE NO. 23:

A STUDY IN CONTRASTS FURNITURE meets FASHION URBAN DEVELOPMENT meets DECAY

We sift through what’s expected and look for the work that’s defining the Pacific Northwest’s own outlook on luxury and style.

TRADITIONAL meets MODERN

MINIMAL ISM meets OPU LENCE RE FIN ED me ets RU ST

IC

BL

A

ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE : $7 US; $9 CDN

CK

ts HIT

W E

#GRAYconversations

ART meets NATURE

ee m

Come get to know us at the GRAY Conversations Stage and Lounge, designed by Jen Hawk of Vancouver-based Occupy Design, and experience an intimate and engaging design-driven experience. We’ve invited heavy-hitters and rising stars in the design industry to participate in essential conversations on topics such as design entrepreneurship, how to get published, and how craft and culture are shaping Northwest design sensibilities.

2015

PREVIEW GUIDE

DISPLAY THROUGH SEPTEMBER 2015

COVER 0815.indd 1

7/16/15 1:47 PM

SUBSCRIBE

online at graymag.net


SHOW FEATURES

social sessions

Keynote Speaker:

Joy Cho of Oh Joy!

The Social Sessions in partnership with Poppytalk is a one day conference at IDSwest that will focus on design, the online world, and blogging. One of the three planned seminars will be led by Joy Cho of the blog Oh Joy! Named one of TIME Magazine’s 30 Most Influential People on the Internet, Joy Cho is an author and consultant and founded the Oh Joy brand, which now includes product lines, how-to lifestyle videos, and a daily blog with a focus on design, fashion, food, and joyful moments from everyday life. Joy will discuss “The Art of Being a Goal-Getter” and how to apply her go-getter principles to your own life and career. The Social Sessions will also feature a panel on “Growing Your Following,” with speakers Jaime Derringer of Design Milk, Jan Halvarson of Poppytalk, Vancouver-based blogger Monika Hibbs and digital and social media strategist Meighan O’Toole. The panel will be moderated by Earl Einarson. Later in the afternoon there will be a panel discussion on “Planning Your Tech.” The panel will feature speakers from Hootsuite, Issuu and Latergramme and will be moderated by Earl Einarson of Poppytalk.

The Social Sessions will take place on SEMINAR LEVEL at the Vancouver Convention Centre West from 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26 In partnership with


Fiddlehead

rollandhill.com

RH_Gray_FiddleheadFull.indd 1

+1 718 387 6132

7/15/15 5:07 PM


A M i dsum me r N ights Dre a m

AS TOLD BY DXV

Every home has a story. Tell yours with the anthology of kitchen and bathroom products from DXV. Culled from 150 years

of pivotal design movements, each piece tells a distinctive story. What will yours be? Visit dxv.com to find your local showroom.


David Papazian Photography, Inc

Privileged to capture the spaces designed by the Northwest’s most talented architects and designers. PHONE 503.421.2416 • DAVID@PAPAZIANPHOTO.COM • PAPAZIANPHOTO.COM


A dramatic three-story Italian pavonazzetto marble stairwell is the centerpiece of this stately Portland home. Influenced by the refinements of European luxury, designer Christopher Gelber fine-tuned each detail: the railings are oiled steel, the banisters are bronze, and the walls were surfaced by French plaster artist François Pascal. A Flos 2097 chandelier by Gino Sarfatti hangs above a vintage deco-inspired console table. OPPOSITE: The house is clad entirely in handapplied, charcoal-hued cement stucco. Surface variegations show the marks of workers’ trowels. German-engineered Innotech windows afford views into the surrounding forest. A 1,100-squarefoot garage houses the homeowner’s Porsche collection.

DARK STAR

A moody, inward-looking house in the Portland hills reveals a new face of Northwest design. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by DAVID PAPAZIAN

DESIGN TEAM

design and construction: Christopher Gelber interior plasterwork: François Pascal exterior plasterwork: Kingsmen Contracting

100

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


l

ike an ancient stone fortress, the imposing walls of Casa Nera exude stately beauty. Set in Portland’s West Hills, the 4,400-square-foot residence is a bold departure from the gold standards of Northwest architecture: open floor plans are eschewed in favor of a cloistered layout, and indoor-outdoor living inclines toward the first part of that vaunted equation. Designed by Christopher Gelber and built in 2012, Casa Nera (named for its black-hued cement exterior) takes a cue from Mexican architect Luis Barragán in its focused palette and sense of containment. A series of 12-foot walls on the main floor guides residents through a controlled progression of rooms, while framed windows—rather than curtain glass—separate indoors and outdoors. “We wanted nature to be

something that you can selectively engage, so there is a high ratio of wall space to window space in this house,” Gelber says. “You sense boundaries—you’re safely cradled in the architecture.” A formal walled entry court “allows guests to orient themselves before they enter the house,” says Gelber. “It slows their pace and shifts them into an interior view so they forget that they’re in the middle of the forest.” Once inside the house, guests are enveloped in sumptuous materials—Italian marble, hand-troweled Venetian plaster, leather-wrapped door handles, black walnut flooring—that impart formality without fussiness. “From the beginning, the homeowners wanted something slightly more cosmopolitan than you usually find in this area,” Gelber recalls. “We’re still in the Northwest, we’re still in the woods, but inside this house is an elevated sense of elegance.” »

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

101


102

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


The crown jewel of the house is its kitchen, replete with pavonazzetto marble, black hand-troweled plaster, and stainless steel. The marble, named for the flamboyant markings of a pavone, or peacock, was a prized material in ancient Rome, adorning Julius Caesar’s triumphal palace and numerous state buildings. “I fell in love with this marble at a local supplier a few years back,” says Gelber, who readily admits his passion for Old World materials. “It introduces drama and theatricality and elevates cooking by making the kitchen almost a temple rather than just a functional space.” The bold patterning—which includes splashes of garnet red, sea foam, and turquoise—was a hard sell at first, but the clients came around. A custom stainless apron sink features twin Karbon faucets by Kohler. Niche Modern’s Stamen pendant lights glimmer above the island. »

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

103


OPPOSITE: Modern lines and timeless materials, such as the statuario and nero marquina marble on the master bathroom floor, lend sumptuousness to the home. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A William Lemos painting above a stainless-steel prep sink in the kitchen complements the home’s European feel; marble-faced drawers with bronze Rocky Mountain Hardware handles keep culinary tools out of sight. The Cube tub is by WetStyle, with a custom marble surround. The library is wrapped in faux-crocodile Venetian plaster. The clients purchased the Foscarini Big Bang pendant from Hive Modern. h

104

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


“THE ARCHITECTURE SETS A BOUNDARY BETWEEN THE WILD WORLD OUTSIDE AND THE ZONE OF REFLECTION INSIDE, A SPACE FOR WITHDRAWAL.” —CHRISTOPHER GELBER, DESIGNER

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

105


DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Iredale Group Architecture construction: KBC Developments interiors: A Good Chick to Know landscape: Bearmark Design & Landscape

Architect Peter Hildebrand of Iredale Group Architecture designed a 4,340-square-foot split-level home to fit within a 100-foot-long, steeply graded site in White Rock, British Columbia. Clerestory windows allow the soft light, as well as views of Semiahmoo Bay, to enter the home. “The light makes this house feel warm even on a rainy day,” says homeowner Debra Wright.

106

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


TRUST THE VISION

An artist and a TV producer orchestrate a blockbuster showplace in White Rock.

ANDREW DORAN: ANDREWDORAN.COM

Written by STACY KENDALL : Photographed by ANDREW DORAN and EMA PETER

a

rt made by committee is rarely as successful as the vision of a lone mastermind. However, the right team can pull together something transcendent. Homeowners Debra and Brad Wright should know: When Debra, a visual artist, and Brad, a writerproducer best known for co-creating the successful Stargate television franchise, set their sights on building a contemporary house in White Rock, British Columbia, in 2011, they knew they needed a strong supporting cast.

The couple first met their contractors, Harv and Ron Kliewer of KBC Developments, after admiring several of their clean-lined projects in the area. On KBC’s recommendation, they brought on architect Peter Hildebrand, a partner at Iredale Group Architecture. Designer Jennifer Scott of A Good Chick to Know finessed the interiors with a mix of new, vintage, and industrial furnishings that play off the home’s clean lines. The resulting 4,340-square-foot split-level places the open-plan kitchen/living/dining area, the master bedroom (with his-and-hers bathrooms), Debra’s art studio, and Brad’s office on its top level. The lower floor holds » GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

107


ANDREW DORAN: ANDREWDORAN.COM

108

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

THIS SPREAD: EMA PETER, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

ABOVE: In the living room, interior designer Jennifer Scott mixed vintage modern furniture, sourced from ReFind in Vancouver, with new pieces, including sleek gray sofas from Inspiration Furniture, also in Vancouver. “An eclectic interior paired with clean, contemporary architecture allows both elements to shine,” Scott explains. BELOW AND OPPOSITE: A wall of glass overlooks the bay. Minimalist landscaping by Brian Beresford of Bearmark Design & Landscape is handsome year-round. The striking steel spiral staircase adds an artistic flourish, while a railing of partially etched glass on the upper deck softens views of neighboring rooftops. »


“As a producer, you trust your team to carry out your vision. That’s how you get the best possible outcome.” —BRAD WRIGHT, HOMEOWNER

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

109


ANDREW DORAN: ANDREWDORAN.COM

110

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

EMA PETER

a second living room, bedrooms for the Wright’s two grown daughters, and a gym and sauna. The deck, which spans the length of the upper story and overlooks nearby Semiahmoo Bay, leads to a majestic steel spiral staircase that winds down to the lower yard. Hildebrand’s first proposed design scheme drew upon the International style, with its long expanses of steel and glass. When his clients worried such a home would feel too cold, he says, “we added rock accent walls for rich texture and tonality, plus soaring flat rooflines, a more open-plan layout, and fir beams and decking on the 14-foot-high ceiling for a more West Coast feeling. This aesthetic brought the house together very quickly.” Thanks to the softened plan, plus Scott’s savvy decorating, the interior proportions are simultaneously intimate and grand. The team collaborated closely on every element, even planning where each piece of art would live—a must for the couple’s extensive collection and Debra’s own vibrant canvases. “No corner went unconsidered. I love every detail,” Debra says. Yet after the new scheme was developed, the Wrights did something quite unusual as clients: They trusted the process completely and let the designers implement their plan with few adjustments. “The house you see here is the same one in our drawing,” says Hildebrand. “That doesn’t happen often—these were outstanding clients.” The hands-off approach had the added benefit of keeping project costs and timeline under control, but that wasn’t the Wrights’ sole motivation. “We respected the team,” Brad explains. “As a producer, you trust your team to carry out your vision. That’s how you get the best possible outcome.” »


The kitchen shows off the focused color palette and natural finishes that permeate the whole house. The underside of the custom-designed table, created from a 100-year-old Spanish chestnut tree by Vancouver’s Sholto Design Studio, features a hand-inscribed timeline of the life of the tree, tracing it from seedling to dinner table. OPPOSITE: At the home’s entrance, a bonsai tree stands in a reflecting pool crowned by an oculus. The soffits look like wood, but they’re actually steel printed with a wood grain—a clever way to avoid erosion from salty air coming off the bay.

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

111


“This house is timeless. The consistent palette throughout means the home will look just as amazing years from now.”

112

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

ANDREW DORAN: ANDREWDORAN.COM

THIS SPREAD: EMA PETER, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

ANDREW DORAN: ANDREWDORAN.COM

—HARV KLIEWER, KBC DEVELOPMENTS


Cantilevered white oak stairs lead to a stunning focal point: a floor-to-ceiling wine storage wall built around a favorite piece coopted from the set of one of Brad’s TV productions, Stargate. For the underutilized space beneath the stairs, interior designer Jennifer Scott found a vintage flat-file cabinet to hold Brad’s scripts. OPPOSITE, FROM TOP: A sauna is adjacent to the downstairs gym. A detail of the Stargate set piece. The freestanding bathtub is in Brad’s en-suite master bathroom; Debra opted for a shower in hers. The downstairs living room is intended to exude a Mad Men vibe, says Scott. h

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

113


DESIGN TEAM

architecture and landscape design: D’Arcy Jones Architecture construction: Ian Maclean and Company steelwork: Albini Lapierre woodwork: Hunter Woodworking landscape materials: Sumana Garden & Nursery

114

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


A Hornby Island house offers an open, casual welcome. Vancouver architect D’Arcy Jones designed both the home and the loose, natural landscape that surrounds it. Behind the seamless wooden door is an al fresco shower. The concrete path links the new house with the old cabin, sited across the courtyard and now used as a guesthouse.

island spirit HORNBY HAS ITS QUIRKS—AND NOW IT ALSO HAS A STRIKING, STRIPPED-DOWN MODERN HOUSE THAT BREAKS THE ISLAND MOLD. Written by STACY KENDALL : Photographed by SAMA JIM CANZIAN

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

115


H

ornby, a ferry-linked hummock east of Vancouver Island in the Strait of Georgia, isn’t easy to reach. And it’s also hard to leave—but not because of its isolation. Its fulland part-time residents have crafted an idyllic community that lives according to what some call the “Hornby Way.” Artists, writers, craftspeople, and free spirits flocked here in the 1960s, and their counterculture ethos persists 50 years later—a central gathering spot is the “free store,” where people bring gently used goods to give away to anyone who wants them. Homeowners Karen and Dick Brown, now full-time Hornby residents, spent the past 20 years vacationing with their two sons in a small, rustic cabin on the island’s northeastern edge. The structure resembles other dwellings on the island, with its rough-hewn exterior and its 24-inch-thick walls made of stacked logs and stucco. They’d always planned to build a new house behind the old cabin, but when Vancouver-based architect D’Arcy Jones first laid eyes on the property in the fall of 2013, he proposed a more inclusive approach. “I didn’t want the new building to turn its back on the old one,” he explains. “I pictured it as an addition that just doesn’t touch.” The Browns’ complex now includes three freestanding structures—the new house, the old cabin, and a storage shed—that gather around a central courtyard “like a circled wagon train,” Jones explains. “The arrangement gives a feeling of protection.” The new home seamlessly incorporates elements from the old cabin, which is now used as a guesthouse: it’s covered in the same textured white stucco, its wood is bleached to the same ashen hue, »

116

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


OPPOSITE: A carport and deep roof overhang shelter kayaks, bikes, and beach gear. The bold vertical posts are crafted from steel, a material used throughout the house and landscape. A bench made from trees felled onsite offers a peaceful spot to rest. THIS PAGE: The homeowners enjoy complete privacy due to the orientation of the rooms and outdoor spaces.

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

117


and the angles of the two structures’ roofs are identical. “Because the new house mimics and borrows from the old cabin,” Jones says, “the cabin itself has an authority and presence it never had before.” Hornbyites make a collective effort to recycle and to use local materials and manpower— instead of buying something new, for instance, they might barter with the neighbors. So it’s fitting that Karen and Dick met their builder, Ian Maclean, years before the project started when they traded him a kayak for a set of sliding glass doors (which Jones later incorporated into the design of the new house). In addition to building their home, Maclean turned trees that were removed during construction into the house’s ceiling and soffit boards, as well as the benches used inside and out. Although the structure, at 1,200 square feet, is smaller than the Victoria condo they once called home, the Browns say it feels surprisingly large, thanks in part to all its streamlined built-in cabinetry (which makes lots of freestanding furniture unnecessary) and the custom clerestory and picture windows that bring in light and reveal the natural surroundings. Jones’s thoughtful design work extended beyond the architecture: he also shaped the surrounding landscape, dotted with white birches and sculptures commissioned from local artists. “Nothing feels missed,” says Karen of the holistic design. Due to almost daily communication and the uncommon bond among the architect, builder, and clients, the project achieved what most don’t—homeowners who reveled in every minute of the 18-month-long design-build process. They became so friendly with Jones that they invited him to bring his family to visit the house for a week while they were out of town. It was the first time he’d ever stayed in one of his own designs. But perhaps it wasn’t surprising—hospitality is also part of the Hornby Way. h

TOP LEFT: Choosing minimalist furnishings to match their streamlined aesthetic, the homeowners combine modern classics, such as the Cherner chairs purchased from Gabriel Ross, with locally designed pieces such as the reclaimed-wood dining room table and bent-spruce pendant light from West Coast Eco Home in Victoria. BOTTOM LEFT: The bedrooms offer a private view of the wilderness.

118

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


“BECAUSE THE NEW HOUSE MIMICS AND BORROWS FROM THE OLD CABIN, THE CABIN ITSELF HAS AN AUTHORITY AND PRESENCE IT NEVER HAD BEFORE.’’ —D’ARCY JONES, ARCHITECT

Materials in the kitchen echo those used in the original cabin, including the rough white stucco walls and the bleached-wood ceiling. Streamlined cabinetry by Hunter Woodworking, a Caesarstoneclad island, and discreet appliances (Sub-Zero fridge, Fisher & Paykel wall oven, and KitchenAid induction cooktop) make for a serene, minimalist space.

SEE MORE PHOTOS OF THIS HOUSE AT GRAYMAG.NET

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

119


NEW CONSTRUCTION

|

REMODELING

|

HIGH PERFORMANCE BUILDING

INCITING EVOLUTION IN BUILDING

HAMMERANDHAND.COM

Karuna House, designed by Holst Architecture

PORTLAND 503.232.2447 CCB#105118

and built by Hammer & Hand

SEATTLE 206.397.0558 WACL#HAMMEH1930M7

2013 AIA Portland Design Award

120

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

2014 National Institute of Building Sciences Beyond Green Award


new traditional

JANIS NICOLAY

Contemporary furniture set in a framework of heritage architecture and traditional detailing strikes the perfect visual balance in a 100-yearold North Vancouver home.

Let’s hear it for heritage. We believe that traditional design still has a crucial role to play in the architectural and interior landscape of the Pacific Northwest—it’s classic for a reason. Yet we do think a little differently about “classics” out here. We know history doesn’t have to repeat itself: we can reinvent it in a fresh way given a little know-how and a few bold moves. Follow the tips of our featured designers, and take a page from our something-old, something-new playbook. »

new again

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

121


new traditional

LONG STORY SHORT

With a roof-to-roots renovation that blends modern and period styles, a heritage house in North Vancouver enters a newly elegant chapter. Written by ERINN GLEESON : Photographed by JANIS NICOLAY 122

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Rima Martinez Interior Design architecture: Still Point Architecture construction: Frost Fine Homes millwork: IGK Finishing Carpentry

r

ima Martinez likes to tell stories. But rather than using words, the Vancouver interior designer weaves her tales with the just-so curve of custom crown moldings and the irreverent placement of a treasured possession. When a client hired her to bring modern style to his 100-year-old gingerbread-style house, she saw an opportunity to write one of her most intriguing narratives. To the homeowner, a single finance professional in his fifties, the North Vancouver residence was a diamond in the rough, ideal for a major renovation. First Max Frost, of Frost Fine Homes in Surrey, British Columbia, took the 3,500-square-foot structure down to the studs. Then the project team—Martinez, Frost, and Still Point Architecture—redesigned the main floor, creating an openplan living room, dining room, and parlor. Original two-by-fours salvaged from the home became kitchen cabinet fronts, which Martinez paired with concrete countertops and reclaimed industrial fixtures for a contemporary yet rugged look. “All the kitchen surfaces and finishes look new now, but eventually they will patina into the antique look the client wants,” she explains. »

OPPOSITE: A palette of blues and grays imbues a North Vancouver home with modern, calm serenity. The living room furniture was part of the homeowner’s haul from a buying trip in Italy. ABOVE: The striking Roll & Hill Agnes chandelier over the dining table is a contemporary bolt of energy in the room. Martinez commissioned Tonio Creanza, the Italian artisan who worked on director Francis Ford Coppola’s villa in Italy, to handapply a natural white limestone plaster to the ceiling.

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

123


NEW TRAD TIP

Exceed Expectations

Forgo the predictable approach to headboards and opt instead for the inventive appeal of wallpaper. We love Farrow & Ball’s monochrome-meets-modern take on a traditional paisley motif.

Keeping the home’s architecture on point with its original appearance was a priority, so Martinez hired IGK Finishing Carpentry to re-create turn-of-thecentury wainscoting, solid wood crown molding, and baseboards, all of which she custom designed. She also spent hours sourcing vintage and reproduction elements such as the push-button light switches from Schoolhouse Electric, and she retained many of the home’s leaded-glass windows for their antique charm. But this was no straightforward period re-do. “We did some really quirky things here,” says Martinez. The pinball machine in the office, for example, was a special request from the homeowner. An ultra-modern Roll & Hill light fixture brings edgy style to the otherwise formal dining room. Then there was the suite of modern furniture the client had purchased in Italy pre-renovation, which hadn’t yet arrived from overseas and whose appearance the client could only vaguely recall. Martinez had to work the mystery furnishings—a dining room set, sofa, coffee tables, lights, and bedroom sets—into the final design without knowing anything about them except for their general color palette. Martinez’s solution: using neutrals throughout the home to boost the chance of a harmonious melding of styles. “In historic architecture, I try to keep furniture quite understated, with simple lines, so it won’t fight with the traditional heritage aspects,” she says. Between the client’s wishes, his home’s historic architecture, and the modern furnishings, the story of this house took on a life of its own. “I enjoy work that really gets into the client’s personality,” Martinez reflects. “A house like this one isn’t something you experience often.” h

124

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

Paisley Wallpaper by Farrow & Ball, $225 per roll at Manor Fine Wares, Portland, manorfinewares.com.


new traditional

The kitchen’s wood cabinet fronts are actually two-by-fours reclaimed from the house’s renovation. A robust mix of materials—wood, concrete countertops, and industrial fixtures—inject the room with personality. OPPOSITE: An office and workout room also serves as a guest bedroom, with a Murphy bed that folds down to reveal an accent wall papered in Wisteria by Farrow & Ball. GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

125


new traditional

Laid-Back

LUXURY

Traditional style shows off its low-maintenance side in a Lake Oswego family home designed to age gracefully. Written by LINDSEY M. ROBERTS : Photographed by LINCOLN BARBOUR 126

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Interior designer Taryn Emerson strategically used furniture to carve out two distinctive sitting rooms within a single large space in a Lake Oswego home. Four chairs from Lee Industries facilitate conversation in the living room, and an area rug from Kush Handmade Rugs anchors the space. Potted plants from Bedford Brown and a painting by Nate Ethington add color and life. Âť

DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Taryn Emerson Interiors woodwork, painting, floors: Vastu Concepts Contractors GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

127


new traditional

l

ife in Lake Oswego, Oregon, revolves around the city’s namesake body of water. So too does the home of Amy and Mark Radich, who tapped local interior designer Taryn Emerson to remodel their 4,500-square-foot house in a way that would support their lake-centric lifestyle and their love of entertaining. That meant furnishings that could take some hard knocks. “When you live on the water, you don’t want to care if things get wet and dirty,” Amy says. “We want our guests to be comfortable.” Casual yet stylish waterfront homes are right in Emerson’s wheelhouse: she studied and worked in the Los Angeles area for the first 10 years of her interior design career, and founded her eponymous firm there in 1996. Though she moved to Lake Oswego in 2005, her time down south continues to influence her design work. “Californians are always looking for supercomfy interiors—deep furniture, easy-to-maintain fabrics, reclaimed wood. Everything I do is a little lighter in feel.” At the Radichs’ home, Emerson devised an interiors scheme that reflects the airy, fresh aesthetic she favors. She selected

128

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

materials for their durability—an ivory-colored sofa in a scrubbable fabric, for example, and a metal coffee table with an existing patina (“You can abuse it as much as you want and it will only make the finish look better”). Furnishing the open-plan living room and family room was a challenge, since together they compose “one giant great room, without a transition in between,” as Emerson puts it. The goal was to create two distinct areas without cramming too much furniture into the space. After all, “you don’t want people to feel like they’re walking into a furniture showroom,” she says. Emerson used varying seating plans to differentiate the two spaces, yet she visually connected them with a cohesive material palette. In the living room, four contemporary wingback chairs around a low table promote conversation. In the family room, a deep sofa is a comfortable landing pad for the family to watch TV and catch up at the end of the day. Year-round, the classic lines and neutral palette help the house feel bright. “Together we did a good job of making this house a home,” Amy says. “I love it best in the summertime, when it’s filled with people. And in the winter, everyone just hunkers in.” h


The star of the master bedroom is a headboard inspired by a magazine clipping that client Amy Radich brought to Emerson. The designer rescaled it to suit the room and had it custom-made in alder by one of her go-to woodworkers, Algia King. OPPOSITE: In the family room, Emerson went with a traditional sofa from Perch, the better for the family to relax and watch TV together. The industrial coffee table is from Hunt & Gather and the rug is from Atiyeh Bros. A versatile hexagonal ottoman, designed by Emerson and built by Lake Oswego Upholstery, doubles as seating and a table.

“I didn’t want anything too dark because we live in a gray environment. I wanted something bright and refreshing.” —AMY RADICH, HOMEOWNER GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

129


130

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


new traditional

DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Lucas Design Associates construction: Bakstad Construction plasterwork: Studio C fireplace: Flying Anvil Studio

Generations of gardeners have shaped this Seattle Craftsman’s 111-year-old landscape, leaving behind a lush legacy that includes mature clematis vines arcing over the garden gate.

MOOD SWING A vintage Craftsman shakes off the chintz. Written by DEBRA PRINZING : Photographed by AARON LEITZ

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

131


new traditional An angular light fixture from Chandelier, a photograph by Barbara Vaughn, and masks from John Fairman of Honeychurch Antiques lend conversational interest to the dining room’s natural tones and textures. Interior designers Suzie and David Lucas created the custom dining table, which is topped with a slab from Urban Hardwoods; its steel base was fabricated by 12th Avenue Iron. OPPOSITE: The metal fireplace front hides an aging brick façade. A custom-designed glass-and-steel coffee table anchors new furnishings and a side chair reupholstered in a bold botanical print. The abstract painting, from the client’s collection, is by Kenneth Callahan.

132

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


NEW TRAD TIP

Stay Neutral

c

an a century-old home look contemporary without losing its soul? To answer that question, consider the light-filled rooms of the 1904 Craftsman home recently updated by Suzie and David Lucas, the sister-and-brother team behind Seattle-based Lucas Design Associates, who possess that rare knack of making outdated interiors feel new. Their trick? Take the best of vintage architecture—oversize windows, high ceilings, and intricate millwork—and infuse it with custom finishes, eclectic furnishings, and fresh textiles. The homeowner already had endured a few design escapades during her 25-year residence, including a 1990s episode involving green William Morris wallpaper, festooned with maroon grapes, in her front hall and large floral window coverings in her family room. It was a look she readily describes as “a tomb”—and an aesthetic she was eager to move past. When the Lucases first visited, they were struck by the lack of vivacity in the house, located in Seattle’s Capitol Hill (a neighborhood that’s itself a sometimes clumsy mix of historic architecture and trendy concepts). But they had hope. “Our client obviously loves beautiful art and objects,” David Lucas recalls, “and she’s open to new ideas.” »

A cacophony of colors is standard fare in traditional décor. If you’re striving to hit a modern note, we suggest a chord of neutral tones, starting with this cream-colored shagreen coffee table.

Shelby Coffee Table by Gabby, price on request at Hunt & Gather, Portland, huntgather.com.

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

133


new traditional

134

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


To begin, Suzie Lucas explains, “We focused on changes that would make the biggest difference.” That meant cloaking mustard-colored walls with luminous pale plaster by the decorative-finish artisan Cathy Conner and saturating golden oak floors with a custom ebony stain to unify adjoining rooms. “Going darker on the floors and paler on the walls balanced light and shadow throughout the house,” Suzie notes. Fresh color and new finishes had considerable impact elsewhere, too. Streamlined cushioning updated the kitchen seating area and complemented a shapely Saarinen table and chair. In the family room, Satellite Sewing restyled an original sofa, while a sculptural lamp gained a new shade. “Our client already owned cool pieces, so we edited them down to the best ones,” David says. Custom fabrications revved up formerly dusty rooms: a steel-fronted fireplace designed by David and crafted by Bart Turner of Flying Anvil Studio—who also made the thick glass top of the coffee table—hides an old brick façade. A Lucasdesigned dining room buffet, bench, and oval table enlivened the space previously occupied by a massive hutch. Above them, a retro-inspired fixture from the San Diego company Chandelier illuminates rather than dominates the room. It’s a refreshing contrast, and a symbol of the home’s happy balance between respecting the past and reveling in the present. h

ABOVE: The family room sports refreshed furniture, including a 1970s Warren Platner for Knoll wire-based armchair. The artwork is by Rachel Brumer. OPPOSITE: In the eating nook, original windows and millwork frame new bench cushions upholstered in faux leather from Holly Hunt and pillows made from Glant, Jim Thompson, and Pollack fabrics.

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

135


new traditional

Case for Curation

Modern and traditional cohabit in harmony when design takes cues from the world of fine art. Written by NICOLE MUNSON : Photographed by EMA PETER

136

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Geralynne Mitschke Design architecture: L.G. Burton construction: Conquistador Builders landscape: DJ Bobcat and Landscaping Services custom cabinetry: G&B Woodcraft, Alex Goldie Custom Furniture

“s

he knew what I wanted,” Sarah Ricci says of her interior designer, Geralynne Mitschke. “‘Manor-esque,’ she kept saying!” Ricci and her husband, Carlo, built their home, a 3,000-square-foot four-bedroom in Surrey, British Columbia, 19 years ago. Nearly two decades and two almost-grown kids later, the family needed an updated space that could accommodate their lives along with lots of visitors, including friends, extended family, and two doting grandmothers who love to cook. The resulting renovation, with its sophisticated and spare interiors, is evidence of a brilliant collaboration between client and designer. Ricci, a fine-art conservator, has developed a strong aesthetic sensibility through her work, and its influence permeates the space. “I wanted the home to feel a bit like an art gallery, a type of space that calms me, but I also wanted the character of a historic home, such as the one I grew up in,” she says. The home has been entirely rejuvenated from its 1990s look thanks to a generous dose of new crown moldings, high baseboards, and custom millwork. Mitschke selected only two paint colors for the entire house: Benjamin Moore’s White Down for the walls and its Cloud White for all the millwork. The near-achromous interior palette is elegant and unobtrusive, allowing the couple’s distinctive furnishings and artwork to claim the spotlight. The Riccis’ decision to furnish the space with mostly modern pieces, despite their request for a traditional interior framework, isn’t surprising—Ricci spends her »

ABOVE AND OPPOSITE: A renovated family home in Surrey, British Columbia, seamlessly blends traditional and modern styles, juxtaposing classic millwork and trim with contemporary and midcentury furnishings. A built-in desk accommodates cookbooks and creates a space for recipe perusal for the culinarily inclined clients.

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

137


new traditional A subdued interior palette complements the couple’s art collection, which illuminates spaces throughout the home. A patinated bronze horse by Canadian Prairie artist Joe Fafard graces the built-in bookshelves and is among the clients’ favorite pieces. The family room sofas are from Lee Industries, sourced through Brougham Interiors.

NEW TRAD TIP

Go Rogue

days surrounded and influenced by fine art. “I feel that furniture and fixtures in a home, like all its other parts, are sculptural, and each one should be visually meaningful,” she says. That curatorial attitude is especially apparent in the breakfast area, where Cherner armchairs surround a Saarinen dining table lit by a contemporary Octo pendant by Secto Design. To create a central hub for the family, Mitschke moved the kitchen to the center of the home and opened it up to the dining room. And, like any great kitchen, the space is inviting to everyone, including Nonna, the family’s Italian grandma, who happily prepares her handmade pasta at the large white Calacatta marble–clad island when she visits. Mitschke’s inspiration to include seating on both sides of the kitchen island eliminates that awkward ducks-in-a-row feeling that can plague bar-side conversations. “We had long debates about what’s most important to us,” says Ricci of the uncommon arrangement. “Was it maximizing island storage? Or being able to look our daughter’s boyfriend in the eyes when we’ve gathered around the island?” “I realized Geralynne was totally right,” says Ricci in retrospect, referring not only to the moment-of-truth kitchen island, but also to Mitschke’s overall design instincts. “Geralynne listened to me talk about the look and feel I desired, and right away she had a strong grasp on what we wanted. She knew we wanted the look of a gracious and well-appointed manor but the comfort of a family home. And now we live in a house that has that feeling.” h

138

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

Traditional spaces stick to the script by layering furnishings from the same period and style. We suggest you mix it up by adding a few modern-minded pieces. Take the first step with a pared-down silhouette, such as this white oak Harbor Chair by Phloem Studio.

Harbor Chair by Phloem Studio, Portland, from $1,400, phloemstudio.com.


the new west coast INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING AVAILABLE

autonomousfurniture.com

Tansu House Tom Kundig, Olson Kundig Architects 2012 AIA Comendation Award Photo Michael Burns

DOVETAILGC.COM GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

139


new traditional

WE LOVE THE CLASH BETWEEN THIS CLASSIC PERSIAN-INSPIRED PATTERN AND ITS AUDACIOUSLY DECAYED EFFECT. AF-08 Slate/Multi rug by Loloi, from $139 at NW Rugs & Furniture, multiple locations, nwrugs.com.

TUCK INTO THIS MINIMALLY MINDED FOUR-POSTER, WHICH EMBRACES ANGLED LINES AND ESCHEWS ORNAMENTATION.

THIS UPDATED VERSION OF A WINGBACK CHAIR NODS TO THE PAST WITH ITS AGELESS SILHOUETTE AND OFFERS A BIG HELLO TO THE FUTURE WITH ITS AU COURANT SCALE.

Hale Bed, from $1,699 at Room & Board, Seattle, roomandboard.com.

»

Marlow Wing Chair by Four Hands, from $705 at J. Garner Home, Seattle, jgarnerhome.com.

For more about M. Callahan Studio, see page 32.

NEW TRADITIONAL STYLE IS EXECUTED TO PERFECTION IN THIS SOON-TO-BE HEIRLOOM, WHICH MERGES OLD-FASHIONED CRAFT WITH A MODERN, PARED-DOWN PALETTE. Silt Blanket, $3,000 at M. Callahan Studio, Seattle, megcallahan.com.

TIMELESS 2.0 Updated furnishings blow the dust off traditional design.

Written and compiled by JASMINE VAUGHAN

CAMPAIGN-STYLE FURNITURE, ORIGINALLY DESIGNED FOR EASY ASSEMBLY BY MOBILE MILITARY MEN, IS TRANSPORTED INTO A NEW ERA OF FUNCTIONAL CHIC WITH THIS BOLD BLUE HUE. Chiba Bedside Chest by Selamat, $1,265 at Sofa Table Chair, Portland, sofatablechair.com.

h

140

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


H O N O R E E

15TH ANNUAL

NORTHWEST

DESIGN AWA R D S

SEATTLE DESIGN CENTER

Portland’s Union Way is a tribute to architectural ingenuity and civic responsibility – so is a stroll through

A PATH WITHOUT A FOOTPRINT

a stand of Collins Pacific Albus trees. Plantation grown Pacific Albus is consistent, uniform and FSC ® 100% certified. And as a visit to Union Way clearly shows, the results are both beautiful and environmental.

Lee Jimerson 800.329.1219 503.816.6962 ljimerson@collinsco.com

CollinsWood.com

Feel good about it

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE Lever Architecture. Photo by Jeremy Bittermann.

141


architecture

blue ribbon

At a transformed ranch near Vancouver, seven lucky show horses live in the lap of equine luxury.

An entry court, used to park horse trailers, load hay, and muck out stalls, gives way to the stable and an adjacent hayloft on a Vancouver-area property. The stable and main house bookend a riding ring and open field.

Written by COURTNEY FERRIS : Photographed by TRACEY AYTON

From the outside, this structure may look like a dream house, but don’t be fooled: it’s all about the horses. Set within a 2.5-acre pastoral landscape near Vancouver, this private stable, conceived by Blackwell Architecture, proves that modern design is not just for people. The client—the non-equine one, that is—grew up riding horses on this property. She and her husband bought the land and, in 2013, built a house and stable. “Their sentimental attachment to the area, and their love of riding, strongly influenced the project,” says architect Shawn Blackwell, who was hired to design the buildings. Clad in local basalt, fir, and cedar and accented with zinc siding, the 3,800-square-foot stable houses seven show horses and ponies. Their home is defined by two interlocking roof planes designed to maximize light pouring in from south-facing clerestory windows. A center aisle punctures the stable, ensuring airflow through the building and framing a view through the adjacent riding field toward the main house. Flanking this center bay are

142

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

stalls, a wash area, a feeding room, and a tack room hung with saddles and bridles. Aesthetics aside, designing a horse stable proved to be quite a technical challenge. “Initially I thought it was a fairly simple design element to incorporate into the overall program,” Blackwell admits. However, after visiting half a dozen stables, he grasped the project’s complexity. Interior finishes required “a bit of a tradeoff,” says Blackwell. “We needed something durable that wouldn’t create potential hazards for the horses.” Thus the paddocks are flush fir encased in metal frames so the horses can’t gnaw at their corners or dent their wood with kicks. Taking efficiency to the next level, all surfaces were designed to be as lowmaintenance as possible—unlike most human homes, the stable can be easily and quickly hosed down. We admit to a bit of horse-house envy. »


Architectural Planters for Commercial and Residential Applications Full Design Services Available 517 E Pike Street Seattle WA 98122 206.329.4737

氀椀最栀琀椀渀最 愀爀挀栀椀琀攀挀琀甀爀攀 洀漀瘀攀洀攀渀琀 瀀爀漀樀攀挀琀

䤀一吀䔀刀一䄀吀䤀伀一䄀䰀 䰀䤀䜀䠀吀䤀一䜀 䐀䔀匀䤀䜀一 䌀伀䴀倀䔀吀䤀吀䤀伀一

㈀ ㄀㔀

匀唀䈀䴀䤀匀匀䤀伀一  䐀䔀䄀䐀䰀䤀一䔀  䔀堀吀䔀一䐀䔀䐀℀ 琀漀  䄀唀䜀唀匀吀 ㈀㄀ 猀琀 嘀愀渀挀漀甀瘀攀爀Ⰰ 䈀䌀 䔀砀栀椀戀椀琀椀漀渀 一漀瘀攀洀戀攀爀 ㄀㈀琀栀

眀眀眀⸀眀攀氀漀瘀攀氀愀洀瀀⸀挀愀 樀甀爀礀 瀀愀渀攀氀㨀

吀伀䴀 䐀䤀堀伀一⸀ 䴀䤀䌀䠀䄀䔀䰀 䄀一䄀匀吀䄀匀匀䤀䄀䐀䔀匀⸀ 伀䴀䔀刀 䄀刀䈀䔀䰀⸀ 䄀一䐀䰀䤀䜀䠀吀⸀  一䄀一䌀夀 䈀䔀一䐀吀匀䔀一⸀ 䨀伀䠀一 倀䄀吀䬀䄀唀⸀ 䘀䄀䰀䬀䔀一 刀䔀夀一伀䰀䐀匀⸀ GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

143


architecture

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Rusticated stone with metal and wood accents give the stable a distinctive Northwest ranch vibe. With space at a minimum, everything has its place, including handsome blankets and brushes for the horses. Each stall, built of wear-resistant materials such as metal-edged wood walls, opens onto the stable’s center aisle and a private exterior paddock. h

144

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


PHOTOGRAPHY

604 669 1301 W W W . J O H N S I N A L . C O M

HOME FURNISHINGS SHOWROOM DESIGN CONSULTATION SERVICES 1122 NW GLISAN ST. PORTLAND, OR 97209 WWW.EWFMODERN.COM | T. 503.295.7336

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

145


architecture

View from the Top Creative construction solutions set this Oregon house seamlessly into the hillside—and clean-lined green design sets it up to stand for a very long time. Written by BRIAN LIBBY : Photographed by JON JENSEN : Styling by SHANNON QUIMBY

DESIGN TEAM

design and construction: Green Hammer landscape: LandCurrent geotechnical engineering: Amrhein Associates civil engineering: Mark Dew structural engineering: Allan Goffe cabinetry: William Olsen Designs

146

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


BELOW: The Fineline House in southern Oregon is set upon a steep wooded hillside to capture views, and a series of terraces allows the home to step down gently with the terrain. The façade is stucco and FSC-reclaimed incense cedar. OPPOSITE: Crafted from juniper beams and decomposed granite, a path leads from the house to a network of walking trails.

c

reated with environmental responsibility and efficiency in mind, the Fineline House in southern Oregon was built to last and to inspire, both today and a century from now. Nestled into a steep hillside, the home—designed and built by the sustainable construction experts at Portland’s Green Hammer, with an extensive assist from landscape architect Anita Van Asperdt of Eugene’s LandCurrent—keeps a low public profile yet sits high enough to capture views of the trees and meadows unfolding down the hill. “I really wanted to make the house harmonious with the landscape and the area,” says the homeowner, who selected the building site. “I’m a climber, and I love views. My wife and I walked the site until we found the spot

with the most striking view, the one that hit us with the most emotion. That spot is now the middle of the great room, where the biggest windows are—that’s the sight line we chose.” To further harmonize home and site, the Fineline House is surrounded by an array of native grasses, granite boulders, and trees that soften the line between landscape and architecture. The back of the house proved to be a structural challenge. “Because we dug so deeply into the hillside, we had to create a big retaining wall,” explains architect Jan Fillinger, who designed the house while working part-time for » GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

147


architecture TOP: The home’s Bulthaup kitchen features anodized aluminum cabinets and quartz countertops, with Diego barstools by Token NYC and a Giogali chandelier by Vistosi. BOTTOM: The dining room, outfitted with Minotti furnishings—including the Clayton dining table and Flavin chairs—offers expansive mountain views. The patterned wall at left was designed by architect Jan Fillinger and crafted from laser-cut steel by Farwest Steel.

Green Hammer (he’s since moved to Eugene and runs STUDIO-E Architecture, his own firm). “But we also wanted to capture patio space.” That’s when Van Asperdt, who worked in close coordination with the rest of the team, came up with the idea of building a concrete wall with amoeba-shaped cutouts along the top, its lower mass partially screened by a large incense cedar planter blooming with horsetail and Crocosmia plants. “It’s an engineering solution combined with an aesthetic one,” she says. The interior is both pristine and casually inviting, warmed up throughout with FSC-certified wood elements, from the richly toned walnut floors to the reclaimed teak cabinets mounted over marble floors in the master bathroom. Anodized aluminum cabinetry in the Germandesigned Bulthaup kitchen provides a crisp contrast to the wood elements. Natural light is an essential element of the home: most spaces are bounded by windows on two or three walls. Yet triple-pane glass—the house is named for the Unilux Fineline window system installed throughout—and extra insulation, designed to Passive House standards, keep interior temperatures comfortable year-round with little need for heating and cooling. “People will live in our buildings long beyond the ownership cycle,” says Green Hammer president Stephen Aiguier. “They need to stand the test of time.” Longevity, in the end, is the greenest goal of all. »

148

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


COLOR YOUR LIFE! DREAM .06

zero voc | low odor | interior paint Portland showroom now open. 519 NE Hancock, 97212 Mention GRAY for 20% off. colorhousepaint.com

want more?

You won’t want to miss the next one!

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE AT

graymag.net

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest 149

GRAY ISSUE No. EIGHTEEN

206-356-7813 sgioia.com

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

149


architecture

The master bedroom and bath feature soft tones and a touch of luxury, with Carrera marble floors in the bath giving way to a floating vanity made of reclaimed teak. The hanging lamp over the bedroom nightstand is a Cheope 09 pendant by Vistosi, and the Superia bed is by Hastens. Âť

150

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


M o d e r n d e c o r i n s p i r e d b y n at u r e

E I G H T E E N K A R A T. C O M

space. reinvented.

Living room + home office + bedroom = one powerfully functional space. 40+ solutions designed and made in Italy by : the global leader in transformable furniture design for more than 50 years. Available exclusively from Resource Furniture. Now serving the Seattle area. WILLIAM ANTHONY

PHOTOGRAPHY

true story

861 Richards Street | Vancouver, B.C. | 604.681.0104

WMANTHONY.COM

resourcefurniture.com New York | Los Angeles | Toronto | Vancouver | Calgary | Mexico City GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

151


architecture

RIGHT: In front of the house, granite boulders and native grasses blur the boundaries between the home and its setting. BELOW: The back patio, ideal for entertaining, includes an artfully perforated retaining wall designed by landscape architect Anita Van Asperdt. BOTTOM: The garage’s cedar-clad door by Schweiss Door opens by folding in the middle along a hidden hinge. “We wanted it to be totally concealed when it was closed,” Fillinger explains. h

152

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Handmade. Fine papers. Letterpress. Laser. With much love. Tieton made.

1400 Second Avenue, Seattle Paper-Hammer.com

Through September 7

Nate Watters

NATE WATTERS.indd 1

|

commercial and editorial photographer

www.natewatters.com natewatters@gmail.com 360.749.1264

1100 Chestnut St. Vancouver, BC | museumofvancouver.ca/happyshow

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE 5/6/15 2:19 PM

153


architecture

OUT OF DARKNESS A future-forward lab on Microsoft’s main campus brings to light crimes committed in cyberspace. Written by LINDSEY M. ROBERTS : Photographed by BENJAMIN WOOLSEY

154

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


The Olson Kundig team was inspired by the concept of a geode when designing the Microsoft Cybercrime Center. Blackened steel exterior shells on the conference rooms and labs­give way to brighter interior materials—red elm and silver-brushed aluminum, respectively. OPPOSITE: Interpretive exhibits in a metallined display channel greet visitors in the entry. Glazing along one wall of the Forensic Lab allows tour-goers to glimpse the serious work performed inside. When a project is too sensitive for public view, employees press a button to turn the Switchlite Privacy Glass opaque.

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Olson Kundig construction: Schuchart Construction Company exhibit fabrication: ImagiCorps

Something unexpected sits amid the concrete, glass, and evergreens of suburban Seattle’s most famous office park: a high-tech lab where Microsoft experts and attorneys hunt down cybercriminals. With its darkly lit, police-blue entrance and the supergraphics that identify its forensic lab and evidence room, the 6,800-square-foot Microsoft Cybercrime Center, set within Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Washington, could easily double as the set of CSI. It’s not designed for drama’s sake, though: malware and piracy are serious global problems. Cybercriminals use the “deep Web” to perpetrate human trafficking, and they steal an estimated » GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

155


architecture

The great room, furnished with seating from Benson and tables by Keilhauer, has conference rooms on one side and the Forensic Lab on the other. BOTTOM: “Tour leaders make use of the ‘canal,’ a series of exhibits that describes the threats we face as well as the tools, mechanisms, and processes that the Cybercrime staff use each day to solve those problems,” says architect Alan Maskin. “We want visitors to learn how dire and extensive the problem is, but also to leave with a sense of optimism and security.”

MICROSOFT

$113 billion a year from consumers. For businesses, too, the damage is devastating: 60 percent of small and medium companies are looted right out of business within six months of an attack. The Cybercrime Center isn’t your typical workspace. Nor was it an average design brief. “Over 500 tours go through the center annually, so the space needed an interpretive component while also functioning as a work environment where staff members fight crime in real time,” says architect Alan Maskin, principal and project lead at Olson Kundig. Contrast is key to the space’s success. The architects juxtaposed a series of dark, almost menacing areas with lighter, more welcoming public spaces. When visitors walk past the sober entrance and into the bright great room, with its towering windows, high ceilings, and views onto landscaped gardens, they make “an emotional journey,” says project manager Marlene Chen. “The blue area is a bit scary, but then you turn the corner and the story changes.” The steel-wrapped conference rooms, arranged at the edge of the great room, tell yet another story. With their warm wooden interiors and comfortable human scale, they’re intended to send clients a reassuring message, says Chen: “Here’s how we can partner with you.” When employees feel overwhelmed by the darkness of their work—when they want a break from PhotoDNA (an anti–child pornography technology) or SitePrint (which maps online organized crime networks) or simply crave a dose of sunshine—they walk over to the great room. Reconnecting with nature and light is the ideal reboot before they jump back into the seamy underbelly of the Internet. h

156

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


love this issue ? DON’T MISS THE NEXT ONE.

SUBSCRIBE graymag.net

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

157


resources 25. NEWS Kaikai Kiki english.kaikaikiki.co.jp Seattle Asian Art Museum Seattle seattleartmuseum.org

McLeod Bovell Modern Houses Vancouver mcleodbovell.com Zinc Art & Interiors Edmonds, WA zincartinteriors.com

26. SCENE: HAPPENINGS Altabira City Tavern Portland altabira.com

30. GRAY LOVES Zoe Pawlak zoepawlak.com

Christian Liaigre christian-liaigre.us

Jeff Martin Vancouver jeffmartinjoinery.ca

Dunn + Hobbes Seattle dunnandhobbes.com Graham Baba Architects Seattle grahambaba.com Holst Architecture Portland holstarc.com Hotel Eastlund Portland hoteleastlund.com IDSA idsa.org Interior Design Show West Vancouver idswest.com Kayla Burke Design Portland kaylaburkedesign.com Kurt Farm Shop Seattle kurtwoodfarms.com Ligne Roset Vancouver and Seattle ligne-roset.com Livingspace Vancouver livingspace.com MakerFlat Portland makerflat.com Niche Outside Seattle nicheoutside.com Portland Institute of Contemporary Art Portland pica.org SKL Architects Seattle sklarchitects.com Studio Art Direct Portland studioartdirect.com Vancouver Art Gallery Vancouver vanartgallery.bc.ca Woock Design Studio Portland dylanwoock.com

31. SCENE: SOURCED Charlie & Lee Vancouver charlieandlee.com Johan Portland shopjohan.com Station 7 Seattle station7seattle.com 32. SCENE: TRENDS Diane Thompson Vancouver clothlab.com Kirsten Southwell Portland kmsouthwell.com Megan Callahan Seattle megcallahan.com 34. SCENE: PROFILE Martha Sturdy Vancouver marthasturdy.com 36. SCENE: NEWS Interface Engineering Portland interfaceengineering.com James Beard Public Market Portland jamesbeardmarket.com Mayer/Reed Portland mayerreed.com SERA Architects Portland serapdx.com Snøhetta snøhetta.com Studio Jeffreys Portland studiojeffreys.com 40. SCENE: CONTEXT Nic Lehoux Vancouver niclehoux.com

Zenbox Design Portland zenboxdesign.com

47. STYLE: SHOP Best Practice Architecture Seattle bestpracticearchitecture.com

30. SCENE: DISPATCH Emily Counts Portland st-eloy.com

Big Leaf Manufacturing Seattle bigleafmfg.com

158

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

Kelly Mark kellymark.com Likelihood Seattle shoplikelihood.com Method Construction Seattle methodconstruction.com Noble Neon Seattle nobleneon.com Troy Pillow Sculpture Seattle pillowstudios.com Yoshihara Furniture Seattle yoshiharafurniture.com 51. STYLE: FASHION Aleksandra Pollner Seattle aleksandrapollner.com Aleph Geddis Orcas Island, WA alephgeddis.com Baby & Company Seattle babyandco.us Bellevue Arts Museum Bellevue, WA bellevuearts.org By Malene Birger bymalenebirger.com Casa Malaspina Vancouver casamalaspina.com Charlie Schuck Seattle charlieschuck.com Erich Ginder Studio Seattle erichginder.com Faris Seattle farisfaris.com Fruitsuper Seattle fruitsuperdesign.com Jamyrlyn Mallory Seattle jamyrlynmallory.com Knauf and Brown Vancouver knaufandbrown.com Lift Label Portland liftlabel.com Maiden Noir Seattle maidennoir.com Michele Andrews Seattle mishnar.com Phloem Studio Portland phloemstudio.com Portland Garment Factory Portland portlandgarmentfactory.com Priory of Ten Vancouver priorypriory.com

Schai Bellevue, WA schaischai.com Silvae Seattle silvae.co Ter Et Bantine teretbantine.com Wyatt Orr Seattle wyattorr.com 60. STYLE: INTERIORS Chown Hardware Portland chownhardware.com Cole & Son cole-and-son.com First Cascade Corporation Lake Oswego, OR firstcascade.com Kartell kartell.com Kelly Wearstler kellywearstler.com Montigo Ferndale, WA montigo.com Moooi moooi.com Pental Granite & Marble Portland pentalonline.com Room & Board Seattle roomandboard.com Vanillawood Lake Oswego, OR vanillawood.com 100. DARK STAR Christopher Gelber Portland gelber2000.wordpress.com Flos flos.com

Bearmark Design & Landscape Vancouver bearmarkdesign.com Inspiration Furniture Vancouver inspirationfurniture.ca Iredale Group Architecture Vancouver and Victoria, B.C. iredale.ca KBC Developments Vancouver kbcdevelopments.com Refind Vancouver refindhomefurnishings.com Sholto Design Studio Vancouver vancouvercustomfurniture.com 114. ISLAND SPIRIT Albini Lapierre Hornby Island, B.C. (250) 335-3252 D’Arcy Jones Architecture Vancouver darcyjones.com Gabriel Ross Victoria, B.C. grshop.com Hunter Woodworking Ltd. Mill Bay, B.C. hunterwoodworking.ca Ian Maclean and Company Hornby Island, B.C. (250) 335-2901 Sumana Garden & Nursery Hornby Island, B.C. (250) 335-1916 West Coast Eco Home Victoria, B.C. westcoastecohome.com 121. NEW TRADITIONAL 12th Avenue Iron Seattle 12thavenueiron.com

Foscarini foscarini.com

Alex Goldie Custom Furniture alexgoldiecustom.com

Hive Modern Portland hivemodern.com

Algia King Portland (503) 703-3754

Kingsmen Contracting Vancouver, WA kingsmencontracting.com

Atiyeh Bros. Tigard, OR atiyehbros.com

Kohler kohler.com

Atlas Stone Products Burnaby, B.C. atlasstone.ca

Niche Modern nichemodern.com Rocky Mountain Hardware Ketchum, ID rockymountainhardware.com WetStyle wetstyle.ca 106. TRUST THE VISION A Good Chick to Know Vancouver agoodchicktoknow.com

Bakstad Construction Seattle bakstadconstruction.com Bari Designs Richmond, B.C. baridesign.com Bedford Brown Portland bedfordbrown.com Benjamin Moore benjaminmoore.com


The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the PACIFIC NORTHWEST GRAY is the authority on design in the greater Pacific Northwest, offering insider access to exclusive stories, emerging trends, and rising-star talent. Topics range from stunning architecture and interiors to innovative product design ... from cutting-edge fashion to inspiring conceptual projects. GRAY is for and about design connoisseurs, with each issue showcasing the best residential and commercial design throughout Washington, Oregon, British Columbia, Idaho, Alaska, and beyond. Don’t miss a single issue ... subscribe today!

INTERIORS • ARCHITECTURE • FASHION • ART • DESIGN

get inspired!

BAJA, FIJI, SAN FRANCISCO:

renovations

ANd UNExPEcTEd INTERIORS The Design Magazine for the Pacific Northwest

INTERIORS • ARCHITECTURE • FASHION • ART • DESIGN

INTERIORS • ARCHITECTURE • FASHION • ART • DESIGN

plus: fRESH IdEAS fOR kITcHENS ANd bATHS

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest

36

UNEXPECTED DESIGN DESTINATIONS YOUR SUMMER ROADTRIP SHORTLIST

INTERIOR DESIGN SHOW WEST

PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGNERS

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest

LEAVE THEIR MARK ON THE WORLD

2015

PREVIEW GUIDE

ISSUE NO. 23:

A STUDY IN CONTRASTS FURNITURE meets FASHION URBAN DEVELOPMENT meets DECAY ART meets NATURE TRADITIONAL meets MODERN MINIMA LISM meets OP ULENCE RE FIN ED me ets RU S

TIC

INSPIRED BY TRAVEL: HOMES, GARDENS, & MORE ISSUE No. TWENTY-TWO : $7 US; $9 CDN

ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE : $7 US; $9 CDN

ts TE

HI

W

OsMOse Design’s bOlD visiOn fOr a POrtlanD cOttage dISPLAY THROUGH MAY 2015

DISPLAY THROUGH SEPTEMBER 2015

DISPLAY THROUGH JULY 2015

COVER 0815.indd 1 COVER 0415.indd 1

✂ 1 year $30 // 6 issues 2 years $50 // 12 issues

3/16/15 11:57 AM

COVER 0615.indd 1

7/16/15 1:47 PM

5/15/15 12:44 PM

Subscribe online at graymag.net Or fill out this form and mail with payment to: GRAY, 19410 Hwy. 99, Ste. A #207, Lynnwood, WA 98036

NAME (PLEASE PRINT)

EMAIL

ADDRESS APT CITY ❑ CHECK ENCLOSED ❑ VISA ❑ MC

CK

ee

interior AvAnt-gArde:

BL

A

STYLISH STAYS: 9 NEW HOTELS YOU NEED TO KNOW

m

ISSUE No. TWENTY-ONE : $7 US; $9 cdN

ST/PRV ZIP COUNTRY

____ ____ ____ ____

EXP.

_ _ /_ _

CVC

___

❑ CC BILLING ADDRESS SAME AS ABOVE ❑ IF DIFFERENT, PLEASE INCLUDE US funds. Available to US and Canadian addresses. International addresses add $10. Your first issue will arrive in 6 to 9 weeks. By providing your e-mail address, you are agreeing to receive GRAY’s e-newsletter. GRAY does not sell or rent subscriber names, e-mail addresses, or mailing information. E-mail: info@graymag.net Fax: 866.437.6204


resources Brougham Interiors Vancouver broughaminteriors.com

Phloem Studio Portland phloemstudio.com

Dew Engineering Medford, OR dew-engineering.com

Cherner Chair Company chernerchair.com

Rima Martinez Interior Design Vancouver rimamartinez.com

Earth Stone Tile Installation Medford, OR (541) 535-9907

Conquistador Builders Surrey, B.C. (604) 538-3393 DJ Bobcat and Landscaping Services Surrey, B.C. (604) 536-1456 Flying Anvil Studio Seattle flyinganvilstudio.com Frost Fine Homes Surrey, B.C. frosthomes.ca Farrow & Ball Multiple locations farrow-ball.com G&B Woodcraft Surrey, B.C. gbwoodcraft.com Geralynne Mitschke Design Vancouver geralynnemitschkedesign.com Gienow Windows and Doors Richmond, B.C. gienow.com Honeychurch Antiques Seattle honeychurch.com

Restoration Hardware restorationhardware.com Roll & Hill rollandhill.com Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co. Portland schoolhouseelectric.com Secto Design sectodesign.fi Still Point Architecture Vancouver stillpointarchitecture.com Studio C Seattle cathyconner.com Taryn Emerson Interiors Lake Oswego, OR tarynemerson.com Urban Hardwoods Seattle urbanhardwoods.com Vastu Concepts Contractors Lake Oswego, OR (503) 805-3491

Green Hammer Portland greenhammer.com Hastens hastens.com LandCurrent Eugene, OR landcurrent.com Minotti minotti.com STUDIO-E Architecture Eugene, OR studio-e-architecture.com Token NYC tokennyc.com Vistosi vistosi.com William Olsen Designs Ashland, OR williamolsendesigns.com 154. ARCHITECTURE BRC Acoustics & Audiovisual Design Seattle brcacoustics.com Bensen Vancouver bensen.ca

4. B & B Italia Seattle bebitalia.com divafurniture.com 18. Bellevue Arts Museum Bellevue, WA bellevuearts.org 5. Best Plumbing Seattle bestplumbing.com

63. Bradlee Distributors, Inc. Multiple locations bradlee.net

164. Lounge22 Los Angeles lounge22.com

33. Brian Paquette Interiors Seattle brianpaquetteinteriors.com

151. Madera Furniture Company Tacoma, WA maderafurnitureco.com

14. Bright on Presidio San Francisco brightonpresidio.com 16. Chown Hardware Portland, Bellevue, WA chown.com

149. Colorhouse Portland colorhousepaint.com

153. Nate Watters natewatters.com

Knoll knoll.com

Loloi loloi.azurewebsites.net

Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushrugs.com

M. Callahan Studio Seattle megcallahan.com

L. G. Burton Design Surrey, B.C. lgburtondesign.ca

NW Rugs & Furniture Multiple PNW locations nwrugs.com

Lake Oswego Upholstery Lake Oswego, OR (503) 635-9991

Room & Board Seattle roomandboard.com

Lee Industries leeindustries.com

Selamat selamatdesigns.com

162. MY NORTHWEST Elm Coffee Roasters Seattle elmcoffeeroasters.com

Lucas Design Associates Seattle lucasinterior.com

Sofa Table Chair Portland sofatablechair.com

Hum Creative Seattle humcreative.com

120. Hammer & Hand Seattle and Portland hammerandhand.com

142. ARCHITECTURE Blackwell Architecture Vancouver blackwellarchitecture.com

AD INDEX 151. 18KARAT eighteenkarat.com

2. Hive Portland hivemodern.com

Manor Fine Wares Portland manorfinewares.com Murphy Wall Beds Surrey, B.C. murphybeds.com Nate Ethington Portland nateethington.com

146. ARCHITECTURE ACE Engineering Ashland, OR ace-engineeringllc.com

Patra Stone Works Surrey, B.C. patrastoneworks.com

Amrhein Associates Ashland, OR (541) 482-6680

Perch Furniture Portland perchfurniture.com

Bulthaup bulthaup.com

160

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

10. Cosentino cosentino.com dekton.com 99. David Papazian Photography, Inc. Portland papazianphoto.com

Olson Kundig Seattle olsonkundigarchitects.com

39. Design in Public Seattle designinpublic.org

Schuchart Seattle schuchart.com

139. Dovetail General Contractors Seattle dovetailgc.com

50. Alchemy Collections Seattle alchemycollections.com camerichseattle.com 130. Anderson Poolworks andersonpoolworks.com 139. Autonomous Furniture Collective Victoria, B.C. autonomousfurniture.com

15. The Modern Fan Co. modernfan.com 153. Museum of Vancouver Vancouver museumofvancouver.ca

J. Garner Home Seattle jgarnerhome.com

Switchlite Privacy Glass switchlite.com

35. Maison Inc. Portland, maisoninc.com

141. Collins Portland collinswood.com

IGK Finishing Carpentry Vancouver igkfinishingcarpentry.ca

ImagiCorps Seattle imagicorps.com

143. L A M P welovelamp.ca

66. BLANCO blancocanada.com blancoamerica.com

141. Beyond Beige North Vancouver beyondbeige.com

140. NEW TRADITIONAL Four Hands fourhands.com

KPFF Structural Engineers Seattle kpff.com

23. KBC Developments Vancouver kbcdevelopments.com

59. Loewen loewen.com Available through: Sound Glass Tacoma soundglass.com Windows Doors & More Seattle windowshowroom.com

Hunt & Gather Portland huntgather.com

Keilhauer keilhauer.com

149. K & L Interiors Seattle kandlinteriors.com

145. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com 163. The Fixture Gallery Multiple locations thefixturegallery.com

24. IDSA idsa.org 6. 67. Interior Design Show West Vancouver idswest.com 19. Interlam interlam-design.com 145. John Sinal Photography johnsinal.com

153. Paper Hammer Seattle paper-hammer.com 143. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com 151. Resource Furniture Vancouver resourcefurniture.com 17. Roche Bobois Seattle, Portland roche-bobois.com 13. Room & Board Seattle roomandboard.com 11. Schuchart/Dow Seattle schuchartdow.com 149. Studio Gioia Seattle sgioia.com 49. Tufenkian Portland tufenkianportland.com 153 . Vanillawood Portland vanillawood.com 46. WestEdge Design Fair Santa Monica westedgedesignfair.com 151. William Anthony Photography wmanthony.com


market The ultimate buyer’s guide. Your resource for everything from design studios and artisans to trades- and craftspeople.

DEMI-LUNE Owner and interior designer Keven Weber presents his unique finds alongside new and previously employed quality home furnishings acquired through private consignment. We also create a mix that can be exclusively yours through our professional interior design services. Contact us to feature your quality consignments! 2514 Fourth Ave. Seattle, WA 98121 lademi-lune.com (206) 728-5600

not2big® React. Reduce. Rethink. Recycle. Relax. At not2big, we build modern artisan furniture and accessories one piece at a time. Handcrafted and individually numbered, no two pieces are exactly alike. Our designs combine the warmth of wood with a creative mix of other materials to produce timeless furniture that is functional and beautiful. Whether you choose an in-house design or a custom piece, it will be a true original. Our goal is to inspire, delight, and surprise, bringing our clients a personalized experience and providing them with a unique product not available anywhere else. We’re rethinking how furniture is made. www.not2big.com (425) 503-0710

Tom Bakker Design Are you building a new home, condo, or office, or are you planning to remodel? As a professional interior designer, I would love to work with you. I’m a great listener and have been involved in projects all along the West Coast, from Vancouver, B.C., to La Jolla, CA. I also create one-of-a-kind contemporary art, and I’d be happy to discuss your custom-art needs as well. My latest commission was recently installed in a home at Big Horn Golf Club in Palm Desert, CA. Call me today to book your first consultation. (206) 877-3327 • (604) 329-9419 tom@tombakkerdesign.com • www.tombakkerdesign.com

Jamieson Furniture Gallery For the past 25 years, designer Richard Jamieson has been recognized as a leader in the modern urban plank movement. Jamieson Furniture’s large Bellevue showroom artfully blends handcrafted live-edged tables with unique and custom-designed hardwood furniture for all the rooms in your home. 10217 Main Street, Bellevue, WA 98004 www.jamiesonfurniture.com (425) 577-8627

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE

161


my northwest WHO:

kate harmer Creative director and founder, Hum Creative

WHERE: Elm Coffee Roasters, Seattle Photographed by NATE WATTERS

Ever since she launched the design and branding studio Hum Creative in 2010, Kate Harmer has steadily expanded her creative footprint. Hum started in a small spare room in Harmer’s North Seattle house, but as her staff and portfolio grew, she knocked down a wall to merge two additional bedrooms into workspace. Soon “85 percent of my home was my office, and eight people had keys to my front door,” she recalls. It was time for a change. So in 2014, the Hum crew, drawn to Pioneer Square’s burgeoning design community, moved to a bright and spacious brick-walled loft in the neighborhood. “I love the energy here right now,” Harmer says. “Pioneer Square is growing rapidly but still has edge and a lot of historic character.” When she needs fresh perspective on a project or to just “shake loose,” as she puts it, she walks down the street to Elm Coffee Roasters, a chic coffee shop that doubles as an impromptu community center. “Every time I go, I run into photographers, creative directors, freelancers, and people from agencies like Digital Kitchen and Tether. It’s a hub of creative energy—an extension of what I hoped this neighborhood would be when we moved here.” ❈

162

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-THREE


Style and substance strike a perfect balance in the bathroom faucet collections from American Standard速. Style are andengineered substance strike a perfect balance in the bathroom faucet collectionsdrip-free from American Standard速. Our faucets to look beautiful and function flawlessly. Worry-free, and built to last, Our faucets are engineered to look beautiful and function flawlessly. Worry-free, drip-free and built to last, all of our bathroom faucets are covered by our Limited Lifetime Warranty on function and finish. Designed all of our bathroom faucets are covered by our Limited Lifetime Warranty on function and finish. Designed to create an elegant and luxuriousexpression bathroom focal our freestanding come in a varietyfrom of styles Presenting an inimitable ofpoint, true heritage, the DXV collection Presenting Presenting inimitable an inimitable expression expression true ofpoint, true heritage, heritage, thetubs the DXV DXV collection from from to create anan elegant and luxurious bathroomof focal our freestanding tubs comecollection in a variety of styles and are made to fit in the space of an average-sized bathroom. American Standard captures the essence of influential design from the last 150 American American Standard Standard captures captures the the essence essence of influential of influential design design from from the the last last 150 150 and are made to fit in the space of an average-sized bathroom. Come in today to speak with one of our knowledgeable kitchen & bath consultants years. Our products evoke aone strong nostalgic connection toto classic design while Come in today to speak with ofaour knowledgeable kitchen & bath consultants years. years. Our Our products products evoke evoke a strong strong nostalgic nostalgic connection connection classic to classic design design while while

setting thethe standard forfor modern bathrooms. Come inintoday totospeak with aa a setting setting the standard standard modern for modern bathrooms. bathrooms. Come Come today in today speak to speak withwith Tigard Showroom Bend Showroom Salem Showroom Eugene Showroom representative and discover the solution. representative representative and and discover discover theperfect the perfect perfect solution. solution. 7337 S.W. Kable Lane 20625 Brinson Blvd. 2710 S.E. Pringle Rd., #110 110 N. Garfield 503-620-7050 541-382-1999 503-779-2882

See

541-688-7621

Seattle Showroom Pacific Showroom 8221 Greenwood Ave. N. 703 Valentine Ave S.E. our new website THEFIXTUREGALLERY.COM 206-632-4488 253-299-7156

See our new website THEFIXTUREGALLERY.COM

VISIT OUR OTHER SHOWROOMS IN IDAHO ANDAND WASHINGTON See See our our new new website website THEFIXTUREGALLERY.COM THEFIXTUREGALLERY.COM VISIT OUR OTHER SHOWROOMS IN IDAHO WASHINGTON See our new website THEFIXTUREGALLERY.COM VISIT VISIT OUR OUR OTHER OTHER SHOWROOMS SHOWROOMS IDAHO IN IDAHO AND AND WASHINGTON WASHINGTON VISIT OUR OTHER SHOWROOMS ININ IDAHO AND WASHINGTON

at Consolidated Supply Co. at Consolidated Supply Co.

atLike Consolidated Supply Co. us on Facebook at Consolidated Supply Co.

at Consolidated atus Consolidated Supply Supply Co. Co. Like on Facebook

LikeLike uson on us Facebook on Facebook Facebook Like us


We’ve heard Marsala is the official Pantone color o f the year.

That’s nice... Lead the flock.

CHELSEA

CHAIR

®

Chelsea Chair. Made in L.A. Designed by Armen Sevada Gharabegian.Visit lounge22.com

GRAY No. 23  

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest.