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INTERIORS • ARCHITECTURE • FASHION • ART • DESIGN ™

Creative Couples Design duos share the secrets to successful collaboration The Design Magazine for the Pacific Northwest

In Your

Element

Design Inspired by the

Natural World indoors + out:

43

new products, furnishings, and accessories for stylish living

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taccia lamp by achille castiglioni, 1962 - chasen suspension lamp by patricia urquiola, 2007 - made in italy by flos

please inquire about our A&D trade program

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flos artek vitra fritz hansen kartell bensen herman miller knoll artifort foscarini moooi emeco moroso montis and more!

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DISCOVER SHADES from Marvin

HANDCRAFTED IN AMERICA AND AVAILABLE ONLY AT YOUR LOCAL MARVIN DEALER

Shades from Marvin® are the most recent innovation from a family-owned company that’s been an industry leader for four generations. You can’t find visionary products like this at big-box retailers, only your local Marvin dealers have the knowledge and expertise to give you both a product and experience unmatched by any other manufacturer. Every Marvin product, from windows to doors and now shades, is made to order, just for your home. That’s what we like to call the Marvin difference.

Find the fit that will enhance your home at MARVIN.COM/SHADES

Pine wood with Espresso stain and Tan shades in blackout opacity.

Contact your local, independent Marvin dealer to explore all your options.

Goldfinch Brothers, Inc. 2812 Rucker Ave. Everett, WA 98201 425-258-4662 GoldfinchBros.com

Lundgren Enterprises, Inc. 2425 NW Market St. Seattle, WA 98107 206-789-1122 LundgrenEnterprises.com

Western Pacific Building Materials Everett – 425-742-5195 Western Pacific Design Studio Bellevue – 425-250-8327 GoWestPac.com

©2014 Marvin Windows and Doors. All rights reserved. ®Registered trademark of Marvin Windows and Doors.

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cont 24

33

46

april – may.14

8. hello

In praise of constraints.

SCENE

17. news

A preview of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s new survey show—plus the must-attend events, exhibitions, and activities of the season.

22. next

Three rising-star designers launch a brand, and premiere their next- generation LED lights.

24. in season

The allure of local flowers.

28. process

Chinese designer Bing Bing Deng updates the art of cloisonné.

STYLE 33. elements

New furnishings and products inspired by the natural world.

44. made here

A Ketchum, Idaho, woodworker and musician launches a new series of custom-built electric guitars.

46. origin

Seattle artist Louie Gong draws on his Native American heritage to design custom shoes and products.

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48. interiors

Interior designer Robert Bailey creates a contemporary mountain haven for an art dealer and her son.

52. sourced

Take a ride on one of these magic carpets—bright colors and patterns to enliven your home.

54. outdoor

A steep Seattle lot is transformed into a playful landscape that’s equally appealing for kids and adults.

58. sourced

Patio party! We’ve got the outdoor picks to prep your deck for spring.


tents 48

66

FEATURES

BACK OF BOOK

60. on the rocks

81. insight

Faced with a difficult cliffside site, a Vancouver–based architecture studio tackles the challenge of designing a modern house on the edge of Gambier Island.

66. domestic kinetics

Designed by Skylab Architecture, Portland’s Skyline Residence epitomizes the firm’s signature angular aesthetic—and the residents’ bold, colorful style.

74. home at last

After construction on their house stalled, a couple in Anchorage, Alaska, called on Seattle architect Steve Bull to redesign the interiors within the constraints of the existing steel frame.

What’s the secret to successful collaboration? We poll six creative Pacific Northwest couples who live, work, and design together.

94. resources

Your guide to the designers, shops, furnishings, craftsmen, and suppliers featured in this issue.

98. my northwest

What inspires the founders of Cause+Affect, a Vancouver brand- ing agency? Their evolving city; the future; and Bestie, a new sausage- and-fries restaurant.

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On the Cover

An off-the-grid home nestled amid the trees and cliffs on Gambier Island, British Columbia. See page

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Written by LINDSEY M. ROBERTS Photographed by JP Delage/OMB

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hello

In Praise of Constraints

“Constraints equal opportunities in my book. I like to view them more like the edges of a canvas rather than as obstacles to overcome.”

—Steve McFarlane, Architect (pg 60)

A few years ago I met an architect who was working on two very different projects at the same time. The first was a small home for clients with a tight budget and a challenging, steep lot. The second was a $10 million mansion. Due to the clients’ deep pockets and uncomplicated site, almost anything was possible. Sounds like a dream project, right? Not according to the architect. Without constraints he felt lost; he was more excited to talk about the small gem of a home he’d created for the first clients, whose budget and site pushed him to innovate and create something original from humble materials. Design is a problem-solving practice; often, the most compelling projects are interesting solutions to interesting problems. The Seattle-based architect Steve Bull knows a thing or two about constraints—and he welcomes them in his projects. “The more pieces of the puzzle you’re trying to fit together, the more interesting things can get,” he told me recently. He hit the jackpot, then, with a home he recently completed in Anchorage, Alaska, which he had to design to fit within the confines of a preexisting steel frame (pg 74). Other projects have fewer bounds—they’re mansions on flat lots, or, as Bull put it, “small things in big fields.” Bull was speaking literally, about a cabin he designed for his family on a 12-acre lot. With no outside pressures dictating the structure’s form or location, Bull decided to site it on the border of two ecosystems, as a way to have something to respond to architecturally. But “small things in big fields” is an apt metaphor for challenges in other creative disciplines as well. For example, putting together a design magazine. There is an endless array of strong work to cover in the Pacific Northwest. How to corral it, and create a magazine whose content feels rich, focused, and cohesive? Like architects do on those rare wide-open, sky’s-the-limit projects, editors at GRAY devise a self-imposed framework. We invent themes, loose organizing principles that shape our approach to each issue. We call this one our Elements issue, but we went wide. In the pages that follow, you’ll find houses with sensitive, nuanced relationships with their sites; a product roundup inspired by the concept of Wu Xing, or the five elements in Chinese philosophy; and stories about landscape architecture, local flowers, and outdoor furnishings. With each issue we relearn how inspiring— and even freeing—constraints can be. No pressure, no diamonds, as the saying goes. We’re excited to share the gems of our discoveries with you. jaime@graymag.net

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Classic Contemporary Home Furnishings Montego sofa $2079; Montego table $649; Sora stool $119; all items priced as shown. roomandboard.com | 800.952.8455 GRAY ISSUE No. FIFTEEN

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Torsion >> Bright Nickel with Maple Blades and optional Light

™

Founder + Publisher

Shawn Williams shawn@graymag.net editorial director

Jaime Gillin jaime@graymag.net editor

Rachel Gallaher rachel@graymag.net Managing Editor

Lindsey M. Roberts lindsey@graymag.net Landscape and Culture editor

Debra Prinzing debra@graymag.net Style Director

Stacy Kendall stacy@graymag.net Associate Style Editor

Nicole Munson nicole@graymag.net Photo Editor

Alexa McIntyre photo@graymag.net Style Contributing Editor

Jasmine Vaughan Portland contributing editor

Brian Libby InternS

Ashley Eisen Courtney Ferris Contributors

Barry Calhoun, Josh Dunford, Erinn Gleeson, John Granen, Alex Hayden, Jeremy Jude Lee, Sarah Miles, Janis Nicolay, Tal Roberts, Kevin G. Smith, Lindsay J. Westley, Bruce Wolf

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Erica Clemeson erica@graymag.net Craig Miller craig@graymag.net Kim Schmidt kim@graymag.net

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES shawn@graymag.net Editorial inquiries submissions@graymag.net Subscription inquiries info@graymag.net No. 15. Copyright Š2014. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 19410 Hwy 99, Ste. A #207, Lynnwood, WA 98036. Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years

Celebrating the modern idiom

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modernfan.com

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Subscribe online at graymag.net


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contributors

Barry Calhoun barrycalhounphotography.com pg 84

JOSH DUNFORD burnkit.com pg 48

Erinn Gleeson pg 28

John Granen johngranen.com pg 54

Alex Hayden alexhayden.com pg 24

Jeremy jude lee jeremyjudelee.com pg 98

BRIAN LIBBY portlandarchitecture.com pg 66

Sarah miles reelizashens.com pg 46

Janis nicolay janisnicolay.com pg 90

Tal Roberts talroberts.com pg 44, 86

Kevin G. Smith kgsalaskaphoto.com pg 74

Jasmine Vaughan madeandstate.com pg 33

Lindsay j. westley lindsayjwestley.com pg 44

BRUCE WOLF brucewolfstudio.com pg 66

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AKJ Architects LLC

BC&J Architecture

Ben Trogdon Architects

Coates Design Architects

Coop15

Duncan McRoberts Associates

akjarchitects.com

coatesdesign.com

bcandj.com

coop15.com

bentrogdonarchitects.com

mcroberts-associates.com

These architecture and design firms are doing outstanding work in this region. They also support GRAY and our efforts to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. Please contact them for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.net or link directly to their sites to learn more.

Gelotte Hommas gelottehommas.com

Johnson Squared Architects johnsonsquared.com

KASA Architecture kasaarchitecture.com

Pacific Northwest

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Nathan Good Architects nathangoodarchitects.com


COMING NEXT ISSUE

Chris Pardo Design: Elemental Architecture elementalarchitecture.com

FabCab

fabcab.com

Best Practice Architecture & Design Bosworth Hoedemaker

JANIS NICOLAY

atelierjones llc

brendon farrell architect Callison chadbourne + doss architects DeForest Architects Eggleston | Farkas Architects Giulietti/Schouten AIA Architects JANOF ARCHITECTURE Prentiss Architects, Inc.

The TRAVEL Issue • Insider guides to the design capitals—and hidden gems—of the Pacific Northwest • Behind the scenes in Portland and Tokyo with John Jay, designer and creative powerhouse • In their own words: Local design luminaries reveal their favorite spots around the globe • The best bags, clothing, and outdoor gear for stylish traveling

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Anchor Your Room

KUSH HANDMADE RUGS

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205 NW 10th Ave. Portland, OR. 97209 503.231.0700 www.kushrugs.com GRAY ISSUE No. FIFTEEN

The Mosaic Collection


scene

news

photo (C) Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto / Paul Kuhn Gallery, Calgary

A detail of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s Salton Sea, California, USA, one of 44 images included in a survey show at the Vancouver Art Gallery this spring.

EXHIBIT Through May 26

This spring, the Vancouver Art Gallery is playing host to Edward Burtynsky, one of Canada’s most lauded photographers. Showcasing 44 photographs from the museum’s permanent collection (34 are new acquisitions), the exhibit spans three decades of work, from Burtynsky’s early documentation of homesteads and rail lines in British Columbia to more-recent investigations into water’s monumental effects around the globe.  vanartgallery.bc.ca

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scene

| news For a preview of WantedDesign, go to Graymag .net/wanted design

EVENT May 16–19

Sponsored by GRAY, seven Seattle-based design studios will present their work at the 2014 WantedDesign show in New York City May 16–19, one of the liveliest events during the citywide NYCxDESIGN festival. Joining forces to share exhibition space are 16th Workshop, Chadhaus, Fruitsuper, Seattle Design Bureau, Piano Nobile, Urbancase, and Standard Socket. The goal? To “highlight the individual talents of each studio and bring awareness to the Seattle design scene as a whole—and its spirit of cooperation,” says designer Darin Montgomery.



COMPETITION Due May 15

IKONPHOTO + NUDESIGNSTUDIO

LECTURES

Iwan Baan

April 8–10, 15–17

TOP: This May, the fourth edition of WantedDesign takes over the Terminal Stores building on 11th Avenue in New York City, featuring seven studios from Seattle. ABOVE: House N in Oita, Japan, exemplifies Sou Fujimoto’s innovative approach to architecture—a subject he’ll discuss at Portland State University on April 24.

Is it “less is more,” or “less is a bore”? The Alaska Design Forum is knee-deep in its search for the answer to this question through its lecture series, Bling. Touching down for one night each at venues in Juneau, Fairbanks, and Anchorage, internationally renowned designers explore how material choices can bring beauty to objects and buildings. Up next are lectures by Bangkok multidisciplinary design studio Supermachine, and New York–based, idea-driven architecture firm Solid Objectives.  alaskadesignforum.org

April 24, May 15

Portland State University’s School of Architecture is wrapping up its Unclad lecture series with talks by two influential designers: the wildly innovative Tokyo-based architect Sou Fujimoto on April 24, and Austin, Texas–based environmental architect David Heymann (perhaps best known for designing a passive solar vacation home for George W. Bush) on May 15.  pdx.edu/the-arts

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How can we reintegrate aging populations into active community settings? Portland State University’s Center for Public Interest Design competition challenges you to come up with fresh models for intergenerational housing.  cpidcompetitions.org

TOUR April 26

After years of ridicule, Vancouver Specials—boxy, affordably built houses from the ‘60s and ‘70s—are seeing a revival of sorts, and the Vancouver Heritage Foundation has set up a tour to win you over. In its sixth year running, this selfguided tour features five renovated homes that showcase just how adaptable these floor plans can be with a dose of creativity.  vancouverheritage foundation.org

CONFERENCE April 1 ��� 6

The University of Oregon’s student-run HOPES (Holistic Options for Planet Earth Sustainability) Conference, held in Eugene, is celebrating its 20th anniversary. This year’s theme, “Inevitability,” challenges students, faculty, community members, and visiting luminaries—past speakers include Shigeru Ban, Samuel Mockbee, and Neri Oxman—to address how design can embrace the dynamics of nature and changing climates.  hopes.uoregon.edu


Ken Garland

4/18/2014

Seattle Public Library – Downtown Doors at 6:30 PM | FREE Admission

Ken Garland is a noted British graphic designer. In 1963 he authored the First Things First manifesto which advocated “in favour of the more useful and more lasting forms of communication” over the increasing overuse of design talent in advertising. He has since designed award winning games and books.

SUPPORT FOR THIS EVENT IS PROVIDED BY

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scene

| news



“As a woodcarver, I use a medium that was once alive and is no longer. It’s easy to see why my work references time, mortality, entropy, and the body, because in a dead tree, it’s already there.” —Dan Webb, Artist Arthur Aubrey. Collection of Jennifer and Christopher Roberts.

EXHIBITS Through April 27

The biennial Portland2014, presented by Disjecta Contemporary Art Center, celebrates artists who are pushing boundaries within contemporary art. The work ranges from visual art to film to performance-based installations, all on view in galleries, kiosks, and on billboards throughout Portland.  biennial.disjecta.org

May 1–4

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: A view of the Bangkok University Creative Center, designed by the Thai firm Supermachine, whose founder will speak in Alaska this spring. Dan Webb’s Splash, 2006, on view at the Bellevue Arts Museum. The Maryhill Museum hosts an exhibit of James Lee Hansen’s sculptures; his bronze Shaman is shown here. The New York–based installation artist Alex Mackin Dolan is among the emerging talent participating in the Portland2014 biennial.

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Rub shoulders with some of the most prestigious decorative painters from around the globe at the 19th annual Salon of Decorative Artists—an international event hosted this year in Seattle (previous cities include Tokyo and Versailles). Sound Transit’s Union Station Great Hall will be transformed with live painting demonstrations, lectures, and the creation of a mural that will be donated to the City of Seattle.  salonseattle2014.com

Through June 15

The whimsical sculptures of Seattle artist Dan Webb elicit a double-take; yes, that crumpled pillow and rippling drop of water are actually intricately carved chunks of wood, seemingly brought to life via Webb’s skillful chisel. Don’t miss the artist’s first-ever solo show, “Fragile Fortress: The Art of Dan Webb,” at the Bellevue Arts Museum through June 15.  bellevuearts.org

Through July 27

The remote Maryhill Museum, located in a grand Beaux Arts mansion on the Columbia River Gorge, is well worth a day trip for its new exhibit featuring bronze sculptures and study models by renowned Battleground, Washington–based sculptor James Lee Hansen. Pack a picnic; the views from the grounds are spectacular.  maryhillmuseum.org

Through August 23

“Portland Collects: British Ceramics” at the Museum of Contemporary Craft offers a rare glimpse into locals’ collections of mid-century to contemporary ceramics, in the process highlighting the lineage and influence of British craftsmanship in the United States. Even more uniquely, this exhibit will examine the relationship between object and collector, gathering the stories behind each piece.  mocc.pnca.edu


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scene

| next

“What excites us about LEDs? Obviously the newness. We’ve been able to rethink what a light fixture is and how it illuminates.” —Matt Davis, co-founder, And lighting

Slab, a 9mm-thick acrylic sheet cocooned in felt, is a rare intersection of beauty and brawn. The narrow strip of exposed acrylic glows as if lit from within, the result of a hightech proprietary material that evenly diffuses the light. Meanwhile, the wrapped felt lends the fixture sound-absorbing capabilities that make it perfect for restaurants or offices—or, for that matter, over your own riotous dining table.

1

2

Get Lit

An upstart lighting company proves LEDs can be sexy. Written by Jaime Gillin

And Lighting, the brainchild of three Vancouver–based designers—Matt Davis, Caine Heintzman, and Lukas Peet—will launch its first products, a quartet of lighting collections, this summer. The nascent company’s mission: “To make decorative lights that are beautiful, functional, and progressive,” Peet says. That translates to high-wattage LED fixtures that balance sustainability (one bulb, 50,000 hours of illumination!) with style and practicality. Is this the future of LEDs? We’ve seen the light. h

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1. Pipeline, designed by Caine Heintzman (the rest of the fixtures were designed by Lukas Peet), is a coppercapped aluminum tube that comes in both straight and snaked versions. 2. Spotlights, available in nine shapes and a variety of milky hues, can be hung solo or grouped in tandem, as shown here. Installed, the fixtures seem to float, thanks to an almost-invisible aircraft cable that supports their weight, while their darker, fabric-covered electrical cords arc daintily through the air. 3. Button is a slim disk that gives off an even, diffused light; it’s dimmable, tiltable, reversible (so it can direct illumination up or down) and available up to four feet in diameter.


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scene

| in season

local flora de S I G N I N G with

Written by DEBRA PRINZING : Photographed by alex hayden

You’ve heard of Slow Food. Meet Slow Flowers—

a renaissance taking shape as floral designers seek botanical inspiration closer to home. Like its culinary predecessor, this movement reflects a cultural shift, a desire to support regional farms and to reduce our negative impact on the earth. A vast majority of the cut flowers we buy today in America—approximately 80 percent—are imported. Domestic production fell off a cliff after the 1991 Andean Trade Preference Agreement, which incentivized South America to shift from producing drugs to growing roses, carnations, and other varieties. America’s cottage industry of familyowned flower farms had trouble competing and began to disappear. But it’s comeback time. Some of the most creative florists working today are devoted to local, seasonal blooms. Freshness and quality— not to mention ephemeral beauty and sensory delight—are at the heart of this story. There’s heightened pleasure in knowing who grew your flowers, and how they got to your table. To celebrate the arrival of spring, we asked three area designers to create arrangements with exclusively local flora sourced from the three-year-old Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, a farmer-to-florist cooperative in Georgetown.

Kelly Sullivan, Botanique, Seattle For this arrangement, Sullivan plucked apricot peony-flowering tulips from her own Seattle cutting garden to pair with sultry purple hellebores and delicate stems of white bleeding hearts, both grown at Jello Mold Farm in Mount Vernon, Washington. “These spring flowers are so ephemeral and the pastels contrast beautifully against the moody purple flowers,” she says.

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Anne Bradfield Floressence, Seattle

Bradfield was smitten by these pink-flowering dogwood, harvested in Tillamook, Oregon, by Oregon Coastal Flowers. “Usually there is one thing that grabs my attention and inspires me,” she says. “Only in spring can you find local flowering branches—and they are so awesome for creating elegant drama.” Bradfield combined the dogwood with orange Icelandic poppies (from Jello Mold Farm), plum tulips (from Ojeda Farms in Ethel, Washington), and dark purple anemones (from Everyday Flowers in Stanwood, Washington), all wrapped with a sheet of Oregon moss.

»

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scene

| in season

Karen McIntosh Flowers by Karen, Monroe, Washington

This bouquet began with heady white lilacs (from Oregon Coastal Flowers), which McIntosh considers the scent of spring. She added red twig dogwood tips (from Glenwood Farms in Hillsboro, Oregon), purple-edged white tulips (from Ojeda Farms), pink-apricot ranunculus (from Everyday Flowers), vintage green hellebores (from Jello Mold Farm), grape-hued fritillaries (from Choice Bulb Farm in Mount Vernon, Washington) and 'Romantik Antike' garden roses (from Peterkort Roses in Hillsboro, Oregon). It's springtime in a vase—the perfect expression of the season’s fleeting beauty. h

See more arrangements from local florists at Graymag.net/ slowflowers

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SUDARE

Seattle University Village, 4608 25 th Avenue NE, 206.523.8407 Bellevue 990 102 nd Avenue NE, 425.455.3508 PASSION FOR LINENS SINCE 1845 . yvesdelormeparis.com

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scene

| process Piling Palang’s line of modern cloisonné, available at Inglenuk Design in Vancouver and Kobo in Seattle, includes a round tiffin box with a blue-andwhite floral-andlattice pattern.

To see more Piling Palang pieces, visit graymag.net/ cloisonne

A partnership between a Vancouver shop and a Shanghai industrial designer helps breathe new life into an ancient Chinese craft.

Cloisonné 2.0 Written by ERINN GLEESON

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images courtesy piling palang

l

eisurely strolling through the old city of Shanghai three years ago, Daniela Ang had a transformative experience. “While my husband Leandro [who had a trading company in the city] and I were living in Shanghai, I always tried to go to the old city and places where I knew I could find treasures from China,” Ang says. “On one of my trips I found this shop called Piling Palang and I fell in love with their products the minute I saw them.” A few years later, the Angs settled in Vancouver, and decided to parlay their passion for design and hand-made goods into a career shift. In 2013, they opened Inglenuk Design—and are now the exclusive distributors of Piling Palang’s distinctive, modern cloisonné in North America. Cloisonné is an ancient technique of decorating metalwork where thin strips of copper or bronze are soldered into elaborate designs, followed by the application of colored enamel within the resulting compartments (cloisons in French). Bing Bing Deng, a renowned Chinese industrial designer and the owner of the Piling Palang boutique, brought innovation to the art of traditional cloisonné by forgoing the usual ancient designs in favor of more contemporary patterns and shapes. “When he [Deng] decided to modernize it, he used patterns like circles, ovals and lines,” Ang says. “You’re no longer going to see a bunch of intricately detailed flowers with leaves, a bird, and clouds.” »


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POrtLanD / 503.972.5000 / mgBWhOme.COm Featuring: FRANCO SECTIONAL in wingate-linen ($8540) $6295, ANSEL CHAIR with brass base in Tibetan lambswool ($1880) $1345, CARMEN OTTOMAN in caspiananthracite leather ($1940) $1345, ALLURE SIDE TABLE $1370, SAVOY CHANDELIER in antique brass $1750, MADISON LAMP $530, TERRA RUG in granite $2395, STACCATO WALL SCULPTURES $435 each GRAY ISSUE No. FIFTEEN

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scene

| process

An Ancient Craft, Updated The Piling Palang line of modern cloisonné was conceived by Chinese industrial designer Bing Bing Deng and is handmade by artisans in a workshop in the city of Tianjin, China. The larger pieces take between 12 and 15 days to complete.

3. Enamel made from vitreous paste— finely crushed glass mixed with pigment— is applied in the gaps between the soldered wire.

6. Workers smooth the piece’s edges and polish the enamel.

1. Workers shape a copper vessel according to Deng’s design.

2. Lengths of copper wire are set in place and then soldered down to outline the desired pattern.

4. The first layer of enamel has been applied to this piece; it is about to be fired in the kiln.

5. The kiln’s high temperatures (typically around 1,500 degrees F) cause the soldered wire to shrink and the enamel to crack. So artisans must repeatedly apply layers of enamel to close the gaps.

7. A completed cloisonné box sits atop a bucket of blue vitreous powder. h

“We can see and feel the high abilities of the craftsman on every piece of cloisonné. Due to its labor-intense technique, we can also pinpoint imperfections, which shows the human side of the process.”

—leandro ang, Owner, Inglenuk Design

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style

elements 5 elements of style

wood. earth. fire. metal. water. Edited by Jasmine Vaughan Written by stacy kendall and Nicole Munson

photo by Gwenael Lewis, courtesy BOCCI

Spring is the time for rebirth and revival, and for that we necessarily strip away excess and pare down to the essentials. The five elements as a force, or Wu Xing, was identified early on in Chinese philosophy. Wood, earth, fire, metal, and water embody phases and processes in perpetual flux, interactions that occur with the changing seasons and the passing of time. As we present the five elements through objects, we are reminded that, in spite of the mercurial side of style and trends, we still hold fast to the enduring truths of nature’s beauty. »

Glassblower Cailey Buye creates a globe for a pendant light in Bocci’s Vancouver studio. For the latest release from Bocci, see page 39.

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style

| elements

From the soft sheen of a polished edge to the raw texture of a burl, wood can take on as many personalities as we have whims.

wood “People on the West Coast just love nature. I found that the trees were a perfect way to reflect this culture in people’s homes,” says Vancouver painter Dana Mooney. She takes custom orders, so you can ensure your piece matches your own interior landscape. The Birch Collection by Dana Mooney, $215 at the Cross Décor & Design, Vancouver, thecrossdesign.com.

2

Lindsay Elliot

1

3 4

1. Shale 2 drawer / 2 door dresser by Blu Dot, $2,299 at Designhouse, Vancouver, designhouse.ca. 2. Gamla Floor Lamp by Gamla, $1,800, Vancouver, gamla.ca. 3. Monet table by Boca do Lobo, from $25,380 at Spencer Interiors, Vancouver, spencerinteriors.ca. 4. Vigo coffee table by Ironies, available to the trade at Michael Folks, Seattle, michaelfolks.com.

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b old b ark The New Jersey–based wallcoverings company Phillip Jeffries recently introduced its handcrafted Enchanted Woods Collection, an ethereal wallpaper that elevates cork, one of our favorite renewable resources, to a whole new level. Metallic gold shimmers through a textured cork skin, as if revealing a glimmering source of light behind your walls. It’s available in 10 finishes, but we’re partial to the high-contrast Navy Fantasy, shown here. Enchanted Woods wallpaper, Phillip Jeffries, to the trade at Jennifer West Showroom, Seattle, jwshowroom.com

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style

| elements

Photo courtesy of FINNE Architects

We’re soothed by the substantial weight of marble, stones, and gems; here we find our solid ground.

earth

ground b reaking Meaning “soft” in Norwegian, the Myk coffee table is the latest furniture design from Finne Architects in Seattle. Though called a coffee table, it easily doubles as a seat with its steel base and soft leather wrap. Its forms were inspired by terrain morphology; look at it long enough and you may spot craggy rocks, volcanic islands, or even cloud formations. Myk coffee table by Nils Finne and Finne Architects, $8,300, Seattle, finne.com

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1. Lunaris 3 wallpaper by Calico, $42 per square foot at AnneStarr, Vancouver, annestarr.ca. 2. Romeo wallpaper and fabric in Carrera by Martyn Lawrence Bullard for Schumacher, to the trade at Linde Ltd, Portland, lindeltd.com. 3. Cliff Table Lamp by Aerin for Visual Comfort, $900 at DFG Showroom, Seattle, dfgseattle.com. 4. Malachite round box by L’Objet, $165 at Uptowne Papers, Portland, uptowne papers.com. 5. Agate cabinet knob, $14 at West Elm, multiple locations, westelm.com. 6. Diamond Storage Box by Areaware, $15 at New Seasons Market, multiple locations, newseasonsmarket.com.

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style

| elements

Ignited by style, these pieces are fanning the flames of our design desires.

fire

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b urn notice Victoria, British Columbia–based photographer Troy Moth is fascinated by the aftermath of fire. His Burnt series is an ode to the often disregarded relics of campfires and other blazing mediums. “When I return to the charred remains of what had previously been a bright and welcoming light, that’s what I’m most curious about. To me, the pieces lying there, burnt and alone and dead on the ground, hold stories—each piece with its own unique and tiny narrative.” Moth’s Burnt series will be on view in Vancouver at the Address interior design show from May 23 to June 4 (kateduncan.ca/address). Burnt 03 by Troy Moth, from $200 at Mammoth & Co., Victoria, B.C., mammoth.co


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1. 57 pendant light by Omer Arbel for Bocci, from $595 each, Vancouver, bocci.ca. 2. Wax Collector by Esque Studio, $300, Portland, esque-studio.com. 3. Toklas Console by Jonathan Adler, $2,500, Portland and Seattle, jonathanadler.com. Âť

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style

| elements

Pulled from the earth and forged in fire, these precious metals cast a potent spell.

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1. Fading Arrow necklace by Sahlia Jewelry Design, $156, Portland, sahlia jewelry.com. 2. Rose Double Deer Antler necklace by Justine Brooks Design, $190, Vancouver, justinebrooks. com. 3. Nefer Earrings by Nikki Jacoby, $150, Seattle, nikkijacoby.com. 4. Black Crystal Cluster earrings by Marisa Messick, $80, Eugene, OR, marisamessick.com. 5. Bedrock Bangle by Thorn&Wynn, $34, Portland, thornandwynn.com. 6. Aten Reversible Cuff Ring by Acanthus Jewelry, $165, Portland, acanthusjewelry.com. Âť


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Life-giving water provides us with a constant stream of inspiration.

water

JUNGLE DREAMS

This watercolor-esque pattern is “inspired by the jungle and the bright colors of the flowers and animals found there,” says Shanan Campanaro, Eskayel founder and designer. “The pattern is meant to be a rich, kaleidoscopic, wild experience.”

Jangala Citron fabric by Eskayel, $168 per yard at Provide Home, Vancouver, providehome.com.

1. by Ali Gradischer, Portland, $2,000 at aligradischer .com. 2. Zliq Island sofa by Marcel Wanders for Moooi, from $9,755 at Livingspace Interiors, Vancouver, livingspace.com. 3. Dark Wave perfume by Olo Fragrance, Portland, $45 at olofragrance.com. 4. Walnut River Console Table by Greg Klassen, from $4,500, Lynden, WA, gregklassen.com. h 1

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“The River Collection takes its name from ‘rivers’ of inlaid blue glass that meander through live edge wood tabletops. I’m inspired by the world right outside my door—the Nooksack River runs past my studio and gives life to many of the discarded trees that I use in my tables.” —Greg Klassen, furniture designer

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Be House Proud ...inspired by Spark Modern Fires. Designed and engineered to be noticed. See our gallery at www.sparkfires.com or 866.938.3846

modern fires

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style

| made here

Wes Walsworth works on a new series of custom electric guitars. BELOW LEFT AND RIGHT: His first, a commission from a Los Angeles–based country musician, is made from quilted maple, ipe, and 100-year-old oak, and has a rattlesnake rattle inlaid into the headstock.

The grape-stained curves of wine casks were Wes Walsworth’s

reclaimed melody Wes Walsworth’s guitars make recycled wood sing. Written by Lindsay J. Westley : Photographed by Tal Roberts

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first muse—he started his furniture-making career in 2009, transforming reclaimed wood from the wine industry into benches and chairs. But these days, his inspiration is decidedly more rock and roll. The 34-yearold Ketchum, Idaho–based woodworker is hard at work on a new series of custom-built electric guitars. Walsworth, a professional guitarist and songwriter, used to work as a luthier at Taylor Guitars in California, building acoustic guitar bodies. “When you make acoustic guitars you have to be careful about what kind of wood you use,” he says. But working on electric guitars frees him up to experiment. “Here, the sound is mostly all created by the pickup system inside, so you can really turn to reclaimed materials to make each one unique.” So far he’s built a guitar body from a piece of oak from an early 1900s mushroomdrying basket, and plans to build the next one from a redwood burl. The antiqued colors and grooved textures of his new designs look nothing like the polished wood of a contemporary electric guitar, and that’s fine with Walsworth. “I guess being a guitar player and a furniture maker, I have my own ideas of what I think is a cool-looking guitar,” he says. “The aged woods have such a worn-in, unique look that I just fell in love.” h


VANCOUVER (TERMINAL sTORE)

1728 Glen Drive tel :

1.604.687.5599

NORTH VANCOUVER

125 - 1305 Welch Street tel :

1.778.340.6392

TUKWILA, WA

720 Andover Park East tel :

1.206. 405. 4411

MOEsHOME.CA

COME FIND WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR. Come visit our newly renovated & expanded Vancouver showroom. You are sure to find the pieces your are looking for.

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style

| origin TOP TO BOTTOM: In his studio, Louie Gong, founder of Eighth Generation, holds one of his Mockups, a miniature vinyl sneaker that people can customize. Laser-etched cedar phone cases include a clever raven— when you take a photo, the flash appears within the bird’s beak. Gong’s one-off sneakers are emblazoned with graffiti-influenced Coast Salish art.

Drawing from Heritage Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by SARAH MILES

“There’s a unique story embedded in each [pair of custom shoes] that will be shared over and over again when people are walking around town, riding the bus, or at school.” —Louie Gong, founder, Eighth Generation

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Unlike many artists, Louie Gong came to his craft later in life. The 39-year-old Seattleite and founder of Eighth Generation—a company that produces products that mix traditional Native American art with icons from popular culture—was a child-and-family therapist and an activist and lecturer focusing on mixed-race experiences before he discovered a talent for drawing in 2007. “I was working at the Muckleshoot Tribal College when it was their turn to host the Canoe Journey,” Gong says, referring to an annual event that brings together coastal tribes to celebrate their heritage. The Muckleshoot tribe made drums to give to participants, and Gong embellished his with traditional Coast Salish patterns and drawings. Some time later, Gong, who was born in Mission, British Columbia, and raised in the Nooksack tribe in Everson, Washington, wanted to buy a pair of Vans tennis shoes—but couldn’t find any that resonated with his identity. So he doodled on a plain gray pair with a Sharpie, creating two eagle claws in a style influenced by both contemporary Coast Salish art and graffiti. He wore them to work, and a cult following soon grew. In 2009, he launched Eighth Generation. Today, products range from Gong’s custom ink-embellished shoes to mass-produced skateboard decks to pillows and blankets made in collaboration with Paul Frank. This past February, Gong launched the Inspired Natives Project, which aims to support Native American artists and entrepreneurs through product design collaboration and mentorship. His first artist is Michelle Lowden, who has created an iPhone case featuring her Acoma Pueblo art. Gong established the project to help counteract an insidious pattern he identified in the market: “Nearly 100 percent of Native art sold in major stores is actually Native-inspired, shamefully derivative of traditional artworks, and Native communities are purposefully left out of the profit loop.” With their authentic designs and licensing agreements that share profits with the artists, the products sold through the project, Gong hopes, will help “establish a new standard for how companies can align with Native themes, art, and culture in a way that is both profitable and provides capacity-building opportunities for Native artists.” h


Visit our KOHLER速 Registered Showrooms for the newest concepts in kitchens & baths. AUBURN

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3620 S. Cedar St., Tacoma, WA 98409

253.473.1756

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| interiors

“Susan is exposed to a rarified world of modern art. I wanted to create a place that would embrace that and have a casual easy elegance.” —Robert Bailey, interior designer

Fresh Canvas

A New York art dealer’s mountain getaway may be designed as a study in neutrals, but it still pops with inspiration. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by JOSH DUNFORD

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DESIGN TEAM

interior design: Robert Bailey Interiors millwork: Radius Architectural Millwork Like the interior of a gallery, the neutral palette of this art dealer’s Whistler, B.C., townhouse lets the furniture and art take center stage. In the main living area, a Fritz Hansen Swan chair by Arne Jacobsen, two Flos lamps, and a cashmere-upholstered Edward sofa from Bensen complement the gray tone of the fireplace. A Bang & Olufsen Cabin Series TV hangs above the fireplace; to the left is a round Bang & Olufsen speaker. “I love the elegant simplicity of it,” the client says. “It looks like art but it is really just a speaker!” GRAY ISSUE No. FIFTEEN

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The dining room’s Porro table doubles as a craft area for Susan and her son Sebastian. Bailey paired it with six Wishbone chairs from Carl Hansen & Søn and a Moooi Random Light—a cheeky, snowball-inspired reference to the elements outside. A suite of Albert Oehlen collages adds texture to the solid-white wall.

“I love wood elements … [it is] very important to have a sense of the outdoors, indoors, in Whistler.” —Susan, homeowner You might expect the home of a hard-working art dealer and collector to be bedecked in flashy, attention-getting pieces. But Susan, who splits her time between Manhattan and Whistler, British Columbia, prefers a minimal environment. “I’m around art all the time, so having bare walls is a refuge for me,” she says. Last spring, Susan, who grew up in Vancouver, bought a 1,500-square-foot townhouse above Whistler’s Creekside Village for her and her three-and-a-half-year-old son, Sebastian. Then she hired Vancouver–based interior designer Robert Bailey. When Bailey arrived, the house “was a very typical Whistler residence,” he recalls. “There were snowshoes on the wall, lots of molding, and a knotty pine floor.” His first move was to install white oak floors as a base for the townhouse’s clean, bright interiors. In the living area, Bailey painted the log mantle on an existing bluestone fireplace white. An adjacent dining space features a lacquered metal Ferro table by Porro that has already

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had two previous lives—it served as a desk in State, Susan’s former gallery in Vancouver, and as a book display in her home office. “It’s full of scratches, which I love,” she says, “and it could tell some great stories about love, life, and business deals.” Now, it also serves as a craft table for Sebastian, and is often covered in glitter and glue. As for the art, Susan chose pieces she feels personally connected to. These tend to be more minimal and abstract. “It’s about lightness and quiet,” she says. “I have lived with a lot of art over the years to figure this out.” Generally, she likes sculpture and works on paper, including drawings by artist Christopher Wool, noting that they have a “more casual, relaxed element to them.” The sentiment echoes her interior designer’s take on the project overall: “Susan is exposed to a rarified world of modern art. I wanted to create a place that would embrace that and have a casual easy elegance, much like our client herself.” h


style

| interiors

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE LEFT: The bathroom has deep Ceramica Flaminia sinks and floating oak vanities designed by Robert Bailey Interiors and fabricated by Radius Architectural Millwork. The light fixtures are by Prandina, available through Livingspace. Given the minimal palette, colorful pieces such as a neon-accented stacking wood vase from Adónde and a Christopher Wool artwork have even greater effect. Rope-bound Knotty Bubble Sconces from New York–based designer Lindsey Adelman hang in the hallway. The master bedroom continues the oak-and-white palette.

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style

| sourced

Janka Splashed Dark Brown, From Russia with Love Collection by Jan Kath, price upon request at Colin Campbell, Vancouver, colin-campbell.ca

Miri Sunrise, from $375 at Tufenkian Artisan Carpets, Portland, tufenkian carpets.com

Kia Sar by Warp & Weft, from $3,300 at Andonian Rugs, Seattle and Bellevue, WA, andonianrugs.com

Ivory/Multi, Studio Leather Collection by Safavieh, from $300 at NW Rugs, multiple locations, nwrugs.com

Pelage, $9,440 at Atelier Lapchi, Portland, lapchi.com

Ikea PS 2014, $129 at Ikea, multiple locations, ikea.com

Cut a Rug

Whether you’re looking for a splash of color or a soft accent in an area rug, we’ve got you and your floor well covered. Written by STACY KENDALL

Geometric Rug Round by Thomas Paul for Chandra Rugs, $1,550 at Beyond Beige, Vancouver, beyondbeige.com

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Tiger Rug, $4,800 at Kush Handmade Rugs, Portland, kushrugs.com h


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| outdoor

Landscape, Elevated Intelligent design solutions transform a steep lot into a playground for kids and adults alike. Written by DEBRA PRINZING : Photographed by JOHN GRANEN

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Opposite: Ipe decking from Crosscut Hardwoods creates a level outdoor area for dining and play. The table and chairs are from Terris Draheim. BELOW LEFT: Twin planters from Aw Pottery flank a doorway. BELOW RIGHT: A small lounging deck gains privacy from a stand of tall bamboo, just a few steps above the lawn.

The three-story contemporary house in Seattle’s Mount

Baker neighborhood had great views of Lake Washington and the Cascade Mountains. But when the owners first contemplated buying it, they balked at the super-steep lot, which lacked kid-friendly play spaces—a critical problem, since their four kids were all under age eight. They purchased the house, but quickly enlisted Dar Webb, principal of Issaquah, Washington–based Darwin Webb Landscape Architects, P.S., to make over the outdoor spaces. The mission: to create level areas surrounding the home, including an extensive play lawn. Webb envisioned a series of multifunctional outdoor spaces where children could explore with abandon and adults could relax nearby. Knowing that there would be engineering challenges, since the lot sloped a full 45 degrees, he tapped landscape contractor Dale Nussbaum of the Nussbaum Group for help early in the process. “We wanted to make a garden that responded to the needs of a family with kids, but also reinforced the contemporary architecture,” Webb says. The resulting landscape features

a sophisticated palette of materials—stone, wood, and steel—and a lush planting scheme. For the children, it’s a bamboo forest with rope swings, monkey bars, a ship’s ladder, a runnel-inspired water feature, a secret tunnel made of a 48-inch diameter plastic culvert pipe, and a 16-by-30-foot lawn where they can kick a soccer ball around. Yet many of the spaces, including two new decks of sustainable ipe wood, are multifunctional, meaning that adults don’t feel like they’re sitting in the middle of a playground. Tiered so that each level of the house corresponds to a distinct outdoor space, the design begins at the upper driveway, with its elegant gabion feature filled with river rocks. Masses of billowy fountain grass soften the wall’s strong lines. A series of steps descend from the driveway, one level to the next, ultimately reaching the lawn, which hovers 20 feet above the street. A steel-clad structural concrete wall extends along the edge of the grass. “It looks like you have this plane of lawn floating above the hillside,” Nussbaum says. “Now the lot is completely functional, even though it’s still steep.” » GRAY ISSUE No. FIFTEEN

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“We wanted zones and spaces where specific activities could take place,” says the homeowner. “That sense of mystery and discovery is so apparent—so much better than having a jungle gym in the backyard.” CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A play lawn seemingly floats 20 feet above street level; the children’s playground features a bamboo forest, a tunnel made from a plastic culvert pipe, and an interactive water feature; a ship’s ladder ascends a gabion retaining wall; and the driveway is enclosed by a gabion feature that’s part structural, part privacy screen. h

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PASSION • INSPIRATION • INNOVATION • PERFORMANCE • DEDICATION

STYLE INSPIRED BY YOU

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style

| sourced 1. Flango Hover Dish by Pot Inc., $110, Vancouver, potinc.ca. 2. Nautica hanging chair by Alberto Sanchez for Expormim, $3,490 at Tint Design Resource, Seattle, tintdesignresource.com. 3. Jack Planter by Steel Life, $225 at Modern, Eugene, OR, modern-store.com. 4. Partition 36 planter by Object Outdoors, $810, Vancouver, objectoutdoors .com. 5. Egg Lime Green, $260 at Ragen & Associates, Seattle, ragenassociates.com. 6. Daytona Square Dining Set, $1,438 at Moe’s Home Collection, Vancouver, moeshome.com. 7. Finn Chaise by Norm Architects, $1,865 at Design Within Reach, multiple locations, dwr.com. 8. The Cube outdoor fireplace, $5,900 at Spark Modern Fires, sparkfires.com. h

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Paradise Found

Sun-lit days loom on the horizon. Make the most of every moment with outdoor eye-catchers that will please your plein air aesthetic. Written by Nicole munson

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On the Rocks

In the space between quiet minimalism and heart-stopping magnetism lies an intensely private, glassed-in retreat perched on the cliffs of Gambier Island.

Written by LINDSEY M. ROBERTS : Photographed by JP Delage/OMB

DESIGN TEAM

architect: McFarlane Green Biggar Architecture + Design (prior to March 2012); Office of McFarlane Biggar Architects + Designers (March 2012窶田ompletion) general contractors: Somerset Homes, West Coast Turn Key

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This compact home on Gambier Island, British Columbia (this page and previous), is predominately made of wood—sustainable because it’s “essentially the only structural material that’s grown by the sun,” architect Steve McFarlane explains. The guest bed, seen in the room to the left, is the Peg Leg from CB2; the master bed, to the right, is Bensen’s Frame Hi from Inform Interiors. The rooftop dining table in the foreground is from Crate and Barrel; the chairs are by Ratana from Crystalview Pool & Spa.

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When the surrounding environment is so breathtaking, it seems only respectful to let it stay the center of attention. Floor-to-ceiling windows in the main living area ensure the scenery envelops the residents from dawn to dusk. TOP: The kitchen table and chairs are by Gus Modern from Stylegarage; the Le Klint pendant is from YLighting. ABOVE LEFT AND RIGHT: A Holden sectional from Spencer Interiors offers a place to perch and take it all in.

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w

ith a 7.4-acre lot, there was room enough for the getaway house that the clients desired on Gambier Island, British Columbia, half a nautical mile from their fulltime home in Vancouver. Complicating matters, though, was a trio of architectural minefields: the sheer cliff on one side of the steep property; the protected watershed on the other side; and the required 50-foot setback from the high-tide mark. No matter, says Steve McFarlane, principal architect of Office of McFarlane Biggar Architects + Designers (OMB). “I always see the constraints as opportunities,” McFarlane says. “Between those three hard boundaries, that’s where we found an opportunity to nestle the house in.” For the architects and their clients, the virtually virgin land was a secret, soggy Eden. A lumber company, which

used the shoreline to raft its log booms for years, was the only owner before the lot was subdivided. “It’s sort of like the archetypal Northwest coast forest,” McFarlane says, “with a mix of coniferous and deciduous trees and this softly lit understory of lichens, cones, leaves, ferns, and the soft pad of the forest floor. It’s super rich and lush.” When you look up from the temperate rainforest, there’s a private cove off Brigade Bay and a stunning view of the iconic mountain peaks, the Lions. In such a setting, the only thing that would do was a house that lives light on the land structurally as well as aesthetically—because you can’t top nature. After countless drawings, models, and back-and-forths with the clients (“Every time we got a new drawing from them it was incredibly exciting because it was so much better than last time,” the husband says) the architects

Generous roof decks expand the size of the island retreat, providing the family with even more living space in warmer weather. The lounge chairs are from Restoration Hardware. Glass railings by Miracle Glass Works ensure nothing blocks the epic views. The decking is from Kayu Canada and was installed by West Coast Turn Key.

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proposed two rectilinear forms, one atop the other, clad in fiber cement panels and cedar. Three bedrooms and two bathrooms are spread out over 1,700 square feet, all set on minimal concrete footings sunk into the bedrock to prevent the house from disrupting the watershed. Large windows are oriented to maximize the daylight that filters in between the trees. To address the challenging site logistics, the architects set the house as close as possible to the cliff—and within inches of both the protected watershed and the high-tide setback, so the homeowners could be as close to the water as possible. The entire process, from conception to construction to move-in, took more than six years—a testimony to the

patient architect–client collaboration, as well as to the site constraints. Construction crews, who often came over on barges with construction materials and even slept on site, could only work on the house during the summer. The project was finally completed in spring 2013. Although other houses are now being built on the surrounding lots, the closest neighbors are still out of view, giving the clients and their two daughters a proper respite from their hectic city lives. From the rooftop deck, you’d think you had the island to yourself: “It’s an incredible view,” the husband says, “looking out over Howe Sound and being completely surrounded by the trees, rocks, sky, and mountains.” h

“We like a true Modernist approach to building—letting the site and the program and the climate be the primary drivers as opposed to some abstract formal idea.” —Steve McFarlane, Architect

ABOVE LEFT AND RIGHT: The challenge in determining a daylighting strategy, according to McFarlane, was, “How could we insert a modest little house into this restrained footprint and configure it in such a way that you enjoy those sunny moments that populate the spaces?” The solution, he says, was “concentrating the glazing on the open waterfront side and keeping it relatively closed off to the cliff face.” opposite: Minimal footings prevent the house from disrupting the watershed, and reduce the building’s impact on the surrounding landscape. There’s no road to the house, so the owners commute by private boat.

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“It’s not a building you can imagine on any other site. This one is really locked into its specific setting and that’s something that happens relatively rarely.”

—Steve McFarlane, architect

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The Skyline Residence offers a view over the treetops from its sunken living room, which includes a Fabrica shag carpet, a Molded Plastic Rocker by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller, and a custom sofa by InHouse PDX. OPPOSITE: Homeowner Andrea Corradini beside a stairway mural by Brazilian artist Felipe Motta.

DESIGN TEAM

architect: Skylab Architecture structural engineer: Froelich Engineers, Inc.

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Domestic Kinetics

A Portland hillside residence speaks Skylab Architecture’s unique language of angles and motion. Written by BRIAN LIBBY : Photographed by BRUCE WOLF

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“The idea was pretty simple: Let’s make a really interesting porch. The architecture really started there.’’ —Jeff kovel, architect

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OPPOSITE: The house includes a generously sized covered front porch made by a cantilevered upstairs bedroom. BELOW LEFT AND RIGHT: Skylab’s design consists of three perpendicularly stacked boxes that give the upstairs spaces the feeling of floating over the valley below. A wooden swing provides a playful perch by the front door.

i

t’s an overcast morning at the Skyline Residence in Portland’s West Hills, the latest from acclaimed local firm Skylab Architecture, but illumination is pouring in from seemingly every direction. Near the entrance, a massive skylight over the stairway illuminates translucent 3form Chroma treads while highlighting a distinctive three-story mural. To the south and west, the view from the sunken living room extends over the treetops for miles, as it also does upstairs from the master bedroom and bath. “I wanted as much light and openness as possible, and to be as environmentally sustainable as we could,” recalls homeowner Andrea Corradini. “But the rest, I said, ‘Push it as far as you want to push it.’” Corradini and her husband, David Brown, both work for Nike and were fans of Skylab’s Hoke Residence, which was designed

for one of their co-workers but gained widespread notoriety after it appeared in one of the Twilight movies. “I said, ‘That’s it!’” Corradini says of seeing the Hoke. The couple’s 4,300-square-foot, three-bedroom house— where they live with their two children—exemplifies Skylab’s signature visual language of angular geometry and kinetics. “Something I’ve been exploring for a long time is how to activate form to bring movement and energy and rhythm,” says Skylab founder Jeff Kovel. The basic form of the Skyline Residence consists of three rectangular, almost shoebox-like forms (a nod to the clients’ day jobs?) stacked perpendicularly, with public areas on the ground floor and the bedrooms above. One upstairs bedroom thereby cantilevers over the ground-floor entrance to form a covered front porch, while on the other side, the master » GRAY ISSUE No. FIFTEEN

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ABOVE: The kitchen canopy, built by Ghilarducci Studios, resembles a reclaimed-maple Möbius strip stretching up the sides and over a pair of cooking islands. FAR RIGHT: A bookshelf in the great room shows off Skylab Architecture’s signature seven-degree angles, which are repeated throughout the house. NEAR RIGHT AND OPPOSITE: Calligaris Ice chairs from Hip surround a dining table made with wood salvaged from a basketball court by local designer Carl Blakeslee. Designer Ruthi Auda created the custom light fixture out of a block of wood, oversized bulbs, and climbing rope. The wallpaper is Elysian Fields by Flavor Paper, favored by the residents for its unconventional pattern featuring bats and carnivorous plants.

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this page: Flavor Paper’s Beggar’s Banquet wallpaper enlivens a wall in the master bedroom. “I picked it because I thrive on light and I loved the idea that the pattern was a digital reinterpretation of stained glass,” Corradini says. “From a color perspective, I felt the purple–gold palette would reflect the sunset coming through our bedroom windows perfectly.” The bed and nightstands are by Made. opposite: Transluscent 3form Chroma stair treads glow beneath a large skylight, as does the mural depicting the family beneath an aspen tree. The bold color array continues in daughter Savannah’s bedroom with Small Flowers wallpaper, part of the Flavor Paper X Warhol collaboration, and a piece of art Savannah created by gluing crayons to a canvas and melting them with a hair dryer.

bedroom appears to float out over the trees. Yet this is far from a boxy house: it’s full of Skylab’s signature seven-degree angles, which form everything from windows to wall shelves to the shape of the fireplace. Black metal awnings with similarly angular shapes extend over the wood-clad boxes almost like a cape. Hence Corradini’s nickname for the house, “The Batcave,” although “Batwing” may be more appropriate given how it soars over the hillside. (Her gleaming black 1988 Porsche 911 Turbo serves as the Batmobile.) Inside, particularly in the great room, Skylab crafted a deft balance between openness and defined spaces. The kitchen, for example, is defined by one continuous strip of wood that

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extends from the floor to form the side of a kitchen island and then rises upward and over to become a kind of sculptural, Möbius-strip-like canopy. Corradini and Browns’ athletic-yetartistic personalities equally come through. The dining table was made by Portland Product Werks from reclaimed basketball court flooring with its painted lines left intact. The stairway mural, featuring a cartoon of the family waving as they surround a leafy aspen tree, is by Felipe Motta, aka Mottilaa, a Brazilian graphic artist that Corradini met on a business trip in Rio de Janeiro and brought to Portland for the commission. “When I’m stressed I just look at it and exhale,” she says. “We just look happy and goofy. That’s sort of how we are.” h


“I wanted as much light and openness as possible, and to be as environmentally sustainable as we could. But the rest, I said, ‘Push it as far as you want to push it.’”—andrea Corradini, Homeowner

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The deck along the north side of this steel-frame house in Anchorage, Alaska, offers expansive views of the surrounding trees, mountains, and the constantly changing northern skies. “The exterior siding is a wood-resin panel chosen to blend in with the natural setting,” says homeowner Trish Cheng. “It gives the house a natural finish with practically zero maintenance.”

home at last

A modern Alaskan residence is a tree-skimming feat of architectural creativity. Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by Kevin G. Smith

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DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Workshop AD contractor: Hawkinson Construction interior design: Lair Design millwork: Jon’s Woodworking

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Below: A large Dellarobia sofa gives the family plenty of room to sprawl out in the living room, and a Spark Modern Fires fireplace built into the tall stone wall adds extra warmth. Opposite: Alex is passionate about cooking, and the industrial-grade kitchen, with appliances by Sub-Zero, BlueStar, and Miele, allows him to prepare meals while the girls do homework at the angular basalttopped island, on stools from BoConcept. Architect Steve Bull chose walnut for the interior walls and ceiling “because it has a nice deep tone to it and looks very sophisticated,” he says. “Using the same material [in both places] creates a much more enveloping experience.”

a

lot can happen in eight years. When Alex and Trish Cheng, an anesthesiologist and a former nurse, started building a house in Anchorage, Alaska, in 2005, they had no idea it would take until 2013 to complete. In addition to the difficulty of getting construction resources to the state of Alaska—the Last Frontier—the project stalled two years in, with only the steel frame and the roof of the 5,200-square-foot house erected. The structure went untouched, exposed to the elements, until 2010, when the Chengs were ready for a fresh perspective

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on the design. On the recommendation of a friend, they called architect Steve Bull of Seattle-based Workshop AD. “When they contacted us, they were just ready to get the project done and move into their home,” Bull says. “During the time when the house sat, Trish and Alex had adopted twin girls, toddlers at the time, so all of the sudden their family needs were different.” The foundation and steel frame were already in place, and the unique engineering of the elevated upper level made it impossible for Bull and his team to change the structure. So Bull worked within the steel frame, focusing on the interiors, »


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A deck on the western end of the house has painted steel railings. The canted trim is metal flashing (used for waterproofing) that matches the prefinished metal roofing. Throughout the house, Marvin windows allow a flood of natural light.

“We wanted to keep as many hemlocks and other healthy trees intact as possible on the site. The house was woven through them. It feels like living in a tree house.” —Trish Cheng, Client

which the clients wanted to keep “clean, streamlined, and contemporary,” he says. Plus, there was the addition of the twins to consider. “We basically started from scratch,” Bull explains. “There were some spaces that are generally in the same location, like the kitchen and the living room, but the rest of the spaces were completely reconfigured. It was a bit of a jigsaw puzzle as the edge of the structure defined the limits of the space.” The Chengs had originally planned to install a lap pool running through the upper level, but with the arrival of the girls, who are now 10, they decided they wanted more functional footage for the growing family. Bull integrated a portion of the pool space into the study and a new project room for the girls. The rest went into a deck off the dining room. Bull also reconfigured the lower level to add another bedroom.

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With its open kitchen, dining area, and living room—and seductive views across the tree canopy—the upper floor’s central area is the most-trafficked hub of the house. Polished concrete floors run throughout and complement the warmth of the walnut walls and woodwork, a pairing brainstormed by Bull and interior designer Christiane Pein of Seattle’s Lair Design, who helped with the furnishings. Every room in the house offers an expansive view of the natural surroundings—including Cook Inlet, Mount Susitna to the northwest, and Denali Mountain to the north—a daily reminder of why the Chengs, who moved from Seattle, chose Alaska as their home. “We moved to Anchorage [in 1996] thinking we would stay for just a few years,” Cheng says. But, “we fell in love with Alaska and here we still are 17 years later. The beauty of the mountain ranges still inspires us each day.” h


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insight James and Kricken Yaker, founders of the design–build firm Vanillawood, in the window of their Portland shop and studio.

Portrait: Ryan Fish, courtesy Vanillawood

first comes love

These dynamic duos are making our hearts skip a beat, one design at a time. Written by Nicole munson

Trendy twosomes, we’re on to you. We see you working together, designing and collaborating like nobody’s business, and we’re jealous. How do you do it? How is your taste so incredibly in sync? What do you have left to discuss at the dinner table? Curious for answers, we questioned six of the coolest couples we know, to find out how they live, work, and play together, all while staying sane and inspired. »

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Vanillawood

WHO: WHAT: A full-service design–build firm located in Portland James and Kricken Yaker, the husband-and-wife team behind Portland’s full-service design–build firm Vanillawood, have been creating design magic for eight years, ever since renovating their first house together in Venice Beach, California. “We loved the experience so much—it seemed to fulfill so many of our creative tendencies and passions, and we realized that we worked incredibly well with each other,” Kricken says. Together for 21 years—they met in college while studying abroad in Florence, Italy—the pair make working in tandem seem like a breeze. “It’s so much easier because you don’t need to dance around each other’s feelings,” James says. “There is no need for bullshit. We can be direct with how we feel about something because we want the project to be the best that it can.” It helps that their personal and professional aspirations are in perfect alignment. Though they’re both lead designers, James serves as general contractor and oversees all construction, while Kricken heads up the interior design department and runs the Vanillawood retail shop. “One of the greatest parts of working with my husband is that at the end of the day, we are working toward the same goal—our family’s future,” Kricken says. “There is no ego involved. We both are each other’s biggest fans. And that’s a great feeling to have that kind of support in business. I trust no one more than my husband and I know he always has my back, as I do his.” »

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Vanillawood handles all aspects of design, from full-house renovations (top right), to custom interior design services (top left and bottom right).

Photographs courtesy vanillawood. above left and right: Josh Partee; center: Ryan Fish; below: Ty Milford

“I saw Kricken on the first day of orientation [in college]—she was at the front of the class, and I was in the back. I asked my friend who she was. Although I couldn’t pronounce her name, I had a pretty good sense that I was looking at my future wife. ” —James Yaker


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insight Cynthia Penner and Jay Brooks excel at high-end restaurant design. Their work in Vancouver includes Black + Blue (top left); Market by Jean-Georges in the ShangriLa Hotel (bottom left); and the Fish Shack (bottom right).

Box Interior Design

WHAT: Interior designers and hospitality specialists in Vancouver

“Being a designer is not a profession as much as it is who we are, so we are grateful for each opportunity to be allowed to imagine and create for our clients.”—Cynthia Penner

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After separate successful design careers, this duo, known for turning out award-winning and stunningly modern hotels and restaurants in the Vancouver area, joined forces when they found themselves competing for the same projects. “I started a solo practice,” Cynthia Penner says, “and Jay was the entire commercial design team at an esteemed residential firm. Eventually we wanted the same jobs, so it just made sense to try to get them together.” They founded Box in 2002, and won their first award that year, an award of excellence from the Interior Designers Institute of British Columbia (IDIBC). They have since won 15 others. The two work well as partners. Jay Brooks brings business acumen and artistic talent (he does drawings for every project by hand), while Penner contributes conceptual ideas, in-depth color and texture palettes, and handles the firm’s marketing and communications. “Since we know each other so well and have been together for so long—25 years!—it is easy to collaborate,” Penner says. “It is normal for us to finish the others’ thoughts and sentences. When you feel safe and comfortable, it is easy to be free in your imagination with another person.” The biggest challenge, as you might expect, is balancing home and work life. Says Brooks: “We have a rule that we can talk about creative ideas after work, but not about affairs of the office.” »

PORTRAIT BY BARRY CALHOUN; PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY BOX INTERIOR DESIGN

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Big Wood Ski

“There is serendipity when we work together … it just flows. When we hit our challenges, we have a date night and don’t talk about work.” —bex wilkinson

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After working in ski shops for 28 years, Caleb Baukol launched Big Wood Ski last spring with his partner Bex Wilkinson. “It wasn’t really a decision; it just sort of happened,” Wilkinson says. “Caleb was building skis and he asked me to help him out a few hours a week. Before I knew it, I was handling pretty much everything else that didn’t include making the skis themselves.” While Wilkinson has experience in start-up companies, Baukol’s skills are on the engineering and technical side. Not just a matter of sport, the skis are a true art form, each custom-designed for the individual. Baukol starts all skis with a FSC Pure Bamboo core, then adds layers of fiberglass, carbon fiber, and Kevlar, varying the applications to suit each distinct rider. The finished product is laminated and sealed with plantbased resins, and each customer can choose from four different finishes: cherry, maple, African bubinga, and zebra wood. Big Wood Ski is also big about giving back. A percentage of each of its sales goes directly to nonprofit organizations, and the workshop participates in Idaho’s Green Power Program, offsetting 100 percent of its carbon footprint with energy created by wind power. »

TOP TO BOTTOM: Caleb Baukol at work on a custom-built ski in Big Wood Ski’s Sun Valley workshop. Baukol started the company with his partner Bex Wilkinson. He brands each ski with the company’s round logo.

PHOTOGRAPHed by tal roberts

WHO: WHAT: Handcrafted, custom wood skis produced in Sun Valley, Idaho


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insight

Piano Nobile

WHO: WHAT: A design studio and fabrication workshop located in Seattle

Based in an old warehouse in Ballard, Piano Nobile, owned by Nickolas Robertson and Isabelle Grizzard Robertson, is the design studio that creative dreams are made of. He is an architect, she, an artist. They have combined their creative powers to produce work at every scale, from architecture to furniture to hand-printed textiles, all under one roof. “We built our workshop to accommodate the differences between our disciplines, and as a way to facilitate surprising moments of inspiration,” Isabelle says. “It’s like sharing an umbrella: sometimes we are both under it, strolling together; sometimes only one uses it. Sometimes we fold it up and put it away to duck into a coffee shop for a date.” Their shared inspiration has recently led to a new textile and home-goods line, which debuted in February. As for how they work so well together, Isabelle thinks that it’s all about communication—and courage. “We honor each other’s ideas and distinct vocabulary at the same time that we construct new technical approaches for each project. The artist Giorgio Morandi would say a single word to his printmaking students a moment before they plunged their copper etching plates into vats of acid: coraggio, or courage. We say that to each other each time we encounter a tough decision— we remind each other to be brave.” »

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PHOTOGRAPHS courtesy PIANO NOBILE

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insight

Provide Home

WHO: WHAT: An interior and lifestyle destination shop in Vancouver

“Shortly after we became a couple, we decided we needed to plan a trip, and we decided on Cuba,” says Robert Quinnell, half of the curatorial genius behind Vancouver’s Provide Home store. “We thought we mostly wanted to hang out at the beach, but after taking a tour of Havana and its amazing architecture, we knew the design world was destined for us.” After opening up shop, Quinnell and his partner David Keeler quickly discovered the true benefits of collaboration. “We love spending time together and we love what we do, so it’s a win–win situation,” Keeler says. “Having Provide allows us to share our passion for design and fulfill our desire to travel—and who better to share those experiences with than the one you love?” The pair balance out each other’s tastes when stocking the floor of their shop, carrying upscale collections including Missoni, Rina Menardi, and Heath Ceramics. “Our tastes vary,” Quinnell says. “Sometimes I can be more modest—because of my wholesale fashion background, I’m constantly looking for the best price and the best deals. David’s taste tends to be richer than mine, so if we can meet in the middle, we know we are on the right track.” So what’s next for the twosome? Look for the expansion of their e-commerce business, as well as new additions to their stylish in-house collection of cushions, throws, and lacquer boxes, all hand-designed by Quinnell and Keeler. »

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JANIS NICOLAY

Quinnell and Keeler stand among the carefully edited goods in their shop. In the foreground lies bold textiles from Missoni.

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insight

Emerick Architects

TOP TO BOTTOM:

Nearly every material used in the architects’ penthouse project was handmade locally in Portland. The couple’s own home was the first stand-alone residence in Oregon to receive LEED Gold status.

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Inseparable since the first week of college, Brian and Melody Emerick first began to incubate their joint career in the vigorous architectural program at the University of Oregon. “I think getting married young [at 21] and attending architecture school together allowed us to develop a solid working relationship early on,” Melody says. “We got to see how each other handled stress, multitasking, and sleep deprivation.” After that early trial by fire, they started their own firm, Emerick Architects, in 1999. The two now have a breadth of projects under their belt, ranging from highly detailed Craftsman houses to a sleek and modern penthouse to the flagship store of Northwest-based Grand Central Baking Company. The couple’s own house was the first LEED Gold– certified house in Oregon. “We divided up the design pretty evenly—he did site work, exterior elevations and details, I did floor plans, interior elevations, and materials. Because we have a pretty smooth working relationship it all came together easily,” Melody says. They realize that working together for most couples isn’t always as easy. “Find the way you work together best,” Melody advises. “I have had clients that enjoy making every decision together. Others divvy up the tasks. And lastly, some couples put one person totally in charge while the other one is fairly removed. Everybody has a different balance.” As for the future of their firm, the Emericks hope to push their creative limits further. “With our daughters heading to college in the next few years we can feel a shift coming up,” Melody says. “We plan to dig even deeper and explore even more opportunities.” h

PHOTOGRAPHS courtesy EMERICK ARCHITECTS

WHO: WHAT: Residential and commercial architects based in Portland


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resources 17. NEWS Alaska Design Forum Multiple locations alaskadesignforum.org Bellevue Arts Museum Bellevue, WA bellevuearts.org Disjecta Contemporary Art Center Portland disjecta.org HOPES Conference, University of Oregon Eugene, OR hopes.uoregon.edu Maryhill Museum of Art Goldendale, WA maryhillmuseum.org Museum of Contemporary Craft Portland mocc.pnca.edu Portland State University Center for Public Interest Design Portland pdx.edu/publicinterest-design Salon Seattle Seattle salonseattle2014.com Seattle Public Library Seattle spl.org University of Oregon Department of Architecture Eugene, OR architecture.uoregon.edu Vancouver Art Gallery Vancouver vanartgallery.bc.ca Vancouver Heritage Foundation Vancouver vancouverheritage foundation.org

22. NEXT And Lighting Vancouver andlight.ca

24. IN SEASON Botanique Seattle botaniqueflowers.com Choice Bulb Farm Mt. Vernon, WA choicebulb.com

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Everyday Flowers Stanwood, WA seattlewholesalegrowers market.com/everyday-flowers Floressence Seattle floressencedesign.com Flowers by Karen Monroe, WA flowersbykarenonline.com Glenwood Farms Hillsboro, OR glenwoodfarmsoregon.com Jello Mold Farm Mt. Vernon, WA jellomoldfarm.com Ojeda Farms Ethel, WA seattlewholesalegrowers market.com/ojeda-farms Oregon Coastal Flowers Tillamook, OR flowersbulbs.com Peterkort Roses Hillsboro, OR peterkortroses.com Seattle Wholesale Growers Market Seattle seattlewholesalegrowers market.com Slow Flowers slowflowers.com

28. PROCESS Inglenuk Design Vancouver inglenuk.com Kobo Seattle koboseattle.com

Design House Vancouver designhouse.ca Eskayel eskayel.com Esque Studio Portland esque-studio.com Gamla Vancouver gamla.ca Jennifer West Showroom Seattle jwshowroom.com

44. MADE HERE Wes Walsworth, Walsworth Furnishings Ketchum, ID walsworthfurnishings.com

Ikea Multiple locations ikea.com

Eighth Generation Seattle eighthgeneration.com

Jan Kath jan-kath.de

Mockups Seattle getmockups.com

Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushrugs.com

48. INTERIORS

Justine Brooks Design Vancouver justinebrooks.com

Robert Bailey Interiors Vancouver robertbaileyinteriors.ca

Linde Ltd. Portland lindeltd.com

Albert Oehlen Available through: Saatchi Gallery saatchigallery.com

Marisa Messick Eugene, OR marisamessick Michael Folks Showroom Seattle michaelfolks.com Nikki Jacoby Jewelry Seattle nikkijacoby.com Sahlia Jewelry Portland sahliajewelry.com Spencer Interiors Vancouver spencerinteriors.ca

Piling Palang pilingpalang.com

The Cross DĂŠcor & Design Vancouver thecrossdesign.com

33. ELEMENTS

Thorn&Wynn Portland thornandwynn.com

Acanthus Jewelry Portland acanthusjewelry.com

Troy Moth Victoria, B.C. troymoth.com

Ali Gradischer Portland aligradischer.com

Uptowne Papers Portland uptownepapers.com

AnneStarr Vancouver annestarr.ca

Victory Portland victorypdx.com

Bocci Vancouver bocci.ca

West Elm Multiple locations westelm.com

Colin Campbell Vancouver colin-campbell.ca

46. ORIGIN

Jonathan Adler Portland and Seattle jonathanadler.com

Livingspace Vancouver livingspace.com

Chandra Rugs shopchandra.com

Bang & Olufsen Multiple locations bang-olufsen.com

NW Rugs Multiple locations nwrugs.com Safavieh safavieh.com Thomas Paul thomaspaul.com Tufenkian Artisan Carpets Portland tufenkiancarpets.com Warp & Weft warpandweft.com

Bensen Vancouver bensen.ca

54. OUTDOOR

Ceramica Flaminia ceramicaflaminia.it

Darwin Webb Landscape Architects, P.S. Issaquah, WA darwinwebb.com

Christopher Wool wool735.com Inform Interiors Seattle and Vancouver informinteriors.com

Nussbaum Group Seattle nussbaum-group.com

Lindsey Adelman lindseyadelman.com

Aw Pottery Northwest Lynnwood, WA awpottery.com

Livingspace Vancouver shop.livingspace.com

Crosscut Hardwoods Seattle crosscuthardwoods.com

Porro porro.com

Terris Draheim Seattle terrisdraheim.com

Radius Architectural Millwork Burnaby, B.C. radiuswood.com

58. SOURCED: OUTDOOR

52. SOURCED: RUGS

Pot Inc. Vancouver potinc.ca

Andonian Rugs Seattle and Bellevue, WA andonianrugs.com

Tint Design Resource Seattle tintdesignresource.com

Atelier Lapchi Portland lapchi.com

Modern Eugene, OR modern-store.com

Beyond Beige Vancouver beyondbeige.com

Moe’s Home Collection Multiple locations moeshome.ca


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Sara Wise Design The Sara Wise Design Collection merges a rich array of materials to create sustainably produced contemporary furnishings of unparalleled quality and finish. Unique compositional elements and unexpected details are the signatures of our collection. Infinite options including exterior finishes are offered for customization. Available at the Terris Draheim showroom in Seattle. sarawise.com (206) 283-1411

Archilume Archilume’s unassuming simplicity masks a visionary design that transforms energy-efficient LED lighting into beautiful accent luminaires. The clear cylindrical lens features a conical diffuser that emits an elegant glow without the glare of a visible light source. Suited for ultra-modern to heritage-style interiors, the transparency of this design is its trademark aesthetic feature. Available in two gentle light effects: one evokes ripples on water, the other provides diffuse, even illumination. These dimmable luminaires are intended for illumination at counter and bar areas, in clustered formations as chandeliers in entrances, lounges and dining areas, or anywhere people want beautiful lighting accents. www.archilume.com (604) 710-2576

Carbon & Sand Garden Gates

New to the Northwest: unique and creative garden gate designs by Carbon and Sand. All our gates are custom-designed and detailed to each of our clients’ specifications. These custom gates will bring you enjoyment for generations. carbonandsand.com

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resources Object Outdoors Vancouver objectoutdoors.com Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com

Expanko Available through: Architectural Directions architecturaldirections.com Fabrica fabrica.com

Design Within Reach Multiple locations dwr.com

Felipe Motta, Petit Pois Studio petitpoisstudio.com.br

Spark Modern Fires sparkfires.com

Flavor Paper flavorpaper.com

60. ON THE ROCKS Office of McFarlane Biggar Architects + Designers North Vancouver officemb.ca CB2 Vancouver cb2.com Crate and Barrel Multiple locations crateandbarrel.com Crystalview Pool, Spa & Patio North Vancouver crystalview.ca Inform Interiors Seattle and Vancouver informinteriors.com

Froelich Engineers Portland froelich-engineers.com Ghilarducci Studios Portland 503-757-8245 Heath Ceramics heathceramics.com Herman Miller hermanmiller.com Hip Portland ubhip.com Luxrail cooperindustries.com Made Portland made-studio.com

Kayu Canada kayu.ca

McGee Salvage Portland mcgeesalvage.com

Miracle Glass Works Hope, B.C. 604-869-9559

Portland Product Werks Portland portlandproductwerks.com

Restoration Hardware Multiple locations restorationhardware.com

Ruthi Auda ruthiauda.com

Somerset Homes West Vancouver somersetcustomhomes.ca Spencer Interiors Vancouver spencerinteriors.ca Stylegarage Vancouver stylegarage.com West Coast Turn Key West Vancouver westcoastturnkey.com YLighting ylighting.com

66. DOMESTIC KINETICS Skylab Architecture Portland skylabarchitecture.com 3form 3-form.com

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United Tile Portland and Renton, WA unitedtile.com

Jon’s Woodworking Wasilla, AK jonswoodworking.com Juno Lighting Group junolightinggroup.com Marvin Windows and Doors marvin.com Miele mieleusa.com Sub-Zero & Wolf Appliances subzero-wolf.com 81. INSIGHT Big Wood Ski Sun Valley, ID bigwoodski.com BOX Interior Design Vancouver boxinteriordesign.com Emerick Architects Portland emerick-architects.com Piano Nobile Seattle studiopianonobile.com Provide Vancouver providehome.com Vanillawood Portland vanillawood.com

98. MY NORTHWEST Bestie Vancouver bestie.ca

11. B & B Italia Seattle bebitalia.com divafurniture.com 12. Chown Hardware Portland and Bellevue, WA chown.com

79. David Papazian Photography Portland papazianphoto.com

13. Hammer & Hand Seattle and Portland hammerandhand.com

80. Garrison Hullinger Portland garrisonhullinger.com

16. Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushrugs.com

80. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com

17. Interior Design Show West Vancouver idswest.com

83. Alchemy Collections Seattle alchemycollections.com camerichseattle.com

21. Design Lecture Series Seattle designlectur.es

83. Design Stage Seattle design-stage.com

23. Gelotte Hommas Bellevue, WA gelottehommas.com

85. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com

27. Yves Delorme Seattle and Bellevue, WA yvesdelormeparis.com

85. Nussbaum Group Seattle nussbaum-group.com

29. Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams Portland mgbwhome.com

87. Digs Seattle digsshowroom.com

31. Tufenkian Portland tufenkianportland.com 32. All+Modern, wayfair.com, Dwell Studio wayfair.com/designer 41. hip Portland ubhip.com 43. Spark Modern Fires sparkfires.com

Wolf subzero-wolf.com

Cause+Affect Vancouver causeandaffect.com

74. HOME AT LAST

AD INDEX

Workshop AD Seattle workshopad.com

2. Hive Portland hivemodern.com

53. OPUS Vancouver Vancouver vancouver.opushotel.com

Lair Design Seattle lairdesign.net

4. The Nines Portland thenines.com

BlueStar bluestarcooking.com

5. Marvin Windows & Doors Multiple locations marvin.com/shades

57. Loewen loewen.com Available through: Sound Glass Tacoma soundglass.com Windows Doors & More Seattle windowshowroom.com

BoConcept Multiple locations boconcept.com Hawkinson Construction Anchorage, AK hawkinsonak.net

9. Room & Board Seattle roomandboard.com 10. The Modern Fan Co. modernfan.com

79. Maison Inc. Portland maisoninc.com

45. Moe’s Home Collection Multiple locations moeshome.ca 47. Keller Supply Multiple locations www.kellersupply.com

59. Inglenuk Design Vancouver inglenuk.com

87. Kim E. Rooney Landscape Architects Seattle kimerooney.com 87. Masins Fine Furnishings & Interior Design Bellevue, WA masins.com 89. 360° Modern Seattle 360modern.com 89. Coates Design Architects Bainbridge Island, WA coatesdesign.com 89. Erik Bishoff Photography Eugene, OR erikbishoff.com 89. Vanillawood Portland vanillawood.com 91. The Fashion Group International of Seattle Seattle seattle.fgi.org Back Cover: The Fixture Gallery Multiple locations thefixturegallery.com


workshop The ultimate buyer’s guide. Your resource for everything from design studios and artisans, to trades- and craftspeople. WantedDesign (May 16-19) is a premier creative destination for the international design community during NYCxDESIGN in May. The event will offer a 360-degree experience with innovative installations, memorable products, a pop-up store, interactive experiences, convivial lounges, thought-provoking student workshops, engaging discourse and more. 269 11th Avenue (between 27th and 28th St), New York

Seattle Design Bureau Seattle Design Bureau is pleased to make its debut at WantedDesign 2014 in New York City. We invite you to join us as we embark on our journey to share with the world our love of design and our nod toward simple yet beautiful objects. seattledesignbureau.com

wanteddesignnyc.com

16th workshop

Chadhaus

16th workshop designs and builds hand-made modern furniture of heirloom quality. Our work offers function, quiet line and balanced composition, while using impeccably hand-crafted, time-tested joinery. In so doing, it brings together the finest qualities of each, allowing our work a stunning presence in any environ.

Chadhaus is an American furniture and design studio rooted in the belief that objects can be beautiful, handcrafted, and made to last. Based in Seattle, WA, Chadhaus is a small company led by husbandand-wife team Emily and Chad Robertson. Chadhaus pieces feature sustainably harvested PaciďŹ c Northwest woods and recycled steel manufactured in Seattle.

16thworkshop.com (206) 905-8662

chadhaus.com (206) 782-4287

urbancase We believe in designing objects that contribute to a simpler, pared-back lifestyle with an emphasis on functionality. Our furniture and products are designed in Seattle and built domestically by our manufacturing partners in Oregon and Vermont. We believe in living well with less.

Standard Socket

urbancase.com (206) 289-0451

standardsocket.com 1-800-447-2046

Founded in 2012 in Seattle, WA, Standard Socket is a contemporary lighting company featuring designs from studios in the Pacific Northwest, New York, and Norway. Our philosophy is simple: Connect - Design - Make.

Piano Nobile Piano Nobile is a design studio and workshop in Seattle. Their work combines structure and surface design, fine art and fine craft. The design studio creates architectural systems for homes, commercial spaces, and industry. The workshop produces organic linens and home goods. Piano Nobile products can be found in stores throughout the US and Japan, and in their online shop.

fruitsuper design, LLC We create products that tell your story. Products designed in Seattle and made in the USA that balance both fun and function. Designed to be used, loved, and lived with. fruitsuperdesign.com

studiopianonobile.com

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my northwest

WHO:

jane and steven cox Founders of Cause+Affect

WHERE: Bestie, Vancouver Photographed by Jeremy Jude Lee

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Shortly after moving to Vancouver in 2004 and founding the branding agency Cause+Affect, Jane and Steven Cox noticed a dearth of opportunities for local creatives to network. “We felt like people didn’t have enough awareness of what was going on that was interesting, even within the design community,” Jane says. So the duo stepped in to help—to “raise awareness and raise the bar.” Over the past 10 years they’ve launched a series of wildly popular events, including Fuse, a recurring party held at the Vancouver Art Gallery, and PechaKucha Night Vancouver. Come May 29, they’ll premiere FUEL, an ambitious conference and forum exploring the “Future of Urbanity, the Environment and our Lifestyle.” Two blocks from the Coxes’ office, another innovative concept has sprouted, though at a smaller scale. Bestie, a streamlined restaurant specializing in sausages and fries, is an unexpected discovery in gritty Chinatown. The Coxes are fans. After all, whether dining out or organizing a global conference, they’re driven by the same passion: “We’re always searching for the new, and we like to reward people who take risks and push the city forward,” Steven says. h


KITCHEN INTERIOR DESIGN

THE SIEMATIC ALUMINUM INTERIOR SYSTEM for drawers and pull outs

affords you creative new options for designing your kitchen entirely according to your own taste and harmonizing it elegantly with your style and finishes. With a unique mix of materials of high-quality a luminum, velvet y f lock, fine porcela in, a nd fine woods like da rk smoked chestnut or light oak with numerous innovative functions. Creating order has never been so much fun. You can see the new interior design system in action via the QR code or at siematic.us/individual.

SieMatic Seattle 2030 1st Avenue Tel: 206.443.8620 www.siematic.us/individual

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STYLE REPORT: WHAT’S NEW FOR BATH & KITCHEN

®

Modern & Chic New from Toto, the Nexus suite is an intriguing mix of clean, modern lines and natural textures. Our showrooms feature water-efficient, high-performance “green” products. Tigard Showroom 7337 SW Kable Lane 503/620-7050 Seattle Showroom 8221 Greenwood Ave N 206/632-4488

Bend Showroom 20625 Brinson Blvd. 541/382-1999

Salem Showroom 2710 SE Pringle Rd., #110 503/779-2882

Eugene Showroom 110 N. Garfield 541/ 688-7621

Pacific Showroom 703 Valentine Ave SE 253/229-7156

VISIT OUR OTHER SHOWROOMS IN IDAHO AND WASHINGTON

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THEFIXTUREGALLERY.COM


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