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LEFT: Wild indigenous landscaping links the house with the Cannon Beach coastline. A metal scupper along the roofline connects to a rain chain. ABOVE: Large roof overhangs in the house’s entry courtyard extend over the walkway to divert rainwater into an underground holding tank. BELOW: Though the house is clad inside and out with wood, its steel framing helps the house resist seismic forces and allows abundant floor-to-ceiling glass. Windows and doors were custom fabricated by Bergerson Cedar Windows.

“While this home is contemporary architecture, I wanted it to feel like it has always been here,” Basha says. “I wanted it to nestle into nature, to be all about nature. And it is. The inside becomes the outside and the outside becomes the inside. There’s a synergy.” Jones chose exterior cedar cladding to echo the conventions of Oregon coastal homes, and the emphasis on wood continues to the interior, which he describes as “just one big piece of furniture,” from its cedar ceiling to its walnut cabinetry. But in a break with local custom, he framed the building in steel to maximize the size of its

floor-to-ceiling windows. “Other houses in the area, they have square holes cut in the walls so you can see out,” the architect explains. “But you have to get out of your chair to see the view.” In contrast, soaring glass on the arcing west façade of Basha’s L-shaped floorplan invites the seaside indoors. The home’s landward side also offers plenty of visual interest. Here lush plants bloom within a courtyard garden, surrounded by a curving roof overhang outfitted with two metal scuppers that stretch over the walkway, funneling rainwater into an underground holding tank for strategic »

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY-TWO

57

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GRAY No. 22  

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest.

GRAY No. 22  

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest.

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