Issuu on Google+

photographs this spread: stephanie dyer

Like a tiny cottage nestled in among the trees, above: The Accessory Dwelling Unit is located just behind Dyer’s main house, and painted a deep brown to match. Bright yellow doors and window frames pop against the paint. below: On the main floor a custom-built seating area can be converted into a bed, or paired with a table to create an eating area. OPPOSITE: Dyer designed the textured tile surrounding the fireplace, as well as the intricately patterned tile in front of it. Above the fireplace is a rendering of the family home in Wisconsin that Dyer’s father-in-law designed before he passed away.

a little brown bungalow sits hidden behind interior designer Stephanie Dyer’s North Portland residence. The deep brown exterior is offset by cheery yellow trim, and a whimsical row of tile pavers leads up to the front porch. At only 342 sq. ft., the space is small, but it serves as a functional replacement to the weathering garage that stood on the lot for years. “When we bought our house there was this dilapidated garage on the property, and we were wondering what we were going to do with it,” Dyer explains. “In 2010 our son was born, and both of our parents were looking for places they could spend extended amounts of time when they visited.” When the family started scouting condos in the area, Dyer’s fatherin-law Christopher suggested that they tear down the garage and build a mother-in-law. Immediately the rest of the family was on board. After a year of planning and design work, and applying for the necessary permits from the city—Accessory Dwelling Units must meet a specific set of requirements such as size, height, and matching the architectural style of the existing residence—Dyer and crew were ready to build. The two-story structure is concise; the downstairs has a small kitchenette with everything except a full-size fridge and oven, and includes a gas fireplace and a breakfast nook that



GRAY No. 10