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Architecture: Projects in Seattle, Portland, British Columbia, and Coeur d’Alene

Interior Design

Decorating with Color,

HOT DESIGN FINDS, New Local Stores

MAGAZINE: pacIfIc NorthwESt dESIgN

Turn it up Custom guitars, ALBUM COVERINSPIRED DÉCOR, rockin’ interiors


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Live your life...

...indoors or out. Design solutions unique to you and your home.

CONTEMPORARY + TRADITIONAL FURNITURE AND INTERIOR DESIGN

10708 Main Street, Bellevue, WA | 425.450.9999 www.masins.com GRAY ISSUE No. four

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Tr a n s c e n d i n g Tr a d i t i o n a l H o m e D e c o r Tabletop | Bedding | Bath | Body Care | Jewelry | Gifts | Accessories shop our entire selection online at www.thepicketfence.com

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p ortl and

503.295.0151

m aisoninc.com

maison inc

INTERIOR

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see a fu ll port folio of our wor k at m aisoninc.com GRAY ISSUE No. four

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cont June–July.12§ Departments

8 Hello

A new season brings fresh, new changes.

12 News

Summer’s packed with hot announcements and collections.

16 Raves

GRAY’s picks for the coolest products in the market.

22 Interiors

Portland’s Skylab Architecture sweetens up the public spaces in W Seattle.

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28 Shopping

47 Outdoor

33 Inspired

Album covers encourage us to keep on rocking.

University of Washington celebrates 150 years with the new Washington Commons.

38 Fashion

71 Made Here

43 Color

75 Icon

Two stores in Seattle and Portland fulfill every design fanatic’s dream.

Cuchè Bikini’s modern swimwear collections rock a vintage vibe. Fig Studio gives a sleek loft space a colorful update.

Get outside with sizzling outdoor furniture finds.

64 Renovate

Seattle’s modularArts has been helping designers see in three dimensions. The history and legacy of the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Chinese Garden.


tents 76 Architecture

Stunning spaces transform how people interact with their surroundings.

78 Resources

Design resources from the issue.

79 Tech

Parsons Guitars turns musical instruments into pure art.

81 Library

Dig into book suggestions from garden expert Debra Prinzing.

82 Zodiac

A design horoscope for charismatic Gemini and protective Cancer.

Features

50 Designed for Life Homeowners Rolf and Randi Astrom fill their dream home with personality and mementos, including a collection of vintage swimsuits.

✤

On the Cover

We hope our custom cover gets you into the groove of all the great design featured in this issue. It reminds us of stereo sound waves or album cover spines.

What about you?

58 Back in Black (and White) Gaile Guevara gives a Vancouver, B.C., home a rock-and-roll vibe.

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hello

aLEX haYdEN

We would be remiss to plan a music issue without sharing a few of our favorite tunes of the moment and of all time. Happy listening!

Sunny Days SUmmEr IS fINaLLY hErE! The sunshine and warmer weather also bring a bright change for the GRAY team. We are all very excited to welcome new associate style editor Nicole Munson. Nicole has amazing taste (just check out her boards on Pinterest at pinterest.com/nicolesharon), and we couldn’t be more thrilled to have her on the team. Another happy change is our new music-themed issue full of gorgeous projects and hot seasonal style. Every summer, the picture-perfect weather in the Northwest reminds us just how lucky we are to live so close to bustling city centers and natural forests, mountains, and water. The designs featured in this issue draw from both sides, with picks that extol the best of urban sensibilities as well as all-natural local finds. Still, preparing this issue was no easy feat. It’s difficult to stay hard at work when the sunshine is in full force right outside. We can’t endorse your playing hooky, but we can hope that this issue serves as your own personal summer getaway.

xoxo,

Angela

Email: angela@graymag.net Subscribe: graymag.net/subscribe graymag.net facebook.com/graymag twitter.com/gray_magazine

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1

“Praying for Sunny Days” by hyper Static Union

2

“Sea Legs” by The Shins

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“Electric Feel” by MGMT

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“Little Talks” by Of Monsters and Men

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“Gypsy” by Fleetwood Mac

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“Canadian Girl” by The Walkmen

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“Hacienda Motel” by Pickwick

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“Have Love, Will Travel” by The Sonics

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“Candy” by The Presidents of the United States of America

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“Crazy On You” by heart

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“Man in Black” by Johnny Cash

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“Thanks A Lot” by Neko Case

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“Smile” by Madeleine Peyroux

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“Got to Give it Up” by Marvin Gaye

15

“Good Old-Fashioned Lover Boy” by Queen

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“Stir It Up” by Bob Marley

Share your playlists with us on Facebook and Twitter!


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contributors

MAGAZINE: PACIFIC NORTHWEST DESIGN

Writer BROOKE BURRIS In this issue: Architecture (pg 76)

Creative Director Publisher SHAWN WILLIAMS

Photographer HANK DREW

Editor

hankdrew.com In this issue: Inspired (pg 33)

ANGELA CABOTAJE

Style Director STACY KENDALL

Editor at Large LINDSEY M. ROBERTS

Assistant Editor RACHEL GALLAHER

NICOLE MUNSON

Contributors BROOKE BURRIS HANK DREW JOHN GRANEN ALEX HAYDEN ELISSA HEISCH DAVID PAPAZIAN DEBRA PRINZING HILLARY RIELLY ALISHA ROLLAND JOHANN WALL BENJAMIN WOOLSEY

Photographer JOHN GRANEN

johngranen.com In this issue: Architecture (pg 77)

CHARLIE HAYDEN

Associate Style Editor

Photographer ALEX HAYDEN

alexhayden.com In this issue: Interiors (pg 22), Shopping (pg 30), Feature (pg 50), Architecture (pg 76)

Advertising KIM SCHMIDT

(kim@graymag.net) RIKKA SEIBERT

(rikka@graymag.net) Subscriptions GRAYMAG.NET INFOGRAYMAG.NET

Special thank-yous to: SUZIE & BARNEY OSTERLOH NOLOGY MEDIA DALE WILLIAMS

Vol. I, No. 4. Copyright ©2012. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing.

Photographer DAVID PAPAZIAN

papazianphoto.com In this issue: Shopping (pg 28)

Flower Expert DEBRA PRINZING debraprinzing.com In this issue: Library (pg 81)

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 13619 Mukilteo Speedway D5 #551, Lynnwood, WA 98087. Subscriptions $30 US/$42 CAN for one-year; $50 US/$72 CAN for two-years.

Subscribe online at graymag.net.

Writer HILLARY RIELLY In this issue: Fashion (pg 38), Made Here (pg 71)

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Why does a kitchen have to look like a kitchen?

SieMatic kitchen interior design. Discover more at www.siematic.us/5005 SieMatic Seattle 2030 1st Avenue Seattle WA 98121 www.siematic-seattle.com

The stringent requirements set by the Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) underscores our dedication to the environment and exemplary conduct at all levels of the manufacturing process.

Tel: 206.443.8620

GRAY ISSUE No. four

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Milton Glaser for Lapchi, Landscape in overcast colorway.

SOMETHING TO SEE

news

Milton Glaser for Lapchi JULY 19–20

Celebrated designer Milton Glaser has teamed up with Lapchi to create a collection of limited-edition rugs—each is privately labeled and numbered. The entire collection will be on display starting in mid-July at Lapchi’s Portland showroom, with a GRAYsponsored launch event July 19 and 20. Until then, you can ogle the designs online!

see

 Atelier Lapchi, 809 N.W. Flanders St.,

Franklin media cabinet by Dwell Studio.

Portland, (503) 719-6589, atelierlapchi.com

NEW EXCLUSIVES

Dwell Studio at Bella Casa

new

 Bella Casa, 223 N.W. Ninth Ave.,

Portland, (503) 222-5337, bellacasa.net

Tom Kundig Hardware Collection Michael Burns

word on the street

Furniture lovers, Bella Casa has your next design fix. They’ve teamed up with Precedent Furniture to become the exclusive Portland-area dealer for Dwell Studio’s line of tables, sofas, chairs, cabinets, and more. Shop away!

Tom Kundig Collection Peek sliding door pull.

Olson Kundig Architects is known for amazing feats of architecture. And now Tom Kundig has teamed up with Seattle’s 12th Avenue Iron to take that one step farther by introducing a line of intimately scaled hardware components. The collection of unpretentious cabinet and door pulls, rollers, hardware, and hooks is meant to celebrate people’s interactions with their environment.  12th Avenue Iron, 1415 12th Ave.,

new

Seattle, (206) 420-3001, 12thavenueiron.com

Christian Woo at Provide Angled table by Christian Woo.

Exclusive, exclusive! Designer Christian Woo is exclusively represented at Vancouver’s Provide, and his new collection of bespoke furniture is a real stunner. Revel in the elegant simplicity and the refined craftsmanship. Go on. We’ll wait.  Provide, 529 Beatty St., Vancouver, B.C.,

(604) 632-0095, providehome.com

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Offerings available at Nest’s new showroom in Portland.

DATE SENSITIVE

news

Ladies Design Grant Deadline JUNE 30

just moved

June 30 is the last day to apply for Seattle Design Foundation’s Ladies Design Grant. This is the foundation’s first grant and is meant to support a single creative project for a female Seattle resident. The winner will be announced in September.  Seattle Design Foundation,

seattledesignfoundation.com

Seattle Japanese Garden JULY 20

It’s a garden party on July 20. United Airlines and the Seattle Japanese Advisory Council are sponsoring this third annual summer fundraising event. Stroll through the garden, designed and built by Juki Iida. Dinner, drinks, entertainment, and a live auction round out the evening. All proceeds go to support the garden’s cultural, artistic, and horticultural programs.

new

 Seattle Japanese Garden,

Lisa Vian Hunter So Seattle-area fashion designer Lisa Vian Hunter didn’t win it all on NBC’s Fashion Star, but she did do her hometown proud. You can snatch up her original designs—including the Olivia Coat (right), which wowed the buyer from Macy’s on the show—at her Madison Park shop and online.  Vian Hunter

House of Fashion, 2814 E. Madison St., Seattle, (206) 860-5030, vianhunter.com

1075 Lake Washington Blvd. E., Seattle, (206) 684-4725, seattlejapanesegarden.org

STORE MOVES Three local shops have trucked their wares to new locations. Couch has settled into a space in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood and is offering an expanded collection with new styles. Totokaelo has opened up a store in Seattle’s Capitol Hill and is now offering home goods as well as designer fashions. Nest has moved right around the corner from its old showroom location in Portland.  Couch, 5423 Ballard Ave. N.W.,

Seattle, (206) 633-6108, couchseattle .squarespace.com  Totokaelo, 1523 10th Ave., Seattle,

(206) 623-3582, totokaelo.com  Nest, 2151 N.W. Front Ave.,

Portland, (971) 544-7727, nestportland.com

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Sept

27–30

Interior Design Show West

Vancouver Convention Centre

+ Trends. + Ideas. New

Products. .For Your Home.

Kelly Deck

Creative Director, Kelly Deck Design From HGTV to some of the finest residences in Vancouver, Kelly brings a wealth of creativity and passion to her work. Celebrate design with Kelly and 30,000 others at IDSwest.

The latest on Speakers and Features at IDSwest.com

COMPLIMENTARY TRADE DAY REGISTRATION NOW AVAILABLE AT IDSWEST.COM Kitsilano Beach House by Kelly Deck Design

IDSwest idswest.com

GRAY ISSUE No. four

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raves

totally Get out the shades and take a peek at our latest design picks—just in time for summer Written by stacy kendall

Pop It

We could just eat this up. Portland’s Esque Studio created fanciful glass paperweights that actually look lighter than air. It may be bubblegum, but this is serious style. Bubblegum paperweight, $200 at Esque Studio, Portland, esque-studio.com.

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raves

To the Max

Check out this totally tubular mirror collection from IKEA in four radical colors. Choices? Like, duh! Get all four and you won’t have to decide. Hylkje mirror, $4.99 at IKEA, ikea.com.

sleep on it

Designer Christian Woo took inspiration from the Pacific Northwest for his new collection, made with sustainably harvested hardwood. This is one design that definitely doesn’t put us to sleep. Low platform bed by Christian Woo, from $6,375 at Provide, Vancouver, B.C., providehome.com.

“It’s really made for the way I work, and the way I think a lot of people work—on the couch with a laptop. It’s hard to find upholstery that is crisp and clean, and the Sfelt does both.” —Andy Johnson, Ample Furniture



Two > One

New from Ample Furniture, the Sfelt table is like getting two pieces of furniture in one. The 100-percent-wool removable wrap is the ottoman, while the solid walnut top is the coffee table. We’ll take two! Sfelt table, $895 at Ample Furniture, Seattle, amplefurniture.com.

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furniture textiles linens lighting accessories wallcoverings carpets outdoor furniture shade architecture

summer 2012

antiquities

Visit the showroom, located in the Seattle Design District, to browse an exquisite array of fine interior & exterior furniture collections custom tailored for the most discriminating interior designers and homeowners.

Where ideas flourish. t

5600 sixth avenue south seattle design district seattle wa 98108 206-763-4100 terrisdraheim.com hours mon-fri 9am to 5pm & by appointment

member of

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raves

Stick It to ‘Em

—Tamara Codor, Codor Design



“I’ve worked with antiques, and for this collection I wanted to deconstruct that look and make it minimal without being cold. I like the feel of history but designed to be something new.”

You’ll want to find stuff to stick up with Pigeon Toe Ceramics’ candy-colored magnets. Based on its popular faceted drawer pulls, these hand-sculpted little guys pack big visual punch. Faceted magnets, from $16 at Pigeon Toe Ceramics, Portland, pigeontoeceramics.com.

Float on

We fooled you! That’s not an antique. It’s the Floating Drawer Dresser from Codor Design’s first collection of modern furniture that’s inspired by old-world beauty. An expert expression of tension between heavy and light, Codor Design has just made this generation’s heirloom. Floating Drawer Dresser, from $11,000 at Codor Design, Seattle, codordesign.com.

Made In the Shade

Handmade in Shwood’s Portland studio from sustainable exotic hardwood, these sunnies take you from summer to fall in flawless fashion. Light and cool, this wood is good. Canby sunglasses, $125 at Shwood, Portland, shwoodshop.com.

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interiors

LOCATION W Seattle 1112 Fourth Ave., Seattle

DESIGN TEAM

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interiors: Skylab Architecture lighting: Esque Studio steelwork: LIT Workshop concrete: Portland Cement Company


w is for wow Portland’s Skylab Architecture gives W Seattle a showstopping makeover sprinkled with the best of the Northwest Written by ANGELA CABOTAJE : Photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

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interiors 24

“We worked with a number of artisans on this project, many of which we brought with us from Portland.” — Jeff Kovel, Skylab Architecture

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A

Kovel created separate gathering areas in the open room by grouping furniture together and using nylon-cord curtains to add privacy.

bland hotel lounge this most definitely is not. Inside the public spaces of W Seattle, eye candy beckons from every corner. Pink blown-glass pendants tempt from above, whimsical wallpaper tantalizes from all sides, and a stainless-steel fireplace looks like a candy bar just waiting to be unwrapped.

The Willy Wonka of this interior renovation is Jeff Kovel from Portland’s Skylab Architecture. Kovel was asked to redesign the lounge, restaurant, and bar using a basic recipe that contained one part W Hotels’ contemporary brand, a cup of Skylab Architecture’s “wow” style, and a helping of Seattle’s colorful legacy. “We developed an initial concept narrative entitled ‘Sonic Lodge,’” Kovel explains. “This concept seeks to illuminate the juxtapositions found in the history and futuristic aspirations of Seattle and the great Northwest.” Kovel infused the Living Room lounge with touches of Native American weaving, Northwest music, and Boeing aviation. For the TRACE restaurant and bar, he used forests and a lodge atmosphere as his ingredients for inspiration. The Living Room feels like a confectionery for design lovers.

It’s packed to the rafters with vibrant details, each one more succulent than the last. Silver-and-gray banquettes mingle with modern fuchsia wingbacks; loopy, orange side tables; and riveted, silver coffee tables. The striped upholstery and open curtains of nylon cords draw the eye up and reference the fabric looms and weaving patterns found in Native American art. Kovel worked with New York–based Flavor Paper to design custom wallpaper panels that depict a lifetime’s worth of record albums, from funk and soul to early rap and blues. They made sure that at least a quarter of the musical acts represented were from Seattle. High above, Esque Studio added the proverbial cherry on top—pink pendants crafted from clusters of fluted hand-blown glass. The pièce de résistance, though, is a three-story-tall fireplace encased in one thousand stainless-steel tiles, which GRAY ISSUE No. four

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interiors Collaborating with New York–based Flavor Paper, Kovel designed 22-foot-tall wallpaper panels depicting a varied collection of music albums. Included are Soundgarden’s Live on I-5 and Jimi Hendrix’s posthumous Hendrix in the West.

were fabricated by Portland’s LIT Workshop. It’s a gracious nod to the industrial past of the city as well as to the gleaming airliners that Seattle is known for today. For the TRACE restaurant and bar, Kovel opted for an open floor plan that would add a free-flow feel. Here the setting is more cozy and intimate, with a careful mixture of cool chrome and glossy black with warm creams and golds. The materials mirror this precise balance as well. Portland Cement Company molded concrete panels that mimic Pendleton’s wool-blanket designs for the bar surround, while Sensitile provided concrete-mix counters that glitter in the light. A custom walnut counter and contemporary wood chairs adorn the sushi bar while embossed ceramic floor tiles feature

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cut-wood patterns. At the far end, Portland’s The Felt Hat created a 12-foot-wide mural that, depending on the vantage point in the room, can appear to be either jellyfish bobbing in the water or a fighter jet zooming through the sky. Kovel says that the varied mix of color, materials, and volume throughout the spaces was meant to invite guests into W Seattle’s new common areas. “We believe that hospitality spaces should deliver a unique perspective to each seat in the house,” he explains. “We thread these individual experiences together through a larger storyline. In this case, we felt an eclectic mixture of both spaces and furnishings would convey a more comfortable ‘lived in’ experience.” Now that’s design you can sink your teeth into.


Nylon cords (left) reference Native American looms, and ceramic floor tiles (above) feature wood-cut patterns. Below left: Portland’s Esque Studio created hand-blown glass pendants, which provide lighting that’s both welcoming and intimate. Below: To disguise the support columns, Kovel reinterpreted lodge structures, wharf pilings, and totems. Portland’s LIT Workshop fabricated the modular sculptural forms to have the look of the charring that remains on a fireplace hearth.

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shopping

Treasure Hunting A bevvy of style booty awaits at two new shops in Portland and Seattle

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LOOT Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by david Papazian

Julie Pierce chose the right name for her Portland boutique. LOOT, which opened last October, is full of beautiful, one-of-a-kind treasures ranging from furniture and fixtures to textiles and rugs. According to Pierce, everything in the shop is handpicked and often emphasizes texture and the way it can be used to add character to a room. “I am definitely a hunter,” she says. “I like to seek out special things, whether it’s a vintage piece or a local artist whose work I love.” Pierce graduated with a degree in architecture in 2008 from Portland State University and describes her aesthetic as rooted in traditional style with an eclectic twist. The evidence is clear in her shop. Bright ikat pillows share space with oriental rugs, eggshell tea lights, and ornate wingback chairs. “The shop reflects me entirely,” Pierce says. “People coming in can really get a feel for my style. Almost all the products are new, but we always have those few special vintage pieces that I just love.” GRAY ISSUE No. four

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Sheridan + Company Written by rachel gallaher : Photographed by alex hayden

Design fanatics cheerfully welcomed a trendy new boutique in Seattle's happening Capitol Hill neighborhood this past March. SHERIDAN + COMPANY is run by Jason Mathews, an interior decorator who used to work in TV news in New York, and offers a wide range of products for every budget. Mathews stocks his shop with goods from local designers, such as furniture company Brackish, and artisan Daniel Saldutti (see page 37). He also offers interior decorating services that include everything from updating wall colors to completely refurnishing rooms. “We’re going for a modern, masculine glamour,” Mathews says. “I love it when somebody comes into the shop and is so inspired that they can’t leave without buying something to add to their home.”

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Opposite, from left: Wire side table, $129, and leather track rug, $2,295, at BoConcept, Seattle, (206) 464-9999, boconcept.com. ❈ Rocher chair, $225 at Ligne Roset, Seattle, (206) 341-9990, ligneroset.com. ❈ Lido console table, $1,191, and glass lamp, $610, at GR Home, Seattle. ❈ Stool with pink seat, $45 at Retrofit Home, Seattle, (206) 568-4663, retrofithome.com. ❈ Kaylee Cole’s We’re Still Here Missing You available at cdbaby.com/ kayleecole, and her new EP Always Going Home is available at kayleecole.bandcamp.com. Album art by Ben Fowler.

Rock On Written by Rachel Gallaher : Photographed by hank drew

No matter how you shake it, Seattle loves music. Emerald City has countless

local bands—some are hometown heroes while others have made it big on the national level. For this issue, we decided to turn our attention to some artists who are making a splash in the current Seattle scene. Damien Jurado and Kaylee Cole, each with a unique and beautiful voice, are two to watch. We could never choose favorites, but album covers are fair game.

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inspired —kaylee cole

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“And I’ll show up in a title of your song. I only hope somebody requests it.” —Damien Jurado

Opposite, from left: Vintage typewriters, from $59 at seattle junklove.com. ❈ Photo collage, $395 at Kirk Albert Home Furnishings, Seattle, (206) 762-3899, kirkalbert.com. ❈ Brackish chair, $600 at SHERIDAN + COMPANY, Seattle, (206) 414-3789, sheridaninteriordesign.com. ❈ Vintage books, $65 and $145 at Susan Wheeler Home, Seattle, (360) 402-5080, susanwheeler home.com. ❈ Camera table light by Daniel Saldutti, $300 at SHERIDAN + COMPANY. Damien Jurado’s Maraqopa available at scdistribution.com/damienjurado or through Amazon and iTunes. Album cover photo by Richard Swift and design by Daniel Murphy of Secretly Canadian.

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fashion

Vintage, Vinyl ,

and swimwear

Vancouver, B.C.’s Eden Rausch designs beach-ready apparel with a vintage vibe Written by Hillary Rielly : Photographed by Johann Wall Hair by Elissa Heisch : Makeup by Alisha Rolland

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Astrid from the 2012 collection has full, French-cut bottoms and a contour halter top.

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fashion

S

staples of un, surf, and music are , the design life for Eden Rausch , B.C.–based mind behind Vancouver t’s clear in tha Cuchè Bikinis, and ces. Her pie ar we im each of her sw of past and inspirations are a mix both music present, drawing from and beach culture. en she took start Cuchè in 2004, wh to d ide She dec tting, about the lack of well-fi her friends’ complaints t to rke ma swimwear in the high-quality, affordable and g win gro is the business heart. Eight years later, line my on ail det e “Th craft. Rausch is fine-tuning her simple a g pin kee yet r, yea ry gets more involved eve look is my approach.” ’70s es a nod from ’60s and The 2012 collection tak vina e hav ors col and lines Euro cult movies. The the to g modern women. “Goin tage feel but are fit for ere wh or is it tter what year beach is a safe bet no ma and x rela to y wa a says. “It’s you are in life,” Rausch y ssic style in a modern wa cla the to add t reflect. I jus erience of that.” to add to the whole exp has beach covered, Rausch the Now that she has Up gs. tin set and s er season started designing for oth and , ear erw out ling sai coats, next are a line of trench r. gea n rai chic

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OPPOSITE: Eugénie (below) and Ginnette (above) feature sporty, nautical stripes for life out on the water. THIS PAGE: Charlie’s push-up top and high-waist bottoms bring back the vintage va va voom of decades past.

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color

Colorful Mission:

Portland interior designer Jenny Guggenheim fills a Pearl District loft with colorful, vibrant touches Written by Angela Cabotaje : Photographed by Josh Partee

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color

W

hen a stylish young professional moved from Seattle to Portland with only her clothes and dog Nic in tow, she sought out Portland’s Fig Studio for design help. Principal Jenny Guggenheim stepped in to fill the empty Pearl District loft with bright, energetic touches that reflected her client’s personality. “The design is as approachable as she is, and comfort was definitely a focus,” Guggenheim says. Working closely with her client, Guggenheim sourced local pieces and designed custom items to create an exuberant space that packs a real style punch. Lucky for us, she’s happy to share her secrets on designing with color.

6Color Tips from Jenny Guggenheim 1. “Never underestimate the power of a white wall,” Guggenheim says. In the main space, the wall acts as a grounding element for the room, while the neutral sofa allowed Guggenheim to play freely with color and pattern without overwhelming the small space. On the other hand, an orange accent wall is more than enough color for the entryway. 2. Start with a point of inspiration. When the homeowner joined the designer for a shopping trip at Kravet, she was immediately taken with the striped pillow fabric, which reminded her of a favorite Kate Spade pattern. “I love when upholstery fabrics start to cross over into the fashion realm, and our stylish client knew right away it would be the perfect fit for her home,” Guggenheim says. The rest of the

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room’s palette was built around the fabric’s saturated colors. 3. Get creative. “One of my favorite color tricks is to remove the dust jackets from novels and textbooks,” Guggenheim says. “The beautiful book cloth is revealed and adds an instant pop of color without spending a dime.” She raided the homeowner’s collection of tomes and chose the prettiest ones to display. 4. Keep your eyes open. The painting behind the sofa is a thrift-store find that the homeowner fell in love with. It’s faux-gold frame pairs well with a Jonathan Adler floor lamp and sunburst mirror. 5. Play with pattern. Guggenheim prefers to keep fabric samples with her

so she can edit combinations on the fly and compare swatches on furniture to check that the scale is just right for each piece. For this space, she chose a Kelly Wearstler chevron for the ottoman and a kilim-pattern rug from West Elm. 6. Shop local. “We tried to source many of the items locally and had many items fabricated by local craftspeople,” Guggenheim says. The reclaimed fir console behind the sofa was fabricated by Fieldwork, and the blue vase was made by Portland artist Laura Cook and purchased at Tilde. By shopping at local stores and working with local artisans, Guggenheim is able to select and design pieces for a particular space, ensuring that each color accent works with the overall aesthetic.


“ Eventually, everything connects… — Charles Eames

...people, ideas, objects. The quality of connections is the key to quality per se.” This design philosophy remains true today, and in all different arenas. More and more, those connections emerge and are strengthened through social media sites. Nology Media creates rich social experiences and lasting connections for brands and their audiences.

nologymedia.com | seattle GRAY ISSUE No. four

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outdoor

Dining chair, Fresh Air Collection by Richard Schultz, $840 at Terris Draheim, Seattle, terrisdraheim.com.

Sunny Side up the grill—it’s time to Up Fire move out!

Outside, that is. Take advantage of sunnier climes and bring the inside out with new outdoor furniture and accessories. Stripes, brights, and whites look cool and crisp against nature’s backdrop, so don’t miss the opportunity to punch up your patio this summer. Written and compiled by stacy kendall

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outdoor

1. Izmir Outdoor Dhurrie runner, $129 at West Elm, westelm.com. 2. Outdoor Eames Wire-Base table, from $1,528 at Design Within Reach, dwr.com. 3. Dining arm chair by Century Furniture, from $1,935 at Michael Folks Showroom, michaelfolks .com. 4. Portofino Pavilion, $699 at Z Gallerie, zgallerie.com.

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GRAY issue No. 3, page 56 Landscape design by Scot Eckley, Inc. Photographed by Alex Hayden

100 % devoted to residential and commercial for and about the Northwest. design our talent. our services. our products. all available

exclusively

right here.

Be a part of the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design scene! Here’s how you can get involved: ❈ Follow us on Facebook and Twitter ❈ Subscribe and be among the first to see each new issue ❈ Submit a project or story idea ❈ Advertise your products or services

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feature

L ife

designed for 50

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The Astroms wanted a modern, light-filled space, in which they added vintage design elements, such as the 1960s Murano glass chandelier over the dining table. Outside, a simple concrete patio elevates the outdoor living area over the natural beach terrain.

Rolf and Randi Astrom built their energyefficient house with an eye toward design—and living life to the fullest Written by stacy kendall : Photographed by alex hayden

DESIGN TEAM

architect: Richard Rhydes, Whidbey Island Architects construction: Yonkman Construction demolition: Bobby Wolford Trucking and Demolition GRAY ISSUE No. four

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1950s furniture in the living room, all discovered by Randi on one of her many excursions to local thrift and vintage stores, lends a bright and playful vibe to the impeccably executed modern architecture. The custom gas fireplace that bisects the living space was one of the pieces Rolf designed and made by hand using his welding know-how from years of restoring vintage automobiles.

i

n many ways, building a house is just an ordinary process that happens every day. But in most ways, the

house that Rolf and Randi Astrom built was out of the ordinary, and that’s just how they wanted it.

When Randi was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007, the Astroms decided at that moment to start what was previously just a dream for another day. They found their ideal property on the shores of Whidbey Island and started to imagine what felt like a near-impossible feat— building a very modern home in the sleepy island town of Coupeville. Building next to salt water turned ordinary construction challenges into extraordinary ones. The Astroms specified every material used to make sure that it was rot- and corrosion-proof, all the way down to the fasteners, which were made of stainless steel. Rolf could be seen some days on the job site with a magnet, hunting down stray iron fasteners or nails. But his involvement didn’t stop there. In his spare time, Rolf restores vintage automobiles and has a full metal shop at his disposal in Woodinville, where he personally built some of the house’s design features. The freestanding fireplace that separates the living and dining rooms is made from a tractor stack and GRAY ISSUE No. four

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A part of the Astroms’ eclectic art collection is Randi’s assortment of vintage swimsuits and swimming caps from the ’20s through the ’60s, which are displayed throughout the entire house. In the kitchen, Caesarstone’s Apple Martini countertop pops against the walnut cabinetry—a perceived style risk that has paid off in enjoyment for the Astroms and their guests.

laser-cut, powder-coated metal that Rolf designed. Their large-scale front door was painted in the same way with automobile paint, just like Rolf’s hot rods. “We were involved in every corner of this house,” Rolf says. To support local businesses, the Astroms hired architect Richard Rhydes, principal of Whidbey Island Architects, and Yonkman Construction to carry out their exacting vision—one that was not only modern but also environmentally efficient. In Rolf’s native country, Sweden, efficiency is a way of life, and he and Randi sought to make their house as green as possible. “We didn’t want to do things the way they’ve always been done,” Randi says. Instead of dumping the demolition waste, the Astroms hired Bobby Wolford Trucking and Demolition to recycle 80 percent of it, including the concrete. Things such as low-VOC paint, a tankless water heater, compact florescent and low-voltage lighting, and tinted glass windows for temperature control were automatically added into the design of the house. The avid animal lovers also opted to be dark-sky compliant, which reduces light pollution at night by directing outside fixtures down instead of up into the trees or sky which can confuse wildlife and obscure star visibility. Green design also found its way into the interiors through the use of vintage furniture, which is one of Randi’s passions. She delights in combining modern architecture with old and new furnishings. In the modern dining room, one can find a 1960s Murano glass chandelier that once belonged to Randi’s grandmother. “It’s all about the mix and the juxtaposition of styles,” Randi says. The chandelier keeps company with one of the most controversial aesthetics in the house—apple-green Caesarstone countertops. Randi says everyone thought they were crazy to choose such a bright color for the kitchen, but it’s this countertop, if anything, that reflects the Astroms’ attitude toward building their dream home. “We wanted to have fun building this,” Randi says. “I told people ‘It’s just a house, and it’s just a countertop, not a life-or-death decision.’ ” For the Astroms, being a part of the designing and building process was really the heart of the matter. From Rolf’s custom door hinges to the decision to have two master bedrooms and modular closets instead of a walk-in one, this house was built out of a passion for design. “We weren’t afraid to do what we wanted,” Randi says. “When you get the opportunity to build a house, you should build it completely for you.” GRAY ISSUE No. four

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Left: Unable to find American bath fixtures that were streamlined enough, the Astroms flexed their DIY skills by mounting and reinforcing IKEA kitchen cabinets to the wall to create the master bath vanity. ABOVE AND RIGHT: The floors throughout the house are poured black concrete. The Astroms specified smooth walls and simple molding to complement their modern structure.

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OPPOSITE: The lady of the house heavily influenced the glamorous dining room but still embraced the dual-color palette. Silver-accented tables and chairs keep the space modern and two large glass vases add a definite “wow� factor. THIS PAGE: Two playful Jonathan Adler ceramic cats add a whimsical touch in the dining room.

back in

black (and white) Written by rachel gallaher : Photographed by gaile guevara

DESIGN

interior design: Gaile Guevara

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W

hen interior designers become good friends with their clients, the lasting creative partnership can extend beyond one single project. Such is true for Vancouver, B.C., interior designer Gaile Guevara and two of her clients, the husband-and-wife owners of a number of restaurants and a downtown music lounge.

After working on their commercial projects, Guevara was asked by the couple to work her magic on their home. “The homeowners wanted a different perspective in how they approached their home,” Guevara says. “I was more modern than their personal tastes, but they were looking for something new.” According to Guevara, the husband was looking for comfort when it came to furniture and the wife was drawn more to the styling. Both of them had antiques inherited from their families—candelabras, crystal pieces, silverware—and it was important that they be worked into the decor. Guevara chose a black-and-white palette for the home to serve as a neutral, classic background for colorful art and

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accessories. In the living room, Guevara and the homeowners achieved the perfect mix between comfort and style. A woven linen sofa and modern leather-and-metal chairs provide seating, while a high-gloss black coffee table provides a place for books and other trinkets. The living room offers laid-back comfort, and the dining room is a full hit of feminine glamour. A large, ornate chandelier from The Cross in Yaletown hangs above the spacious dining table—a necessity for a couple that loves to entertain. Black is a bold choice for all-over room paint, but Guevara filled the room with white accessories, which are illuminated by light from the large windows. If the dining room is the wife’s space, then downstairs is


OPPOSITE: The designer’s dog, Teddy, a regular fixture on project sites, rests on a bold, graphic rug purchased from Canadian company EQ3. THIS PAGE: The painted black fireplace in the living room is edgy yet sophisticated, and metal-and-leather chairs provide clean lines— the perfect contrast to the coffee table’s ornate legs.

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the husband’s domain. A room that embraces the couple’s love of music (they are very involved in Vancouver’s music and nightlife scene), it is a place where the husband can have friends over for a jam session or where the entire family can hang out and relax. The original carpet was torn out and replaced with dark hardwood flooring—a durable and stylish addition. Brightly colored portraits of each member of the Beatles, gifts from a good friend, line the wall above the sofa. To add to the rock-and-roll vibe in the home, a funky painting of Keith Richards and a psychedelic poster of Bob Dylan adorn the main-floor living room. Throughout the home are riffs of teal—a favorite color of the wife. In her office, Guevara added texture with teal,

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woven-grass wallpaper and a large, cream area rug. Two lamps from the homeowners’ previous residence continue the glitzy theme, and chairs upholstered in a charcoal-gray, woven-knit fabric and a desk provide clean lines. With input from the homeowners and Guevara, the original dated and beige home was transformed into a space with a spirited and youthful mix. “Working with this couple was very fun,” Guevara says. “They are very easygoing and know what they like. The home totally reflects who they are, both in terms of their love of music and entertaining, and they were very happy with the end results.”


OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The couple’s

son, Asher, poses with his dad outside their Vancouver home; black-and-white poufs from The Cross provide stylish extra seating in the living room; baby pictures of Asher serve as sweet mementos, while yellow details complement the neutral space; Teddy poses on the mantel in front of a mirror from Peridot; collections of white vases against a white wall create visual texture without adding clutter; whitelacquer shelving pops against dark-blue walls in the wife’s office. THIS PAGE: It doesn’t get any more rock-and-roll than Keith Richards—the portrait by artist Sebastian Kruger hangs above the husband’s guitars, which are ready for an impromptu jam session.

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renovate

Bow Down to

Washington, Alumni The University of Washington celebrates its 150th birthday with a newly renovated Washington Commons, designed to embody the university’s past, present, and future Written by stacy kendall : Photographed by Benjamin Woolsey

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LOCATION University of Washington Alumni Commons 4333 Brooklyn Ave. N.E., Seattle

DESIGN TEAM

architect: ZGF Architects construction: Howard S. Wright graphics: Studio SC

Left: Part of ZGF Architects’ goal to make the design of the Commons “unmistakably UW” is the etching that replicates the university’s iconic Suzzallo Library stained-glass windows on lacquered fiberboard. This old-meets-new combination can be found throughout the design of the space. GRAY ISSUE No. four

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“Here, all are welcome,” says Sue Wilson

Williams, the president of the UW Alumni Association Board of Trustees. The renovation of the Washington Commons wasn’t merely about designing the home of University Advancement and the University of Washington Alumni Association. It was about creating the full story of the university in just 4,000 square feet. This was the task given to Seattle’s ZGF Architects LLP in 2010, and with 150 years of Husky history, there was a lot to consider. Luckily for the architecture firm, the campus proved to be a goldmine of inspiration. One of the university’s most iconic buildings, Suzzallo Library, with its collegiate gothic style that feels more cathedral than house of books, was a natural place to start. ZGF’s Patrick Gordon, the principal in charge of the project, explains that they wanted to “evoke the university’s past with design that was subtle, modern, and yet timeless.” Guests to the Alumni Washington Commons are welcomed first by a simple etching on the wall of Suzzallo’s majestic stained-glass windows, symbolic of knowledge and history. “It’s unmistakably UW,” Gordon says.

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Taking another cue from the past, ZGF commissioned Seattle’s Meyer Wells to transform a fallen red elm that once stood tall on campus, into the 14-seat conference table in the boardroom. Overlooking the table is a dramatic graphic, created by Seattle’s Studio SC, that depicts University of Washington graduates and represents the university’s past and future legacy. Standing in the heart of the space, visitors are treated to a sweeping view of the campus. To the designers, it was key to make the connection between this space and the university. So etched on large picture windows is a silhouette of Memorial Way, the tree-lined formal entrance to the university’s campus. On the opposing wall, a large graphic of Mt. Rainier stands in place of the real view of the mountain, which can be seen looming in the distance from several points on campus. “The values of the alumni association are really reflected by the language and imagery used in the Commons,” says Paul Rucker, the association’s executive director. “This place represents the interests that UW has for the public good—that it has the power to change lives.”


Instead of designing a simple reception desk, ZGF Architects wanted to create a place that was the literal and figurative center of life in the Commons. From here, visitors can see many of the design elements that make up this important university space.

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Two years ago, Meyer Wells salvaged a tree on the UW campus that they later crafted into the 12-foot-long conference table that now commands the floor of the Commons boardroom. Studio SC created a wall graphic that pictures 124 UW graduates, showcasing the diversity of the university’s past and future legacies.

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made here

Rock and Wall Seattle's modularArts helps designers and architects see things in three dimensions Written by Hillary Rielly

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made here

The modularArts collection includes panels for large-scale installations, tiles that work better in residential projects, and blocks to create rock-solid sculptural walls. With plenty of textures to choose from, designers won’t get bored any time soon.

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fitting that a former musician founded a company that produces three-dimensional wall surfaces that give any space plenty of attitude. Donald Kaump, founder and president of Seattle’s modularArts, transitioned from New Wave cover band in the 1980s to specialty fabricator and furniture designer, working on projects for Seattle Opera and the Pacific Science Center. One day, while Kaump worked on a dimensional wave wall for a restaurant in Bellevue, the idea for the company came to him. “I thought there must be an easier way to create this, maybe a modular method,” he says. A decade later, modularArts has two manufacturing spaces in Seattle that total 30,000 square feet and produce a collection of sculptural panels, tiles, and


nels, and blocks The company crafts its tiles, pa ls like ceramic, so creating from a unique material that fee blem. ultra-detailed designs is no pro

blocks from gypsum and locally mined natural aggregates. The surface looks and feels like ceramic, allowing for ultra-fine detail in the designs, while still being light enough for infinite wall and room applications. “We are very proud to be a successful American manufacturer,” Kaump says. Architects and designers, both here and abroad, have used modularArts to liven up their residential, retail, and hospitality projects from California to Florida. Up next, Kaump says modularArts plans to add more patterns and expand its three-dimensional BLOCK line. “Rather than surfacing new or existing walls, like our panels and tiles, they create full, round sculptures.”

LEFT TO RIGHT: Swim Deluxe InterlockingRock panel; Yuma Deluxe InterlockingRock panel; Weaver fully dimensional BLOCK; Burle Deluxe InterlockingRock panel.

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icon Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden Written by Lindsey M. Roberts

One of the biggest testaments to the Pacific Northwest’s connection to Asia is the Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden in Vancouver, B.C.’s Chinatown, the first full-size Chinese garden ever built outside of China. Fifty-two master gardeners from Suzhou, China, started construction on the garden in 1985 using techniques passed down from gardening during the Ming Dynasty period of 1368 to 1644—techniques that don’t require nails, screws, or glue. In 1968, the nonprofit Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden Society opened the grounds as part of its mission to strengthen the connection between East and West. Both society and the garden are named after Dr. Sun Yat-Sen, a Chinese hero known as “Guo Fu,” or the father of the country, who sought democratic rule and helped overthrow the Qing dynasty. He traveled the world to promote his vision, visiting Vancouver three times to raise funds in support of the 1911 revolution. The emperor eventually abdicated, and Yat-Sen became the first provisional president of the Republic of China from 1911 to 1912. He resigned to devote himself to China’s economic development and died in 1925. The garden, which celebrated its 25th anniversary last year, was designed around four elements—rock, water, plants, and architecture—which are balanced in the Eastern philosophy of yingyang, or balance of complementary forces. It features two pavilions, one of which seems to float on a pond, and two halls for educational programming. Water-worn limestone rocks from a lake near Suzhou change with the light and pile up in a false mountain in the center of the garden. GRAY ISSUE No. four

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architecture

The Writable Office  Written by brooke burris Photographed by benjamin woolsey

Real Northwest Written by brooke burris Photographed by alex hayden

Project architect Kozo Nozawa of Seattle’s Prentiss Architects helped guide the homeowners of a ’90s rambler through a full-gut remodel of their 5,000-square-foot Medina home. With help from Odyssey Builders, Nozawa maintained the original footprint and reconfigured some of the interior spaces, and Scot Eckley Inc., gave the exterior areas a full makeover. The primary goal of the project was to unify the indoor and outdoor living spaces, providing an open, modern look inside that would be in perfect balance with the Pacific Northwest surroundings. Clean lines, minimal trim, and white walls create a light and airy feel. Wood elements— such as rift-sawn white oak featured in the exposed millwork—warm up the home and tie in with the outdoors. The result is a house that’s bright, fresh, and truly Northwest.

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When a tech company wanted help creating a collective studio atmosphere, where employees could also work in individual offices, it turned to Seattle’s chadbourne + doss architects. The Pioneer Square building housing the office had recently been restored by Seattle’s SHED Architecture & Design, so architects Daren Doss and Lisa Chadbourne went to work on the interior layout. They came up with a solution of open, large-desk seating along with private office pods. “It was important that the cubes felt elemental in form,” Doss explains. The pods have plywood floors, walls, and ceilings, with an exterior made of sheetrock and glass. The interior desks are made of writable laminate surfaces. A recessed black base makes it appear as if the pods are floating six inches above the floor. Their clean and white appearance contrasts nicely against the texture of the industrial warehouse space.


A Spa for all Seasons

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER : Photographed by JOHN GRANEN

Surrounded by vast expanses of blue prairie sky and gently rolling Native American land, the Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort and Hotel is a scenic getaway from the big city. Last year, with help from Seattle’s Mithun architecture firm, it underwent an expansion that added a steakhouse, 98 hotel rooms, and a unique treatment spa with a name fit for the setting: Ssakwa’q’n, meaning “water on the head.” In this case, the head of a mountain is located near rural Crystal Lake, and the 15,000 square foot spa facility embraces the beauty of its surroundings. “We really wanted to bring the outside in,” spa director Kelleye Heydon explains. “The color scheme is very neutral. There is lots of wood, such as cedar and also copper detailing—things that are indigenous to the area.” The minimal décor includes windows in most of the treatment rooms, allowing for sweeping views. “The décor is very rustic elegance, very gender neutral,” Heydon says. “It is not your typical spa experience. Our motto is ‘From nature to nurture.’ ”

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resources

Ample Furniture (pg 18) 4632-C Ohio Ave. S. Seattle, WA 98134 (206) 834-6702 amplefurniture.com Atelier Lapchi (pg 32) 809 N.W. Flanders St. Portland, OR 97209 (503) 719-6589 lapchi.com BAKU Contemporary (pg 2) (253) 265-3921 bakucontemporary.com Bobby Wolford Trucking and Demolition (pg 50) Woodinville, WA (425) 481-1800 wolfordtrucking.com BoConcept (pg 34) 901 Western Ave. Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 464-9999 boconcept.us Brook Farm General Store (pg 43) brookfarmgeneralstore.com Builders’ Hardware & Supply Company, Inc. (pg 70) 1516 15th Ave. W. Seattle, WA 98119 (206) 281-3700 builders-hardware.com 1038 116th Ave. N.E., Ste. 310 Bellevue, WA 98004 (425) 679-5115 builders-hardware.com Capers (pg 82) 4525 California Ave. S.W. Seattle, WA 98116 (206) 932-0371 caperscapers.blogspot.com chadbourne + doss architects (pg 76) Seattle, WA (206) 860-1975 chadbournedoss.com

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Clayhaus (pg 21) Portland, OR (503) 928-3076 clayhausceramics.com

Fieldwork Design, LLC (pg 43) Portland, OR (503) 360-1437 fieldworkdesign.net

Codor Design (pg 20) codordesign.com

Flavor Paper (pg 22) flavorpaper.com

Cuchè Bikinis (pg 38) Vancouver, B.C. (604) 250-0548 cuchebikinis.ca

Fliptography (pg 74) (877) 435-4786 fliptography.net

Cupcake Royale (pg 13) Seattle and Bellevue, WA cupcakeroyale.com Damien Jurado (pg 33) damienjurado.com Design Stage (pg 70) Seattle, WA (206) 829-9049 design-stage.com Design Within Reach (pg 48, 82) dwr.com Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden (pg 75) 578 Carrall St. Vancouver, B.C. V6B 5K2 (604) 662-3207 vancouverchinesegarden.com Esque Studio (pg 16, 22) esque-studio.com The Fashion Group International of Seattle, Inc. (pg 42) seattle.fgi.org The Felt Hat (pg 22) felthat.com Fig Studio LLC (pg 43) Portland, OR (503) 367-7871 figstudiopdx.com

Gaile Guevara Interior Design & Creative (pg 58) Vancouver, B.C. (604) 617-2037 gaileguevara.com Gelotte Hommas Architecture (pg 46) Bellevue, WA (425) 828-3081 gelottehommas.com seattlearchitect.thenew hive.com/arc-i-tek Glacier Window & Door, Inc. (inside back cover) 1229 S.E. Grand Ave. Portland, OR 97214 (503) 408-8838 glacierwindow.com

Howard S. Wright Construction Co. (pg 64) Seattle, WA (206) 447-7654 howardswright.com IDSwest (pg 15) idswest.com IKEA (pg 18) ikea.com Imports from Marrakesh (pg 43) importsfrommarrakesh.com Karen O’Leary (pg 43) etsy.com/shop/studiokmo Kaylee Cole (pg 34) kayleecole.bandcamp.com Kirk Albert Vintage Furnishings (pg 33) 5517 Airport Way S. Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 762-3899 kirkalbert.com Kravet (pg 43) kravet.com

The Good Mod (pg 43) 4701 S.E. 24th Ave. Portland, OR 97202 (503) 206-6919 thegoodmod.com

Ligne Roset (pg 32) 112 Westlake Ave. N. Seattle, WA 98109 (206) 341-9990 ligneroset.com

GR Home (pg 34) 4520 Union Bay Pl. N.E. Seattle, WA 98105

LIT Workshop (pg 22) Portland, OR (503) 224-1399 litws.com

Hip (pg 17) 1829 N.W. 25th Ave. Portland, OR 97210 (503) 225-5017 ubhip.com Hive (pg 43) 820 N.W. Gilsan St. Portland, OR 97209 (503) 242-1967 hivemodern.com

LOOT Design House (pg 28) 925 N.W. 19th Ave., Ste. A Portland, OR 97209 (503) 477-5878 lootdesignhouse.com Madison and Grow (pg 43) madisonandgrow.com


tech

play it lou

fts Local luthier Randy Parsons cra rks of art wo one-of-a-kind guitars into true Written by Rachel Gallaher

bols of rock-and-roll. From Bob The guitar is one of the iconic sym Hendrix’s impressive left-hand Jimi to ing Dylan’s acoustic strumm cultural influence. talent, the guitar has had a strong instrument has become more For local artisan Randy Parsons, the Parsons, who dabbled art. of than wood and string—it is a form , started in the business child a was he e with playing the guitar sinc ir shop. In 2006, after receiving about 20 years ago by setting up a repa ar for Jack White (of The White a phone call about modifying a guit ting a one-of-a-kind coppercraf Stripes fame), Parsons ended up topped guitar for the musician. there as requests for handmade Parsons’ career skyrocketed from icians and collectors. Now owner guitars started flooding in from mus his craft like a true artist, using hes of Parsons Guitars, he approac in instruments, taking anywhere hand tools to create intricate patterns a guitar, and using exotic materials from six months to a year to create exotic woods. “I’ve been involved such as cow skulls, metal, vinyl, and tle native says. “They’re so Seat with guitars my whole life,” the ry guitar I do is completely complicated; it’s like a puzzle. Eve an thumbprint on each one.” different, but I like to leave the hum

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resources

Maison Inc. (pg 5) 1611 N.W. Northrup Portland, OR 97212 (503) 295-0151 maisoninc.com Manor Fine Wares (pg 9) 907 N.W. 23rd Ave. Portland, OR 97210 (503) 954-2900 manorfinewares.com Masins Fine Furnishings & Interior Design (pg 3) 10708 Main St. Bellevue, WA 98004 (425) 450-9999 masins.com Michael Folks Showroom (pg 48) 5701 Sixth Ave. S., Ste. 254 Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 762-6776 michaelfolks.com Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams (back cover) 1106 W. Burnside St. Portland, OR 97209 (503) 972-5000 mgbwhome.com Mithun (pg 77) Seattle, WA (206) 623-3344 mithun.com modularArts (pg 71) Seattle, WA (206) 788-4210 modulararts.com Nology Media (pg 45) Seattle, WA (877) 665-6499 nologymedia.com Parsons Guitars (pg 79) Seattle, WA (206) 624-7668 parsonsguitars.com

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Penna & Co. Kitchen & Giftwares (pg 82) 130-777 Royal Oak Dr. Victoria, B.C. V8X 4V1 (250) 727-2110 pennakitchen.com

Secretly Canadian Records (pg 33) secretlycanadian.com

Perch Furniture (pg 43) 923 N.W. 10th Ave. Portland, OR 97209 (503) 208-5128 perchfurniture.com

SHERIDAN + COMPANY (pg 30, 33) 1517 12th Ave. Seattle, WA 98122 (206) 414-3789 sheridaninteriordesign.com

The Picket Fence (pg 4) Sun Valley, ID (866) 944-5511 thepicketfence.com

Shwood (pg 20) shwoodshop.com

Pigeon Toe Ceramics (pg 20) 424 N. Tillamook St. Portland, OR 97227 (503) 709–5479 pigeontoeceramics.com Portland Cement Company (pg 22) Portland, OR (503) 914-6120 portlandcementco.com Prentiss Architects (pg 76) Seattle, WA (206) 283-9930 prentissarchitects.com Provide (pg 18) 529 Beatty St. Vancouver, B.C. V6B 0G2 (604) 632-0095 providehome.com Retrofit Home (pg 34) 1103 E. Pike St. Seattle, WA 98122 (206) 568-4663 retrofithome.com Room & Board (pg 82) roomandboard.com Seattle Junk Love (pg 33) seattlejunklove .blogspot.com

Sensitile (pg 22) sensitile.com

SieMatic Seattle (pg 11) 2030 First Ave., Ste. 110 Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 443-8620 siematic-seattle.com Skylab Architecture (pg 22) Portland, OR (503) 525-9315 skylabdesign.com Sound Glass (inside back cover) 5501 75th St. W. Tacoma, WA 98499 (253) 473-7477 soundglass.com Spa Ssakwa’q’n (pg 77) 37914 S. Nukwalqw Road Worley, ID 83876 (855) 232-2772 cdacasino.com/spa Studio SC (pg 64) Seattle, WA (206) 262-9270 studio-sc.com Susan Wheeler Home (pg 33) 5515 Airport Way S. Seattle, WA 98101 (360) 402-5080 susanwheelerhome.com Terris Draheim (pg 19, 47, 82) 5600 Sixth Ave. S. Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 763-4100 terrisdraheim.com

Tilde (pg 43) 7919 S.E. 13th Ave. Portland, OR 97202 (503) 234-9600 tildeshop.com Tramell-Gagné (pg 82) 5701 Sixth Ave. S. Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 762-1511 tgshowroom.com University of Washington Alumni Commons (pg 64) Seattle, WA washington.edu W Seattle (pg 22) 1112 Fourth Ave. Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 264-6000 starwoodhotels .com/whotels West Elm (pg 48) westelm.com Whidbey Island Architects (pg 50) Freeland, WA (360) 331-3503 whidbeyisland architects.com Windows, Doors & More (inside back cover) 5961 Corson Ave. S. Seattle, WA 98108 (206) 782-1011 windowshowroom.com Yonkman Construction (pg 50) Oak Harbor, WA (888) 309-8127 yonkman.com Z Gallerie (pg 48) zgallerie.com Zimmer Gunsul Frasca (ZGF) Architects LLP (pg 64) 925 Fourth Ave., Ste. 2400 Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 623-9414 zgf.com


library

Amy Stewart’s book inspired me to team up with Seattle photographer David Perry and interview flower farmers and eco-designers about all the positive ways we can have seasonal and locally grown flowers in our lives.”

A Floral Designer’s Bookshelf

Written by LINDSEY M. ROBERTS

MEET Debra Prinzing, FLOWERVORE. She is a Seattle-based garden writer who asks where her flowers come from before she buys them—the same way some of us might ask where our salmon comes from before ordering it at a restaurant. In her new book, The 50 MARY GRACE LONG

Mile Bouquet: Seasonal, Local and Sustainable Flowers (St. Lynn’s Press, April 2012), photographed by Seattleite David Perry, Prinzing explains why we ought to take the local-food, slow-food movements to the floral industry. She also offers inspiration and resources for DIY garden-grown bouquets and flower arrangements. As a professional journalist, Prinzing reads a lot about each subject she reports, so we asked her what’s on her potting-shed shelves this season. Flower Confidential: The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful in the Business of Flowers by AMY STEWART (Algonquin, 2007)

Amy was the first person to take a look inside the global floral trade and reveal how incredibly dependent U.S. consumers are on imported flowers.

Grow Your Own Cut Flowers by SARAH RAVEN (BBC Worldwide, 2002)

Written by a gardener, not a florist, this charming book is about the joys of growing annuals, perennials, bulbs, flowering shrubs, vines, herbs and ornamental grasses—so that you are certain to have endless ingredients for your bouquets.

The Flower Farmer: An Organic Grower’s Guide to Raising and Selling Cut Flowers by LYNN BYCZYNSKI (Chelsea Green, 2008)

This is an essential guide for anyone considering entering the market-farmer business. Home gardeners interested in floral design will also benefit from Lynn’s useful tips about growing and harvesting cut flowers.

Bringing Nature Home by NGOC MINH NGO (Rizzoli, 2012)

This is a beautifully photographed book intended as a visual poem to nature in all four seasons. No imported blooms in this book!

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zodiac

Left to right: Patricia Urquiola Canasta chairs for B&B Italia, $3,219 at Terris Draheim, Seattle, terrisdraheim.com. ❈ Tuuci Razor Shade, $1,400 (umbrella) and $525 (stand) at Design Within Reach, dwr.com. ❈ Bodum FRYKAT Mini Picnic charcoal grill, $80 through Penna and Co. Kitchen and Giftwares, Victoria, B.C., pennakitchen.com.

Gemini Social, Inquisitive, Charismatic

May 21–June 21

Gemini and Cancer have sunny colorful dispositions. Add some bright, . pieces into your design forecast and niCole munSon Compiled by RAChel GAllAheR

Cancer June 22–July 22

Nurturing, Protective, Optimistic

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GRAY ISSUE No. four

Left to right: Case Study Planter, $189 at Room & Board, roomandboard.com. ❈ Aimee Wilder for Surya, $1,078 at Capers, Seattle, caperscapers.blog spot.com. ❈ Custom Boa triple pendant by Fuse Lighting, price available upon request at Trammell-Gagné, Seattle, tgshowroom.com.


Loewen Window Center of the South Sound 5501 75th Street West Tacoma, WA 98499 253-473-7477 sales@soundglass.com www.SoundGlass.com

Loewen Window Centre of Portland 1229 SE Grand Avenue Portland, OR 97214 503-408-8838 sales@glacierwindow.com www.glacierwindow.com

Loewen Window Center of Seattle 5961 Corson Avenue South Suite #100 Seattle, WA 98108 206-782-1011 www.lwcseattle.com www.windowshowroom.com Project: Waterfront

Architect: McClellan Architects

Builder: Jergens Construction Company

For luxury homeowners — and the architects, designers and custom builders who create their dreams — Loewen is the brand that delivers an unrivaled combination of artisanship, experience, and environmental sensibility in an extensive line of Douglas Fir, FSC Douglas Fir and Mahogany windows and doors. Contact the Loewen Window Center in your area to begin the experience.

Discover the world’s most inspiring windows and doors at www.loewen.com

Design. Create. Inspire.

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Our

MODERN

Connected with a common factor of comfort, we take a traditional approach to modern design. Silhouettes with an edge, but never edgy, bring a welcoming sense of warmth to clean and classic lines. Experience our collection for the home: well priced, in stock and ready for delivery. ENJOY 30% TO 70% SAVINGS DURING OUR SUMMER TAG SALE, 6/28 THRU 7/29.

1106 West Burnside Street / 503.972.5000 / Mon thru Fri: 10am to 8pm, Sat: 10am to 6pm, Sun: 11am to 6pm Complimentary Parking Validation at PMC (12th and Couch) / www.mgbwhome.com

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Hunter Chair 40”w x 39”d x 31”h in a crème textured solid, Manning Console Table 52”w x 12”d x 29”h, Concord 8’ x 10’ Rug in white, Karen Cappotto’s “Map IX” framed collage print on archival paper 43”w x 35”h, Joe Cariati hand-blown glass vases. GRAY ISSUE No. four


GRAY No. 4