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INTERIORS • ARCHITECTURE • FASHION • ART • DESIGN ™

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest

THE

COLOR ISSUE DESIGN TIPS AND IDEAS FROM THE PROS

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F O O D

I S

A R T.

R E S P E C T

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cont 38

44

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february –march.15

8. hello

True colors.

SCENE

17. news

A new look for the Opus Hotel bar.

20. news

Not-to-miss exhibition openings and what’s hot on the arts and culture scene.

24. news

Airbnb’s Portland office embraces the modern way we work.

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28. art

John Grade’s latest project takes the unpredictability of nature and brings it indoors.

32. ask

Designer Rocky Rochon takes the guesswork out of choosing paint.

36. hospitality

Designer Trey Jones went from customer to collaborator when Broadcast Coffee opened its latest Seattle shop.

38. architecture

A new student center in Fairbanks creatively maximizes light from the brilliant Alaskan sky.

STYLE

43. small spaces

In diminutive digs, every square inch must pull its weight. Let our design tips, project stories, and product picks inspire you to achieve complete space domination over your tiny turf with Titanic-sized style.

58. profile

Globetrotting designer Caitlin Wilson’s latest textile collection is inspired by Portland, her new hometown.


tents 61

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FEATURES

BACK OF BOOK

61. seasonal palette

84. studio visit

A house by Suyama Peterson Deguchi, nestled in the Rocky Mountains, exemplifies the firm’s holistic approach to site and structure.

70. a house of a different color

A Novogratz project is never boring, and this color-splashed vacation home in Seabrook, Washington, is no exception.

78. world of color

An Australia-inspired palette infuses a West Vancouver residence with the sunny warmth of the owners’ homeland.

Only artist Christopher Marley could make arthropods and arachnids look this appealing.

90. architecture

Shape Architects serves up some modern style at the prestigious ‘70s-era North Vancouver Tennis Centre.

94. resources

Your guide to the designers, shops, furnishings, craftspeople, and suppliers featured in this issue.

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On the Cover

Color and pattern set the tone in an Australia-inspired Vancouver residence by the Airey Group and Heffel Balagno Design Consultants. See page

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98. my northwest

Old building, new tricks. Seattle developer Liz Dunn gives props to Oola Distillery. GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

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hello

true colors When I was four years old, in Queens, New York, my parents let me pick the paint color for my bathroom walls. This was a breakthrough moment for me, a Very Big Deal. I carefully considered the fixtures—avocado-green sink, avocadogreen toilet—and settled, confidently, on a bright salmon pink. Will I lose all credibility if I say the palette worked? It worked not because the colors “went” per se, but because I loved the way they looked together. That room really made me happy. Truly, that’s the best way to make decisions about color in your home. You can listen to all the experts—and we’ve got a fleet of them weighing in on the subject in this issue—but in the end, color is a subjective thing. Your orange living room may be calming to you but unnerving to me. I don’t have to live there! Do what you like. The spirited Seattle interior designer Rocky Rochon offers some great advice in our interview on page 32. When picking a paint, “don’t focus on how you want a room to look,” he says. “Forget all the B.S. of your brain and tune in to how you’re feeling.” If you let your feelings guide your design decisions, your home will be imbued with beauty, whatever color the walls. And if you end up hating that gray-lavender or outgrow that salmon pink, remember: salvation is just a gallon away.

Jaime Gillin, Editorial Director jaime@graymag.net

Overheard on social media “Stormy afternoon wandering on Bainbridge Island ... Found blooming camellias, Japanese moss gardens, and this wonderful reflection pool.” @glasswingshop #BloedelReserve

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we believe in breaking the rules | trusting our instincts | american-made quality | natural materials | comfort | beauty and function | timeless design | collaboration | following your heart | mixing and matching | high expectations | paying attention to detail | personalization creating your ideal home

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™

Founder + Publisher

Shawn Williams shawn@graymag.net editorial director

Jaime Gillin jaime@graymag.net editor

Rachel Gallaher rachel@graymag.net Style Director

Stacy Kendall stacy@graymag.net editor AT LARGE

Lindsey M. Roberts lindsey@graymag.net Landscape and Culture editor

Debra Prinzing debra@graymag.net Associate Style Editor

Nicole Munson nicole@graymag.net Photo Editor

Alexa McIntyre alexa@graymag.net Assistant Editor

Courtney Ferris courtney@graymag.net Contributing Style Editor

Jasmine Vaughan jasmine@graymag.net Portland contributing editor

Brian Libby copy Editor

Laura Harger Assistant to the Publisher Tally Williams Intern Nessa Pullman Contributors

Timothy Aguero, Tracey Ayton, Jeremy Bittermann, Cortney Cassidy, Jennifer Chong, Nicolle Clemetson, Alex Hayden, Amara Holstein, Aaron Leitz, Redstone Pictures, Eric Scott, Jeremy Segal, Kevin Smith, Ed White, Matthew Williams, Bruce Wolf ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Craig Allard Miller, Michelle Bexelius, Erica Clemeson, Jennifer T. Reyes, Kim Schmidt ADVERTISING: info@graymag.net Submissions: submissions@graymag.net Subscription: subscriptions@graymag.net No. 20. Copyright Š2015. Published bimonthly (DEC, FEB, APR, JUNE, AUG, OCT) by GRAY Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Permission to reprint or quote excerpts granted by written request only. While every attempt has been made, GRAY cannot guarantee the legality, completeness, or accuracy of the information presented and accepts no warranty or responsibility for such. GRAY is not responsible for loss, damage, or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, photography, art, or any other unsolicited material. Unsolicited material will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope. If submitting material, do not send originals unless specifically requested to do so by GRAY in writing. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GRAY, 19410 Hwy 99, Ste. A #207, Lynnwood, WA 98036. Subscriptions $30 us for one year; $50 us for two years

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contributors

Timothy Aguero aguerophoto.com pg 34

TRACEY AYTON traceyaytonphotography.com pg 50

JEREMY BITTERMANN bittermannphotography.com pg 26

Jennifer Chong jchongstudio.com pg 38

Nicolle Clemetson nicolleclemetsonphoto.com pg 58

ALEX HAYDEN alexhayden.com pg 44

AARON LEITZ aaronleitz.com pg 61

BRIAN LIBBY portlandarchitecture.com pg 61

Redstone Pictures redstonepictures.com pg 98

ERIC SCOTT ericscottphotography.com pg 90

Jeremy Segal jsegalphoto.com pg 19

Kevin Smith kgsalaskaphoto.com pg 40

Ed White ewp.ca pg 78

Matthew Williams matthewwilliams photographer.com pg 70

bruce wolf brucewolfstudio.com pg 84

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pacific northwest architects These architecture and design firms are doing outstanding work in this region.

They also support GRAY and our efforts to advance the Pacific Northwest’s vibrant design community. Please contact them for your next project. Visit their portfolios at graymag.net or link directly to their sites to learn more.

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scene

news The New Cool

Robert Bailey reprises his design role and breathes new life into Yaletown’s hottest hotel. Written by stacy kendall : Photographed by jeremy segal

Set apart from the concierge desk, the Opus Hotel’s new bar serves coffee by day and signature craft cocktails by night. Interior designer Robert Bailey says the space has “daylight glamour,” achieved with subtly layered patterns and textures that impart an elegant atmosphere. »

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| news

Bailey’s sophisticated design juxtaposes contrasting materials and finishes. Combinations such as the Venetian plaster wall behind the bar and the polished brass shelves, and the white Bertoia stools fronting the zebra-striped marble bar top, give the space its eclectic charisma. Playful touches such as neon artwork add just a bit of edge.

“It’s like throwing an H&M sweater together with a Chanel bag. We can make our own rules.” —Robert Bailey, interior designer

Never one to let its interior stagnate,

Vancouver’s Opus Hotel has revitalized its lobby bar with an extreme makeover. For the revamp, the 12year-old property turned to Robert Bailey, the hotel’s original interior designer, and design consultant Craig Stanghetta. Aiming to create a destination for Vancouverites and hotel guests alike, Bailey designed a glass partition with French doors to clearly separate the Opus Bar from the adjacent check-in and concierge area. The color scheme, a cool yet vivid palette of blues and grays with brass accents, contributes to an aesthetic that Bailey defines as new West Coast glamour: “It’s got a casual chicness and irreverence,” he says. White-wire Bertoia stools sidle up to the striking zebra-striped marble bar, backed by a polished Venetian plaster wall tinted ocean blue. A gray leather banquette runs the length of the room, which is peppered with small, round tables and velvet-upholstered armchairs. “I wanted to bring together beautiful things in our quirky West Coast way,” Bailey explains. “It’s like throwing an H&M sweater together with a Chanel bag. We can make our own rules.” h

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| news

Glass art aficionados: it’s time for a road trip.

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Through March 1

Alaska and color aren’t always synonymous, but the “Perceptions” exhibition (1) at the Anchorage Art Museum is one exception (another is the Perkins+Will-designed building in Fairbanks we feature on page 40). Through carefully constructed compositions of overlapping planes, Ashley Lohr’s oil paintings explore the balance between light and shadow, color and line, and realism and abstraction. �� anchoragemuseum.org

go see Written by COURTNEY FERRIS

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Through March 8

Get your fashion fix at the Museum of Vancouver exhibition “From Rationing to Ravishing: The Transformation of Women’s Clothing in the 1940s and 1950s.” (3) From Christian Dior evening dresses to Boeing jumpsuits, this showcase sits at the intersection of haute couture and blue-collar chic. With more than 80 World War II and postwar-era garments on view, the influence of historical events on fashion is on full display, including designers’ promotion of masculine silhouettes in wartime and feminine ones in peacetime. �� museumofvancouver.ca

Through April 19

Vancouver Island–born and Berlinbased artist Shannon Bool’s new installation (4), presented by Vancouver’s Contemporary Art Gallery, reveals a mind consumed with the details. Bool has painstakingly documented and pieced together digital images of a recently rediscovered 16th-century Egyptian Medici Mamluk carpet, zeroing in on the ornamentation and signs of wear that come from day-to-day use. The overscaled piece now hangs in the highly trafficked Yaletown-Roundhouse Station. �� contemporaryartgallery.ca

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Robert Youds, For Everyone a Sunset, 2014 (detail), Courtesy of the Artist

3

4

Courtesy Shannon Bool, Kadel Willborn Gallery, Düsseldorf and Daniel Faria Gallery, Toronto

EXHIBIT

©2015 Georgia O’Keeffe Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy International Arts.®

1

The stars have aligned to bring four amazing exhibitions to the Northwest in coming months. Start up north in Vancouver for the Robert Youds show (2) organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery. The Victoria-based artist’s installation features salvaged glass and neon lighting that create dramatic and constantly changing color effects (through April 12). Head south to Bellevue and the Bellevue Arts Museum’s exhibition “Emerge/ Evolve” for a look at up-and-coming talent in kiln glass, featuring the finalists from Portland’s Bullseye Glass Company’s biennial Emerge competition (February 20–June 14). Next up, Tacoma, where the Museum of Glass showcases a collection of drawings in graphite, charcoal, and acrylic by glass artist great Dale Chihuly (March 1–June 30). Finish your trip in Portland at the Museum of Contemporary Craft’s “Living with Glass” show. Not only does it feature a broad range of glasswork from the famed islands of Murano, Italy, but it also delves into the relationship between art and art collectors, including the two discerning patrons whose private collections make up the exhibition (February 20–May 16). �� vanartgallery.bc.ca �� bellevuearts.org �� museumofglass.org �� mocc.pnca.edu

Tanya Goehring, Post Photography

Courtesy Ashley Lohr

scene


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scene

| news

Over recent months, a healthy crop of new design shops has sprouted across Portland. If shopping local is your thing, MadeHere PDX (6) has you covered with a solid representation of top Portland makers, including Revolution Design House and Caravan Pacific. From the folks behind Nell & Mary, Make It Good, and Pigeon Toe Ceramics comes the new collaborative North of West, which stocks not only their own lines, but also carefully crafted apparel and home goods from other Pacific Northwest companies. Rounding out the group is Maak Lab, where you can purchase a Coffee Bar soap and maybe get a peek at the process behind it—the products are made in the in-house lab. �� madeherepdx.com �� shopnorthofwest.com �� maaklab.com

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EXHIBIT March 1–June 7

Through May 17

Capturing Oregon’s diverse landscape is no small feat, but that didn’t faze the 10 contemporary photographers featured at the Oregon Historical Society’s original exhibition “Place: Framing the Oregon Landscape.” (8) Their images are displayed alongside artifacts from the Portland-based organization’s collections (think antique cameras and vintage paperbacks), telling a story about both the artists and the dramatic, changing Oregon that they capture through their lenses. �� ohs.org

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March 15–July 5

Make an adventure out of your next museum day: trek along Washington’s scenic Columbia River Gorge to Maryhill Museum of Art’s new exhibition (7), dedicated to American Indian paintings. It’s well worth the journey to see this collection of rarely exhibited paintings by some of the most important American Indian artists of the 20th century, including Stephen Mopope and Allan Houser. �� maryhillmuseum.org

Allan C. Houser (Chiricahua Apache, 1914–1994), Buffalo Hunt, 1952. Courtesy Arthur and Shifra Silberman Collection, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City, OK

The vibrant and colorful works of Georgia O’Keeffe (5) and other prominent Southwest artists are heading to the Tacoma Art Museum for “Eloquent Objects: Georgia O’Keeffe and Still-Life Art in New Mexico.” The show spotlights more than 60 paintings, all shaped by the unique and harsh climate of the southwestern United States. �� tacomaartmuseum.org

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LECTURE Through March 30

Vancouver’s Emily Carr University has produced some of the region’s most talented artists and, no surprise, has assembled a bang-up list of speakers for Visual Art Forum, its annual lecture series. The program is midway through, but you can still catch a few hits including, on February 23, Peter von Tiesenhausen, a Canadian artist and self-described “reluctant activist” whose 1996 land-as-art copyright claim prevented a gas pipeline from crossing his rural property. �� ecuad.ca

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©JOSEPH GLASGOW, COURTESY OREGON HISTORICAL SOCIETY

GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

Michael Branscum

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scene

| news Like all Airbnb offices, the 16,000-square-foot Portland base has meeting rooms inspired by favorite Airbnb rentals, including a recreated Loz Feliz dining room, a boat captain’s quarters, and, pictured here, a tree house in Cornwall’s St. Keverne.

Adventure Airbnb exhibits the company’s spirited Capitalists ethos in the design of its new Portland digs. Written by courtney ferris : Photographed by jeremy bittermann

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scene

| news

“We’re about the individual and being entrepreneurial, so spending money directly in the community felt like a natural way to engage and build an office.” —Rachael Yu, architect

Pushing the boundaries of how people share space is nothing new for Airbnb, the San Francisco–based company whose room- and house-rental listings span the globe. A poster child for the 21st century’s sharing economy, Airbnb took an egalitarian and innovative approach to the design of its new offices in Portland, enlisting local staff and a fleet of local designers to re-envision what a workplace can be. To kick off the design process and develop a concept that incorporates all kinds of working styles, the internal Airbnb Environments team, led by architects Rachael Yu and Aaron Taylor Harvey, polled Portland staff on how they like to get their jobs done. The resulting 16,000-square-foot space, designed in collaboration with Boora Architects, trades bulky individual desks for an open layout that is evenly divided among lounge areas, communal tables, and standing desks, all furnished by Pacific Northwest designers. Most of the Portland staff work in the customer-experience department, communicating directly with Airbnb hosts and guests via laptop and headset. The new office allows staffers to be nomadic, wandering from space to space as they desire. “Our mantra is ‘Belong Anywhere.’ It’s kind of a foundational mission statement,” explains Tido Pesenti, head of facilities at the Portland office. “The fact that employees can go and use all these spaces and belong in any of them is important to us as a company, and important culturally as a Portland office.” h

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The office layout and furnishings were designed to allow employees free-flowing movement throughout the space. Nods to Portland’s maker culture abound, from the custom-fabricated plywood chairs by the Good Mod to coffee tables by NK Build to standing desks by SuperFab that incorporate a locked cabinet for overnight laptop storage. All the furniture was co-designed by the Airbnb team. Employees gather in the kitchen for snacks and social time throughout the day.


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| art

James Harnois

scene

Ensemble Cast With the help of 200 volunteers, artist John Grade creates a Smithsonian-bound work that is the ultimate demonstration of letting go.

“I am interested in examining change throughout all my work, so seeing the gradual breakdown of the sculpture is one of the most fascinating aspects for me.” —JOHN GRADE

John Grade, courtesy Davidson Galleries

Written by RACHEL GALLAHER

FROM TOP: Seattle’s MadArt commissioned and partially funded artist John Grade’s Middle Fork installation in its 5,000-square-foot space in South Lake Union. Grade, his team, and 200 volunteers created an intricate structure around resin casts of a 140-year-old hemlock tree, using tiny, hand-glued cedar blocks to mimic the shape of the trunk.

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THE BEST OFFICE MIGHT NOT BE AN OFFICE AT ALL. Imagine sharing an environment with people in different creative fields who happen to be as interesting and motivated as you.

A shared-space community of socially conscious entrepreneurs and creative business owners. Opening Spring 2015 | cloudroomseattle.com GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

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| art

a

s Seattle artist John Grade tells it, a colony of termites led him to the breakout moment of his career. It was 1999, and Grade was showing his handcrafted wood-and-resin sculptures in traditional gallery settings. “I had been making work to reflect landscapes,” says the 44-year-old Grade, “but the sculptures themselves didn’t reflect the effect nature has on those landscapes. The pieces felt too controlled.” That’s when he introduced insects into his sculptures—he purchased termite colonies, wood-eating millipedes, and beetles by mail order, then placed them in tanks with the sculptures for up to 12 months. As an artist, Grade could take a piece only so far—the insects did the rest of the work, serving as a microforce of nature and as an element that he could not control. “The problem was that the termites would usually escape or die,” he says with a laugh, “so then I put my work out in the landscape. I have pieces buried in Arizona, Washington, and Idaho. I’ll go out and dig them up in another 10 years and see what nature has done.” Grade is standing next to his latest project, Middle Fork, on exhibition through April 25 at MadArt, an arts organization and storefront space in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood. Commissioned and partially funded by MadArt (as well as the Smithsonian and several other donors), Middle Fork combines Grade’s interests in landscape, decay, and forfeiting control— this time without using termites. The artist, who is an avid rock climber and outdoorsman, chose as his subject a 150-foot hemlock tree growing by the Snoqualmie River in western Washington. With a team of eight people, he spent two

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Grade and a team of eight spent two weeks hanging from harnesses and plastering this hemlock tree with a potatobased resin. After removing and transporting the casts to Seattle, the installation process began. Sections of the tree were assembled separately in the MadArt space. A close-up view reveals the intricate handwork.

weeks hanging from harnesses and plastering the tree with a potato-based resin to create casts. In homage to the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C., where Middle Fork will be displayed for six months starting in November 2015, Grade selected a tree that’s the same age as the gallery’s 140-year-old building. After removing the casts and bringing them to the 5,000-square-foot MadArt space, Grade and his team of assistants, along with droves of volunteers, some of whom wandered in as they were passing by, created an intricate wooden structure around the casts, gluing together small, hand-cut rectangles of cedar that follow the natural curve of the tree. The entire process took one year, following the logic that the thickness of the finished sculpture corresponds to one year of tree growth, as evidenced by an annual ring. After the Seattle exhibition closes, the piece will work its way to London, then run a tour from the Renwick around the United States before coming to rest at the base of the original tree. There it will gradually decompose and perhaps, Grade hopes, become a nurse log for another tree. “I am interested in examining change throughout all my work, so seeing the gradual breakdown of the sculpture is one of the most fascinating aspects for me,” Grade says. “It is also where chance and unforeseen elements feed into the larger process of conceiving and making my work—which will most likely spark future projects.” It’s those unforeseen outcomes that keep our curiosity piqued. The inspiration for Grade’s next masterpiece could be just around the bend. h

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: John Grade, courtesy Davidson Galleries; Katie Wood; John Grade, courtesy Davidson Galleries

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| ask

Interior designer Rocky Rochon presides over the Paint Laboratory in Seattle, along with colorists Jeffery Parks and Nancy Meyer. Each Rocky Rochon Paint chip is hand-painted, rather than printed with ink. It’s a more laborious process, says Rochon, but it’s the only way to capture the true nature of each hue, including how it changes in different light conditions.

We’ve all been there: standing in

hues you can use

What you don’t know about color can hurt you, so take in these valuable tips from the ever-spirited Rocky Rochon. Written by JAIME GILLIN : Portrait by Tim Aguero

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front of a paint chip display in a hardware store, head spinning. Rocky Rochon is here to put you out of your color-selection misery. According to the Seattle-based interior designer, picking a shade from most brands’ decks is an exercise in futility. “Who is going to paint their rooms most of those colors? They’re hideous!” To counteract the glut, Rochon recently launched his own line of paint: 50 fail-safe hues, each available in eight values stepped incrementally from light to dark, and “all in a range you can actually use in a room,” he promises. He’s also created 60 vivid shades, nine charcoal grays, and nine whites. Unlike most commercial paints, Rochon’s are saturated with colorants in complementary hues, making for richer, more dimensional colors. The line is a natural evolution for the interior designer, who has long created custom colors for each of his projects. In fall 2013, after his go-to paint shop closed, he snagged its star colorists, Jeffery Parks and Nancy Meyer, and opened a shop of his own. Based in a small, chic storefront in north Capitol Hill, the Paint Laboratory is on a mission to educate people about color, and it plans to open outposts in Los Angeles and San Francisco in the coming year. In addition to Rochon’s paints, the shop sells a selection of other brands and creates custom colors in a variety of textures and finishes, including metallic, suede, and Venetian plaster. Rochon recently sat down with GRAY at the Paint Laboratory to dispense some colorful advice. »


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| ask

“One of the biggest goals of the Paint Lab is to educate people about how color works—that’s our baseline.” —Rocky Rochon

Say someone has no idea what color to paint a room. Where to begin? Don’t focus on how you want a room to look, but how you want it to feel. That should be the first point of reference for any project— forget all the B.S. of your brain and tune in to how you’re feeling. Look through images of rooms to get ideas, and then consult with a paint colorist to help you translate the color that will give you that effect. Then what? Test the potential color on several walls to see how it looks. The same color can “feel” very different from room to room and in different lighting conditions. A butter-yellow paint in a sunlit room will look remarkably different than it will in, say, a northern-exposure room with a grove of trees outside the window. If you want the same sunny feeling in that second room, you will have to counteract the reflected blue-greens by adding pigment to the paint, and also possibly adjusting the formula to create more chroma [brightness]. The foundation of Rochon’s paint line is a series of earthy hues or, as Rochon puts it, “complementary subdued versions of colors.” They work especially well in the Northwest, he says. “Because we don’t have much bright light here, we see nuances of color more than in many other regions in the country. I just bought a house in Palm Springs, and it’s amazing how vivid colors neutralize in the desert.”

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What’s the biggest misunderstanding people have about paint? People often don’t understand that color intensifies as it is applied to a room. What may look neutral in a small chip becomes a stronger blue, green, or yellow as it envelops the space. When I use color, I like to add complementary or secondary pigments to make it more three-dimensional. For example, if we’re doing a red, we’ll add a bit of green or yellow. If we’re doing a blue, we’ll add orange. Complicating the color creates much more dynamic effects.

Any tips on picking a bedroom color? Generally, a bedroom should be for relaxation and rest, so I like a neutral palette without a lot of visual activity. However, I know people who love bright red, and it makes them feel good. They would find comfort in a bright-red bedroom. When it comes to color, I don’t believe in rules! What’s the best approach for tight spaces, such as a powder room or hallway? Small spaces are great opportunities to take risks, especially if they are devoid of windows. When you are in a small space, you get very near surfaces, so I fill them with detail that can be appreciated up close and intimately. This a great place to use textured paints, such as our Ralph Lauren suede, river rock, or metallic finishes. Any color trends you’re surprised or excited about these days? I am not interested in color trends. Successful design and color work never have a time stamp attached to them! Say I want to stay safe with my wall colors. What’s a nice alternative to straight-up white? First off, there is no such thing as a straight-up white—and I don’t think of white as “safe.” White shifts the quickest of any value because it is so affected by even the smallest amounts of pigment. It’s also the most reflective value, so it changes dramatically in different light conditions. The safest approach to painting a room is to stay in a monochromatic and neutral color scheme: taupe, ash, mud. If someone isn’t ready to paint their whole room with a bold color, what else can they do to brighten their space? Contrast can brighten a room. Set dark and light colors against each other, as in a striped wall or black-and-white checkered floor. Any other thoughts or advice? Don’t be afraid to experiment—paint can make the most impressive change in a room. Go for it! h

Hilary McMullen, courtesy The Paint Laboratory

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| hospitality

Craft Brew

Trey Jones—customer–turned­–design collaborator—creates the winning look of Broadcast Coffee’s newest shop. Written by Rachel Gallaher : Photographed by Jennifer Chong

Like so many Seattleites, industrial designer

Trey Jones considers his morning coffee a ritual. So when he and his wife moved to the Central District in 2009, they began to frequent Broadcast Coffee, a local café. The owner, Barry Faught, quickly became a friend—and soon afterward a client. “I was drawn to Trey’s work for its clean lines and his attention to detail, so I asked him to build some furniture for my next location, in Capitol Hill,” Faught says. Following that first successful collaboration, Jones was granted broad creative control over the design of the third Broadcast café, which opened this past summer in the Roosevelt neighborhood. “My initial idea was to make a warm, bright, modern space,” Jones says. “I thought about the long Northwest winter nights, and I wanted a place that would be inviting when it was cloudy or dark.” Working with Blox Construction, Jones created an open floor plan anchored by a 24-foot-long coffee bar with two

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Designer Trey Jones’s touches permeate Broadcast Coffee’s new Roosevelt shop, from the oversized quilted wood wall panels to the slatted black Salt chairs from Design Within Reach to the minimal ash-wood planters, which are part of a new décor line that Jones plans to launch this spring through his own company, Trey Jones Studio.

sections—one made of white ash, the other wrapped in brushed brass. Overhead are geometric brass Dia lights, designed by Jones and available through Standard Socket. A hefty custom green La Marzocco espresso machine peeks over the bar, adding a cheerful hit of color. The palette is simple, but Jones wields his materials strategically, employing a subtle gradient: dark shades are placed near the floor, and lighter wood appears as the eye travels upward. The effect is contemporary and open— something that Faught hopes to capture in all his cafés. “We are a growing company,” Faught says. “Bringing on Trey to completely design and build my third store was the start of unification among my other locations—and the future of the Broadcast brand.” h


THIS IS MAX

HOTEL MAX | 620 Stewart Street | www.hotelmaxseattle.com GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

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| architecture

BRIGHT OUTLOOK

A new student center in Alaska brings the Northern Lights down to earth in dazzling technicolor. Written by LINDSEY M. ROBERTS : Photographed by Kevin Smith

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The aurora borealis is a spectacular and short-

lived phenomenon spotted in northern latitudes. Its dancing colors, created by electrically charged solar particles colliding in the earth’s atmosphere, inspired an unlikely canvas: the windows of the University of Alaska Fairbanks’s newly expanded student center, the Wood Center. “Light in Alaska behaves in such an extraordinary way,” says architect Doug Streeter, a principal at the Seattle office of Perkins+Will, the firm tasked with designing not only the 50,000-square-foot addition to the center, but the long-term plan for a reinvigorated campus. “The winter is like a permanent sunrise. In the summer, the sun never seems to set. You have these two extreme conditions, and the use of color can capture that experience.” Following a series of light and color studies, the architects designed a façade bejeweled with floor-toceiling windows that alternate clear glass with brightly hued panes ranging from aqua to orange to raspberry red. “The aurora borealis looks like colored dust pouring down from the heavens,” Streeter says. Similarly, when the sun shines through the student center’s vibrant windows, long, brilliant beams, seemingly made of the same celestial dust, are cast throughout the interior. »


THIS PAGE: Long beams and shadows zig and zag their way down the grand staircase, defining the interior space and highlighting the connection to the dining hall from the ground level. As architect Doug Streeter says, “The light sculpts the space.” OPPOSITE top: The glazed façades face south and west to capture as much winter sun as possible. Slices of color brighten interior spaces and help temper intense summer light. OPPOSITE bottom: In a study corner, the polished floor recalls the reflectivity of ice, while the blues and greens echo Alaskan waters.

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Perkins+Will construction: Ghemm Company glazing: Bucher Glass GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

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“The liquid light of color splashes and washes over everything and moves through the building over the course of the day.” —Doug Streeter, architect

This much glazing is difficult to carry off in Alaska, where structures must be super-insulated from the cold (wintertime temperatures can drop to -45 degrees Fahrenheit). The architects placed special insulated spandrels every 10 feet, and all the glass is triple-glazed with two low-E coatings for heightened protection. The colorful panels are laminated inside with microns-thick translucent film. To achieve their bold tones, the design team layered together multiple plies of film. To get lime green, for example, they paired a blue and a yellow sheet. “We got to experiment with the color palette like paint,” Streeter says. Inside, most floors, ceilings, and walls are kept neutral, allowing the play of light to be the dominant feature. However, Perkins+Will embedded plenty of visual interest for the months when the sky stays dark. “Every part of the building, in the most elegant way we could find, responds to the landscape and the environment,” Streeter says. The staircase’s glass balustrades are etched with a fritted pattern of aspen trees, the prevailing species on campus. The Douglas-fir ceiling has lily pad–like white ovals that contain 4-foot-wide lights and acoustic panels. In a study corner, the epoxy-coated steel floor resembles ice. “At some point, we worried that it all might be too much,” Streeter says, “or that visitors would feel like they had taken this crazy drug or something.” But in fact, the Wood Center has quickly become one of the most popular places on campus. “It’s a fantastic delight to see it in reality,” Streeter says. “It’s just the right amount of excitement without being over the top.” h

FROM TOP: Though blues and greens dominate the glazing, vertical bands of oranges and magentas catch afternoon sun on the building’s west side. In the dining hall, the stone floor and light-colored wood reflect sunlight when it’s present and add interest to the space when it’s not. The ceiling, featuring suspended lights and acoustic discs, was inspired by Fairbanks’s clear, starry nights.

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style

Pattern Play Don’t believe the Hype— large-scale patterns do indeed work well in small spaces. We love the proportion and versatility of these removable wallpaper tiles, a boon for those wanting a temporary yet sophisticated option for dressing up a wall, or four. Andanza Removable Wallpaper Tiles by Laundry Studio, Portland, $33 per tile, hyggeandwest.com. For more small SPACE finds, See page

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| small spaces

This Page: The art-filled multipurpose media/living/dining room is the public half of the 788-square-foot studio. It features a custom media cabinet, a Jensen chair by Minotti from Inform Interiors, two custom ottomans upholstered in Schumacher’s Zenyatta Mondatta, and a Heracleum LED chandelier by Moooi from Hive Modern. Opposite: A custom screen dividing the living area from the bedroom area is by Hyde Evans Design and is upholstered in Kuawa-patterned fabric by Kravet. The Saarinen table’s streamlined silhouette and pedestal base ensure clear sight lines through the space.

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Mini Masterpiece Scale down without sacrificing big style? In a triumph of careful space planning, one designer convinces a small-space skeptic. Written by STACY KENDALL : Photographed by ALEX HAYDEN

“A

m I really able to live in one room?” That was the earnest question a client, whose previous residences had been downright grand, asked of her longtime interior designer, Barbara Hyde Evans. The client had purchased a 788-square-foot studio in Bellevue, Washington, and intended to use it as a pied-à-terre while visiting friends and family in the Seattle area. Yet she had reservations about its habitability, even for an overnight. Hyde Evans was determined to make it work—and beautifully. The designer, too, is accustomed to working in large homes, and she has renovated kitchens that are as big

as her client’s entire studio. Yet she appreciated the precision required to decorate a compact dwelling. “You have to capitalize on every inch of the space, and everything in it has to play more than one role,” she says. The client had just two requests. One was functional versatility—although she had downsized, her life was as busy as ever. She needed a workspace, and she still wanted to host parties. Her second requirement was that the color pink— representing her fun-loving lifestyle—appear somewhere in the design. Hyde Evans delivered on both conditions with a custom» designed 8-foot-long hot-pink upholstered folding screen, a GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

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LEFT: The homeowner’s bedroom and office are on the private side of the screen, with a custom bed fabricated by Pat Howe Furniture that features pullout storage space. The mirrored bedside table is from Editions Design Collection. BELOW LEFT: A desk from West Elm serves as both a bedside table and workspace. BELOW RIGHT: The custom shower curtain is Pavillion Chinois, a spirited toile by Schumacher. Opposite: The bedroom’s minimalist custom shelving, fabricated by Collins Construction, is made from white-painted metal pipes that “float” in front of the window and allow light to pass through them.

visual and physical barrier that bisects the room. One side serves as a media and dining area, while the other is a bedroom, library, and office. When it came to furniture, the interior designer carefully calibrated each piece to serve a dual purpose. The Saarinen table received a custom-sized marble top that can accommodate up to six people for a dinner or, alternatively, serve as a coffee table. The punchy, fabric-covered ottomans function as both footrests and extra seating. Hyde Evans’s design expertise allowed her client to avoid the small-space cliché of Lilliputian furnishings. “Everything can’t be little,” the designer says. “You have to have something that will draw attention and emphasis, like the screen. As you can see, everything is pretty lightweight visually but still very active.” The last challenge was to incorporate the client’s art collection. Hyde Evans, who has worked with the client over the past 15 years, was familiar with her art and created a floorto-ceiling display that presents the most colorful pieces in a fresh way and makes the best use of space and proportion. “Decorating all the way up to the ceiling helps the eye travel and makes a space feel larger,” the designer advises. The client had gotten her hot-pink centerpiece and versatile furnishings, but she still needed one thing: Hyde Evans’s assurance that she needn’t fret about one-room living. “I was incredibly trepidatious about living in a studio apartment,” says the client. Her verdict? “Now I don’t even notice its size.” A lifestyle reinvention can never be too little too late. h

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Barbara Hyde Evans’s Small-Space Tricks Use consistent light colors, especially on the walls. Don’t chop up the space with color changes. Remember that light colors reflect light, which expands the look of a room. Emphasize height. Decorate to the ceiling to draw the eye upward. Large art pieces draw the eye up and out. Use multifunctional furniture—for example, ottomans that work as seating, or a desk that doubles as a bedside table. Pull furniture away from walls to create a sense of spaciousness. Cramming pieces against walls actually makes a space looked cramped. Beware of clutter. A collection of little accessories just looks busy in a small space. Keep accessories large, clean, and to the minimum. The same should be true of your furniture.


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“Texture can play an almost subliminal role,” says designer Nathan Chambers, referring to the cabinetry’s high-gloss finish. “It might not be the first thing you notice when walking into a space, but that extra reflectiveness really adds to the lightness of the space.”

life in 200 Square Feet Even the smallest spaces can accommodate multiuse zones if you shake up traditional design approaches. Written by courtney ferris

With 30 units clocking in at around 200 square feet each, the Pladhüs Apartments, built last summer in Seattle’s

Roosevelt neighborhood, take efficiency and functionality to the next level. Designed by architecture firm Playhouse Design Group and outfitted by Abodian, a local build-to-order cabinet shop, the studios fit right into Seattle’s growing trend of micro-apartments—ultraefficient units that offer small footprints plus the convenience of living in coveted urban neighborhoods. The biggest challenge, according to Abodian designer Nathan Chambers, was “to create a livable solution that married the kitchen requirements, sleeping space, and adequate storage for day-to-day living.” In the kitchen, that meant rethinking traditional approaches to layout. “Classic kitchen design centers around the work triangle,” Chambers says, referring to space plans based upon a resident’s moves among the stove, sink, and fridge. “But in small spaces, we have to think of multiuse zones.” Here’s what the designers did, and how. h

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Images courtesy Dead Serious MM


��

In tight footprints, think up instead of out, advises Chambers. Often-overlooked areas, such as spaces near the ceiling, can easily be transformed with built-in cabinets and shelves. Repeating a single vibrant color throughout the diminutive space helps to visually unify and simplify the unit’s complex detailing.

Key to functionality in the 202-square-foot unit is a fold-down Murphy bed designed and built by Abodian. When the bed is closed, a table pulls out to provide work or dining space (opposite). The bed opens to reveal bonus shelving.

Details are everything. Flush mounted light fixtures and streamlined hardware reduce visual clutter, and “cabinet-depth appliances create a smooth face surface without large bump-outs into the space,” Chambers says.

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE:

To make a 616-square-foot Vancouver condo feel bigger, interior designer Corey Klassen mixed custom furnishings, such as floating walnut shelves and a 19-foot-long banquette, with transformable pieces from Resource Furniture. Each one unfolds like a magic trick. The Cubista ottoman, below, contains metal frames and upholstered pads that assemble into five individual chairs. “That little cube is the best thing I’ve ever seen,” Klassen says. The sofa is from Camerich; the rug is from CB2.

TRICKS OF THE TRADE

A bevy of space-saving tricks and a fleet of transformable furniture rescue a formerly cramped condo. Written by jaime gillin : Photographed by Tracey ayton

Corey Klassen and Lindsey Richardson banter like old friends, not like interior designer and client. That rapport may trace back to the way their professional relationship began, back in 2013—standing side by side in Richardson’s tiny bathroom in Vancouver, pretending to brush their teeth together. It was their first consultation before Klassen renovated Richardson’s 616-square-foot Kitsilano condo, and he wanted his client to get real about how she needed her home to function. In addition to acting out real-life scenarios to gauge space requirements, Klassen asked “lots of interesting questions, from how much sock storage I needed to whether I really needed a bathtub,” Richardson says. (She didn’t.)

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Drawing on his extensive renovation experience and aided by easy dialogue with his client, Klassen transformed Richardson’s postwar one-bedroom condo into a model of clever small-space living. Richardson, a sociology professor, had lived in her home for 10 years before hiring Klassen to update it, and she had a clear sense of her priorities. At the top of the list was entertaining. Richardson loves to host dinners and has lots of out-of-town friends and family who stay overnight. With its single bedroom, closed-off kitchen, and limited, poorly placed storage, her home fell far short of her needs. Working with his longtime collaborator, Fifth Element Construction & Renovation, Klassen took portions of the »


Go Long

Resident Lindsey Richardson wanted to throw big dinner parties, but a large table wasn’t practical in the tight space. Klassen’s solution? The telescoping, multileaf Goliath dining table, which can seat up to 12 people when fully extended. Goliath table, from $4,350 at Resource Furniture, Vancouver, resourcefurniture.com

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When you’re furnishing a small space, think in terms of overlapping activities, Klassen suggests. The quintessential example in Richardson’s home is the wall-mounted LGM Tavolo by Clei, which transforms in mere seconds from a desk and bookcase to a guest bed with side tables. “It’s an office, reading area, and sleeping area, all resolved together in one functional space,” Klassen says.

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condo down to the studs, opening up the galley kitchen to the rest of the living space, removing three underused hall closets to free up square footage, and raising the ceilings by two inches—a minor change with a surprisingly big impact. Three pieces of furniture, sourced from Resource Furniture in Vancouver, are key to the apartment’s functionality. A desk and bookshelf in the living room tuck and swivel to reveal a pull-down Murphy bed, a comfortable landing pad for guests. A 17-inch-wide table with five hidden leaves can extend up to 115 inches, enabling Richardson to seat up to 12 people. And the top of a cube-shaped ottoman lifts off to reveal four small stools nested within it—seating for five condensed into a tiny footprint. To get the most out of the remaining space, Klassen leaned on built-ins and other custom furniture, including a 19-foot-long banquette that runs the length of the apartment, from the dining to the living areas. Storage space hidden beneath the banquette’s cushions contains everything from tools to linens. “If you open up to customization, you’re able to add multiple functions in a small area and get the feeling of more space,” Klassen advises. That’s precisely what Richardson has discovered since the renovation. “Pre-renovation, there is no way I would have been able to do anything remotely close to what I can do now,” she says. “It feels like it has more rooms than it actually does.” She recently invited a friend for dinner. Over the course of an evening, they cycled though her open living space: sipping wine on the banquette, chatting over the kitchen bar, dining at the table, drinking tea on the sofa. “Each small area serves a different purpose. Even though it’s a single large room, the functionalities don’t feel crammed together or forced,” Richardson marvels. “It all just flows seamlessly from one space to the next.” »


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HOME bentrogdonarchitects.com GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY 53


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| small spaces

I prefer living in a small, well-designed space to living in a large one. “I’ve learned that

I like how everything is built for functionality and there’s no dead space. I had no idea that I could live so comfortably without expanding the floor plan.” —Lindsey Richardson, client

Klassen opened up the formerly claustrophobic, closed-off galley kitchen to the larger living space, replacing its standard appliances with European-sized 24-inch fixtures to better suit the scale of the room. A Caesarstone-topped eating bar enables Richardson to chat with dinner guests as she cooks. The curved custom walnut shelves echo the arc of the Brizo brushed-bronze faucet. h

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| small spaces

Surface saver

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1. Adequate lighting everywhere lets you utilize every nook and cranny of your home, and wall mounting saves valuable surface area. For easy installation, order the plug-in version. Envoy Swing Plug-In Sconce, $224 at Schoolhouse Electric, Portland, schoolhouseelectric.com.

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Maximize your home’s potential with these clever, space-savvy furnishings and accessories. Edited by jasmine vaughan

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2. Philippe Malouin’s hooked Hanger Chair is quite possibly the cleverest use-and-store piece of furniture to come along since the stackable Aalto stool. Cheap-looking folding chairs, begone! Hanger Chair by Philippe Malouin for Umbra Shift, $209 at Vancouver Special, Vancouver, vanspecial.com. 3. Invest in furniture that can adjust size to fit your needs at a whim. Once expanded, this piece can seat up to eight. Bonus feature: The leaves store inside the table when not in use! Odin Round Extension Table by Norm Architects, from $3,400 at Design Within Reach, Portland and Seattle, dwr.com. 4. Add vertical storage space and a dose of light reflection, all in one fell swivel-swoop with Bensen’s elegant mirror-clad unit. About Face Rotating Cabinet by Bensen, from $1,650 at Inform Interiors, Seattle and Vancouver, informseattle.com; informinteriors.com. 5. No bedroom? No problem. You can sit by day and sleep by night on this polished brass-framed chaise. Maxime Daybed, $3,500 at Jonathan Adler, Portland and Seattle, jonathanadler.com. 6. We’ve got a cooking crush on the new studio-scale AGA range. At just 24 inches wide, it’s equal parts petite and powerful. City24 Range by AGA, from $8,199 at Albert Lee Appliance, multiple locations, albertleeappliance.com. h


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style

| profile

local color

Globetrotting interior designer Caitlin Wilson has a new point of departure: Portland.

Written by stacy kendall : Portrait by Nicolle Clemetson

Caitlin Wilson’s designs span the globe—literally.

Over the past six years, multitudes have followed the interior designer’s journey via her blog as she’s jetted from London to Dubai to Hong Kong to Philadelphia to Portland—where, in July 2013, she and her husband, an international investment banker–turned–Nike merchandiser, finally settled down. Wilson encountered a significant setback while working abroad: the high-end fabrics she was accustomed to sourcing in the U.S. were prohibitively expensive to ship to Asia and the Middle East. So in 2011, Wilson began to commission,

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from a small Hong Kong factory, fabrics by the yard that featured her own digital and hand-drawn patterns, which she then had stitched into pillows and other upholstery projects. The Far East’s influence is obvious in many of her designs, from her signature Fleur Chinoise, with its stylized blooms and graphic leaves, to bold, graphic patterns with names such as Gold Lotus. “I am most inspired by Asian design. Hong Kong style is very high-end and sophisticated,” Wilson explains. Wilson’s transition to the Pacific Northwest brought her a fresh wave of inspiration. She debuted her Portland textile collection this past fall: dusty pastels in stripes, buffalo checks, and spots, and a painterly, loosely drawn botanical print. “The patterns are classic but a little edgy, funky, and unexpected,” Wilson says. “It’s my interpretation of the Northwest—there’s that natural element but with totally bold color, which is me.” This spring, she’ll introduce her first wallpaper collection, which includes scaled-down versions of some of her most popular patterns, as well as small accessories such as notepads and cellphone covers. “We’re going for it all,” she says. And with splashy color like this, we’re all in. h

Top: Brittany Lauren; bottom: margaret jacobsen

LEFT: Caitlin Wilson’s textile designs are inspired by her itinerant lifestyle. The time she spent in Dubai and Hong Kong sparked a series of gold patterns. BELOW: More recently, Wilson launched a line of botanical prints, stripes, and buffalo checks inspired by her new home, Portland.


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home

A Suyama Peterson Deguchi窶電esigned home in the Rocky Mountains towers 30 feet above a river.

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DESIGN TEAM

architecture: Suyama Peterson Deguchi interiors: Doug Rasar Interior Design landscape: Alchemie Landscape Architecture + Design

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Seasonal Palette An all-star cast of Seattle-based design pros create a minimalist riverside home warmed with ever-changing views of light and landscape. Written by BRIAN LIBBY : Photographed by Aaron Leitz

Nestled into a hillside, the glass-walled house gleams at night. Large roof overhangs and ceiling beams extend beyond the faรงade to unite interior and exterior spaces. GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

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ABOVE LEFT: The home’s concrete courtyard walls ensure the residents’ privacy. ABOVE RIGHT: The stairway exemplifies the home’s simple material palette of concrete, wood, and blackened steel, while the owners’ artworks, such as this painting by Robert Kelly, provide colorful accents. OPPOSITE: A two-sided fireplace separates the living and dining areas.

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ou don’t enter a Suyama Peterson Deguchi home through its front door. You enter it as you walk onto the property, with its outdoor and interior spaces fused into a single seamless flow. Such is the case at a riverside home in the northern Rocky Mountains that the Seattle firm created in partnership with interior designer Doug Rasar and landscape architect Bruce Hinckley. Although the home keeps a low profile on its street, you are immediately enveloped by its serene rhythms when you pass through its concrete perimeter walls. “The front gate is our symbolic front

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door,” says George Suyama, the project’s principal in charge. “Once you pass through it, you’re in the house, in a sense.” Sculptural boulders in the courtyard, placed as if in a Japanese garden and echoing the mountainous topography, lead your eyes to the overhanging roof that stretches far past the home’s glass walls, through which the owners have matchless views of mountains, forest, and water. As in much of Suyama’s work, the design sensibility here is quintessentially Northwest modern but draws upon the architect’s Japanese roots. The house is built on a steeply sloping site that overlooks a river 30 feet below. Suyama Peterson Deguchi’s design, »


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THIS PAGE: Seattle-based interior designer Doug Rasar chose two fabrics for the living room’s 16-foot-long sofa to break up its size, and he separated the custom coffee table into two pieces. The globe-shaped artwork at right is by Julie Speidel. OPPOSITE: An Edward Curtis photo hangs from a custom blackened steel screen behind an antique Japanese chest.

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working from a concept first developed by Hinckley, nestles the house deep into the hillside—it is almost cavelike, with the ground-floor living room giving way to a master suite a level below. Yet natural light fills the house through the glass walls, especially in winter, when the snow’s reflections reach deep into the interior. “We’re such a part of the seasons here,” the homeowner says. “In the fall, it’s brilliant with golds and yellows and rust. In the winter, it’s sparkling white, with trees dusted with snow. In the spring, it’s so alive. You feel every pulse and movement of the year.” The interiors feature a neutral color palette selected to let the picturesque landscape beyond the glass take center stage. ”Nothing screams, ‘Look at me!’” Rasar says. “It really lets the views sing.” Yet every piece feels carefully selected and, in many cases, resonant with the architecture—the custom coffee table in the living room, for example, matches a nearby stairway banister. Infusions of color come primarily from the clients’ extensive art collection, encompassing abstractions by Northwest artists such as Bill Hoppe, sculpture by Julie Speidel, and a traditional Japanese seascape painted on antique shoji doors in the master bedroom. »

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BELOW: In the master suite, custom steel floating nightstands hang from a cedar shelf mounted on the wall, which also holds a series of multipaneled antique Japanese shoji doors painted with traditional seascapes. OPPOSITE: The master suite’s white Cubist chair is by Holly Hunt, the painting is by Bill Hoppe, and the sculpture is by Julie Speidel.

The home’s design allows it to feel intimate or expansive depending on the occasion. The living and dining areas, separated by a two-sided fireplace, can be screened off from the kitchen and home office with a series of sliding doors. Additional bedrooms are tucked away in a separate guesthouse adjacent to the main structure. The commercial-grade glass walls, running the length of the living and dining areas, are meant to seemingly disappear. “The glass acts as almost a veil, separating the spaces while connecting interior and exterior,” says architect Chris Haddad of Suyama Peterson Deguchi, who worked closely with George Suyama on the project. “It emphasizes the blurred boundaries.” h

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“If you work with the Novogratzes, you’re going to get color and art. Bob is as passionate about modern art as Cortney is about color.”—Lance Humphreys, client

A House of a Different Color

Forget beige walls and generic art—this full-spectrum vacation house offers guests a chance to live large in style and leisure. Written by Lindsey M. Roberts : Photographed by Matthew Williams

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OPPOSITE: Robert and Cortney Novogratz in the kitchen of a vacation home they designed in Seabrook, Washington. THIS PAGE: The living room is relatively muted, with a vintage sofa and chairs, purple curtains in Robert Allen fabric by the Shade Store, and a pink cocktail table from ABC Carpet and Home. Enlivening the walls are Stars and Stripes I, by Ann Carrington, and Untitled (Marilyn Monroe), by an anonymous artist.

DESIGN TEAM

interiors: Robert and Cortney Novogratz architecture: Lew Oliver, Whole Town Solutions construction: Ryan Carr, Seabrook Construction landscape architecture: Seabrook Land Company GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

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OPPOSITE: Antique collectibles dotting the open shelves imbue the kitchen with personality. Sleek drawer handles from Restoration Hardware mimic the lines of the tiles. THIS PAGE, TOP TO BOTTOM:

In the kitchen, white subway tile is a calm counterpoint to the vibrant purple and green barstools, while Crate and Barrel pendants make the room glow. The dining table is from the Novogratz Collection for CB2, topped with a chandelier from Canopy Designs. The walls are painted with Benjamin Moore paint in Grape Green. A Pluma Cubic chandelier floats above the vintage pool table.

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he work of designers Robert and Cortney Novogratz is infused with a rainbow of colors. From their former Manhattan townhouse, complete with a basketball court and a Zaha Hadid sculpture, to their multihued product designs for Shutterfly, Macy’s, and CB2, this couple’s projects are vivid and bright. “We’re big believers that color makes you happy,” Robert says. “When it’s raining outside, waking up in a colorful house makes it feel sunny inside.” It’s no surprise, then, that color makes an outsize appearance in their first Pacific Northwest project, a 3,800-squarefoot, five-bedroom house in the beachside town of Seabrook, Washington. Designed as a family-friendly vacation home for Anthology, a luxury hospitality company with properties across the U.S., the Craftsman-inspired house blends into its coastal surroundings on the outside. Inside, however, is a dynamic blend of color and nature-inspired elements. On the main floor, a wall in acid-toned citron lights up the dining area, punctuated by windows sheathed in blue roman shades. Rose, olive-gold, green, and navy peacefully commingle in the more muted living spaces, while in the kitchen, a mint-green stove and barstools decked out in vintage purple and green fabrics give the white room a vibrant kick. Upstairs, the designers took even more risks. There are three master bedrooms—“Almost everybody gets a master,” Anthology co-founder Lance Humphreys says—one of which is a single-color exploration of violet, from the patterned headboard to the graphic wallpaper to the paint. The dominance of one color allowed the Novogratzes to seamlessly mix textures and patterns that might otherwise clash. »


THIS PAGE, clockwise from right: Benjamin

Moore’s Purple Lotus paint sets the tone for a purple-on-purple master bedroom. Additional texture comes from the StudioFour wallpaper, Crate and Barrel chair, roman shades in Robert Allen fabric, and pendant from Canopy Designs. Purple glass in the ensuite bathroom flanks a Kohler tub, while a mirrored wall and glittering chandelier hit a glam note. OPPOSITE: The blue master is playfully traditional, with Osborne and Little wallpaper and a Serena & Lily headboard. The globe pendants and the pink coffee table, both from the CB2 Novogratz Collection, add modern sensibility.

Another master is dedicated to a crisp, more traditional periwinkle theme. Amber globe pendants and a similarly hued throw pillow add a modern touch and keep the room in line with the rest of the house. The third has a hint of British style, with an accent wall papered in floral print and a rose-colored, geometric-patterned fabric on the bed and headboard. Beneath the exuberance, a palette of neutrals underpins the whole project. This subdued foundation, most notably the salvaged oak floors, is what allows the colors to shine so brightly. “Flooring tones down the colors,” Robert says. “If you use light-colored flooring, you’re able to use a little more color elsewhere.” And, of course, it wouldn’t be a Novogratz project without a lavish helping of modern art. To curate a collection for the home, Robert took Humphreys on a whirlwind buying spree in Manhattan. Says Humphreys, “We visited as many New

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York galleries as we could in a day. It was an absolute blast.” Together, they selected 20 pieces of art and furnishings, including a vintage Brunswick pool table and a hand-molded black Clay chair by Maarten Baas. “When people stay in a vacation house, they want to feel like they’re in a boutique hotel,” Robert says. “So we tried to make it unique, whimsical, and very fun.” Indeed, this project closely mirrors the designers’ own personal aesthetic—one perk of designing a home that’s more public than private and meant to appeal to a rotating cast of vacationing families. “When you design someone’s permanent home, the choices are very personal and a lot of people are involved,” Robert says. “But Lance let us do what we wanted.” Given such freedom, the Novogratzes could create their ideal luxury vacation home—which, in the end, will provide an ideal experience for future guests. »


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“We use less color on main floors and more color on bedroom floors. When people visit, they don’t go in your bedroom, so you can take more risks upstairs.” —Robert Novogratz, designer

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The Novogratzes’

Color Rules Go neutral on walls and floors, and bring in pops of color with art and furnishings. Use color on a focal wall to make a bold statement. On main floors, moderate your use of color to ensure a good flow from room to room. You can take greater chances with color in private spaces, such as upper floors and bedrooms. Flooring tones down colors. A neutral floor lets you put bright tones elsewhere. If you get tired of a color, change it! Take risks with paint.

OPPOSITE: The salvaged-wood flooring from Schotten & Hansen is made of old-growth German oak and finished with a generationsold proprietary process. “It’s a really artisan product,” Humphreys says. A Marcel Wanders pendant floats over a sculptural bench by the Campana Brothers. THIS PAGE, TOP TO BOTTOM: A basementlevel guest bedroom has Sheila Bridges wallpaper on the ceiling and Benjamin Moore’s Lavender Blue on the walls. The headboard is by Serena & Lily, and the nightstand and table lamp are from Area 51. A lacquered yellow bench by Piet Hein Eek and hooks by Kartell brighten up an entryway. Outside, the chairs are a mixture of Westminster Teak and Pottery Barn. h

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World of Color Aussie expats envelop their new house in the Pacific Northwest with hues from home. Written by DEBRA PRINZING : Photographed by Ed White

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A chic Vancouver residence houses an active family of six who hail from Australia. Designers Howard Airey and Taylor Johnson of Vancouver’s Airey Group used glass, cedar, and stone to convey a West Coast contemporary vibe. Nature is never far from view, as 10-foot-tall, commercial-style window walls overlook an entry pool that reflects the sky, clouds, and a canopy of conifers.

DESIGN TEAM

architecture: The Airey Group interiors: Heffel Balagno Design Consultants construction: Keystone Projects landscape architecture: Paul Sangha Landscape Architecture landscape construction: Fossil Project Services GRAY ISSUE No. TWENTY

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BELOW: A Roche Bobois Mah Jong sectional in the living room mixes and matches patterns and solids in blue, plum, orange, and lime green. A low polychromatic cushion doubles as a tray-topped coffee table. The custom wool rug is from Salari Carpets. OPPOSITE: In the wine bar, bottles become works of art, including the owners’ Dom Pérignon Tribute to Andy Warhol collection, with labels seemingly made to suit this home’s palette. The gray flannel Montis Ella Easy swivel chairs are from Inform Interiors; the Minotti spool table is from Livingspace.

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fter settling in Vancouver in 2004, it didn’t take long for an Australian family of six to embrace British Columbia’s distinct four-season climate. Though the weather differs dramatically from that of their previous hometown, Melbourne, they saw no reason to change their lifestyle. “We always wanted to build a contemporary home that has a continual flow from inside to outside, similar to those found in the warm climates we were used to,” says the client. She and her husband tapped designers

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Howard Airey and Taylor Johnson of the Airey Group to conjure up that indoor-outdoor experience, “even though Vancouver’s climate isn’t always conducive to one,” Johnson says. A pristine design language is expressed throughout the 8,700-square-foot West Coast contemporary, nestled on a corner lot in the Kerrisdale neighborhood. The pale interiors, designed by Lesli Balagno and Joel Trigg of Heffel Balagno Design Consultants, answer the homeowners’ request for a neutral architectural palette with natural basalt, vein-cut travertine, white edge-grain oak, and white high-gloss lacquer


cabinetry. The finishes flow seamlessly from one room to the next, Balagno explains. “We used materials in different ways over and over again, from the white oak panels and integrated hardware to the white lacquer millwork,” she says. But monochromes aren’t the only scheme at work here. Flamboyant blues and turquoises imbue each quiet room with youthful energy. “Those are two colors that my husband and I both really like; we feel they are timeless, not seasonal,” the client says. “Color livens up the areas and makes each room feel homey.” The designers selected other hues to evoke

Australia’s dramatic landscape and pay tribute to the owners’ place of origin. Marine blues recall the oceans that surround the nation. Burnt oranges and corals are as rich as its clay soils. Deep plums suggest the horizon at sunset. The architecture’s organic backdrop cried out for enriched hues, Balagno says. “Because the house is so clean, it was easy to add saturated colors. We tried to keep things simple and fresh, yet it’s quite bold. When you have the right clients, who will accept color and are open to living with it, the results are exciting.” »

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“They were used to living in Australia, where it’s more tropical. So they were very willing to bring color into the house.” —Lesli Balagno, interior designer

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: Turquoise blue brightens the master bedroom, where gray dominates the custom Heffel Balagno–designed bed, table, and upholstered wall. The upstairs kids’ play area is as functional as it is fashionable, furnished with twin Ligne Roset chairs from Livingspace, a Desiree sofa from Bloom Furniture Studio, and a custom rug by Zoe Luyendijk. OPPOSITE: The miniscule powder room is a jewel box accented by an Alex Turco art panel that riffs on the natural grain of onyx. It’s reflected in a mirror over the custom stone sink designed by Heffel Balagno and built by Adera Stone. The faucet is Dornbracht, sourced from Cantu Bathrooms and Hardware. h

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studio visit

Creature Feature

Inside Christopher Marley’s fantastical art studio–laboratory, Pheromone.

It doesn’t seem to be the likeliest place for a 5-foot-long leopard shark to end up, but when the fish arrived recently at Christopher Marley’s 10,000-square-foot studio in Salem, Oregon—packed with dry ice in a Ziploc bag and FedExed overnight—it was in good company. Into the industrial freezer it went, surrounded by other exotic specimens, many identified with their species name and condition upon arrival. Eastern Rosella, perfect. Flap-Necked Chameleon, ripe. Over the past 15 years, Marley has built up a thrumming business in creating wall art from eye-catching creatures and objects at every scale. Plucked out of the natural world, the artist’s subjects are carefully preserved and arranged in graphic, minimalist patterns in hermetically sealed shadowbox frames. His minerals, shells, and fossils come from miners, paleontologists, and dealers in India, Morocco, the Philippines, and beyond. Animal specimens, such as beetles, butterflies, reptiles, and birds, were either responsibly harvested or “reclaimed”—meaning they died of natural or incidental

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causes in captivity. Breeders, zoos, and animal importers send Pheromone their losses. As Marley puts it, “When their freezer is full, they call me.” The leopard shark came from a prestigious aquarium in California. The week before that, a crateful of parrots and finches arrived from a bird-breeding facility. Growing up, Marley was an “art nerd with an emphasis on monsters,” as he puts it, fascinated by weird sea creatures and reptiles. Ironically, though, he was terrified of insects— “They scared the heck out of me.” While working as a fashion model in Asia in the ’90s, he encountered a stack of framed beetles and spiders in a Bangkok night market and was overcome with curiosity. The mix of revulsion and attraction he felt pointed the way toward a new career path. In 1999, he opened a gallery in Southern California, displaying his work in the front and creating new pieces in a studio in the back. Since going wholesale in 2002 and moving to Oregon in 2003, Pheromone has grown considerably. To meet the demand for his pieces, which are sold in 500 shops, galleries, and showrooms in 22 countries, Marley employs 14 »

Courtesy Pheromonegallery.com

Written by JAIME GILLIN : Portrait and studio photographed by BRUCE WOLF


When arranging beetles and other insects on museum ragboard, Salem, Oregon–based artist Christopher Marley (opposite) carefully hides their legs beneath their bodies to reduce the creepycrawly factor and keep viewers’ focus on his subjects’ remarkable forms and natural flair. Electric-hued beetles, sourced everywhere from Japan to Tanzania, compose the mandala-like Prism No. 5.

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studio visit

“As an artist and collector, I’m always stretching and trying to break the next barrier. The more obscure and arcane, the more it interests me.” —Christopher Marley, Pheromone

staffers at his studio in Salem, one in Atlanta, and another dozen at a dedicated studio in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Even so, he does the initial design of each piece before turning it over to artisans to reproduce, and he still opens every box that arrives at his studio. Rifling through a boxful of dead geckos, monitor lizards, and skinks may not be the high point of your day, but for Marley, “it’s like Christmas. Honestly, these are my favorite days, seeing what new challenging opportunities we have.” Here, Marley lets us poke around his workspace, a curious mix of art studio, factory, natural history museum, and science lab. »

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Courtesy Pheromonegallery.com

ABOVE and left:

Every animal Marley uses in his artwork is either responsibly harvested or “reclaimed,” meaning it died of natural causes in captivity. The bird above came from one of the oldest macaw rescues in the U.S.—when it passed away, the rescue group froze it, and Marley later acquired it. It now adorns the Nike head offices in Portland.


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studio visit

“A big part of what I do is discovering reclamation opportunities—finding beautiful and mysterious creatures that can be put to use rather than discarded.”

TOP LEFT: In the Pheromone studio, mineral specimens are organized by color and size. TOP RIGHT: The industrial freeze-dryers stay sealed for at least two months to allow for the full desiccation of specimens in Pheromone’s Reclamation series. Over that time, the temperature is raised slowly from -30 degrees Fahrenheit to room temperature, forcing any moisture to turn directly from solid into gas. When the process is over, the animals are bone dry and the consistency of balsa wood. LEFT: Marley is currently working to develop new preservation methods that maintain fishes’ natural colors. His forthcoming book, Biophilia, to be published by Abrams this April, showcases Pheromone’s full range of work. h

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Courtesy Pheromonegallery.com

—Christopher Marley, Pheromone


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architecture

Shape Architecture aimed to put both tennis and the landscape at center court in its update of a 1970s sports complex formerly known as the Grant Connell Tennis Centre. Set within a temperate rainforest and adjacent to a sensitive waterway, the revamped building respects strict setback requirements.

Set against the wild backdrop of the North Shore Mountains and the temperate

design-love

Shape Architecture serves up world-class sophistication in its remodel of a storied tennis center. Written by COURTNEY FERRIS : Photographed by ERIC SCOTT

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banks of McKay Creek, the North Vancouver Tennis Centre has long been a model of success for sports complexes, raising countless casual players to higher skill levels. A recent 25,000-square-foot expansion of the 1970s facility, led by Vancouver firm Shape Architecture, has finally elevated the design to a caliber befitting the center’s lofty reputation. Challenging the prevailing look of athletic facilities—opaque, drab, fluorescently lit—Shape incorporated a medley of transparent and translucent glazed panels into the court structure, sheltered within a system of preengineered steel portal frames. A 39-footlong forest-viewing window and, above that, a tall, translucent gable “allow the natural light of the forest into the facility,” says architect and lead principal Nick Sully, “and the light of the interior illuminates the transparent panels like a lantern in the forest.” On the inside, spectators and players are treated to a view of dappled light and lush foliage. From the outside, the game of tennis is on clear display, luring new generations of competitors to the courts. »


TOLOMEO MEGA

design M. De Lucchi & G.Fassina

1-877-382-9450 • Info@Lmatters.com • www.Lmatters.com

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architecture In this state-of-the-art tennis facility, a Plexipave acrylic sport surface system keeps players safe and comfortable on the courts, while white-painted interiors and an indirect illumination strategy even out the light. Connecting the three new courts onto the old building is an interstitial space dubbed the hub, which holds an expanded lobby, a unique small-scale children’s practice court, and a two-story spectators’ hall. The architects paid as much attention to aesthetic details as technical ones—graphic film on an interior wall appears as a bold pattern, but viewed from the street, it resolves into an image of a tennis ball. h

“Outside, the façade provides a neutral backdrop against which the nuances of flora can be perceived uninterrupted. Inside, opaque and transparent elements allow views in and out, as well as areas of visual quiet that do not impede tennis play. The effect is to bring the unique nature of the Pacific West Coast into the interior.” —Nick Sully, architect

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DESIGN. BUILD. LIVE.

2 0 6 . 7 3 5 . 7 9 7 0 • 5 2 2 1 9 t h Av e E S e a t t l e , WA 9 8 1 1 2 • h e l l o r o b i n c o o k i e s . c o m

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resources 17. NEWS Robert Bailey Interiors Vancouver robertbaileyinteriors.ca

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Ste. Marie Vancouver stemarieartdesign.com

Boora Architects Portland boora.com

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20. NEWS Anchorage Art Museum Anchorage, AK anchoragemuseum.org Bellevue Arts Museum Bellevue, WA bellevuearts.org Contemporary Art Gallery Vancouver contemporaryartgallery.ca Maak Lab Portland maaklab.com Made Here PDX Portland madeherepdx.com Maryhill Museum Goldendale, WA maryhillmuseum.org Museum of Contemporary Craft Portland museumofcontemporary craft.org Museum of Vancouver Vancouver museumofvancouver.ca North of West Portland shopnorthofwest.com Oregon Historical Society Portland ohs.org Tacoma Art Museum Tacoma, WA tacomaartmuseum.org Tacoma Glass Museum Tacoma, WA museumofglass.org

SuperFab Portland superfabpdx.com The Good Mod Portland thegoodmod.com 28. ART John Grade Seattle johngrade.com MadArt Seattle madartseattle.com Smithsonian si.edu 32. ASK Rocky Rochon Design Seattle rockyrochondesign.com The Paint Laboratory Seattle thepaintlaboratory.com 36. HOSPITALITY Trey Jones Studio Seattle treyjonesstudio.com Blox Construction Everett, WA bloxconstruction.com Broadcast Coffee Roasters Seattle broadcastcoffee.com Standard Socket Seattle standardsocket.com

Vancouver Art Gallery Vancouver vanartgallery.bc.ca

38. ARCHITECTURE Perkins+Will Seattle perkinswill.com

Emily Carr University Vancouver ecuad.ca

Bucher Glass Fairbanks, AK bucherglass.com

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Ghemm Company Fairbanks, AK (907) 452-5191 University of Alaska Fairbanks alaska.edu 44. SMALL SPACES Hyde Evans Design Seattle hydeevansdesign.com Cedar Mountain Woodwrights Ellensburg, WA cedarmountain woodwrights.com Collins Construction Seattle (206) 356-2736 Editions Design Collection editionsdesign.com Hive Modern Portland hivemodern.com Inform Interiors Seattle Informseattle.com Kravet Seattle kravet.com Minotti minotti.com Moooi moooi.com Pat Howe Furniture Seattle (206) 783-7864 Patricia Larson Upholstery and Custom Furniture Woodinville, WA patricialarson upholstery.com West Elm Seattle and Portland westelm.com 48. SMALL SPACES Abodian Seattle abodian.com Playhouse Design Group Seattle playhousedesigngroup.com

50. SMALL SPACES Corey Klassen Interior Design Vancouver coreyklassen.ca Fifth Element Construction & Renovation Vancouver fifthelementconstruction.ca Brizo brizo.com Camerich Seattle, Vancouver camerichusa.com CB2 Vancouver cb2.com Caesarstone caesarstone.com

Umbra Shift umbrashift.com Vancouver Special Vancouver vanspecial.com 58. PROFILE Caitlin Wilson Portland caitlinwilson.com 61. SEASONAL PALETTE Suyama Peterson Deguchi Seattle suyamapeterson deguchi.com Alchemie Landscape Architecture + Design Seattle alchemiesites.com

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Holly Hunt hollyhunt.com

Albert Lee Appliances Multiple locations albertleeappliance.com Bensen bensen.ca Design Within Reach Seattle and Portland dwr.com Hygge & West hyggeandwest.com Inform Interiors Seattle and Vancouver informseattle.com informinteriors.com Jonathan Adler Seattle and Portland jonathanadler.com

Doug Rasar Interior Design Bellevue, WA rasarinteriors.com Edward Curtis edwardscurtis.com

Julie Speidel juliespeidel.com 70. A HOUSE OF A DIFFERENT COLOR Robert and Cortney Novogratz thenovogratz.com ABC Carpet & Home abchome.com Ann Carrington anncarrington.co.uk Anthology anthologydestination.com Benjamin Moore benjaminmoore.com Campana Brothers campanas.com.br

Laundry Studio Portland laundrystudio.com

Canopy Designs canopydesigns.com

Schoolhouse Electric Portland schoolhouseelectric.com

CB2 Vancouver cb2.com


The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the PAcIfIc NorThwEST GrAY is the authority on design in the greater Pacific Northwest, offering insider access to exclusive stories, emerging trends, and rising-star talent. Topics range from stunning architecture and interiors to innovative product design ... from cutting-edge fashion to inspiring conceptual projects. GrAY is for and about design connoisseurs, with each issue showcasing the best residential and commercial design throughout washington, oregon, British columbia, Idaho, Alaska, and beyond. Don’t miss a single issue ... subscribe today!

✂ 1 year $30 // 6 issues 2 years $50 // 12 issues

Subscribe online at graymag.net or, fill out this form and mail with payment to: GrAY, 19410 hwy 99, Ste. A #207, Lynnwood, wA 98036

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❑ cc Billing address same as aBove ❑ if different, please include US funds. Available to U.S. and canadian addresses. International addresses add $10. Your first issue will arrive in 6 to 9 weeks. By providing your e-mail address you are agreeing to receive GrAY’s e-newsletter. GrAY does not sell or rent subscriber names, e-mail addresses, or mailing information. E-mail: info@graymag.net fax: 866.437.6204

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resources Crate and Barrel Multiple locations crateandbarrel.com Kartell kartell.com Maarten Baas maartenbass.com Marcel Wanders marcelwanders.com Osborne & Little osborneandlittle.com Piet Hein Eek pietheineek.nl Pluma Cubic pluma-cubic.com Pottery Barn Multiple locations potterybarn.com Restoration Hardware Seattle and Portland restorationhardware.com Robert Allen Fabric robertallendesigns.com Schotten & Hansen schotten-hansen.com Seabrook Seabrook, WA seabrookwa.com Serena & Lily serenaandlily.com The Shade Store Seattle theshadestore.com Sheila Bridges Design sheilabridges.com Westminster Teak westminsterteak.com Whole Town Solutions Portland wholetownsolutions.com 78. WORLD OF COLOR Heffel Balagno Design Consultants Vancouver heffelbalagno.com The Airey Group Vancouver theaireygroup.com Adera Stone Burnaby, B.C. aderastone.com

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Alex Turco Art Designer alexturco.com Bloom Furniture Studio Vancouver bloomfurniturestudio.com Cantu Bathrooms and Hardware Vancouver cantubathrooms.com Dornbracht dornbracht.com Fossil Project Services Vancouver fossilprojectservices.com Keystone Projects Delta, B.C. keystoneprojects.com Ligne Roset Seattle ligne-roset-usa.com Livingspace Vancouver livingspace.com Minotti minotti.com Montis montis.nl Paul Sangha Landscape Architect Vancouver paulsangha.com Roche Bobois Seattle, Portland, and Vancouver roche-bobois.com Salari Carpets Vancouver salari.com Zoe Luyendijk Fort Langley, B.C. zoeluyendijk.com 84. STUDIO VISIT Pheromone Salem, OR pheromonegallery.com Select pieces available through: Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams Portland mgbwhome.com 90. ARCHITECTURE Shape Architecture Vancouver shape-arch.ca

North Vancouver Tennis Centre North Vancouver northvanrec.com 98. MY NORTHWEST Dunn + Hobbes Seattle dunnandhobbes.com OOLA Distillery Seattle ooladistillery.com AD INDEX 59. 360째 Modern Seattle 360modern.com

53. EWF Modern Portland ewfmodern.com

100. Lounge22 Los Angeles lounge22.com

99. The Fixture Gallery Multiple locations thefixturegallery.com

11. The Modern Fan Co. modernfan.com

91. Gath Interior Design Seattle gathinteriordesign.com 10. Gelotte Hommas Architecture Bellevue, WA gelottehommas.com 31. Hammer & Hand Seattle and Portland hammerandhand.com

93. Nicolle Clemetson Photography Portland nicolleclemetson.com 55. Nussbaum Group Seattle nussbaum-group.com 35. OPUS Vancouver Vancouver vancouver.opushotel.com

93. Hello Robin Seattle hellorobincookies.com

87. 2015 Product Runway Seattle productrunway.com

2. Hive Portland hivemodern.com

89. Ragen & Associates Seattle ragenassociates.com

41. hip Portland ubhip.com

87. Resource Furniture Vancouver resourcefurniture.com

37. Hotel Max Seattle hotelmaxseattle.com

13. Roche Bobois Seattle, Portland roche-bobois.com

19. B & B Italia Seattle bebitalia.com divafurniture.com

55. Hyde Evans Design Seattle hydeevansdesign.com

9. Room & Board Seattle roomandboard.com

12. Bellevue Arts Museum bellevuearts.org

91. inHaus Development Ltd. Vancouver inhaus.ca

57. Scot Eckley Inc Seattle scoteckley.com

53. Ben Trogdon Architects Seattle bentrogdonarchitects.com

25. Interlam interlam-design.com

4. Alchemy Collections Seattle alchemycollections.com camerichseattle.com 23. Armak Architectural Millwork Port Coquitlam, B.C. 604-941-1588 91. Autonomous Furniture Collective Victoria autonomousfurniture.com

5. Bradlee Distributors, Inc. Multiple locations bradlee.net 59. Chown Hardware Portland and Bellevue, WA chown.com 29. The Cloud Room Seattle cloudroomseattle.com 57. Design Stage Seattle design-stage.com 89. Digs Seattle digsshowroom.com

59. K & L Interiors Seattle kandlinteriors.com 16. Kush Handmade Rugs Portland kushrugs.com 91. Light Matters Seattle lightmattersonline.com 42. Loewen loewen.com Available through: Sound Glass Tacoma soundglass.com Windows Doors & More Seattle windowshowroom.com

33. SPARK Modern Fires sparkfires.com 89. Timothy De Clue Collection Seattle timothydeclue.com 21. Tufenkian Portland tufenkianportland.com 93. Vanillawood Portland vanillawood.com 27. Wood-Works Cabinetry + Design Seattle woodworkscad.com


market The ultimate buyer’s guide. Your resource for everything from design studios and artisans, to trades- and craftspeople.

Filling Spaces Curated and custom collection of fabulous products for you and your home! Bright and bold eclectic style Visit our beautiful showroom, 935 N.W. 19th at Lovejoy, Portland Instagram: #fillingspacesdesigns Facebook: fillingspaces.designs fillingspaces.com (503) 222-2028

fruitsuper design

Jamieson Furniture Gallery

We create products that tell your story. Products designed in Seattle and made in the USA that balance both fun and function. Designed to be used, loved, and lived with.

For the past 25 years, designer Richard Jamieson has been recognized as a leader in the modern urban plank movement. Jamieson Furniture’s large Bellevue showroom artfully blends handcrafted live-edged tables with unique and custom designed hardwood furniture for all rooms in the home.

fruitsuperdesign.com

10217 Main Street, Bellevue, WA 98004 www.jamiesonfurniture.com (425) 577-8627

Carbon & Sand Garden Gates

New to the Northwest: unique and creative garden gate designs by Carbon and Sand. All our gates are custom-designed and detailed to each of our clients’ specifications. These custom gates will bring you enjoyment for generations. carbonandsand.com

not2big® React. Reduce. Rethink. Recycle. Relax. At not2big, we build modern, artisan furniture one piece at a time. Handcrafted and individually numbered, no two pieces are exactly alike. Our designs combine the warmth of wood with a creative mix of other materials to produce timeless furniture that is functional and beautiful. Whether you choose an in-house design or a custom piece, it will be a true original. Our goal is to inspire, delight, and surprise, bringing our clients a personalized experience and providing them with a unique product not available anywhere else. Rethinking how furniture is made. We are not2big! www.not2big.com (425) 503-0710

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my northwest

“The new generation of creative ‘makers’ are motivated to embed themselves in the urban mix—it’s where they’ll find their audience, and it’s where they themselves want to live and work.”

WHO:

liz dunn Real estate developer

WHERE: Oola Distillery, Seattle Photographed by Redstone Pictures

If anyone in Seattle knows buildings, it’s Liz Dunn. As the founder of Dunn + Hobbes, she has redeveloped eight mixeduse properties in Capitol Hill and set a high bar for adaptive reuse projects, transforming industrial buildings into beautifully designed destinations with buzzing restaurant and retail scenes. Like most successful developers, Dunn has a keen understanding of what draws people to a space. Oola Distillery, one of her favorite spots in Seattle, hits all the marks. For one, it’s housed in a former commercial bakery. “I love the fact that they carved out this beautiful space in an old building in the middle of an urban neighborhood,” Dunn says of the 4,700-square-foot tasting room and microdistillery, which produces small batches of gin, vodka, and bourbon. “It was a workhorse of a building, and they are still producing something there.” Dunn’s own buildings, including the highly anticipated Chophouse Row, cater not only to eating and shopping, but to working and producing things, too. As she puts it: “The reason I am in this business is to provide space for people to do things, not just consume things.” h

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Presenting an inimitable expression of true heritage, the DXV collection from American Standard captures the essence of influential design from the last 150 years. Our products evoke a strong nostalgic connection to classic design while setting the standard for modern bathrooms.

Tigard Showroom 7337 S.W. Kable Lane 503-620-7050

Bend Showroom 20625 Brinson Blvd. 541-382-1999

Salem Showroom 2710 S.E. Pringle Rd., #110 503-779-2882

THEFIXTUREGALLERY.COM

Eugene Showroom 110 N. Garfield 541-688-7621

at Consolidated Supply Co.

Seattle Showroom 8221 Greenwood Ave. N. 206-632-4488

Pacific Showroom 703 Valentine Ave S.E. 253-299-7156

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GRAY No. 20  

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest. graymag.com

GRAY No. 20  

The DESIGN MAGAZINE for the Pacific Northwest. graymag.com