Issuu on Google+

Welcome to Motivation: A Short Course Day 2

Led by Punya Mishra & Leigh Wolf Educational Psychology & Educational Technology Program College of Education, Michigan State University


What are we doing today?


What are we doing today? a lot... but first...


Yesterday’s photos*


Overview of yesterday Motivation: State of condition that serves to activate of energize behavior and give it direction OR that which “makes us do stuff.” Complex construct Different theories (Maslow’s hierarchy, expectancy value theory, Flow… ) Praise for effort v.s. for success (connected to task difficulty)


Onward…


Daniel Pink - Drive

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc


We have talked a lot about what motivates


We have talked a lot about what motivates What about DEmotivation?


In your groups, create your own demotivational poster in Google Presentation. Decide on one particular motivational mechanism, turn it onto its head, and create a poster with that new, scientifically valid, “demotivational� message. Use images from Flickr.com Email link to seekmotivation.rightnow@picasaweb.com


Project I


Polish & Shine Time Put the final touches on your presentation Email your ppt (if you have one) to seekmotivation@gmail.com


Time to present! Presenters Remember to keep to your time (8 minutes + 2) Remember you are being evaluated by your peers Audience Pay attention (take notes), ask questions Important: Your final project will need you to utilize / apply the ideas that you hear http://tinyurl.com/APUMSUeval


Project 1 - presentations Metacognition Sriparna, Kriti, Jharna Self Regulation Theory Sejuti, Madhulika and Siddharth Mastery vs. Performance Sarveena, Shiva, Shifa Locus of Control/Attribution Theory Ziaul, Siddhanth, Bharath Individual Interest vs. Situational Interest Mukesh, Samir, Anuradha, Rahman


Lunch


post lunch


3  ways  of  looking  at  motivation ¡ Can  I  do  this  task? § Locus  of  control  /  Attribution  theory

¡ Do  I  want  to  do  this  task  and  why? § Individual  (personal)  interest  v.s.  Situational  interest § Expectancy  Value  model § Mastery  (intrinsic,  task  involved)  v.s.  Performance  

(extrinsic,  ego  involved)

¡ What  do  I  have  to  do  to  succeed  at  this  task? § Self  regulation  theories § Meta  cognition  &  Motivation

22


Lets look at the evaluations‌


What have we learned?


Onward...


Motivation to learn


Motivation to learn Motivation to learn: the learner’s “tendency to find academic activities meaningful and worthwhile and try to get the intended learning benefits from them� (Brophy). Motivation to learn helps the learner make sense of the learning activity, understand the knowledge it develops, and master any skills it promotes. Based largely on big ideas, an exploratory orientation, active processing and meaning construction, and empowering the learner. Stimulated most directly through modeling, communication of expectations, and direct instruction or socialization by significant others (especially parents and teachers)."


Why not motivated to learn?


Why not motivated to learn? Believe that present goals/activities are wrong for you. Feelings/emotions about present activities are generally negative. Have not considered listing of important goals that define success for you personally (lack of SRL) Don't have (or believe you don't have) the ability to do present activities or obtain future goals. Satisfaction of achieving goals seems in distant future. Present activities not seen as related to important goals. Important goals conflict with present activities. Extrinsic incentives are low. Personal problems interfere with present activities.


Teaching strategies that decrease motivation


Teaching strategies that decrease motivation Give student less attention during instruction; Present easy, limited and repetitive content, with an emphasis on facts and drill and practice; Demand lower quality of performance; Call on students infrequently; Leave little wait time after questions, Either give students the correct answers or call on someone else; Praise incorrect answers.


Teaching strategies that increase motivation


Teaching strategies that increase motivation Give frequent, early, positive feedback that supports students' beliefs that they can do well. Ensure opportunities for students’ success by assigning tasks that are neither too easy nor too difficult. Help students find personal meaning and value in the material. Create an atmosphere that is open and positive. Help students feel that they are valued members of a learning community. Help students develop a plan of action Use games and simulations Avoid the “daily grind”; keep the “big picture” in mind


problems of practice


Project II


Learn about each other… In your groups - Talk to each other about what you do (did) - What are some practical concerns you have (connected to motivation) - Discuss and choose a problem of practice (POP) that is “rich” and complex that you will tackle as a group


Example of POP Seventy percent of our students in special-education did not pass the state test last year, In particular they did not do well on the open-response questions in both math and English language arts. In many cases, they left those problems blank.We may not be providing these students with enough practice on open-response questions.We may be providing too much assistance so that when they have to tackle these prompts on their own, they do not know where to start.


Example of POP Seventy percent of our students in special-education did not pass the state test last year, In particular they did not do well on the open-response questions in both math and English language arts. In many cases, they left those problems blank.We may not be providing these students with enough practice on open-response questions.We may be providing too much assistance so that when they have to tackle these prompts on their own, they do not know where to start. • What kinds of tasks are students being asked to do in class? • What are the different ways you see students being assigned work in class? Additional questions: • Are kids collaborating and problem solving critically? • Are teachers planning activities that allow for collaborating and problem solving around critical thinking skills?


Learn about each other… In your groups - Talk to each other about what you do (did) - What are some practical concerns you have (connected to motivation) - Discuss and choose a problem of practice that is “rich” and complex that you will tackle as a group


Your task Is to take this problem of practice and develop a multi-faceted solution (based on research and what we have covered so far) to address this problem - Develop a poster that identifies - The problem of practice - Raises questions that can help you identify key issues underlying the problem - Develops solution(s) based on the research - A method of evaluating the success of your intervention


Think... … hard about identifying underlying “root” causes … of possible solutions. It is not necessary that there just be one approach (there usually never is) … of how research can help come up with specific solutions (consider all the different ideas we have covered here in the past day and a half). Holistically, Organically in coming up with your solution


3  ways  of  looking  at  motivation ¡ Can  I  do  this  task? § Locus  of  control  /  Attribution  theory

¡ Do  I  want  to  do  this  task  and  why? § Individual  (personal)  interest  v.s.  Situational  interest § Expectancy  Value  model § Mastery  (intrinsic,  task  involved)  v.s.  Performance  

(extrinsic,  ego  involved)

¡ What  do  I  have  to  do  to  succeed  at  this  task? § Self  regulation  theories § Meta  cognition  &  Motivation

42


Evaluation You will be evaluated on - Identifying a “rich� problem - Appropriateness / sophistication of the solution/intervention - Level of detail - Connections to research - Appropriateness of evaluation - Ancillary materials


Tomorrow‌ Punya & Leigh will be available to meet, discuss and help in any way that we can In this room Signup sheet is available to meet with you in groups (between 10 am - 2 pm)


Final presentations Friday‌ Details to be worked out‌


Motivation a Short Course: Day 2