Issuu on Google+

USS STENETT [cG-31I

SEPTEHBER/OCT0BER Se.nvLne Famllqt and FaLe-nd.r

ol Ste.nett

XXPA6SANJAN FALLS, REPLIBLIC OF THE PHILTPPINESXX

vol. d No. 5


DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY USS STERETT.(CG 3II FPO SAN

F

RANCTSCO 9667A-1

1

54

15 November 1989

Dear STEREII family and friends, September and 0ctober went by very quickly for us all, including about flive weeks at sea in a series of irnportant military exercises with our Japanese and Korean allies and a period of operations with four U.S. Navy battle groups, two with aircraft carriers and two with battleships.

l{e did have the much-appreciated opportunity to spend the first three weeks of September at home in Subic. lt/e all enjoyed the time with our families and friends. We can all be very proud of the STERETT men who contriouted their time during this period to fix up Asinan Elementary School in Olongapo and work with the children of Kalayaan Elementary School nere on base. Ihe details of these worthwhile projects are provided in the Familygra;n. Also during September we said good-bye to the members of our helicopter detachment (who must join us For six months without their families) and welcomed the replacement memoers from their home squadron in San Diego. 0n the 24th of September we headed north to rendezvous for the exercises. STERETT was in charge of two oilers and a stores ship, as well as a destroyer and a frigate, for the trip north. We spent one day in Yokosuka, Japan, where we embarked the Commander for Anti-Subnrarine Warfare during the exercises, a Japanese rear admiral, and his staff. h/e all learned a lot from this rare opportunity to work so closely with our Japanese allies. (Two Thai officers have also been aboard for training since August, giving STEREIT a true international aspect.) Part way through the exercises, the Japanese admiral and staff were relieved by U.S. ones, Rear Admiral Reason and the Cruiser-

Destroyer Group Three Staff.

amived back home on Halloween, after having celebrated the occasion the Sunday before with the First Annual Halloween Steel Beaeh Picnic. Photos of the memorable and historic event are conLained inside. fr/e

As the holiday season approachesr. we wish you aII the think of you often and need your continued support.

Captain, U.S.

Navy

Commanding 0fficer

besl.

While

at sea we


TABLE

ffi

CONTENTS

ABOARD. FAIR WINDS AND FOLLOWING SEAS. BITTS AND PIECES....

.

MABUHAY: V{ELCOME

.....7 .....]O ....I2

PACEX. ESIATE PLANNING. PAGSANJAN FALLS TOUR. AS]NAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

.. . ..4

....15 ....].8

PROJECT.

.......20

ADOPT.A.SCHOOL/ADOPT.A.SHIP NAVY'S BIRTHDAY PARTY ON STERETT.... HALLOWEEN STEEL BEACH PICNIC. CHAPLAIN'S CORNER NAVY RELIEF NEWS. THE MILITARY POSTAL SERVICE FAMILY NEWS AND INFORMATION... RECREATION/HOME SAFETY AND HEALTH....

uss

. . .23

..,.25

......27 ...30

...]1 ...32

.....33 ...36

STEREIT [C8.3U Forlnllgr'llgrltt SERVING IHE FAMITY AND FRIENDS OF IHE STERETT

0FFICER CAPT B.M. PL0TT, UsN OFFICER LCDR J.S. LAMBERT, USN

C0MMANDING

EXECUTIVE

EDIToR LT J.D. PUTTLER, CHC, USNR PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER LTJG B.A. RILEY, USNR TYPING/LAY0UI Rp3 M.V. KRAUSS, USN

PHOTOS

SMCM

R.K. BEIHEL,

ISI

USN USN

R.L.

CUNNINGHAM, UsN

R.W. CLAPP, RP3 M.V. KRAUSS, STGS

STEREIT FAMILYGRAM

IS

USN

PUBLISHED BIMONTHLY.


MABUHAY,I wElcoI.IE

ABOARD,I

Tne STERETT family is constantly changing with new faces arriving eacir month. SIEREII extends a Mabuhay to the newest members of the crew that have

arrived since the July-August 1989 Familygram was published. **

Lieutenant

Island,

Commander

San Diego,

* *.r

*****

for duty from Naval Air Station,

Steve Bagby reported

California.

North

Jt-,t*)fr**F**

LieuLenant Mark l,'lharton reported San Diego, California.

for duty

from Naval

Air Station, North Island,

****,(*)+)tJ+*

Lieutenant Anthony Lisanti reported for duty frorn Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California. **)crJC*)6'+)fr*

Liet.ltenant Lee McHugh reported San Diego, California.

for duty

from Naval

Air Station, North Island,

***xx)f**x*

Aviation Machinistrs Mate Chief Arrnando Budomo reported for duty from Naval Air Station, North Island, $an Diego, California.

********** Aviation Electronics Technician First Class Eric Roos reported for duty Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California.

from

Aviation Electrician's Mate First Class Stephen Klernko reported for duty Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California.

frorn

**

)t )f ,t*

f,***

** n rt* ***J(*

Electrician's

Mate First CLass Keith E. $lilcoxson reported Subic Bay, Repuott:_:1.:l:.?ntatopines.

Electrician's

Mate

Repair

Facility,

for duty

from Ship

Class Ramon P. Edquilang reported for duty from Shore Activity, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. *x)tx)f***J(if First Class Glenn R. Clark reported for duty from the USS

First

Interrnediate Maintenance

Fire Controlrrran TRUXTUN (cGN

l5)'

Machinist's Mate First Class Interrnediate Maintenance

*r(*)e'r*)r*x* Damaso Simbulan

Activity, Pearl Harbor, ** * r,t*lt***

reported for duty from Shore Hawaii.

Aviation Machinist's Mate Second Class Mario Relente reported Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California.

for duty frorn

*)e*J( )tx l(-xn*

I\VH il-C}(D Nfl H

A[B(DA[R

il)g


**.!t**,t****

Aviation Structural Mechanie Second Class Dave Purcell reported for duty Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California' lf lt** ***

lf

frorn

**

Aviation Anti-submarine l,,larfare Operator Second Class Bruce Cappel reported for duty frorn Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California. *****.****Jt Machinist's Mate Second Class Ramoncito G. Grepo reported for duty from Naval Air Station, Security Detachment, Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines. *JC*X***)t**

Gunner's Mate Second Class Tirnothy c00K (FF 1081).

A.

Campbell reported

* *Jf *'*

Gunner's Mate Second Class John

BEA.H (cGN

9)'

Jt

lt

for duty from the USS

Je**

P. Lyons reported for duty from the

USS L0NG

**********

Machinist's Mate Second Class Kenneth J. Labre reported for duty from the MIDWAY (cv 4r)' {.****i**n* Fire ControLman Third Class Randy R. Cavalier reported for duty from the ro['ERS (DDG

9)'

Boiler Technician Third WICHITA (AOR

1).

*J+rr*****xx Class Michael Demesa

reported for duty from the

USS

USS

USS

***

***Jt,(tJf

Sonar Techician lhird Class Michael Cummings reported for duty from Submarine Warfare fraining Center, Pacific, San Diego, CaJ.ifornia.

Fleet Anti-

Jt** ** ***Jt*

Sonar Techician Third Class C.B. Lenham reported for duty frorn Fleet AntiSubmarine Warfare Training Center, Pacific, San Diego, California. *****,t**Jt*

Radioman Third Class Craig A. Pendergrass reported KEA (AE 22), home ported in Oakland, California.

for duty from the

USS

MAUNA

**tt**.t*rt**

Operations Specialist Third Class Hegan A. USS COCHRANE (DDG

Simmons

reported

21).

for duty

frorn the

****)t***Jt*

Machinist's Mate Third Class John M, Sypher reported for duty from the CONSTELLATION (CV

USS

54).

*rt**** ** ** Machinist's Mate Third Class Jeffrey R. 0sterrieder reported USS TOWERS (DDG 9).

for duty from

the

******-f,*)t*

Boatswain's Mate Third Class Marlin D. Isaacs reported for duty frorn the USS MIDWAY (CV 41). ********** Operations Specialist Third CLass'Keith D. Falvey reported for duty frorn the USS TRUXTUN (cGN 35)' ********** Noel Romero reported for duty from the USS HALSEY Third Class S. Quartermaster %) rcG ' ********** Aviation Structural Mechanic Third Class Joe Erger reported for duty from Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego' California. *)t*****Jf

**

Aviation Elect,rician's Mate Third Class Merle Whitehead reported for duty from Naval Air Station, North Island; San Diego, California. ******

5

lt*rc*


t*********

Aviation Anti-submarine Warfare Technician Airman Gary 0,Connor reported for duty frorn Naval Air Station, North Dieso, Catifornia.

]:l?lg,*:an

Aviation Anti-subinarine Warfare 0perator Airman Ty Hornbaker reported from Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California.

Naval

* * )t*******

for

Aviation Anti-submarine lVarfare 0perator Airrnan from Naval Air Station, San Diego,

Thomas Bower

Gunner's Mate Seaman Scott W. Davidson reported WILSON (DDG 7).

for duty from the USS HENRY B.

:?}il?i?i?.

reported

duty

JC*****)C***

Fireman Apprentice Mark Saxton reported Great Lakes t rllinois ' *.,Gri*JG

for duty

from Service Sehool

Command,

duty from Service School

Command,

)r,(*,r*

Fireman Recruit David A. Brooks reported for Naval Training Center, Great Lakes,.]l*iffi:;

0perations Specialist Seaman Recruit Timothy D. Graves reported for duty from "A" School, Dam Neck, Virginia t"""li.Yllglli.. Seaman

0S

Recruit Mauricio A. Salazar reported for duty from Reeruit Training Skills Training, t"l.?*:g?,*California.

Center, General

Signalman Seaman Reeruit Robert M. Crabtree reported

School, Naval Training Center, ott"?X:i_:l?llo".

Fireman Recruit Johnny J. Guajardo reported command' Great Lakes' Illinois' *'***r*-*.,r* Fireman Recruit Percival P. Quiray reported command, Great Lakes, rllinois.

lor duty from SignaLman

rtArl

for duty from Service School for duty from Service

SchooI

****rr*****

Machinist's Mate Fireman Recruit James Johnson reported for duty from Service School

Command,

Great Lakes,

Illinois.

*Jf *****lt**

Recruit Floyd E. Crossland reported for duty from Overseas Fleet Training Center, San Diego, California. Seaman

*lf Jtltlt

*****

Mess Specialist Seaman Recruit Martin W. Thomas reported for Homeport Unit, Fleet Training Center, San Diego, California. It.l(* *

Homeport Unit,

)f

x

,( Jt

duty from Overseas

**

Seaman

Recruit Corey J. Berg reported for duty from Recruit Training General Skills Training, San Diego,.:?lil::1i".

Commandt

Recruit Michael D. Frey reported for duty from Recruit Training General Skills rraining, san Diego,_??1ll?lll".

Command,

Seaman

6


FAIR I{INDS

AND FOLLOWING SEAS

A time cornes when eacir member of the SIEREIT flamily moves on to new duty stations, new friends, and new adventures. Paalam. *** * r )c )(,f ,( n Lieutenant Cornmander John MacCrossen transferred in September and reported to Naval Air Station, North Island, t"l_?*:9:i,*?"tttornia for duty.

Lieutenant Joe Beer detached in septernber and reported North Island, San Diego, Califor"t?,,1?:_XYIL

to I'laval Air station'

Lieutenant GIenn Morgan transferred in September and reporled to NavaI Air station, North Island, San Diego' t?lif:ll*l_tot duty. Lieutenant Junior Grade Tim Fleming detacired in Septernber and reported Air Station, North Island, San Diegot_??lll?lnia for duty.

to

Naval

ELectrician's Mate Senior Chief (Surflace Warfare) Salvatore A. Jimmenez detached with his wife, Linda, and four children, Melody, Bobby, Deborah, and Valerie, in September and reported to Naval Recruiting District, Portland, oregon for dutY' *JGJG*F,(**** Machinist's Mate Chief Kevin Swick detached in October with his wife, Asuncion, and two children, Karen and Kenneth, and will report to Naval Magazine, Subic Bay Security Detachment, Subic t"y,_T:?y?lt_:*ot the Philippines for duty. Aviation Maintenance Clrief Jerry Sarnple transferred in September and reported to Naval Air Station, North IsJ.and, S.L?*:g?,*California.

Aviation Metalsmith First Class Rolando Quinqua detached in September reported to Naval Air Station, torr?,*|:}???Lt"n Diego, California for duty.

and

Aviation Electrician First Class Tony Speros transferred in September reported to Naval Air Station, North.l:lllgi.San Diego, California for duty.

and

Electrician's Mate First Class Lloyd M. P. Limpiado detached with his wife, Clanel, and two children, Elaine and Ranulfo in Novernber and will report to Naval Station, Long Beach, Californi:,,1?1.9y:t.

Aviation Powerplant Technician Second Class Lorenzo Deleon transferred in September and reported to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California for duty. Aviation Sensor Operator Second Class Britt Akins detached in September reported to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, Cal-ifornia for duty.

and

Aviation Metalsmith Second Class Edward Saidro transfemed in September reported to Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California for duty.

and

,(*********

*JF)f)6'tJttc)c)t*

MGVBISG


Aviation Publications Technieian Second Class Tim Shenefield detached in September and reported to Naval Air Station, North IsJ.and, San Diego, california for duty *J(********

Aviation ELectronics Technician Second Class Richard Yells detaehed in and reporled to Naval Air Station, North Island, m Shore Intermediate Maintenance

Activity,

Septernber

Hawaii.

::?11,.1?l?"r, Hull Technician Second Class James Unverdorben, Junior, transferred in September and reported to Naval Station, tubt:_??Xi_l:fblic of the Philippines for duty. Class Charlie Johnson detached in September with tris wife, Raquel, and three children, Virgine, Bernard, and Monica, and reported to Nuclear weapons Station, Indian tr,:19.?::i:l*.nr, Hadlock for duty. Radioman Second

Gunner's Mate Second Class George Joseph Provencher transfemed with his wife, Lou Nignig, and reported for duty to 0RDMISL Test Facility WSMR, White Sands, New

Mexico'

*****x.**** Machinist's Mate Second Class Wil]iam P. Loughran detached with his wife, Marlyn Bangor, washinston for duty. in 0ctober and reported to Triden,

T:l*:.:il*1irr,

HuIl Technician Second Class Ronald E. Bureh Jr. detached with his wife, Wendy, and son, Travis, in October and reported to the USS DIXON (AS l7), home-porled in San Diego, California for duty. ****)r***** Hospital Corpsman Second Class Charles tsond detached in 0ctober with his wife, Gerlie, and son, Charles, and witl report to Branch Clinic, NPTC, EI Centro, california for dutY' *******i(x* Clyde Cartright transferred in 0ctober and Class Second E-LecLronics Technician Station, San Miguel, Republic of the Naval Communications will report, to Phili'Pines ' *******x** gperations Specialist Second Class John Dewveall detached in October with his wife, Josephine, and two children, Briana and Riza, and will report to the USS KrsKA (AE 15) for duty ****rr***r** Aviation Sensor operator Third CIass Chuck Haga transferred in 0ctober and reported to Naval Air Station, North_li13l*.San Diego, California for dutv' to Quartermast,er Third Class David G. Masker detached in October and reported for dutv' California ,dssault Craft Unit One, home-port.o.l?-:?l???oo'

rnterior

Communications

and reported

to the

Third Class Charl-es Rhinehart transferred in (CV 61) for duty'

USS RANGER

*****

September

lt*ltl(*

Engineman Thi.rd CIass Vonray Smith transferred witn his wife, Ap-o-lonia, in September and rePorLed to Ship Repair Facitity, Subie Bay, Republic of the Philippines for dutY. 16.tt

JtJt lt

Jt J(

* **

Rebecca' Maehinist,s Mate Third class Fl0yd P. Piper rI detached with his wife, Station' Air Naval and two children, David and Jennifer, and will report to Miramar, California for duty. **rG***)r***


Aviation Electrician Airrnan Tim Lawson transferred in September Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, Calilornia for duty.

and

reported to

Aviation Metalsmith Airman Jason Ruffin detached in September Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, California for duty.

and

reported to

**.rt** rc**** ***Jt)txlt***

Seaman

in September and reported to the USS to^"olli*?illl:t^ta for duty. Ronald Germany detached in September and reported to the USS

Apprentice Brian Hart transferred

FLINT (AE

32), home-ported in

Seaman Apprentice, FLINT (AE 32), nome-ported

in Concord, California for

duty.

XXAIdARDS CEREIlONYXX

IdHILE STERETT IdAS UNDERLJAY.' CAPTAIN PLOTT PRESENTED AtlJARDS TO IlANY STERETT SAILORS. ABOVE HE PRESENTS THE 60OD CONDUCT IlEDALS. IN THE NEXT SECTION., BITTS AND PIECES., THESE SAILORS AND THEIR AtlJARDS ARE NOTED. CON6RATULATIONS TO ALL FOR A J

0B IdELL D0NE

I


FCL Jimmie

Martin reenlisted for

six more years in the U. S. Navy.

FC2 Jeffrey Clark reenListed for four more years in the U. S. Navy. FC2 Rodney Hughes reenlisted for four more years in the tJ.S. Navy.

BITTS

EM2 Cezar Nava

ftM ***

n

)t****

n*

ESWS

,f

0S2 John Dewvea]l reenlisted for more years in the U.S. Navy.

Jt

if Jf

six

x** x* * * x Jf x,f F * r****

FC2 Robert Harkleroad

QUALIFIERS

for three

prograrn

is a self-initiated

Halkins, (Sw)

ET2 Clyde EM2

Eladio Mangalino reenListed more years in the U.S. Navy.

for six

M52 Charles Thomas reenlisted six rnore years in the U.S. Navy.

ENf Vonray Smith reenlisted for fout more years in the U.S. NavY.

FC2 (SW) Shawn Ches-

BTf Eric Jorgensen reenlisted for six more years in the U.S. NavY. Jt rc

n

* )c * rF * x )$ )+ )t J( n * )+ x )t rt )t lc )t )t l+ J+ Jf ,c *,+ J+,t,t,f

James Gold, EW3 (SW) Sammie Freernan, and GMM3 (SW) Dean Schwictenberg. **

**

x)t

**it

n

for

RMf Norrnan Starks reenlisted for four more years in the U'S. NavY.

Sammy

*)t *** )t** tt***l(****,f

Cartright reenlisted for in the U.S. Navy.

three more years

Simpson' GMG2 (SW) Rooert Gatner, FC2 (SW) Kevin BarrY, FC2 (SW) Kevin Anderson, FC2 (SW) Vincent Fulbright, ETZ (5W) A1len Warren, BM2 (Sw) Steve McCormack, GMMf (SW) GMM2

reenlisted

in the U.S.

tsT2 Bradley Bender reenlisted for four more years in the U.S. Navy.

study and training program in which a thorough understanding of the ship's weapons systems, propulsion, and operational capabilities is achieved by the candidates. Their final qualfication is obtained in an oraL board headed by the Commanding 0fficer and several Chief Fetty 0fficers. The designation authorizes the wearing of the Enlisted Surface Warfare breast insignia. Congratulations lo the following personnel: MSC (Sw) Jose Gobaleza, DCl (SW) Jeffrey Vlestern, GMM2 (SW) Mark

Inore years

Navy.

achievement of EnListed Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS).

ser,

for

Steve McCormick reenlisted rnore years in the U.S. Navy.

BM2

j(.r**

significant ES|VS

Navy.

five

The folloiving individuals have distinguished themselves through the

Ihe

reenlisted for

six ,nore years in the U.S.

tt

*i(

ADVANCEMENTS

Congratulations to the following to their present rank: 0S2 Staten' 0S2 Ewest, SH3 Carr, OSSN Miller, OSSN Bowers, OSSN Rivera, YNSN Hernandez, OSSN Decker, 0SSN Sanders, OSSN Quarles, MMFN Jones, MMFN Puebla, YNSN Williams, FA Saxton, and RMSA Risinger.

n* * * **lt**

crewmembers who were advanced REENLISTMENTS

Richard HaIl reenlisted for four more years in the U.S. Navy. EMCM

0scar Astrero reenlisted for three more years in the U.S. NavY. SHC

**** )f ***x*)c IO

nx *

)t*** n*,+x*** )t* * * x***x**


** * * * * * * * x * Jf * ** * * * lf **

lt

.,(* *****

* *',f * * * * * * * ** * * *

*J(

X*J(**J(* lt****

************

SAILORS OF IHE QUARIER

The Sailor of the Quarter is chosen for his sustained dnd outstanding performance, exemplary behavior, and unselfish contributions to the ship and crew.

Congratulations to the following personnel who received awards for outstand-

ing performance and excellence:

LT

Pultler (Certificate of Appreciation),

DriskelL (Navy Achievement vedal), MMC Shields (Good Conduct-SeGMC (SW)

Certificate of Appreciation) r OSC Alyesworth (Good Conduct-Third), SHC Astrero (Certificate of Appreciation), BMC Cox (Certificate of Appreciation), TMI Lawver (Certificate of

The Junior Sailor Quarter FY 89 is:

cond and

MMJ

BMZ

Pritchard

-rf

(GooO Conduct-

lt

* x tt *

r(

**

)t

tt***lt**

)f ,( )f

SIERETT

Congratulations to

**** n.lt**lt** *******

x*

tf

* **jt***

*

**

MEMBERS

AMS2

David

E.

)t********

* **.,f

*****

Miller (Sea

SHIP'S

OVERALL AWARDS FOR FY-89

The USS STEREIT received the following Warfare Excellenee Awards during the last competitive period:

-Anti-Submarine Warfare Excellence Award

-Anti-Air Warfare Excellence

Award

-Eleetronic V'/arfare -Supply Excellence

Award Award

-Navigational and Seamanship Mobi-

lity

(Certificate of Appreciation), and MMFA Wilson (Certificate of Appreciation). J(

****

Purcell and his wife, Michelle, on the birth of their daughter, Amanda Mae, weight I lbs. and 7 ozs. on 09 0ctober 1989 at II53.

Service Ribbon-First) r DS} Begley (Sea Service Ribbon-First), MS3 HalI (tlavy Achievement Medal), GMG, Becker (Sea Service Ribbon-First), OSSN Burnwatt (Sea Service Ribbon-First), STGSN Wagoner (Sea Service Ribbon-First), FN Critelli (Certificate of Appreciation), 0SSN Miller (Sea Service Ribbon-First), PCSA Guyton (Sea Service Ribbon-First), MSSA Dowell (Sea Service Ribbon-First), SA Lamy Salazar (Certificate of Appreciation), SA Mauricio Salazar (Certificate of Appreciation), 0SSA Arellano

**

)f

Congratulations to BM2 Jay E. and Aneita Whaley on the birth of their son, Dean Ray, weight 9 lbs. and 5 ozs. on 05 0ctober 1989.

GMM2 GMM2

Commendation), BT3

*jt*

NEl'll

Parks (tetter of CommendKiv1ey (Certificate of Appreciation), RPi Krauss (Certificate of Appreciation), FC3 Burdek (Sea Service Ribbon-First and Certificate of Appreciation), STGf Cunningham (Certificate of Appreciation) , DC3 Bemy (t-et-

ter of

of the Fourth

SKl Tho Le

duct-Second), SK2 Gonzales (Good Conduct-Second), MM2 Gonzales (Good Conduct-second), STG2 fhompson (Good Conduct-Second), DK2 Mayo (GooO Conduct-

First) , Fifst), ation)r

Gary Barnes

The Senior Sail-or Quarter FY 89 is:

Appreciation), EMI Candaliza (Good Conduct-second), DSI Aguirre (Good Conduct-Second), DSI Pickens (GooO Conduct-Third), FCI Martin (Navy Achievement Medal), 0Sl Wright (Good Conduct-Second) , FCz Barry (ltavy Achievement Medal), AWz Cappel (Navy Achievement Medal), SfGz Grifflith (Good Conduct-First), 0S2 Cannon (Good Con-

of the Fourth

ExceLlence Award

-Damage Award

Control Mobility Excellence

-Engineering Mobility Excellence

**i( * * ** * * * * * * **.,f * * * ** * * n * ** * *

Award

Congratulations for a job weJ.l donei II

*******n**Jt*)t*.,t****Jr**lr*lt***n*****Jt*


PACIFIC EXERCISE

-

SEPTE},BER TI.RU

MTffiER

During the months of September and October, STEREII participated in one of largest exercises sponsored in the Pacific 0cean since World lVar II. Naval and Air Foree units of the United States, Japan, South Korea, Thailand, and Singapore joined in numerous events, which included multiple carrier operations, practice amphibious landings, and simulated attacks by a variety of aircraft, ships and submarines. This major event began with an exercise called Thalay Thai just off the coast of Thailand. The STERETT team played a vital role protecting the airways over the USS MIDWAY tsattIe Group and the amphibious landing forces from simulated attacks. Lf Garner and LTJG Cleveland, as the ship's weapons coordinators; FCCS Deutseh and FCt Martin, as the weapons engagement controllersl and 0S2 Cannon and OSf Thomas, as the track supervisors took on the challenge of the dreaded "0range Forces'r, easily defeating them. Then, back to Subic Bay to pick up the replenishment ships and escort them to Yokosuka, Japan. After one day in Yokosuka to embark the staffs of DESR0N 15 and the Japanbse COMC0RTFL0T-3, we went north to again fight the "Orange Forces'r. This time the game changed. The r'0range Forcesrr came at us with submarines, but they obviously hadn't planned on the STERETT First Team being there as STGC Gaughan and SIGI MacArthur quickly showed them what cruiser antisubmarine warfare was aLl about. For thirteen days the First Team slugged it out with the able help of Japanese destroyers to fend off these would-be attackers. Then it was time to go where duty calls: South Korea. 0nce again those forces of "Orangefr were up to no good. Enroute to South Korea there was &he

time to gather two carrier battle groups, two battleship battle groupsr do

amphibious readiness group, and representatives of the Japanese maritime self defense force for an unforgettable photo exercise. Following the Photoex tlas an extraordinary demonstration of airpower and firepower by the air wing of the USS CarI Vinson and the battleships USS NE|tt JERSEY and USS MISS0URI. STEREII arrived off the coast of South Korea, escorting the rnighty earrier Enterprise. This was "Orange's'r last stand as the rernnants of their forces attempted to gain a foothold on friendly soil. The air vrar was hot and heavy and stil1 ably covered, but a new dimension had appeared. "Orange'r fast patrol boats lurked close by. The SIERETT First feam harpoon engagement planners, 0Sl Tomlin and 0S2 Hull, jumped to the rescue, successfully simulating an engagement of an

'roranget'patrol boat at long range. 0nce the'torange forcesrrhad been eradicated from South Korea, STERETI headed home, in company with the destroyer' USS HEI,iITT, enroute to a much deserved rest. OSC

T2

Aylesworth


XXPACEX

NMOORED.

/ JAP ANXX

SHIFT COLORS.'

JAPANESE SHIPS READY TO PARTICIPATE

U. S.

NAVY.

13

IN

EXERClSES tljITH

THE


SEVENTH FLEET BATTLE FORCE PARTI_

CIPATES PACIFIC.

IN

TXERCISES IN THE

NORTH ,::rlt ,r: i

SEVENTH FLTTT BATTLE FORCE MOVING ;I.JTO FORIlATION FOR A FiRIN6 EXER_ CISE. lrq

1,.::

rri


d.{*i

STERETT CREbJIIEIlBERS STAND ON THE FOC'SLE TO IdATCH THE FIRIN6 EXER_ CISE.

FIRING

COHMENCES

THE BATTLESHIPS. 15

ON


ESTATE PI-ANNING

Every FamiIy should have a pJ.an to ensure the financial security of survivcrs in the event of the prirnary wage earner's death. Life insurance, saving programs, investments and reaL estate are excellent vehicles for

obtaining this goal.

Survivors should also be aware of benefits available from the Navy, Veteran's Administration and Social Security Administration. The following is a summary of Military Survivor's Benelits: Active Duty Deatir: xfrnmediate benefit/allowance from the Navy:

-

Death gratuity $1,000 Government funded round-trip travel ( fn): For spouse and unmarried dependent children under 27 to funeral site (outside local area) and per diem in amount of $50.00 per day for maximum of two days per traveler.

Note: If POV utilized, only authorized driver is entitled to travel allowance at a rate of 22.5 cents per rnile. - Navy funeral: With fuII military honors. FuneraL expenses payable when:

-- Internment in a private cemetery (maximum) $2,140 -- Internment in a Natj.onal cemetery $1,f90 with funeral home services. -- Internment in a National- cemetery without funeral home services $75.00. - Burial FIag: To rJrape the casket, after whiclr it is presented to the next-of-kin. - Basic Allowance for Quarters (BAQ) z 90 day rent-free occupancy of government quarters or 90 day BAQ/VHA for area of residence. - Unpaid Pay and Allowance: Includes unpaid base pay and other allowances plus pay for accumulated leave (maximuin of 50 days sell back during service career). relocation: Move within one year at government Household/dependents expense. Under extenuating circumstances a request for an extension

be approved.

may

services for - Identifieation Card privileges: t"ledical/Commissary/MWR spouse, and children through age 21. Children's privileges can be extended through age 23 if attending college full time. - Dependent's Dental Plan: Coverage continues through end of the month the sponsor's death occurred. - Navy Relief Society assistance/counseling: Contact Navy Relief Auxiliary Headquarters. to eligible survivors - Survivor Benefit Plan (SAp): An annuity payable based on 55% of full gloss retired pay (computed as . a . voluntary retirement). Applicable only to those with at least 20 years creditable service. Annuity is reduced to 35% of gross retired pay when spouse reaches age 62. Note: SBP stops if spouse temarries prior to age 55.

L6


*Benefits/Allowances from the Veterans Administration (vq):

-

Serviceman's Group

Lile

Insurance

(SGLI): FuIl

coverage

is

(DIC): Payable to eligible spouse or certain parents of service personnel or veterans who die from service-connected disease or injury. Benefit rates are based on member's pay grade. Current DIC rates for surviving spouse are: Dependency and Indemnity Compensation

and children

MONIHLY

MONTHLY

PAY

GRADE

E-t E-2 E-3 E-4 E-5 E-5 E-7 E-8 E-9

w-I w-2 |'i{-3

-

$50r000.

Headstone/Marker: Veterans Administration will provide one or pay a maximum of $80.00 reirnbursement toward cost of a private headstone/marker.

VA

PAY

RAIE

$539 555 570 606

RAIE

GRADE

$773 682

l4l-4

0-1

0-2 0-3 0-4

522

0-5 0-5 0-7 0-8 0-9 0-10

636 667 704 735 682 709 730

704 754 797 879

99L 1, 071

LrL74

Ir25g

I, f8l

Counseling: Counseling is available to spouse and eligible children

upon request.

*SociaL Security Administration benefits

(SSA) :

- Lump sum death benefit $255.00 - A monthly Social Security benefit is payable to eligible spouse and children.- The amount of payment dependi upon contributions' to SSA. Widowrs benefit is payable until the youngest child reaches age 15, or when spouse reaches age 60 and there are no eligible child/children. Children Inay receive benefits through age 18, or 19 if still in high school.

from

17

NCCS

Alexander


PAGSANJAN FALLS TOUR

0n 17 September a group of

STERETT

sailors and friends ventured 60 mil-es

of Manila to visit the resort town of Pagsanjan and "shoot the rapids." Thanks to arrangements made by I.T.T., the STEREIT group traveled by bus through many picturesque Philippine towns and rice plantations to the southwest

province of Laguna.

A tour guide joined the trek in Manila, explaining many of the sites. At one

point, she ordered the

famous young coconut

pies for those

who

desired

them

frorn a roadside vendor. Once

there, participants

by twos into dugout boats,

changed

manned

into

more comfortable

clothing and

boarded

by expert boatman. Thus, began the splash-

filled ride up river to Magdapio Falls. In places, the boatrnan maneuvered the craft through a gorge f00 feet deep. The scene changed from palm fringed shores to cliff lined jungle vegetation, occasionally broken up by small waterfalLs. Apocalvpse Now and Rambo II were filmed in this area. Finally amiving.at the falls, several took the raft ride behind the falls, bathing in the powerful down pour. After experiencing the return trip downstream, the meal at the Pagsanjan Falls Resort was a welcome finish to a long and enjoyable day.

r8


PAGSANJAN FALLS TOUR/RETRIAT

STERETT

TOUR

IIEIlBEf(S AND 6UIDES GOIN6

THE FALLS.

THE SIlALL VILLA6E NEAR THE FALLS. 19

UNDER


ASIN'IN ELE}IENTARY SO{XL PROJECT

Twenty-six sailors spent a dreary rainy day on 15 September, contributing over l4f man-hours of work to better the living conditions at Asinan Elementary School. Ihe large school is located just a few blocks from the Subic tsay Naval Base's front gate. Frorn time to time SIERETT sailors have had their children enroLled there. This turned out to be an ideal community relations project' for STEREIT volunteers.

Ihe principal, Mrs. Gloria Malias, shared with LT Dan Almazan, Ensign Shawn Colson, and Chaplain Puttler the imrnediate needs of the school. No working drinxing fountains were available for the children. The water storage tank leaked, endangering the safety of the school's water supply and wasting tlrat precious resource. Ihe bathrooms were in complete disrepair. The toilets rvere missing mechanisms and inoperable. The septic tanks needed to be drained.

tt.I !

.l

to the enthusiastic response of the crew the project was completed in short order. After the Public Wcrks Cornnission drained and cleaned the septic tanks, STERETT vo-Lunteers went to work. The working party divided into three groups. One group, led by GMM2 (SW) T.J. Kivley and 0Sl Robert Tomlin, took responsibility for the cleaning, disinfecting, and painting of the bathrooms. Fixing the t.oilets and making sure the mechanisms worked was aLso their task. Thanks

BTi Ronald Deleon, BT2 Ken Bridges, and BTFN Jose Montemayor guided another They began cutting and fitting pipe for the new drinking fountains. Eventually, they succeeded in rnaking availaole for the students two safe, conveniently located drinking fountains and an indoor spigot for filling water

group. bottles.

Scotl Buzzell and HTz Ronald Burch oversav{ the third gourp in the of the water tank. There were times during the rain that welding -on the water tank was suspended lor safety's sake. But the job was eventual-ly MR2

welding

completed.

Except

for a brief break for

sack lunches supplied by the ship's kilchen,

and the intermitiant rainfall, work progressed throughout the afternoon. By the end of the day a proud group of sailors could say the time was well spent. Thank you STERETT

LT J.D.

for your help:

PUTTLER

LTJG TODD JUDKINS

LIJG

BEN IORREON

ENS SHAWN COLSON

BTl IiONALD DELEON BI2 KENNEIH BRIDGES BT] JAMES CONNORS BT] ERIC JORGENSEN BTFN JOSE

MONTEMAYOR SHAWN NORTHUP

BTJ BIFA TIMOTHY

WITTE

EMz RICKY HEWITI TN' JOSE GOMEZ

HTz RONALD

ISl

RANDY

BURCH

W. CLAPP

MMl B.J. CELESIINO MMf RONALD HARR]SON MRz SCOII BUZZELL OSl ROBERI TOMLIN OSSN JOHN

BOWERS

SN RICHARD

HENSON

SIGI(SW) GLENN MACARTHUR YNI COLSTON COLLINS GMM2 (SW) T.J. KIVLEY GMG] SHANE

MCOONALD

FN CHRISTOPHER

REYNOLDS

f' h


XASINAN ELEIlENTARY SCHOOL PROJECTX

"PAiI,iT. TOIlLIN., PAiNT.'

'KEEP IlOVIN6 6UYS.'

"

'tdHAT IS S0 II,ITERESTING 2T

'

, "*.e*

6UYS?'


IlRE SCOTT BUTTELL AND HIS FELLOhI SHIPMATES bJORKING ON THE tl]ATER TANK.

GNGT SHAtljN IlCDONALD HELPIN6 AN ASINAN ELEMENTARY STUDENT lljASH HIS HANDS l.ljITH ONE OF THE NEU LJATER FOUNTA]NS.

SONE OF THE YOUN6 ASINAN ELEllEl',lTARY STUDENTS ENJOYIN6 THE COIlPANY AND HELP FROM THE STERETT CREbJ MEIlBERS.

22

ASINAN ELEIlENTARY PRINCIPAL NRS. IlALIAS GETS SOIlE UJATER FROIl ONE OF THE NEU SPIGOTS.


ADOPT-A-SCI-OOL/ADOPT-A-SHIP

The saiLors and

of

families of the

SIEREIT

Kalayaan Elementary School students and

ship as its own. In early September

hold a special place in the hearts

teachers.

STERETT

sailors

The school has adopted our

voLunteered

3 days to

read

to the students favorite children's books as a part of a special reading program. Some of the sailors also rel-ated sea stories and told of recent deployn'rents

to China, Thailand, and Hong Kong.

Operations Specialist Seaman Apprentice Emiliano Arel-Lano dressed costume and performed The

for several of the 2nd Grade Classes.

children of one c-l-assroom shared stories they had written, entitled

tne Zebra Has Stripes." Each child had a different, explanation Many

many

times

"Why

humorous,

of the zebra's coloring.

other projects are planned for this year, including other

visits to

school and a pen pal program between sailors and students. lVhile

the

STERETT was

in 0ctober, partici.pants in the reading project t^lere presented by PLott a Certificate of Appreciation from the SchooL's principal, Dt.

underway

Captain

in a mime

Frank Vahovich:

LI

JAMES PUITLER SHC OSCAR ASTRERO MMC JEFF SHIELDS BMC KENNEIH COX

T.J. KIVLEY LINDSAY BURDEK

GMM2

FCf

(St,t)

STG] RANDY CUNNINGHAM RP] MIICHELL KRAUSS SN LORE SALAZAR SA MAURICE SALAZAR MMFA LANCE WILSON

OSSA EMILIANO ARELLANO

23


KALAYAAN ELETlENTARY READING PROJECT

A FEId STERETT SAILORS IlJENT TO THEIR SECOND HOIlE.' KALAYAAN ELEIlENTARY SCHOOL, ABOVE 1 IN ORDER TO READ TO CHILDREN GRADES K_E SOilE SHORT STORIES" TELL ABOUT OUR RECENT UNDERl]JAY PERIODS" ETC. BELOU LEFT. ST63 CUNNIN6HAIl TELLS THE CHILDREN ABOUT LIVIN6 ON A CRUISER. BELOU' RI6HT" 11flC SHIELDS SITS READINC TO THE CHTLDREN.

il

ss{r;i} !i*

p

-"*'"&

x

4& Wr,

Itrl :llli

l: ill

r|lr;

lf

i

i

aIt

jl",

ffi

':,

6

#.! rr

fjs' t,q i'* r]


"HELLO

c0x.'

"

CHILDREN.

11Y

NAIIE 1S CHIEF

'IJHAT ARE YOU SHOIdIN6 THEM.,

'HEY " B0YS AND 6IRLS.' IdHAT IS OSSA ARRELANO LOOKIN6 AT?"

GMt1A

"S0 " B0YS AND 6IRLS, HOUI IIANY OF YOUR DADS ARE ON THE STERETT?N ASKED CHIEF OSCAR ASTRERO. 25


XNAVY'S BIRTHDAY PARTY ON STERETTX

[ 'uaenv a],qrH BTRTHDAy r0 y0u., u.s.

NAVy..

STERETT CRElljIIEMBERS CELEBRATING THE U.

BIRTHDAY"

],3 OCTOBER ],181. 26

:?

S.

NAVY'S


xHALLOIdEEN STEEL BEACH PICNICX

MSA PETERSON' DKE ANDRADA' AND SKA 6ONZALTS AIit PREPARIN6 FOR THE STEEL BEACH PICNIC ON THE FLI6HT DECK. BELOIJ LEFTl THE PICNIC COil11ENCES. BEL0hJ RiGHT. CAPTAItI PL0TT PARTICIPATES Il'l THt

FESTIVITTES.

1t


ss

.:r:Tp*

THE STEEL BEACH PICNIC: A TIIlE RELAX AND ENJOY THE FELLOl]JSHIP.

TO

THE SKEET SHOOTIN6 CONTEST.

'CHAPLAIN PUTTLER' LET US TN ON THE JOKE.' 'SEAtlAN RECRUIT IlATTHELJS " H0tij DID Y0U D0?' 28


DURIN6 THE PICNIC" THE FIRST ANNUAL STERETT HALL0IiJEEN C0STUI''lE CONTEST IdAS HELD. ABOVE. THE

LINE UP FOR JUD6I$I6. 'lljAS BME BENNETT. OUR THE UINNER RUhINERS-UP IJERE SN HENSON.' ETE J OHNSON. FC3 SCHAPIRO.' AND ET3

CONTESTANTS

NCNABB. THE REilAININ6 CONTESTANTS IdERE SA ARRELANO. STGSN CAPPS" STG], NEEL' SN HOLDER. FN YAZZIE" FC? JANDA' 0SSN C0USER' HTE PATTERSON.' ElljE 11ARTINEZ 60LD, AND HT3 JACKS0No

'

Cfl113

CONGRATULA-

TIONS TO ALL IJHO PARTICIPATED IlADE THIS A SUCCESS.

AND

29


CTIAPLAIN's CffiIâ‚ŹR

told a story tlrat goes like this, 'rv{hich of you, intending to down first and count the cost, whether he has enough to finish it--Iest, after he has Laid the foundation, and is not able to finish it, a.Ll who see it begin to mock him, saying, 'This man began to ouild and was not able to finish. "' tsuilding a tower or anything else certainly takes some planning and preparation. Getting ready to be a Navy family takes planning, too. Navy husbands and wives know that deployments and times of separation are inevitable. Successful Navy families plan for these times of separation. A number of articles in this and future Far[Laglgrns are provided for your information and assistance in planning when Hffidi?_alil- Dad go on deployment. No one can force a couple into rnaking some of these plans, but there will be less worry if a couple will plan and prepare. Soiire inforrnation provided in this issue includes: Allotments. Lynne James, director of Navy Relief writes an article encoGa$E!'--Fdfrilies to set up dependent allotments. Getting rnoney home in a timely manner from the ship using the mail service can be a source of Jesus once

ouild a tower, does not siL

unnecessary

worry. Using a D Allotment can remove that uncertainty.

Mail. Our Postal Clerk, PCSA Ronald Guyton does a tremendoug joo in the shiprF-post office. He has written an artic.l-e explaining the piost office's mission and how rnail gets to us. i?emernber that when you don't get mail on a particular day and your friends do, that doesn't mean your spouse hasn't written, It does mean that your mail hasn't amived yet. Have paLience, sit down and write a letter. 0mbudsmen. Our ship's ombudsmen, Mrs. Delia Waterson and Mrs. Leanne.Clapp are EilFTicial contact persons lor STERETI families when the ship is away. The Command rnaintains contact with the ornbudsmen regularly. Should there be a change in the ship's scnedule, the ombudsmen are the first to know. Therefore, it is important and advisable that wives contact these ladies regularly, to find out whal's happening. If families would remember to stay in touch with the ombudsmen, SIEdETI s-ailors would worry less about whether or not, their families "got the word."

planning for your family's separation is your responsibility. You, ultimately, have control of how well your family will survive deployment cycles. You are the architect for the building of your tower. Have you planned well enough to finish it? \ Remember,

--\*-<=i.iS=\J =5''I-\\-*, :"--d r:=' .lnvtrD. PurrLERcbur-,nr.rbrcHAPLAIN ---__)

30


NAVY RELIEF

NE|/{/S

DOLLARS FOR 'IDII

Webster's New World Dictionary defines an allotment as "a portion of one's pay regularly deducted, as for one's dependents" (support). The theory of providing the military a way to handle personal financial responsibilities is o.l-d as the naLion.

alll

Colonial Sailors and Marines could allot their pay...when they were paid at During the Civil War, Federal troops a]Iotted funds to their rnothers and

spouses.

Today the Navy and Marine Corps Finance Centers encourage the use of direct deposit. Whatever the means, it is obvious the service chiefs recognize that the rigors of military duty place special obstacles before their personnel when it cornes to paying for life's needs and wants. Navy Relief encourages all deploying personnel to register a trD[ a]lotment for the support of spouses and children, in addition to utilizing direct deposit. Generally, the Finance Centers do not tamper witn the rtD' al-Lotment even if the rnember is having a pay problem. The dollar vaLue of the "D" depends on the monthly obligations the spouse is expected to cover. If payment for tent, utilities, flood, auto loans and insurance, and any installment debts are to be paid by the spouse, the allotment should be adequate to cover these items

plus rniscellaneous spending

money

for

each family member.

Some Mar.ines and Sailors have avoided instituting a 'rDrr alLotment because of the 'rshort pay" experienced the first mid-month payday. This inopportune time usually coincides with the last few weeks the family has together before deployment. In an effort to eneourage the registration of "D" aLLotments, Navy Relief will lend the missing mid-month allotment amount. Repayment of this interest free loan can be extended for six months.

The disbursing

office offers the

same "advanced"

allotment, called

a

"predeployment D," to those members deploying outside the U. S. for at least a month. Application must be made no earlier than 60 days before deployment. 0n the otirer hand, Navy Relief assistanee for this purpose can be amanged at anytime, and allowing getting a I'Drr allotment in place at a time that may be more convenient than

just prior to

deployment.

The Navy, Marine Corps, and the Navy Relief Society have made provisions to help with the proper handling of family finances. The choice is Y0UR5. Regardless of the method of support selected, the Philippines Auxiliary has volunteers willing to assist with budget counseling to help service mernbers plan for the support of their families and debt obligations. Call fB4-8672 or'3843424 for an appointment.

Written by Mrs. Lynne James, Navy Relief Director

31


TI-E MILITARY POSTAL SERVICE

The mission of the Military Posta.l- Service is to provide service to tne of Defense agencies in support of D.0.D. missions. The ultimate goal

Departrnent

of the Military Postal service is to provide a level of service to rnilitary patrons equal to that provided by the United States Postal Service to the civilian population of the United States.

0ffice is capable of providing a]I services with the Mail. These services include: Priority, lirst, third and fourth class mailings. The office also offers special services such as registered, certified, and insured mail. The Post 0ffice also sells money orders, handles claims, and injuries and is responsible for the routing of the STERETT's Pos[ of Express

exception

ship's mail.

The Intratheater Delivery Service permits all eligible patrons of the Military Postal Service to send correspondence to other Military Post 0ffices located in the same geographical area at no cost to the mailer. Items must originate at a Fleet Post 0ffice or an Army/Air Force Post Offiee, and must not

pass through

USPS channeLs.

Mail from home is very important to personnel because it renev/s contact with family and friends. Mail is often of great legal or financial significance, so every l-etter must be treated with the utmost importance. Mail from all over the United States is gathered at the Joint Military Postal Activity Pacific which is located in San Francisco, California with a branch also in Seattle, hld. The mail is bundled and bagged there where it is sent on to, depending on where the ship is located, a Fleet MaiI Center (FMC). The FMC sorts the mail and bags it for each different unit. MaiI is transported by COD (Carrier onboard delivery) aircraft to the aircraft carrier for further transfer by the helicopter and,/or highline to other ships operating with the aircraft earrier as part of the

battle

group.

is first canceled in the STEREIT post office, bundled and via helo to the carier. The carrier separates the bundles for the states or other countries; puts it in bags or letter trays; then flies it to the nearest Fleet Mail Center via COD flights. From FMCs the mail is loaded on to military air carriers to be shipped to the United States. lt/hen the mail reaches the San Franeisco or Seattle gateways it is turned over to the United States Postal Service for transit to its final destination to be placed in your destination's mailbox. 0utgoing mail

bagged, then sent

PCSA Ron Guyton

32


FATIILY I.IEI{S ATS IISffiMIITION SOME SUGGESIIONS FOR LETTER hIRITING

m-*

Don't waste time and spaee writing, "I have nothing to write about.'r There's always the weatherl And some of the best letters ever writ,ten are those detailing an event that may be just a small snap shot of your day. Don't brag to others about the number of letters you write or the number you receive from your spouse. The art of writing differs greatly frorn individual to individual, and score-keeping may only result in hurt feelings. Do write reguJarly and often. You are less likely to have to write long explanations and descriptions ifl you write frequently. Some write every day. 0thers average about three letters per week.. Many find it helpful to number eaeh letter, so if one is lost, the recipient will know one is missing or if letters pile up, there will be a logical order to reading the letters. Remember to have patience. When STERETT is at sea, there may be many reasons why you haven't teceived mail. There are many reasons why mail is late. Don't judge your spouse or automatically blame him for mail that is late or has not been received.

with great care. Remember that in writing no one can your voice or see the expression on your face. Something hear the tone of jest may be taken quite seriously. The same holds true of expressing written in disapproval. Many are the spouses who have argued in their letters, sent them, and then been sorry. If you have a legitimate gripe, sleep on it overnight, then by alL means write it and get it off your chest. But remember, there are no kiss-and-make-ups when families are separated and written words ate far more indelible than spoken ones. Use sarcasm and humor

Don't ask for advice on long time for an answer.

some

pressing matter unless you're

willing to wait

a

you write about other spouses, be careful. Caution your spouse about speaking of any news you relay. It's a sad day when one husband Learns from another that his wife has been sick or dented a fender. The same holds true in what a husband writes. lr'/ait for the wi le 's husband to inform her of his promotion or new orders.

If

for better or for the worse, and it is onJ-y fair that one should at times. Any problems you may have can be written in a letter. Try to state the facts without alarm. Better to tell your husband that you took Junior to the Doctor, the DocLor said he had tonsillitis and you're now giving him an antibiotic, than to say Junior has a fever of 10f degrees, is complaining of his throat and you're wolried to death. The latter approach can only serve to worry husbands unnecessarily. Sprinkle your leLters liberally with snapshots, newspaper cLippings, cartoons, children's schooL papers, and their letters. Marriage is share the worse

33


THE

Knowing how upon on how

well

ARI OF ASKING

to ask questions is a we

plan,

make

QUESTIONS

skill that impacts and counsel others. tsy

vaLuable leadership

decisions, solve problems

skilllul questioning, you can gain or verify information, uncover underlying problems, gain insight and train subordinates, identify motives and give informat ion.

fhere are two oasic kinds of questions: Open-ended, These are used

to

draw out a wide range

of

responses on a broad

can't be answered by a simple yes or no and often begin witn rr or "why. I' They allow the respondent to express feelings and "what, " 'rhorv, opinions and to discover things for himself. They can also stimulate the individual to think about your ideas. CLosed questions. These restrict the answet to I'yes' or 'rno' or sorne other very brief answer. You can r-ise them to get specific facts. They are useful in the feedback process and can be used to direct a conversation to a particular area. A disadvantage to closed questions is that they do not stimulate an

topic.

They

exchange

of

inforrnation.

Getting good answers. you

to

ask.

To

How

you ask a question

is just as important as what

get truthflul, complete answersr you must structure your questions

maximize your chances

of getting the inflormatir:n you need.

Some

tips

on

questioning: Use

correct timing. If the individual is not in the proper frame of

mind

to receive questions, you will not get accurate and effective answers. Asking questions too soon or interrupting at the wrong time may dull their impact. Al-l-ow enough time for your subordinate to think and come up with an answer. Have a questioning plan. Have a general idea of what you would like to ask to get the particular information you require. 34


l{ith

whom

are you speaking?

questioning can be a big help Ask permission

in

Knowing something about

the person you

are

frarning and delivering your questions.

to ask questions. In counseling sessions or

when questioning

sensitive areas, this simple show of respect for another person will set a positive tone and is a good first step toward building trust. It allows for

of information. Move from broad to narrow questions. From' the answer, specific areas of concern may corne to light that you may want to focus on with more definitive, more honest, straightforward answers and

a free-flowing

exchange

follow-up questions.

Build on previous responses. In other words, listen before you ask the next

question. Concentrate on what he or she is saying, and then with this information, frame your next question.

questions. Try to pursue one line of thought, allowing the individual to tlrink logically about a partieular subject. Have one main thought. Structure your questions in such a way that it,s elear to the other person what you're really asking. Avoid ambiguous questions. Be specific. If the other person doesn,t Focus your

clearly understand the question, he or she cannot give you an accurate or complete answer.

Keep your emotions

in check. Don't turn your questioning into

an

interrogation. Controlling your emotions and staying away from sarcastic or rapid-fire questioning techniques will help you to get the resul,t.s you desire. By increasing your questioning

skillr

you can become more productive

roLe as a problem so.l-ver and counSe-Lor as weLl as more information needed to make good decisions.

35

efficient in

in your

gathering


RECREAIION/HOME SAFETY AND HEALIH MYTHS ABOUI SAFETY BELTS 'f

Itrr a good driver. It won't

happen

to

me.r'

driver, but that doesn't make the other person a good driver. of every three people will be involved in a serious automobile collision. Accidents can, and do, happen to you.

You may be a good Remember, one out

Are you willing to take the chance that one won't? betting your life or the life of someone you love.

If you are, you could be

'rl'm not going far, and I won't be going over 25 mph.

How

I get hurt?" Most collisions occur under 40 mph and witnin a distanee of 25 miles of home. This is everyday driving--to the store, the school, a friend's house. And even if you are driving slowly, will the driver of the other car be doing the saine? 'rl'd rather be thrown clear of the car" ilhat does this really mean? Well, it means you will be hitting hard pavement or ground after going through the windshield or window or a partially opened door. What can happen? Many things, including being scraped along the ground, hitting a hard object, such as a treel or being run over by the car you were in or another vehicle. Your chances of remaining alive are many times greater if you stay in the car. "I don't want to be trapped under water or in a fire.'l The chances of these events occuming are Less than one-half of one percent. But even if one of these does happen, your best chance of survival is to be conscious, uninjured and mentally alert, so you can get out fast. The greatest danger is the impact that precedes the water of fire. can

"Safety belts are uncomfortable and inconvenient.'l Yes, they can be inconvenient for the first few times. Habits are hard to get into but, once established, habits are also hard to break. After you have buckled your belt and felt it hug you snugly next to the seat numerous times, you will probably be uncomfortable without i.t. If you have problems with the shoulder belt crossing your neck or face, contaet your automobile dealership to see if adjustments can be made. Also, remember that with continued public use and demand, safety belts will become more comfortable and convenient. "My

safety belt doesn't work properly. It

moves when

I

do.'l

if it is a new model automobile, is designed to provide you with of movement. But it will lock in a sudden stop.

Your be1t, freedom

"safety belts can hurt me in a crash." Properly worn, low on the hips safety belts won't hurt you most of the time. And if they do the chances are the injuries will be minor, usualJ.y just bruising. A bruise is better than a concussion. Think about it. 36


"Rear seat passengers are safe, so they don't need safety belts."

Yes, it is true the back seat of a car is safer than the front one. But unbelted passengers are still more likely to be hurt from an impact within the car and can also fly forward, injuring those in the front. Guard against these collisions. "Young

ehildren and pregnant

women

shouldn't use bel-ts.r'

right about children under four years old. They should ride in approved child safety seats. A1] 50 states now mandate that chi.l-dren ride in these special seats. Pregnant wornen ore o,lother matter. They doubly need a safety belt's protection. According to the American Medical Association, a pregnant woman and her fetus are much safer with a safety belt ofl, provided the belt is $/orn as low on the pel-vis as possible. The shoulder belt provides additional You're

protection.

tP: by Virginia Auto Safety ALliance.

37


ALCO{I-

*Fetal Alcohol with

FAS can

retardation. But it is preventable.

affect any drinking

the first few eritical

& IIfMMATIO.I

(fAS) is the third leading cause of birth defects

Syndrome

accompanying mental

FACTS

weeks

of

woman's unborn

child. Alcohol

pregnancy, when

women

consumed during

rarely are

aware they are

pregnant, can be especially damaging.

little alcohol it takes to damage an unborn child. It is known that because the child shares the mother's b1ood, it also shares the mother's blood alcohol level. Not drinking any alcohol is the onJ-y sure way for prospective mothers to avoid FAS. Birth defects associated with FAS include low birth weight, below-normal growth rate, mental retardation and learning disabilities. FAS infants may have No one knows how

deformed heads,

*Alcoholism

States

today.

week, 12.1

faces, or limbs.

is

one

Out

million

of the most serious public health problems in the United

of 18.J million adults have one

or

who consume more than 14

more symptoms

drinks per

of alcoholism; an j.ncrease of

8.2

percent since 1980. *Al-cohol

is the most widely used--and abused--drug in America. In 1981, lhe equivalenL of 2.77 gallons of absolute alcohol was sold per persori over the age of 14. That amount of absolute alcohol is about 59I l2-ounce cans of beer, 115 fifths of table wine, or 35 fifths of 80 proof whiskey, gin or.vodka. A tenth of the drinking population consumes half the alcohol sold. xAleohol abuse accounts for approximately 98,000 deaths annually. This includes cirrhosis and other medical consequences, alcohol-related motor vehicle and non-motor vehicle accidents, and alcohol-related homicides and suicjdes.

*Chronic brain injury caused by alcohol is second only to ALzheimer's disease as a known cause

of mental deterioration in adults. Alcohol

mental

deterioration is not progressive. If the patient stops drinking, the deterioration is arrested and substantial recover\t can occur.


*Genetic inlluence

is identifiable in at least 35 to 4A percent of alcoholies and alcohol abusers, and it affects both men and women. People with family nistories involving parental alcohol abuse face increased risk.

in the United States indicate that the first drinking experience today usually occurs around age L2, and that it is no longer *Recent surveys conducted

I ' i

unusual

for I0 to

12 year olds

xSince 1986, the number

least once a

to

have serious alcohol abuse problems.

of high school students nationwide inLoxicated

month has more than doubled, from 10 percent

to

more than

at 20

pereent.

*Alcohol related highway deaths are the No. *Between 400 and 800 boating

is

in 65 to

implied

xDrinking 38 percent

is

59 percent

involved

of child

in

fatalities

I killer of 15 to 24 year olds.

annualJ.y involve

of all reported

alcohol.

Alcohol

drownings.

about 50 percent

of

spouse abuse cases and up to

abuse cases.

*Fifty-four percent of jail

inmates convicted

of violent

crimes were

drinking before they committed the offense. Sixty-two percent of those convicted

of assault

had been

drinking. Forty-nine percent of those convicted

of murder or attempted murder had been drinking. *An estimated

3.f million drinking teen-agers, aged 14 to 17, are showing

signs that they may develop serious alcohol related problems.

39


Official MailUSA

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY

COI1I1ANDING OFFICER

I.SS STERETT C6-3], FPO SAN FRAI'ICISCO

lbb?8-l,l,5q OFFICIAL AUSINESS PENALTY FOR PRIVATE UsE,

oPNAV 5110,/26(4-83) 5N OlOT-LF-O51-1r3()

T3OO

Otficial MailUSA

-

Official Mait USA


sept-oct1989