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Educate. Inspire. Mobilize. Stop the Spread of HIV.

Achieving an AIDS-Free Generation through Soccer


THE NEED AIDS has dramatically decreased life expectancy throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

Life Expectancy at Birth (years)

70 65

BOTSWANA

60 SOUTH AFRICA

55 50

SWAZILAND

45 ZAMBIA

40 35

ZIMBABWE

30 25 20

1970-1975

1975-1980

1980-1985

1985-1990

1990-1995

1995-2000

2000-2005

2005-2010

• Young people ages 15-24 are among the hardest hit, accounting for roughly one in three new HIV infections. • Young women are particularly at risk, with rates of new infections up to four times higher than young men.

WHY IS HIV A PROBLEM AMONG YOUTH IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA? Poor Information: • Only 30% of youth demonstrate comprehensive HIV knowledge. Lack of Testing and Treatment: • Fewer than half of infected individuals know their status; these people cannot be treated and are 96% more likely to infect someone else than an HIV+ person on treatment. • Only 33% of young people stay on treatment. Harmful Gender Norms: • In many countries, more than a third of girls have experienced sexual violence by age 18. • Women who have experienced partner violence are 1.5 times more likely to contract HIV.

Stigma: • Stigma and discrimination contribute to a fear of testing and a lack of support for HIV+ individuals. Lack of Medical Male Circumcision: • Approximately 85% of men are not circumcised, a procedure which reduces a man’s risk of contracting HIV by 60%. Risky Behaviors: • A lack of knowledge, harmful gender norms, and stigma all contribute to risky behaviors such as older partners, overlapping partners, and drug and alcohol abuse, which fuel the epidemic.


OUR SOLUTION With 2.1 million new infections each year, HIV remains one of the world’s most serious challenges. But the tide is turning. In sub-Saharan Africa, HIV prevalance among young men and women (ages 15-24) fell by 42% from 2001 to 2012. For over a decade, Grassroot Soccer (GRS) has been an innovative player in HIV & AIDS prevention and is poised to play a leading role in ending the HIV epidemic and achieving an AIDS-free generation.

THE GRASSROOT SOCCER FORMULA

ROLE MODELS GRS trains young community leaders, including local professional soccer players, to be HIV educators and Caring Coaches.

CURRICULUM The GRS SKILLZ curriculum is guided by the latest evidence of what works in prevention, testing and treatment.

SOCCER GRS uses the world’s most popular game to break down barriers, build trust, and educate young people to adopt healthy behaviors.

GRASSROOT SOCCER IMPACT Positive outcomes experienced in GRS participants include: Poor Information: • 102% improvement in knowledge of risks associated with older sexual partners. • 20% improvement in knowledge of risks associated with multiple sexual partners. Lack of Testing and Treatment: • 288% improvement in HIV testing among girls. • 85% HIV+ youth stay on treatment vs. 33% status quo. Harmful Gender Norms: • 23% improvement in attitudes towards gender norms. • 15% improvement in attitudes towards acceptability of violence in relationships. • 63% improvement in girls’ knowledge of sexual assault support services.

Stigma: • Much more likely to speak with their family and friends about HIV and help care for a family member with AIDS. • Less likely than their peers to stigmatize a classmate with HIV. Lack of Medical Male Circumcision: • Adolescent boys 2.5 times more likely to get circumcised. Risky Behaviors: • 5 times less likely than their peers to begin having sex between the ages of 12 and 15. • 4 times less likely to have had sex in the last year. • 8 times less likely to have had more than one sexual partner.


WHY GRASSROOT SOCCER Soccer has the power to save lives. In the late 1990s, four players from one of Zimbabwe’s top professional soccer teams saw their teammates and friends die from AIDS. They decided they had to do something. For GRS CEO Tommy Clark, that meant training as a pediatric doctor, then specializing in HIV at one of the world’s top HIV research institutes, University of California, San Francisco. For Zimbabwean National Men’s Soccer Team Captain Methembe Ndlovu, it meant getting a degree from Dartmouth College and then returning to his home country to work in HIV prevention. In 2002, together with former teammates Kirk Friedrich and Ethan Zohn, they founded Grassroot Soccer.

Tommy Clark (far left) playing in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe with the Highlanders junior squad at age 14.

HIGHLIGHTS • 700,000 young people empowered with HIV education and life skills in 46 countries. • Over 73,000 people tested for HIV. • 10,300 young adults trained as GRS Caring Coaches, equipped with job and life skills. • Over $40M in programmatic funding deployed to impact youth. • Support from premier funders including Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Elton John AIDS Foundation, Barclays, Nike, the UN Women’s Trust Fund and USAID. • Charity Navigator 4-Star Rating for 4 consecutive years, placing GRS among the top 7% of US charities for accountability, transparency, and fundraising efficiency. • Strong commitment to research including 19 research studies carried out across 8 countries.

“Grassroot Soccer takes a bold and fresh approach to HIV prevention that focuses on impact and results. They’ve got a great formula that embraces soccer and positive role models, and they are constantly testing new, innovative approaches that can build on their tremendous success so far.” - Joe Cerrell, Managing Director, Global Policy & Advocacy, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation


GLOBAL REACH, LOCAL IMPACT Grassroot Soccer operates its own flagship sites in South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe, and has worked with over 40 implementing partners to deliver GRS curricula in 20 additional countries, proving that our programs are both scalable and replicable.

Flagship Sites

PEACE CORPS PARTNERSHIP In addition to the partnerships highlighted on the map above, Grassroot Soccer works with over 1,100 Peace Corps volunteers in 46 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean to deliver HIV prevention education to youth in some of the most remote and under-resourced areas of the world.

Partnerships


STRATEGY #1 the facts ? ? ? ? ? ?

Treatment reduces the risk of transmission from an HIV+ person to a partner by

Only one third of females and one fifth of males ages 15-19 have ever tested for HIV and received their results.

96%.

44%

Major barriers to testing are fear of being seen at a clinic, lack of transport, stigma of testing positive, and concerns about confidentiality.

of people in sub-Saharan Africa who are eligible for treatment are not receiving it.

our gameplan Voluntary Counseling & Testing Tournaments Using the power of soccer, these events bring youth and community members together for a fun day of soccer matches combined with access to free HIV testing and counseling services.

GRS Caring Coaches Young adult role models educate and mentor adolescents, linking them to HIV testing and treatment services and supporting them every step of the way.

Support for HIV+ Youth In addition to referrals, GRS offers a safe and inclusive environment for HIV+ youth to openly discuss social concerns and support each other in adhering to HIV treatment.


TESTING & TREATMENT our results

“WE TESTED BECAUSE THE COACHES WERE SUPPORTIVE...AND WE FELT LIKE IT WAS THE RIGHT THING TO DO. IT’S RIGHT TO KNOW YOUR STATUS.” - GRS Participant


STRATEGY #2 the facts HIV / AIDS is the leading cause of death globally for women ages 15-49.

A young woman 15-24 yrs old in sub-Saharan Africa is as much as more likely than a young man to contract HIV.

4X

Women who have experienced partner violence are more likely to acquire HIV.

In South Africa, more than one third of girls have experienced sexual violence by age 18.

50%

our gameplan Addressing GenderBased Violence

Providing Links to Health Services

The GRS SKILLZ curriculum incorporates lessons and vital conversations about gender norms and the importance of respect in relationships. Caring Coaches also provide referrals to sexual violence services.

Caring Coaches introduce girls to the sexual and reproductive health services available in their communities and accompany participants to access these services.

Empowering Girls Through Soccer In the communities where we work, soccer is still considered a boys’ game. We give girls the chance to play in a fun environment, and we watch their confidence reach new heights.


GENDER our results WITHOUT GRASSROOT SOCCER

WITH GRASSROOT SOCCER

1,000 Girls

1,000 Girls

Per 1,000 Girls 288% = 520 Girls

HIV Test 18% = 180 Girls

Knowledge of Sexual Health Services

IMPROVEMENT

70% = 700 Girls

63% = 110 Girls 18% = 180 Girls

29% = 290 Girls

Self Esteem Through Sport

809% = 890 Girls 11% = 110 Girls

100% = 1,000 Girls

“GRASSROOT SOCCER IS RESTORING DIGNITY AND BUILDING SELF-ESTEEM OF YOUNG GIRLS LIVING IN A CHALLENGING ENVIRONMENT, TRANSFORMING THEM INTO ACTORS FOR THE HIV PREVENTION REVOLUTION.” - Michel Sidibé, UNAIDS Executive Director, GRS Global Board Member


STRATEGY #3 the facts Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) can reduce female-to-male transmission of HIV by up to

In 5 of the countries with the highest HIV burdens, only about of men are circumcised.

For every 4 circumcisions performed in Zimbabwe, 1 HIV infection can be averted.

570,000 HIV infections could be averted in Zimbabwe alone through increased scale-up and uptake of VMMC over 4 years.

15%

60%.

HIV

our gameplan Education & Myth-Busting

Male Role Models

Many myths persist about VMMC, so education is essential to ensure young men are making informed decisions. Caring Coaches teach young men about the procedure and its efficacy in reducing the transmission of HIV and sexually transmitted infections.

Circumcised male role models, including professional soccer players, share their own experiences, connect directly with participants, and encourage them to follow through with the procedure.

Soccer-Based Activities Soccer generates an environment that is conducive to open dialogue, and using soccer-based activities is a particularly effective means of engaging young men.


VOLUNTARY MEDICAL MALE CIRCUMCISION our results

“VOLUNTARY MEDICAL MALE CIRCUMCISION IS A PROVEN BIOMEDICAL INTERVENTION THAT HAS THE POTENTIAL TO SAVE MILLIONS OF LIVES AND SIGNIFICANT RESOURCES.” - Amb. Eric Goosby, former US Global AIDS Coordinator


WHAT YOU CAN DO The impact of a $100,000 investment in Grassroot Soccer TESTING & TREATMENT Get 2,124 HIV+ youth in Zambia on treatment

$46 to support an HIV+ young person to get on anti-retroviral treatment*

Support 3,334 young people to attend Grassroot Soccer Holiday Camps

$30 to attend a week-long GRS camp incorporating soccer training, HIV education and testing*

Get 7,692 community members in South Africa counseled and tested for HIV $13 for a community member to participate in an HIV counseling and testing soccer tournament*

GENDER Graduate 2,000 girls from gender-focused programs in South Africa

$50 to engage a girl in a program that educates her to combat destructive gender norms and access critical community based services*

VOLUNTARY MEDICAL MALE CIRCUMCISION Avert 513 HIV infections in Zimbabwe

$195 per HIV infection averted by using soccer to empower young men to get circumcised.*

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT Develop 182 young African leaders at Grassroot Soccer sites

$550 to hire, train and support a Grassroot Soccer Caring Coach for a year

INTERN PROGRAM Support 29 Grassroot Soccer interns

$3,500 to support a young adult serving as an unpaid volunteer in Africa for a year

* Costs are for delivering an HIV prevention intervention.


“Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to inspire, it has the power to unite people in a way that little else does. It speaks to youth in a language they understand. Sport can create hope, where once there was only despair.” - Nelson Mandela, 1918-2013

“Doctors and scientists are trying their best. The power is in our hands. Now let’s go out there.” - Grassroot Soccer Participant Bulawayo, Zimbabwe


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Profile for Grassroot Soccer

Grassroot Soccer: Achieving an AIDS-Free Generation Through Soccer  

Grassroot Soccer: Achieving an AIDS-Free Generation Through Soccer  

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