Page 1

Register first coast

August - September 2013

Ponte Vedra • Jacksonville • The Beaches St. Augustine & Amelia Island

BRIDAL TRENDS

Fall wedding advice for the First Coast

BACK TO SCHOOL

Study habits for a better year 1 AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2013 | FIRST COAST REGISTER

FALL FASHION

Transitioning during Florida’s endless summer


2 AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2013 | FIRST COAST REGISTER


FIRST COAST REGISTER | AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2013 3


in this issue 20 10

contents

VOLUME 7, ISSUE 2

ONE OF US - BROOKE BIAGINI

5

FUN EVERY MONTH At ever-changing art show

8

ST. SIMONS AND JEKYLL ISLAND Georgia’s jewels in our backyard

10

FALLEN OFFICERS MEMORIAL Eagle Scout project to memorialize local police who have died in action

14

SCENIC ST. JOHNS RIVER FARMERS MARKET

16 18

ENJOYING ‘WINE WITH SWINE’ A CJ Acres

16

MAKING THIS YEAR THE BEST YET Study tips for going back to school

20

FALL WEDDING TRENDS

24

SOCIAL MEDIA AND WEDDING PLANNING

28 30 32

SAY I DO... TIPS FOR NAVIGATING The Jacksonville Farmers Market FROM THE RUNWAY TO THE FIRST COAST Fall fashions for real wardrobes

34

OKTOBERFEST! On the First Coast, in your home and beyond

38

FUN AND HISTORY On Cumberland Island National Seashore

44

about this magazine

The First Coast Register is a bi-monthly general interest magazine published by The Ponte Vedra Recorder and OPC News, LLC. The magazine can be found throughout the upscale areas of greater Jacksonville. For advertising inquiries call 904.285.8831. Susan Griffin, Publisher Kelly Hould, Editor Rob Conwell, Circulation Manager Elizabeth M. Steif, Staff Writer Carrie Resch, Staff Writer/Sales Coordinator Ed Johnson, Senior Account Executive Kristin Flanagan, Account Executive Cary Johnson, Manon Zamora-Barwick, Publication Design April Snyder, Sales Assistant

First Coast Register

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24

100 Executive Way, Suite 105 • Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 32082 904.285.8831

Cover photo featuring Cara Murphy and Illyssa Perez courtesy of Sydney Cardel’s


One of us

BROOKS BIAGINI photos and story by KELLI MCDANIEL

B

rooks Biagini is the executive director of JDRF North Florida Chapter, an organization that is dedicated to funding research towards a cure for type 1 diabetes. Biagini has been with the organization for over seven years and her job as the executive director entails creating and working with a dynamic team to ensure that the organization’s fundraising goals are met annually. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation is currently the top private fundraising organization for type 1 diabetes worldwide and the research the organization is funding will benefit everyone affected by diabetes. Biagini is originally from Feyetteville, N.C., but grew up in Mandarin and considers Jacksonville her home. When she is not at work, Biagini is enjoying time with her husband Mike and two daughters Zoey, 4, and Rachel, 2. She also enjoys photography and is an active member in her church, where she also volunteers. She said the most enjoyable part of her job is the diversity of it. There are so many layers to what JDRF does, she said, that no day is ever the same. What is JDRF? The mission of JDRF is to improve lives and cure type 1 diabetes. We’re an organization founded in 1970 by a small group of parents wanting to find a cure for their children who had type 1 diabetes, and since its inception 43 years ago the organization has funded more than $1.7 billion directly to research, which is quite amazing. We don’t receive money from the government or any outside sources, we are all grassroots so it comes from the ground from people raising money $20 at a time through participating in FIRST COAST REGISTER | AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2013 5


events such as the Walk to Cure Diabetes, attending galas, and coming to wine tastings (and other) things that we do in the field. Even though the organization is now an international organization, we still operate as a grassroots organization because we are such a volunteer-driven organization. Tell me about the JDRF North Florida Chapter? Here in North Florida we are a business unit of the overall organization so here we serve 36 counties from Jacksonville through Gainesville, up and over through Tallahassee and the Florida panhandle. We are in business to put ourselves out of business by finally finding a cure. We are a fundraising organization, [and] it’s a very streamlined organization. We are a type 1 diabetes organization raising money to fund research that will improve lives and find a cure for type 1 diabetes, so 80 percent of every dollar goes directly to research. Forbes magazine has rated JDRF as an A+ charity for several years in a row, which is wonderful, and the way that we do that is because we work so in sync with volunteers. Here locally we have three staff people and we have 30 board members, in addition to hundreds of volunteers. What is diabetes? There are different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where your pancreas stops producing insulin and you must give yourself insulin injections through shots to stay alive.You must (also) count carbohydrates, prick your finger eight to 10 times a day to test your blood sugar, and keeping good control of type 1 diabetes will help reduce the long term complications which include eye disease, kidney failure, amputation and more — so it’s very serious. Type 2 diabetes is when your pancreas in still producing insulin but something is not allowing it to do its job to the fullest and a lot of times that can be controlled or even cured by diet and exercise. The difference is type 1 diabetes, which impacts at least 3 million Americans — type 2 diabetes impacts 24 million Americans— it’s autoimmune…there’s nothing you can do to prevent it. There’s nothing you did to cause it. There may not be any family history, so when you’re diagnosed it could be at any age. It’s not just children. At JDRF we have resources to help children when they’re first diagnosed as well as their families and also adults.

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What are some upcoming fundraising events for JDRF? Something that’s in Ponte Vedra is our Fresh Market Wine Tasting — that is a very loved event in that area. It’s Aug. 29 and will be our fifth year of doing this. Because Fresh Market and their vendors donate everything for the event, all of the food and drinks, 100 percent of the proceeds benefit JDRF. Tickets are $25 and it’s underwritten by Fresh Market. They close the store and from 8-10 p.m., it’s a private party for people who want to rally around to support JDRF and enjoy over 30 different kinds of wine. Our next event after that is the Miracles Gala. This is the 13th Annual Miracles Gala and it’s going to be at the Sawgrass Marriot on Oct. 12. The theme for this year is Set Sail to Cure T1D and it’s a cruise theme so people will come dressed as though they are going to a Captain’s Dinner on a cruise ship. They will enjoy a cocktail reception, the best silent auction in town and then that will follow with a Captain’s Dinner in the ballroom of the newly refreshed Sawgrass Marriott. Our goal is to raise about $300,000 at this year’s gala (and) about 400 people attend the event. The JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes is April 12, 2014 at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds and at that event we hope to generate about $600,000 for research. So locally, our goal annually is to raise $1 million that will go towards research. The walk and the gala are our two signature events that we put on to do that. What is some of the research that JDRF is funding? JDRF was the first funder of the Artificial Pancreas Project. That is a really life-changing, life-improving control mechanism for people living with T1D and we started the funding for that about seven years ago and now it’s in FDA approval process here in the U.S. and real human clinical trials at the University of Virginia, so it’s probably going to be available to the market in the next several years. There are other projects such as beta cell encapsulation, which is awesome. This is a pocket of material and inside of it you have some working beta cells and you implant it under a person’s skin, a person who has T1D, and it allows them to produce insulin for 18 to 24 months. That is the next up-andcoming, exciting research breakthrough. It is the early phases now so there is a lot of need for funding.


Who’s Who

ON THE FIRST COAST

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FUN EVERY MONTH AT

EVER-CHANGING

Art Show photos and story by AMANDA LONG

T

he Body & Wellness-themed July Art Walk, held in downtown Jacksonville on the first Wednesday of each month, was full of fun venues, art and delicious food vendors. The Jacksonville Art Walk is a must-see, multi-block art show with different events and venders each month. July’s art walk also happened to be the 100th Jacksonville Art Walk. The event runs from 5-9 p.m. each month with live music at local venues following the official Art Walk times. The center of the Art Walk is located in Hemming Plaza but participating vendors and bars are located around the city and at the Jacksonville Landing. The Museum of Contemporary Art, located adjacent to Hemming Plaza, offers free admission every month during Art Walk. Ride the Skyway for free to get around town, or walk to get a chance to see the many artists and musicians lining the streets. Metered parking is free downtown after 6 p.m. Various types of art and many crafts are available from local artists including amazing ball-point sketches, paintings, sculptures and handmade clothing. In July, Chamblin’s Uptown hosted a Body Art Walk tattoo fashion show along with live music, free to Art Walk patrons. The Florida Theatre offered free behind-the-scenes tours of the iconic venue. In addition to these special July events, there are many activities that take place monthly. With the numerous options for dinner, it may be hard to choose. Burrito Gallery, Fionn MacCool’s and Indochine are just a few of the participating restaurants and bars. The “food truck village,” located at the corner of Forsyth and Main streets , also offers many delicious eats. The Jacksonville Art Walk is a must-see event, with a different theme every month. This is a chance to meet and support local artists, musicians and performers. For more information on the Jacksonville Art Walk visit www.iloveartwalk. com.

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S

t. Simons Island and Jekyll Island, located in southern Georgia, are perfect for a weekend getaway or a day trip from the First Coast. Located halfway between Jacksonville and Savannah, both islands are only about an hour’s drive north of Jacksonville and are beautiful, unique places to visit. Both islands have a laid-back island atmosphere with plenty of activities to keep busy, or miles of beaches to relax on. Driving into St. Simons, moss-covered oak trees canopy the road. The community is alive with many people on bikes, riding around the island. Mallery Street is the main road in the downtown area of St. Simons. Within walking distance of the beach and pier, it is lined with cute island-themed shops and restaurants. The pier is a popular spot for fishing or to simply sit and

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relax. Depending on the tide, there are steps down to the beach or water a short walk down from the pier. There is also a swimming pool and water park near the pier and Windsor Park. The laid back island is a great place to relax on the beach or take a bike ride through the tree-lined streets. There are numerous beach accesses along the island. Trolley tours of St. Simons are also available. The lighthouse on St. Simons, built in 1872, features a museum and coastal heritage exhibits. The lighthouse also hosts concerts and live music during the summer. The trolley offers tours that stop at the lighthouse and other historical sites throughout the island. Small cafes and bakeries offer numerous options for breakfast. Popular breakfast spots include Sandcastle Cafe’s breakfast buffet and the Fourth of May Bakery and Cafe. The island is


ST. SIMONS AND JEKYLL ISLAND:

GEORGIA’S

jewels IN OUR BACK YARD

photos and story by AMANDA LONG

also home to the original Barbara Jean’s Restaurant, serving up southern favorites. Southern Soul Barbeque is another local favorite. Featured on the Food Network’s “Diners, Drive Ins and Dives,” the restaurant serves up smoked pulled pork, beef brisket and ribs to name a few choice items. The very busy restaurant has picnic table seating outside and bar seating inside. Three large smokers are set up outside where the barbecue is prepared. Order inside and your food is delivered to you at your picnic table. A family from Orange Park that was eating lunch at Southern Soul said they were on their fourth trip to St. Simons — just to eat the barbecue. There are numerous other restaurants spread throughout the island, too many to try in just one trip. Jekyll Island is located just south of St. Simons Island. Jekyll

charges a fee to enter the island, starting at $6 per vehicle per day. These fees are used to maintain and preserve the natural beauty of Jekyll Island. The Jekyll Island Historic District is a must see. In the late 1800s and into the 1900s, Jekyll Island was a retreat for America’s most rich and powerful. The Jekyll Island Club’s members included William Rockefeller, Joseph Pulitzer and J.P. Morgan. Some members’“cottages” still stand on the island. These include the Goodyear Cottage, the original Club House and the Rockefeller’s 25-room home, named Indian Mound. The large cottages are all located within walking distance of each other and within walking distance of Jekyll Island Club Hotel. The historic hotel is impossible to miss, the largest landmark on the island. Located nearby on the Jekyll Wharf is Latitude 31, an oyster FIRST COAST REGISTER | AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2013 11


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bar and restaurant with waterfront seating. The casual islandstyle restaurant specializes in seafood and oysters at the “rah bar.” The Horton House, owned by Major William Horton in the 1700s, is located on the island. This house is one of the oldest houses in Georgia and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Today, it is less a house and more a cement building with no roof, but the structure has lasted over 200 years. After touring the historic spots around the island, Summer Waves Water Park is the perfect place to cool off. Open daily all summer long, the water park offers six slides, a lazy river and a wave pool. There is also an area designed for smaller children to enjoy. Bikes are also a preferred form of transportation on Jekyll Island — so much so that the island only has one gas station. With over 20 miles of trails and board walks, it is a great way to explore the natural wonders of the island. The island is partially surrounded by marsh land, home to birds, dolphins and fish. The island is also home of the Georgia Sea Turtle Center which helps with research, rehabilitation and conservation of

sea turtles in Georgia. Their efforts include protecting the turtles from road mortality. They also educate the public on how the turtle population is impacted by human actions. Too much lighting can cause the turtles to become disoriented while searching for a nesting site, so Jekyll Island enforces a Beach Lighting Ordinance to protect the nesting turtles. Last year there were over 2,000 sea turtle nests along the coast of Georgia. There have been over 125 reported on Jekyll Island so far this year. There are many beaches to enjoy along the island, the most scenic of which is Driftwood Beach. The beach access is located on the north side of the island. There is a pull-off to park your car and a trail through the trees to the beach. This scenic beach is covered in old oak trees that have toppled over during storms or due to erosion. With so much to see, a weekend might not be enough time. These islands offer Southern charm and an escape from reality close to home. For an extended stay, there are plenty of vacation rentals that are perfect for a family getaway.

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FALLEN OFFICERS MEMORIAL photos and story by CARRIE RESCH

J

acksonville’s first public police memorial is on its way and some say it’s about time. The Fallen Officers Memorial is my oldest nephew’s, Troop 5 Life Scout Adam Resch, uberambitious Eagle Scout project. When people tried to deter Adam from such an ambitious undertaking, he disregarded their concerns and ventured forward with the project. Now, two and a half years later, after various meetings, presentations and location changes for the memorial, the project is finally on its way. The Jacksonville City Council approved 800 square feet of space for the memorial in front of the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena, and the groundbreaking for the Fallen Officers Memorial was June 26. Undersheriff Dwayne Senterfitt echoed some of the public’s feedback for the memorial project when he spoke at the groundbreaking.“It’s about time we have a fitting tribute to those who gave the ultimate sacrifice,” he said.“It’s about time a city of our size has something like this.” Adam ultimately decided on a police memorial as his Eagle Scout project because law enforcement is near and dear to his heart. He comes from a long line of police officers. Both of his

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great grandfathers and his grandfather were police officers. His father Shannon Padilla is a Jacksonville sheriff’s officer. The memorial wall will be nine feet tall and in a semi circle shape. Adam said he designed the memorial this way so that visitors will feel safe and protected. The wall will be made of black granite with the names of the 60 fallen officers who have died in the line of duty in Jacksonville since 1840. There will also be a circle of black pavers with a thin blue line in between them that will be comprised of blue tiles or a blue light representative of the thin blue line emblem associated with fallen officers. The Fallen Officers Memorial is expected to be completed in May. The price tag for the project is expected to be around $250,000. To help fund the project, Adam is selling memorial bricks and Fallen Officer Memorial wristbands, as well as soliciting support from local businesses and corporations. For more information about the Fallen Officers Memorial, call (904) 625-1851 or visit www.fallenofficersmemorial. webs.com.


Opposite Page: Adam Resch, FOP Chaplin Clarence Jarrell, Undersheriff Dwayne Senterfitt, FOP President Steve Amos, Councilman Don Redmond and Scoutmaster Fred Gardner Left: Life Scout Adam Resch speaks before a crowd gathered at the Police Memorial groundbreaking June 26. Above: Adam Resch (right) with his parents Beth Resch and Officer Shannon Padilla.

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A

lpine Groves Park is a perfect place to get away close to home — and a family-friendly venue for the weekly St. Johns River Farmers Market. The park is the ideal setting for a picnic with the family or to lounge under the canopy of oak trees, reading a book. Located off of SR13 in Switzerland, Fla., it contains more than 50 acres to explore. Alpine Groves is open daily from dawn to dusk. The park offers playgrounds for the kids, benches and swings along the river, a covered dock, hiking trails, picnic areas and three historic buildings. Slightly off the beaten path, the park is calm and quiet. The covered dock is perfect for fishing or relaxing, and there is also a wooden ramp for launching canoes or kayaks. The wooded area is perfect for bird-watching and said to be home to eagles, ospreys and owls to name a few. It is also one of over 500 sites on the Great Florida Birding Trail. Every Saturday, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Alpine Groves Park hosts the St. Johns River Farmers Market. The market offers local produce, delicacies, artwork and more. Some vendors at the market have included KYV farms, Dennis Fermin Spanish Guitar player and more. Crab King offered crab cake sandwiches or frozen crab cakes to prepare at home. For more information on the farmers market, visit www.facebook.com/St.JohnsRiverFarmersMarket.

RELAXATION AT

scenic

ST. JOHNS RIVER FARMERS MARKET photos and story by AMANDA LONG 16 AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2013 | FIRST COAST REGISTER


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ENJOYING ‘wine with swine’ AT CJ ACRES photos and story by CARRIE RESCH

C

J Acres Animal Rescue Farm in Keystone Heights, Fla., is a nonprofit, volunteer-run organization that provides a safe haven for animals that were abused, neglected or victims of catastrophic events. The residents include turkeys, goats, horses, chickens, feral cats, pigs, sheep, ducks and cows. As a nonprofit, the organization holds fundraisers throughout the year to support running and maintain the farm and the animals who call CJ Acres home. Wine with the Swine took place June 15, where about 60 supporters and volunteers

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turned out to enjoy wine and vegan food pairings while mingling with the animals of CJ Acres and participating in a silent auction. The next fundraising event is the COWpassionate PIGnic on Saturday, Sept. 14, from 2-4 p.m. CJ Acres also has tours and volunteer days. For more information about CJ Acres or information about volunteering or donating money or supplies, visit www.cj-acres.org, email info@cjacres.org or follow them on Facebook.


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MAKING THIS YEAR THE BEST YET:

STUDY TIPS FOR GOING BACK TO SCHOOL by KELLI MCDANIEL

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T

he summer is coming to an end as families take their last vacations and students begin to get back into “school mode.” Along with dusting off those old backpacks that are lost in closets or used to haul beach gear during the summer months, middle and high school students should brush up on their study skills and habits to be prepared for a new year of learning. Motivation, organization and time management are key factors in successful study habits for students. The habits that students develop now will help build a solid foundation for academic success in their futures, and middle school is a great time to learn those skills that can be carried into high school and eventually college. A student’s motivation can determine how far they go academically. When a student wants to learn and isn’t forced to study then they are more likely to put effort into their school work and studies. The motivation that students learn early only will make a big difference in the future of their education. It is very important to emphasize to students how imperative a good education is. A student’s motivation and commitment to learning is what will drive them to reach their full potential academically. A successful student is inspired to study and to continue to learn to get the most out of their educational career. Keeping all the components of a student’s life organized is a critical step for success. An agenda is a great tool for students of all ages and can really come in handy when students enter middle school and begin to juggle more than one class. It is

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important to record all homework assignments and due dates, as well as any upcoming tests so time can be set aside to study. Using a binder is also another way to stay organized. It helps keep everything in one place and can be divided between classes for maximum organization. Organized students are likely to be and to feel more prepared for their classes. It is a skill that can help improve grades because students will be aware of all their homework assignments and due dates, and not forget about any upcoming tests or quizzes. Being organized will also help students better manage their time, one of the most important skills a student can acquire. Time management can be applied to nearly all aspects of a student’s life. Most students in middle and high school have more than just responsibilities with school, whether it’s an after-school job or extracurricular activities, so learning how to efficiently manage responsibilities with school and life will set a student up for success. Students can learn to better manage their time by making schedules for each day and prioritizing what needs to be accomplished first and what can be done later. However, be careful with putting off homework responsibilities and time to study for too long because procrastination can produce last-minute panic and forgotten assignments. A student’s success in the classroom depends on what they do outside of the classroom. A student who is motivated, organized and can effectively manage their time will develop solid study habits and skills that will stick with them through each stage of their education. Middle and high school comes with enough challenges — don’t let poor study habits be one of them.

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bridal

TRENDS

Marjie Lee Hill, photo by Ryan Ferguson

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for 2013

Fall Wedding Trends by KELLI MCDANIEL

A

timeless trend in the wedding world is choosing to tie the knot in the fall. Something about the autumn weather and changing foliage makes for the ideal environment for brides and grooms to say their “I dos.” Fourteen percent of all weddings take place during September, the most popular month to get hitched, according to The Knot, an online resource to assist in wedding planning. Weddings in October make up 12 percent of all weddings, and October is the third most popular month to get married, while 6 percent of weddings take place in November,

the ninth most popular month to get married. Those planning their nuptials for the fall season should know they are not limited to warm autumn hues and pumpkin decor. There are lots of other, unconventional wedding options that still represent the season’s many themes. This fall, new trends have emerged to keep classic autumn weddings fresh with functional color schemes, unconventional floral arrangements and dresses that are testing the boundaries of traditional wedding designs.

photos by Megan Manus Photography

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COLORS

Choosing the right colors for a fall ceremony is a pivotal step in wedding planning, and one that should be decided very early on. Once a color scheme is chosen, the rest of the wedding details can fall more easily into place. Pantone, a global authority on color, recently released their Fashion Color Report Fall 2013, which features the top 10 colors in men and women’s fashion for the upcoming season and the color schemes we can expect to see at weddings. Pantone’s fall palette was designed to capture and showcase the many moods of fall and includes: Koi (a bright orange), Samba (deep red),Vivacious (saturated pink), Acai (royal purple), Mykonos Blue (green-leaning blue), Emerald (jewel toned green), Carafe (coffee brown), Linden Green (a light mossy green), Turbulence (deep gray) and Deep Lichen Green (a grayed green).

FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS

The right floral arrangements bring together the final look of a wedding. Some popular trends in fall floral arrangements include non-floral elements and non-traditional vases. Arrangements this fall will stray away from using just flowers to complement the season by using materials like twigs, herbs, and various fruits and vegetables to tie in the fall theme with an organic and rustic look. Non-floral accents in arrangements will be a popular trend for weddings this fall. Unique centerpieces to house floral arrangements are another popular trend that will be seen in fall weddings. Brides are avoiding using classic glass vases for their cen-

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terpieces and are instead opting for uncommon ways to display their flowers. Weddings this fall will feature alternative containers like thrift shop pots and urns, and silver trophy cups.

GOWNS

Brides this fall are utilizing less traditional styles when choosing their perfect wedding gown. This season you can expect to see some classic and minimalist designs, dresses that are inspired by old Hollywood and gowns with long sleeves, as well as blush-colored dresses instead of the traditional white. There will always be brides in search of a simple and sleek dress design.The minimalist look will remain in style through the season with enhanced details like high-low skirts or a sash to make a classic design seem fresh and new. The old Hollywood look is another style that will be very popular this fall. The elegant and sophisticated style with detailed beading and high drama is a perfect option for an evening wedding during the autumn months. Dresses that feature long sleeves are another great, seasonally-appropriate option for brides who are getting married during the cooler autumn months. Strapless gowns are stepping aside for long-sleeved styles that are appealing to many different brides. Lastly, more and more brides are turning away from traditional white gowns is a trend that will continue to be seen through the fall. White gowns do not flatter every bride’s skin tone, so blush gowns are something to be considered. This fall the wedding world will see a surge in blush colored dresses, as well as floral textures and patterns, which creates new options when it comes to choosing the right dress.


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SOCIAL MEDIA

and WEDDING

PLANNING by ADAIR CURRIE

I

feel like when I got married, I was planning in the “dark ages” — before Loverly (www.lover.ly), Pinterest (www.pinterest.com) or Instagram (www.instagram.com) even existed. Those were the simpler and dare I say less confusing times. There is something I must admit: I have a love-hate relationship with hashtags, bundles and “pins.” Don’t get me wrong. It’s not all bad. There is plenty of good to be found. But I think, speaking as a wedding planner, I need to step in when it comes to social media and wedding

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planning in order to lay some simple ground rules. So, here are three basic tips for planning your wedding using social media: 1. Pick a theme. When your theme starts to evolve, delete the “pins” that don’t make sense anymore. They will only end up confusing and cluttering your social media. On your wedding day, your officiant will not be handing out “most pinned” awards. 2. Use “collaborative boards” wisely. While this is a great concept, don’t allow a collaborative board to be your inspiration. With shared boards where more than one person may pin things, you are likely to end up with many bridesmaids dresses, mother of the bride dresses, decor not in your theme and other miscellaneous pins that will only end up clouding your vision. Your mom and girls mean well — but always remember that it’s your day! 3. Be realistic. Make sure that when you’re looking at pictures for inspiration, you don’t have your head in the clouds. Try to find the source of the picture and see the time of year of the original event, type of venue and even other pictures from the same wedding. Sometimes what you will find is that the pictures come from a photoshoot rather than a real event, or from weddings that may be slightly out of your budget. Consider the season in which the pictures were taken, which will impact your choice of flowers. One piece of advice I always give my brides is that it is great to seek out inspiration, but weddings should be just as different from one another as brides are! Don’t rely too heavily on social media. Make sure you incorporate yourself and your fiance in the day, including your shared loves and hobbies. That’s what makes it more than a wedding — it makes it “the beginning.” Adair Currie is the owner of Dairing Events, www.dairingevents.com

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I do... photos by Megan Manus Photography

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O

pen 365 days a year, the Jacksonville Farmers Market is truly a diamond in the rough. Located at 1810 W. Beaver St., it is close to Riverside and downtown and features up to 200 different vendors. The market opened in 1938 and has been offering fresh produce year round ever since. Local produce, baked goods, honey and other products line the market. Plants, olives, boiled peanuts and seafood are also available throughout the year. One recent deal that you will not find at the supermarket is watermelon and cantaloupe for $1 each. It seems as if all your produce needs could be fulfilled in this one stop, from Brussels sprouts to cilantro. Because of the competition between the numerous vendors, it is good to browse before you buy. A better deal might be waiting at the next vendor. The vendors are friendly and eager to sell their products. This is one place where it is still possible to haggle prices. Ask for a 2-for-1 deal or offer what cash you have left. Shipments arrive on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. A vendor advised that Friday is the best day to visit because it is the largest shipment and Fridays offer the widest variety. As a result, Fridays and Saturdays are the busiest days at the market. Andy’s Farmers Market Grill serves up breakfast favorites and sandwiches. It is open Monday-Friday, 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. and Saturday, 7 a.m.-4 p.m. This farmers market offers the convenience of being open seven days a week, with a wider variety than many markets. Many vendors also offer wholesale for restaurants and some offer catering or will make party platters.

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TIPS FOR NAVIGATING THE

JACKSONVILLE

FA R M E R S

MARKET photos and story by AMANDA LONG


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FROM THE RUNWAY TO THE

First Coast:

FALL FASHION FOR REAL WARDROBES by KELLY HOULD

F

all fashion in Florida is understandably tricky.While designers are sending leather, shearling and wool down runways in Paris and New York in the middle of the summer, we Floridians can’t imagine incorporating these heavy designs into our wardrobes until after Christmas — and sometimes not even then! Although the weather might prevent us from becoming early adopters of these styles, we can get creative and incorporate ele-

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ments of the newest trends into our wardrobes. We can also get away with cutting-edge accessories despite the weather, including hats, boots, structured bags and statement jewelry.

COLORS FOR FALL

Each season ushers in new collections from designers worldwide, and although there is no one arbiter of color each season, it’s easy to see colors that the top designers have in common.


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Many designers utilized green in their fall collections, which is a color that has not received much emphasis lately through other seasons. While last year’s favorite accent color was a deep red dubbed “ox blood,” this year expect to see lots of deep emerald green on shelves. Designers created monochrome looks with deep shades of green from head to toe, something many did last year with the popular burgundy ox blood color. Emerald green is flattering for most skin tones, and while head-to-toe burgundy is probably a bit too overwhelming for the average day of wear, a full outfit from emerald green is probably not out of the question if you’re feeling daring. If you’re afraid of looking like a cucumber, choose instead a few basic pieces such as a pencil skirt or cardigan in solid emerald. Military-inspired looks continue to march down the runway, meaning that army green is another popular choice this fall. This mossy green is easy to incorporate and almost universally flattering. Army green can be substituted into your wardrobe in place of khaki — so choose tailored chinos, long shorts (yes, we can get away with shorts in the fall) or a light military-inspired jacket in order to work this color into your fall wardrobe. Two other colors persist from last year: white and bold blue. Winter white continues to be a popular choice for many designers, violating the old rules about wearing white after Labor Day. Although white shoes are probably a bad choice for fall — more for practicality than any hidebound fashion reasoning- — white is easy to incorporate into outerwear and tailored separates. As with emerald, many designers sent models down the runway in head-to-toe white, but this is definitely not a flattering look for everyone. If you feel comfortable, rock it. If you feel like the Michelin Man, choose a few white pieces that are tailored to flatter you. Bold blue continues to be a hot choice, which is good news if you’ve already bought into the trend (or if you’re a Gators fan).

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You can bring out the blue pieces you stowed away after last year. Or, if you never put them away and wore beautiful blues all summer, keep incorporating blue basics into your fall wardrobe.

HOT SILHOUETTES

Although past seasons have trended towards a more chic and streamlined silhouette, many runways saw heavily layered and oversized outfits this fall. This is great news for Floridians. Layering is an easy way to wear fall trends during September and October, which tend to be just as warm during the day as most states’ summer weather. Choose simple base pieces, such as a tank top or fitted sleeveless shell, pencil skirt, chinos or a basic dress. From there, you can build an outfit from head to toe utilizing accessories that won’t overheat you. One trend seen across many collections for fall was the combination of pullover sweaters with fitted skirts. With chunky, textural knits, this is admittedly a bit too warm for the First Coast — at least until November or later.You can get the same look by substituting lighter, open knit sweaters in oversized shapes for the heavy sweaters seen on the runway. The important element here is the fit and the texture — not necessarily the type of yarn or heaviness of the sweater. Choose a light sweater with an open neck that hangs loose at the waist. When all else fails, make sure you are wearing a shell underneath that looks acceptable enough on its own in case you get stuck in a hot situation and need to abandon the sweater.

TRANSITION ACCESSORIES

Accessories this fall span the spectrum, finding inspiration from leather-bound street styles to luxe gilded jewelry that looks straight out of the Renaissance. As usual, it is up to you to choose accessories that make you feel comfortable. If you love the trend of gold studs and black leather — great! But incorpo-


rate it sparingly or risk an outfit that looks more like a costume. The same goes for hats, boots and jewelry. Too much of one trend can make more of a statement than you really wish to convey. Hats were back on runways this fall, with many designers featuring 1960s inspired headwear in colors corresponding to their outfits. Shaped wool hats completed the look for formal outfits and were often simple but statement making. Knit beanies were also popular on the runway, and offer a light alternative that’s easy to wear even during our normal months. If you have never worn a slouchy beanie, definitely consider it this season. Beanies are basically the leggings of the hat world: comfortable and informal, and they go with everything. Not to mention the fact that a beanie can turn around a bad hair day faster than any other solution under the sun. Structural bags were a huge trend on runways and are a marked departure from the large, shapeless handbags that have been so popular for so long.Your shoulders will thank you if you invest this season in a moderate, structured clutch or crossbody bag. These handbags generally featured boxy shapes accented by large, visible hardware and hinges. If you’ve been living out of beach bags all summer, it’s time to edit your ever-moving collection of stuff and choose a smaller structured bag for the fall. Texture is huge this fall, and probably most easily incorporated into your choice of footwear. Although no one in Florida will frown at you for wearing flip flops well into winter, you may want to invest in some boots for the fall. Embellished cowboy boots add a fun twist to otherwise tame outfits and fall is a good time to test out whether or not you enjoy this trend. Short Western-inspired boots are also a perfect alternative to taller styles — at least until things cool down a bit in the South.

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Oktoberfest! ON THE FIRST COAST, IN YOUR HOME AND BEYOND photos and story by CARRIE RESCH

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R

oll out the barrel — Oktoberfest is almost here! That’s right, Oktoberfest actually starts in September. This year Oktoberfest is officially celebrated from Sept. 21-Oct. 6. Oktoberfest is a German festival that was first celebrated on Oct. 12, 1810. That was the date of the royal wedding of Crown Prince Ludwig and Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen. The pair invited the public to attend festivities to celebrate their wedding thus sparking the first Oktoberfest. The year 2010 marked the 200th anniversary of the German tradition that has grown into the world’s largest fair that is annually attended by over 6 million people from around the world. So, some would say that this “holiday” is a big deal. Besides, do you really need an excuse to celebrate and drink beer? The official Oktoberfest is celebrated in Munich, Germany, with a 16-day festival. There are Ferris wheels, cake walks, roller coasters and other rides, along with 14 large beer tents and a few smaller beer tent. The “tents” are actually enclosed temporary structures filled with picnic tables centered around a stage with performers that range from traditional German Polka bands to more modern music. To get an idea of the tent size, the smallest tent can hold 90 people. I attended the “real” Oktoberfest at the ripe old age of 16, and it was one of the most memorable experiences of my life. That was in 1995. My family and I flew to Europe, took a train to Paris and there we boarded the Orient Express train to Germany (equipped with our French baguette and wine of course) to make it to Munich for the second to last day of Oktoberfest. On a side note, we actually heard the Oct. 3, 1995, OJ Simpson acquittal verdict over a staticky radio in a Beer garden at a park in Germany. If you can’t make it to Germany for Oktoberfest, which I highly recommend you do at some point in your life, there are some local Oktoberfest celebrations you can attend. Another option is to throw your own Oktoberfest party like my family does. Plan a menu of authentic German food. Decorations are available online or at party supply stores. Download Oktoberfest music or get a CD to play during the party — including the Chicken Dance (an Oktoberfest staple).You can even get really festive and get an Oktoberfest costume. Get an assortment of Oktoberfest seasonal beers such as Sam Adams Oktoberfest or even an authentic Oktoberfest beer like Lowenbrau. Don’t like beer? Opt for German wine such as a Riesling instead. So, Ein Prosit (a toast). Raise your stein and break out your Lederhosen – it’s time to celebrate Oktoberfest! Oktoberfest isn’t just a celebration in Germany any more. There are worldwide celebrations. Here are a few local Oktoberfest celebrations around town.

JAXTOBERFEST

Presented by PRI Productions and Jacksonville’s Buzz Magazine, the first annual Jaxtoberfest will be held at the Shipyards property in Downtown Jacksonville Friday, Oct. 11, 6-11 p.m. and

Saturday, Oct. 12, 9 a.m.-11 p.m. There will be a ceremonial tapping of the keg at the beginning of each day, two stages — one playing traditional German music and one playing alternative entertainment and games such as a Brat eating competition, Stein holding and a Beer Barrel Race. There will also be vendors with authentic German food, as well as traditional fair food and a family-friendly area with activities called Kinderfest. A 5K Beer Run will take place at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 12. For more information, visit http://jaxtoberfest.com.

OKTOBERFEST AT EUROPEAN STREET CAFÉ

There will be two Oktoberfest celebrations at two European Street Café locations. On Saturday, Oct. 5, the Jacksonville Beach European Street Cafe location at 972 Beach Blvd. has Oktoberfest festivities and on Saturday, Oct. 19, the Riverside European Street Cafe location at 2753 Park St. will have another Oktoberfest celebration. For more information, visit www.europeanstreet.com or call the Jacksonville Beach location at (904) 249-3001 or the Riverside location at (904) 384-9999.

INTUITION ALE WORKS

Intuition Ale Works will be hosting an Oktoberfest celebration Sunday, Oct. 6 at Memorial Park in Riverside. The event will be a fundraiser for the Memorial Park Association. The celebration will include live music by The Swinging Bavarians, German food, food trucks, Oktoberfest games and more. For more information, call (904) 683-7720 or visit www.intuitionaleworks.com.

ENGINE 15 BREWING COMPANY

Engine 15 will celebrate Oktoberfest on Saturday, Oct. 5, with E15 beer specials and live music by Feasts of Strength. Engine 15 Brewing Company is located at 1500 Beach Blvd. in Jacksonville Beach. For more information, call (904) 249-2337 or visit engine15.com.

CELEBRATING AT HOME

Want to plan your own Oktoberfest party? Here are some ideas for what to serve.

MENU IDEAS

•Soft pretzels and store bought pretzels such as pumpernickel pretzels with assorted mustards • Sauerkraut • Bratwurst • Beer Cheese • Red Potatoes or Potato Salad • Dessert: Black Forest Cake or German Chocolate Cake This is a recipe for Quick Black Forest Cake from Yummly.com

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BLACK FOREST CAKE This is a recipe for Quick Black Forest Cake from Yummly.com Ingredients: • 1 (18.25 ounce) package devil’s food cake mix with pudding • 3 eggs • 1 tablespoon almond extract • 1 (21 ounce) can cherry pie filling • 1 1/2 cups semisweet chocolate chips • 1 tablespoon butter • 2 tablespoons milk • 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

2. Mix together cake mix, beaten eggs, almond extract, cherry pie filling and 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips. Stir until just combined. Pour batter into a greased 9x13-inch pan. 3. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove cake from oven and let cool. 4. To make glaze: Heat 1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips, butter or margarine, and milk in a saucepan over medium high heat. Once semisweet chocolate chips are melted and mixture is combined stir in confectioners’ sugar. 5. Spread glaze over cooled cake. Serve cake as is or with whipped cream and a cherry.

BEER CHEESE There are many, many recipes for beer cheese, but I hit on one my family loves and it’s easy and inexpensive to make. You can even make beer cheese soup instead of a dip or even make fondue. Cheese and Beer Dip from Cooks.com Ingredients: • 1 (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened • 1 small container cheddar cheese spread, softened •½ cup beer • Garlic salt Directions: Mix all together and chill. Serve in hollowed out rye bread. Use center taken from bread and cut into cubes for dipping. Can be used with fresh vegetables to dip.

OKTOBERFEST POTATO SALAD

This delicious recipe comes from allrecipes.com.

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Ingredients: • 3 pounds potatoes, peeled and sliced • 1 ½ cup chopped onion • 2 teaspoons salt • ½ cup mayonnaise • ¼ cup vegetable oil • ½ cup cider vinegar • 2 tablespoons white sugar • 2 tablespoons dried parsley • ground black pepper to taste Directions: 1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add peeled and cut potatoes; cook until tender but still firm, about 15 minutes. Drain, and transfer to a large bowl. Add onions. 2. In a large bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, oil, vinegar, sugar, parsley, salt and pepper. Gently stir in the potatoes and onion. Let stand for 1 hour before serving to enhance flavors.


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SOFT PRETZELS

This is a soft pretzel recipe for bread machines from www.food.com (recipe #45567). If you don’t feel like making homemade soft pretzels, you can find them at your local supermarket in the freezer section. Ingredients: • 1 (1/4 ounce) package dry active yeast • 1 tablespoon sugar • 3 cups flour • 1 cup water • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 2 tablespoons oil • 1 egg white, slightly beaten • coarse salt • butter Directions: 1. Place ingredients in bread machine pan in the order suggested by the manufacturer. 2. Select White Bread setting, Manual and then press Start. 3. After the machine has completed the second rising cycle, it will beep. 4. Remove the dough onto a very lightly floured surface. 5. Divide into 4 parts. 6. Divide each fourth into 3 pieces. 7. Roll each piece into an 18 inch rope.

Does your guest list include people with special dietary needs? For example, many members of my family are either vegetarian or vegan, so we’ve adjusted our menu accordingly. It’s easier to do then one might think, and most of the substitutes are available at your local grocery store. Buy vegan bratwursts, vegan sausage, or vegan hot dogs. For the

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8. Shape rope into a circle, overlapping about 4 inches; from each end, leaving ends free. 9. Take one end in each hand and twist at the point where dough overlaps. 10. Carefully lift ends across to the opposite edge of circle. 11. Tuck ends under edge to make a pretzel shape; moisten and press ends to seal. 12. Place on greased cookie sheet. 13. Let rise, uncovered, until puffy, about 20 minutes. 14. In a 3-quart saucepan, combine 2 quarts of water and 1/3 cup baking soda; bring to a boil. 15. Lower 1 or 2 pretzels into the saucepan; simmer for 10 seconds on each side. 16. Lift from water with a slotted spoon. 17. Return to greased cookie sheet. 18. Let dry briefly. 19. Brush with 1 egg white slightly beaten. 20. Sprinkle with course salt or sesame seeds or leave plain. 21. If you leave them plain, after they bake dip into melted butter then in cinnamon and sugar mixture. 22. Bake at 425°F for 4 minutes; then turn cookie sheet around and bake 4 more minutes. soft pretzels, forgo the egg white wash and substitute vegan butter. Beer cheese can be made vegan by using vegan cream cheese and vegan cheese. Use a mayonnaise substitute such as Vegenaise for the potato salad and an egg substitute for the Black Forest cake. Enjoy!


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Greyfield Inn. The Greyfield estate was built by Thomas and Lucy Carnegie for their daughter Margaret Ricketson in 1900. It was converted into a private inn in 1962 by Margaret’s daughter, Lucy R. Ferguson and family.

FUN AND HISTORY ON

Cumberland Island NATIONAL SEASHORE story by CARRIE RESCH photos by ED JOHNSON

C

umberland Island is a hidden gem off the coast of St. Marys, Ga. When you visit the island, it seems like you’ve stepped into a children’s book where wildlife abounds including a large population of wild horses who have free roam of the largest and southernmost barrier island in Georgia. Besides feral horses, the island is also home to wild turkeys, white tail deer, bob cats, armadillos, alligators and many species of birds. In fact, more than 335 species of birds have been recorded on the island according to the National Park Service. Visitors can tour the island via ranger-or self-guided walking tours. There is also a ranger-led mortised tour. There are over 50 miles hiking trails throughout the island. Bicycles are available for rent on a first come, first served basis at the Sea Camp Dock. Other island activities include camping, swimming, fishing and beach combing for sharks teeth or unoccupied sea shells.

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This majestic island was also once home to Thomas and Lucy Carnegie and their family. Thomas Carnegie was the younger brother of steel tycoon, Andrew Carnegie. Thomas and his wife Lucy built three mansions on Cumberland Island, Dungeness, Plum Orchard and Greyfield. The three structures are still standing on the island today, although all one can see of Dungeness is the ruins after the mansion caught fire and burnt in 1959. Plum Orchard was built for Thomas and Lucy’s son, George and his wife Margaret Thaw. The mansion now belongs to and is in the care of the National Park Service who provides tours of the home. Greyfield mansion was built for Thomas and Lucy’s daughter, Margaret Ricketson in 1900. Greyfield has since been converted to a private inn by Margaret’s daughter, Lucy R. Ferguson in 1962 and is still run by the family. The island is also home to the First African-American Baptist Church established in 1893 and rebuilt in the 1930s. This was


the church where John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn Bessette married in 1996. If you go: The only way to reach Cumberland Island is by boat — either by a 45-minute ferry ride aboard the National Park Service’s Cumberland Queen Ferry or via a private boat. Cumberland Island is 7 miles east of St. Marys. To get to the National Park Service building and Cumberland Island ferry, take I-95 North to exit 3. Turn east onto Highway 40. Follow signs to Historic St. Marys. Turn right onto St. Marys St. Reservations are recommended and can be made up to six months in advance. To make a reservation, call (877) 860-6787 or visit www.nps.gov/cuis. A round-trip ferry ride to and from Cumberland Island is $20 for adults, $14 for children 12 and under, and $18 for seniors 65 and over.

The First African Baptist Church established in 1893 and rebuilt in the 1930s was the site for John F. Kennedy, Jr. and Carolyn Bessette’s 1996 wedding ceremony.

Dungeness Ruins. Dungeness was originally built by Revolutionary War Hero Nathanael Green’s widow, Catherine Greene. In 1884, Thomas and Lucy Carnegie built onto the original foundation of Dungeness. In 1959, the structure caught fire, and now only the ruins remain on the site.

Group of wild horses relaxing in the shade outside of Dungeness Ruins on Cumberland Island.

A mare and her colt graze on Cumberland Island. The island is home to a large population of feral horses who have free roam of the island.

The feral horses roam the island from the beach to the saltwater marsh and the inner dwellings of the island. FIRST COAST REGISTER | AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2013 45


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CUMMER MUSEUM

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