Page 1

Keeping the state’s Highways

Safe

Life in the Minor Leagues

Athletes playing for the love of the game

Active Years Start new activities at any age

Fall Fashion

Make the world your runway

SEPTEMBER 2017

OUR ANNUAL FACES OF OKLAHOMA


Stroke symptoms? B.E. F.A.S.T. and call 9-1-1. Balance suddenly lost

EVERY SECOND COUNTS WHEN IT COMES TO STROKE CARE. Getting help from trained stroke professionals

Eyes suddenly blurred

as soon as possible is critical in determining the level of recovery you will have. The Saint Francis Stroke Center is ready

Face droops on one side

24/7 with a specially trained stroke response team of emergency physicians, nurses, neurosurgeons, neurologists, neurointerventionalists, technicians and

Arms suddenly weak

other staff members. They have the expertise and experience to quickly assess and treat the cause of the stroke. For more information, please visit

Speech slurred, confused

saintfrancis.com/stroke.

Terrible, sudden headache A stroke is a medical emergency. If you believe you or a loved one is exhibiting any symptoms of stroke, note the time symptoms first occurred and call 9-1-1.

SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL | THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | WARREN CLINIC | HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL SOUTH | LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL MUSKOGEE | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL VINITA | SAINT FRANCIS BROKEN ARROW | SAINT FRANCIS CANCER CENTER | SAINT FRANCIS HOME CARE COMPANIES


Features SEPTEMBER

2017 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXI, No. 9

46 Life in the Minor Leagues

Without any glamour, athletes face long bus rides, offseason jobs and personal sacrifices … all for the love of the game.

65 Active Years

Growing older doesn’t have to mean slowing down, especially with the benefits of staying mobile, social and engaged.

70 OHP Challenges

The 80-year-old Oklahoma Highway Patrol copes with a manpower crisis and budget limitations in numerous ways.

38

Fall Into Fashion

Here are the season’s trends and musthaves. Make the world your runway.

74 Fall Festival Preview

WANT SOME MORE?

Safe

Faces of Oklahoma

These local businesses have distinguished themselves as a cut above the rest – the true face of their field.

Life in the Minor Leagues Active Years Start new activities at any age

2

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

MORE PHOTOS ON THE COVER:

Athletes playing for the love of the game

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

Keeping the state’s Highways

SPECIAL SECTION 50

Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES

SEPTEMBER 2017

OUR ANNUAL FACES OF OKLAHOMA September 2017

Autumn in Oklahoma means celebrating all the cultures, hobbies, music and food that make this state one of a kind.

Fall Fashion

Make the world your runway

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE INTERVIEWS THE CHIEF OF THE OKLAHOMA HIGHWAY PATROL AND A 20-YEAR VETERAN TROOPER. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes even more great Oklahoma events.


Deliveringthe thehighest highest standards standards ininstroke Delivering strokecare care

whenyou you need need ititmost. when most. The St. John Heyman Stroke Center is eastern Oklahoma’s only Joint Commission–Certified

The Comprehensive St. John Heyman Stroke Center Oklahoma’s onlynurses Jointand Commission–Certified Stroke Center. We is areeastern proud that our physicians, staff have received the Comprehensive Stroke areThese proud that our physicians, nurses have received the nation’s highest honorsCenter. in strokeWe care. awards* recognize stroke teamsand whostaff consistently administer personalized care for each patient, while meeting the highest stroke care quality measures. nation’s highest honors in stroke care. These awards* recognize stroke teams who consistently administer personalized care for each patient, while meeting the highest stroke care quality measures.

It’s not about the accolades, it’s about having the most qualified stroke professionals standing ready, 24/7 to deliver care, having with thethe fastest time – when you need it most. It’s not about the thespecialized accolades,stroke it’s about mostresponse qualified stroke professionals standing ready, 24/7

to deliver the specialized stroke care, with the fastest response time – when you need it most. STJOHNSTROKECENTER.COM

STJOHNSTROKECENTER.COM

P U L S E L I N E P H Y S I C I A N R E F E R R A L 918 - 744-0123 | D O W N L O A D O U R A P P ST. JOHN MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN SAPULPA | ST. JOHN OWASSO | ST. JOHN BROKEN ARROW P UJANE L S E LPHILLIPS I N E P H YMEDICAL S I C I A N CENTER R E F E R R| AST. L 918 - 744-0123 | D OCARE W N L O| AST. D JOHN O U R CLINIC APP JOHN CLINIC URGENT

ST. JOHN MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN SAPULPA | ST. JOHN OWASSO | ST. JOHN BROKEN ARROW JANE PHILLIPS MEDICAL | ST.Award JOHNfor CLINIC URGENT CARE *Eastern Oklahoma's only hospital to receiveCENTER the Gold Plus seven consecutive years.| ST. JOHN CLINIC

Target: Stroke Elite Plus Award from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

*Eastern Oklahoma's only hospital to receive the Gold Plus Award for seven consecutive years. Target: Stroke Elite Plus Award from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

17SJH11611_Stroke_AHA_ASA Awards_Print_TP_f.indd 1

7/17/17 5:40 P


9 12 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

State

OSU, OU and TU have their share of enthusiasts who take cheering for their favorite teams a notch above the rest.

Safety Culture History Sports People Makers Business Insider

9

23 Life and Style 24 28 30 32 36 37

Interiors Ronette Wallace mixes modern and funky design for a skinny, three-level townhouse with brilliant views of the OKC skyline. City Life Health Destinations Style As the weather turns, fall

fashion staples are essential to keep you looking hot.

Scene

81

81 Taste 84 86 87

The Jones Assembly in Midtown OKC doesn’t pun(t) when it comes to exquisite food and drink.

Local Flavor Chef Chat Random Flavors

89 Where and When 90 95

London’s smash hit The Bodyguard makes its way to Tulsa this fall.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

96 Closing Thoughts

4

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

89

36 24


Enhance Your Curves BRAZILIAN BUTTOCK LIFT = FAT GRAFTING & LIPOSUCTION

BRAZILIAN BUTTOCK LIFT

Want to improve your backside view?

Tulsa Surgical Arts offers a complete line of surgical procedures to enhance your buttock…. ”Brazilian Butt Lift” is one of Dr. Cuzalina’s most popular surgeries! Call to schedule a free consult, 918-392-7900 Tulsa Surgical Arts offers a full line of Cosmetic Surgical and skin care procedures to help you look and feel your best this summer. Angelo Cuzalina, MD

918.392.7900 | tulsasurgicalarts.com


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™

Your Day Made Perfect

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

OKLAHOMA

DANIEL SCHUMAN

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K . SCHUMAN

SENIOR EDITOR BRIAN WILSON

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT MARY WILLA ALLEN

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE

GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN

GRAPHIC DESIGNER GARRET T GREEN

Let Oklahoma Magazine help plan your special day! The January wedding issue and the Oklahoma Wedding Show are your go-to guides for wedding planning.

DIGITAL EDITOR JAMES AVERY

OFFICE/ADVERTISING ASSISTANT OLIVIA LYONS

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CAROLINE SHAW

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOT T MILLER, DAN MORGAN, DAVID COBB, MARC RAINS, SCOT T JOHNSON

CONTACT US

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES:

ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM

EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM

QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM

ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com

www.okmag.com

Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204

The wedding issue of Oklahoma Magazine will hit stands in January, and the Oklahoma Wedding Show returns Saturday, January 13. Booth spaces are limited. Reserve yours now!

Copyright © 2017 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

440 0

2016

UNDER

TM

918 ™

MAGAZINE

IN

OKC

IN

TULSA

Member

For more information, call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com. 3/4 Wedding House.indd 1

6

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

8/25/17 3:58 PM


Life in professional sports is always grueling. The demands on the athletes’ bodies and the constant training to remain at the top of their games requires a high level of dedication – but one that most people would consider well worth it for the rewards that come with the career. Not all athletes live a seven-figure lifestyle, however. Oklahoma is home to many minor league teams, and players on these teams often find themselves on 30-hour bus rides to play games and balancing offseason jobs with their training regimen. Some may hope for a call up to the major leagues, but others are playing for the love of the game. In this issue, we talk to three minor league players to find out what drives them to play their sports. Also in this issue is our annual Active Years feature. When Oklahomans retire, they may find themselves with longer days than they realized and less activities to fill them. Many places in the state offer activities, however, allowing people to not only find new hobbies but make new friends. Whether it’s painting, line dancing or learning a new language, there’s always a reason to be active. Finally, fall is the time for festivals in Oklahoma – don’t miss our Fall Festival Guide, bringing you all the information you need for the most exciting celebrations in the state. As always, feel free to contact us at editor@okmag. com.

OKMAG.COM

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

L E T T E R F R O M T H E E D I T O R I A L S TA F F

OK

COMING UP IN SEPTEMBER AT OKMAG.COM

The time has come to start switching over to your fall wardrobe. Don’t miss our annual fall fashion spotlight, where you can find the latest styles available at Oklahoma’s premier clothing retailers. For an inside look at the goings-on behind the camera, watch our web-exclusive video at okmag.com/ web. See our hair, makeup and photography team at work to capture the perfect shot. Let the staff at Oklahoma Magazine give you a head start on your new wardrobe. WEB-EXCLUSIVE VIDEO SEE A SELECTION OF FALL FASHION FROM OKLAHOMA’S PREMIER RETAILERS. STICK AROUND AND WATCH ALL OF OUR WEBEXCLUSIVE VIDEOS AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.

DECEMBER 2017

2014

Is Your Company Great?

Oklahoma Magazine is currently looking for great places to work in Oklahoma. If your company has what it takes, let us know. Visit okmag.com to nominate your company for inclusion in Oklahoma Magazine’s Great Companies To Work For. adver tising@okmag.com • Great Companies 1/2.indd 1

918.744.6205 •

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

Advertising opportunities available

OKLAHOMA

8/23/17 5:43 PM

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

7


Cancer is smart. It pushes us. We push back. Finding smarter solutions. Like precision cancer treatment. Intelligent technology that helps us find and target it. We’re not just fighting cancer.

We’re outsmarting it.

At Cancer Treatment Centers of America®, we’re forging ahead with advancements in medicine that weren’t available to cancer patients just a short time ago, including advanced genomic testing and immunotherapy. To learn more about the ways we are fighting cancer, call or visit us online. Atlanta | Chicago | Phoenix | Philadelphia | Tulsa © 2017 Rising Tide

888.568.1571

cancercenter.com/outsmart


State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Superfans Gear Up for Another Season

PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

OSU, OU and TU have their share of enthusiasts who take cheering for their favorite teams a notch above the rest. We’ve all seen him: the bare chested guy in outlandish boxer shorts, painted from the waist up, chanting the team mantra, holding up a sign and encouraging other fans to cheer. He’s the one fan you think could almost pass as the team mascot. He is a superfan. Sports teams in Oklahoma, especially on the collegiate level, have legions of superfans, who are something more than your average sports enthusiast. They live up to the word fanatic and some are legendary.

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

9


The State

The Power of Orange LEE REDICK FOUND HIS TRADEMARK ORANGE JUMPSUIT IN THE BASEMENT OF A NEWLY PURCHASED HOME IN TULSA. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Enthusiasm devotee Lee Redick is one of those legends. You are sure to find him and his florescent orange jumpsuit at every home game of the Oklahoma State University Cowboys.

“I believe in supporting our team, no matter what,” he says. “These are 18-, 19-, 20and 21-year-old kids. Win or lose, I’m there to support them and, most of all, have fun!” Many know him as Mr. Orange Power (or Mr. OP or just OP). He and his wife, often referred to as Mrs. OP, have attended every home game since 1997, but it wasn’t until 1999 when he started living up to his name. Redick says his orange power persona started by accident. “My favorite cheer when I was going to OSU in the ’80s was ‘Orange …Power!’” he says. “When I bought our season tickets in 1997, we [OSU fans] had stopped doing it. I spent the next two and half years just yelling, ‘Orange!’ by myself.” It wasn’t until the Big 12 basketball tournament in Kansas City, Missouri, that Redick’s wife stopped him and suggested he get other fans to participate with him. “We were on the last row of the upper deck,” Redick says. “I asked all the alumni in our two sections if they’d like to do ‘Orange … Power!’ They said yes and it took off.” Not long after that game, the Redicks bought a house in Tulsa. It just so happened that in the basement of the new home was a florescent orange jumpsuit that fit Redick like a glove. It soon became the apparel that he is well known for wearing. It is also what helped him gain traction in becoming Mr. Orange Power. “I took the jumpsuit into Bedlam Sports and asked them to put ‘ORANGE POWER’ on the back and a bunch of OSU patches all over,” he says. “I wanted to look like Elvis meets NASCAR! “Once I had the suit, I needed a way to communicate with the crowd, so I made my first ‘ORANGE’ sign to help get the cheer started.” However, Redick doesn’t see himself as a superfan. He says his main goal is to have a good time and help the Cowboys win. “I’m just proud to be part of the ‘Sea of Orange!’”

‘Boomer! Sooner!’

The University of Oklahoma is not without its superfans. Like Redick, John Griffith is definitely a step above many spectators. He even has a cardboard cutout of himself decked out as his superfan persona, The Sooner Guy. Griffith embodies the OU spirit from head to toe. At home games (and some away games), you can spot him in his OU boots, sunglasses, socks, boxers, suspenders, shirt, tie and over-the-top hat. You can guarantee that his face will be painted crimson and cream. “I am definitely a superfan,” he says.

10

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


“Every day I wear something OU.” Dedicated enough to drive from Tulsa to Norman for OU home games, Griffith has attended contests since he was in third grade. “I’ve always been an OU fan,” he says. “My family has had season tickets since 1997, and I went to most of the games growing up. I’m 28 and single and don’t have kids, so, during football season, that is my life.” His transition from fan to superfan has been gradual and has only taken root in recent years. After his dad died in 2008, Griffith took a hiatus from attending games. It wasn’t until 2015, when he decided to go to a Tennessee vs. OU game with his brother, that he stepped up his game. “I decided I wasn’t just going to go to the game; I was going to go big,” Griffith says. “I had some black shorts and a white OU T-shirt, and I put on some white Halloween makeup and that was it. “Over time, my outfit has changed. This season I ordered a jersey that says ‘Sooner Guy’ on the back and some new shorts.”

The Blue and Gold

Not all superfans wear paint or a cape. Some are like Ted Williams and dutifully attend home, away and bowl games. Williams graduated from the University of Tulsa in 1964 and attended a few games, but it wasn’t until his children were old enough to go to games that he started buying season tickets. It’s been a family affair ever since. “We try to make all the home games and are usually joined by an assortment of children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren,” he says. Dedication is what makes a superfan and, according to Williams, all of TU’s regular fans are superfans. “Where else can we have folks that follow TU through a 1-11 season [after] hoping for a 10-win season?” he says. “Being there when they tore down the south goal posts to celebrate the end of a 10-game losing season is something I will always remember. That is who we are.” Williams has traveled to bowl games all over the nation, including Dallas; Boise, Idaho; Memphis, Tennessee; Mobile, Alabama; and Anaheim, California. He doesn’t think everyone has to be a superfan to support a team, but he would like more people to cheer on TU sports teams. “It is an absolute shame we cannot support Coach [Philip] Montgomery and the team by filling the stadium every game,” he says. “I don’t bring signs showing myself as being a superfan, but I am a 110 percent member of the Golden Hurricane Club and I just come to the game!”

TED WILLIAMS HAS HELD SEASON TICKETS TO TU’S FOOTBALL GAMES SINCE HIS CHILDREN WERE OLD ENOUGH TO ATTEND WITH HIM. PHOTO COURTESY TED WILLIAMS

ALAINA STEVENS

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State

JUST ‘DROP IT AND DRIVE’

SAFET Y

U Drive. U Text. U Pay. Despite laws, motorists in Oklahoma and nationwide continue to imperil others with distracted driving.

O

klahoma was the 46th state to enact legislation that bans texting while driving. Despite this 2015 law, people are still doing it. “It’s a real problem,” says Trooper Dwight Durant, public information officer for the Oklahoma Highway Patrol. “We need to have a change in attitude in our state when it comes to texting or being distracted while you’re driving. It’s very dangerous.” Durant says educating the public is an ongoing effort to show the dangers of distracted driving. The youngest and most inexperienced drivers are most at risk. According to the Oklahoma Highway Safety Office, 25 percent of all distracted driving crashes involve drivers under age 24. However, they are not alone. Across the country, at any given moment during daylight hours, up to 660,000 drivers use hand-held devices while driving, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration reports. The highway administration also reports that 3,477 people died nationwide and 391,000 were injured in distracted driving crashes in 2015. The agency says distracted

12

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

drivers are 23 times more likely to have an accident than attentive ones and cause one in four accidents. Oklahoma’s no-texting-while-driving law is named after Oklahoma Highway Patrol troopers Nicholas Dees and Keith Burch, who were struck by a driver updating his social media page with his phone. Dees died at the scene, and Burch underwent long-term rehabilitation for his injuries. The law makes it illegal to operate a motor vehicle while using a hand-held electronic device to compose, send or read electronic messages while driving. Violations are punishable by a $100 fine. Also, texting while driving is a primary offense, meaning drivers in Oklahoma can be ticketed without first having committed another traffic offense. “We hope the anti-texting law gains momentum, just like the wearing a seat belt law did,” Durant says. “Nowadays, most people know they have to wear their seat belt or they can get a ticket. It’s a matter of time for people to learn it’s just not safe or smart to drive distracted.” SHARON MCBRIDE

The “Drop It and Drive” campaign, in 65 Oklahoma public school districts, was begun in May 2016 by Gail Lambert after her daughter, Bobbi White, an English teacher at Owasso MidHigh School, was killed in a car wreck caused by a distracted driver. The initiative targets Oklahoma’s youngest drivers. “If drivers aren’t watching the road, and children are distracted themselves, it’s time to do something,” Lambert says. “We need children to see and talk about this from a very young age. Texting and driving is not OK. These children will make an impact on their parents’ lives as well when they take this information home with them.” “Drop it & Drive” signs appear all over the state. “Several school personnel and parents have shared their stories with me,” Lambert says. “It’s amazing how many of us are out here – parents that have lost children to distracted driving.” To get involved, Lambert says to ask schools for car decals, stickers, T-shirts and street signs. Lambert can be reached at facebook. com/gail.lambert.96.


JOIN THE FIGHT FOR ALZHEIMER’S FIRST SURVIVOR.

ESCAPE to the Garden

The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s® is the largest fundraiser for

We are open late! Thursdays, 5 - 8pm

Alzheimer's care,

Dog Night

support and research.

Craft Night: Nature Collages

September 7, 5pm

Start, join or donate to a team today!

September 14, 5pm

Wellness Night: Yoga September 21, 6pm

Music Night: Erin O’Dowd September 28, 6pm

September 9 in Ada seokwalk.org

Fun Fall Kickoff

September 23 in Tulsa tulsawalk.org September 30 in OKC okcwalk.com

October 5, 5pm Music from Jacob Tovar, beer samples from Marshall Brewery, and more fall fun!

In the Garden with Wordsmiths and Their Flowers A brunch and talk at the top of the Tandy Floral Terraces Saturday, September 30, 10:30am Tickets limited | Visit tulsabotanic.org

3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive | tulsabotanic.org | 918.289.0330

22836 Alzheimer's Association.indd 1

8/17/17 22852 3:50 PM Tulsa Botanic Garden.indd 1

8/24/17 1:11 PM

The Healthiest Way to Get involved with the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative! We’re helping older adults across the state maintain health and independence through classes and workshops, such as: FAMILY CAREGIVER EDUCATION DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT TAI CHI RESISTANCE BAND TRAINING ARTHRITIS MANAGEMENT EXERCISE AND NUTRITION CERTIFIED NURSE AIDE TRAINING ALZHEIMER’S EDUCATION

We also offer training to healthcare professionals who help seniors. Main: 918.779.7367 I Toll Free: 888.616.8161 I OHAI.org The Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative (OHAI) is a program of the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma and is supported by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. 22835 Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative.indd 1

8/10/17 1:41 PM

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

C U LT U R E

Not an Easy Definition

The Red Dirt genre, uniquely associated with Oklahoma musicians, blends influences from many styles.

R

get people talking about Red Dirt bands, you ed Dirt music, named after got everything from very traditional country Oklahoma’s unusually colored bands to garage rock bands who definitely soil, is a style closely tied to don’t have the same sound. It’s more of a comthe state. Defining that style, munity.” though, is more difficult. “I just learned from those guys that did it Edwards is quick to list people who helped before me,” says longtime Oklahoma musiTurnpike Troubadours get started, particucian Cody Canada, known for his bands Cross larly Jason Boland and The Stragglers, Mike Canadian Ragweed and The Departed. “They McClure and Canada. always said the music is as pure as the dirt is Another element that Red Dirt bands have red. I always thought that was a beautiful way in common is an unexpected combination of to put things. It’s just honest music.” influences. Edwards, who lists his primary A Texas native, Canada moved to Yukon influences as the punk rock band Rancid and when he was 15, then to Stillwater a year country legend Merle Haggard, said Turnpike later. At that time in the mid-’90s, StillwaTroubadours’ sound combines whatever the ter had a thriving music scene, and Canada band members bring to the stage. quickly learned another key part of Red Dirt “It’s just sort of the way everyone learned music: community. to play,” he says. “I moved up there “There’s bluegrass “They always because I really didn’t melodies and punk have anywhere to go,” said the music rock beats and he says. “I knew that chicken-picking is as pure as I wasn’t really good guitars. Just mash at anything but music, the dirt is red. I all that together, and I wasn’t really that and that’s kind always thought of the sound good at [music] at that point, but I knew I was that came out, that was a going to be. I met The and that’s beautiful way to sort of Great Divide and Tom Skinner and The Red all of us put things.” Dirt Rangers and all growing those dudes, and man, up with they really, honestly just took me in. It was different influences.” just everybody looking out for one another, Canada, who grew up listening to you know, and helping each other out along “Merle Haggard in one room and Stone the way. There was never really any big plans Temple Pilots in the next room,” says that to be superstars.” combination of sounds isn’t something he sees often, and he does his best to work new That tradition of community has endured through the years and is a founding principle of sounds into sets by collaborating with other musicians. With his three-piece band, he alMedicine Stone, held Sept. 21-23 at Diamondhead Resort in Tahlequah. The annual festival ways has room to invite someone up on stage, began in 2013 through the joint efforts of Turn- he says, and he looks forward to bringing that pike Troubadours and Jason Boland and the to Medicine Stone. Stragglers, but the intention was never to create “From what I’ve learned over 24 years of an event based on a certain style of music. doing this is people like structure – they do – “I don’t know that we ever really set out to but when people lose their minds and just start be a Red Dirt festival, whatever that is,” says jamming, that’s what makes it a good night,” R.C. Edwards, bass player for Turnpike Trouhe says. “That’s what makes people say, ‘That badours. “We just play music, man. When you was a good show.’”

14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

CODY CANADA MOVED TO STILLWATER WHEN HE WAS 16 YEARS OLD AND BECAME PART OF THE RED DIRT MUSIC SCENE. PHOTO COURTESY CODY CANADA


HISTORY

The Right Mix for a Legend

Tom Mix, who has a museum devoted to him in Dewey, was a silent-film star who helped to define the celluloid cowboy.

S

TOM MIX WAS A MARSHAL WHO WORKED ON THE WILD WEST SHOW AT 101 RANCH BEFORE BECOMING AN ACTOR. PHOTOS COURTESY TOM MIX MUSEUM

cores of early movies provided a nostalgic, romanticized version of the Wild West and cowboys that many in the quickly changing and industrializing United States wanted at the turn of the 20th century. An Oklahoma transplant played a role in those everlasting images. Westerns, and the Wild West shows before them, provided pictures of times and places that didn’t really exist anymore – if they ever truly had. Tom Mix, heavily influenced by living and working in Oklahoma, embodied the ideal cowboy of the Wild West. Athletic and rugged, with only a passing glance at education, Mix left his birthplace in Medix Run, Pennsylvania, for the U.S. Army. Discharged in 1902, he headed west to Oklahoma, spent some time in Guthrie and became a marshal in Dewey before ending up on the famous 101 Ranch outside Ponca City. He gained an early love for horses and the ways of the cowboy, and he learned what he needed to know to perform in an entertaining Wild West show at the 101. Mix made up for any deficiencies in actual skill by exuding confidence and looking the part of a cowboy.

During this time, Mix married three times and had one child, Ruth, in 1912. Mix began his transition to movies in 1909 when Selig Polyscope Film Co. of Chicago filmed a Wild West show in Dewey where Mix tended livestock. In his book Wild West Shows, Paul Reddin describes how, despite being barely qualified, Mix asked for and was granted a part in the film. After this first film appearance, Mix continued to perform in live shows, but his popularity in silent movies steadily grew through his work with Selig. “Tom Mix rose to star status early on and paved the way for future generations in the Western movie-making era,” says Fawn Lassiter, manager of the Tom Mix Museum in Dewey. World War I brought changes and Mix joined Fox Film Corp. in 1917. He became a member of the Hollywood elite with a Beverly Hills mansion, a ranch in Arizona, servants and multiple expensive cars. He also married his fourth wife, an actress, and had another daughter, Thomasina, in 1922. Mix is credited with making hundreds of films and was the highest paid actor in Hollywood at one point, known for doing his own daring stunt work and accomplished horsemanship. Mix had trouble with the transition

to talking movies and found his way back to Wild West shows. He even owned his own circus briefly. By this time, however, the nation was deep into the Great Depression and Mix’s fame had declined. He also divorced and married one more time. He died in a car accident in 1940. Mix created a persona for himself. He represented a wholesome, good character at a time when the nation had become more materialistic and flashy. Mix played “the good guy who wore the white hat and saved the day and he always wanted the children to look up to him,” Lassiter says. Celebrate the performer’s life and legacy at the Tom Mix Festival during Western Heritage Weekend in downtown Dewey, Sept. 23-24. The festival features live music, children’s games, country swing and line dancing, Tom Mix Museum tours, the Longhorn Cattle Drive Parade down Main Street and an evening street dance. Visit westernheritageweekend.org for more information. BONNIE RUCKER

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

15


The State

SPORTS

From Norman to Charm City

JEFFERSON SIGNED A FOURYEAR CONTRACT WITH THE BALTIMORE RAVENS THIS OFFSEASON. PHOTO COURTESY BALTIMORE RAVENS

Former OU standout Tony Jefferson lands in another burg after signing a big contract with the Baltimore Ravens.

A

confessed University of Southern California fan with a tattoo of an Interstate 805 road sign on his chest, Baltimore Ravens safety Tony Jefferson’s football career keeps leading him away from home. Jefferson played three years at the University of Oklahoma before entering the NFL draft. Despite being projected as a second-round pick, he went undrafted and signed with Arizona as an free agent. Jefferson spent three years with the Cardinals, stayed focused and made the most of his opportunities before becoming a full-time starter in 2016. Exceptional play last year enabled Jefferson, a free agent, to TONY JEFFERSON CHOSE TO PLAY FOOTBALL AT OU BECAUSE OF THE STABILITY OF THE COACHING. PHOTO BY CHRIS CRUZ

16

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

sign a four-year, $36 million contract with the Ravens. Jefferson’s zig-zag road to Baltimore came through Norman, but the Chula Vista, California, product says playing at OU wasn’t always clear cut. He was intrigued with USC, but potential NCAA violations (USC was given a two-season postseason ban in 2010) and the school’s coach, Pete Carroll, leaving for the NFL made becoming a Trojan less appealing. He committed to Stanford and UCLA at various points, and even had a verbal commitment to the University of Florida. “I was like a teenage girl trying to pick a dress for prom,” he says. Eventually, coaching stability and an opportunity for a championship at OU won out. Jefferson, who graduated high school early, began classes at OU in what would have been the spring of his senior year. Not only did he have to adjust to a different culture, but it was difficult for him to see what his friends in high school were doing every time he checked Facebook. Jefferson was eligible for financial aid because of his family’s income, and he says he used that money to fly back to California several times during that semester. “Coach [Bob] Stoops was pretty much telling us, ‘You’re going to your prom,’” Jefferson says. “So I went back for prom, and I got to graduate and do all that type of stuff. It was different, it was difficult, but I knew I was [at OU] for a purpose.” His dedication paid off. In his first year, he was named the Big 12 defensive freshman of the year and first-team freshman All-American by The Sporting News and CollegeFootballNews.com. He continued

gaining recognition through his three years at OU and came to love Norman. And while the Sooners may not have captured a national championship in his time there, Jefferson carries his record against the University of Texas with him. “I was undefeated against the Longhorns, so I can take that with me wherever I go,” he says. “It was a good experience for me being a California kid, never actually being somewhere out of state. It was pretty much culture shock for me, a guy coming from the beach, moving more to the lakes and those types of things. But I really enjoyed myself.” Baltimore may be distant from California and Oklahoma, but Jefferson says the love for football is the same. “When I first got here, I just felt like I belonged,” he says. “Everybody welcomed me. It’s a football town, sort of like the feeling you get when you’re in Norman. I’m used to it, and I really appreciate how committed the fans are.”

A SURPRISING RETIREMENT

University of Oklahoma head coach Bob Stoops shocked many people when he retired in June after 18 years as head coach – including Jefferson. “I was very surprised,” he says. “That was 18 years of hard work and good work by him, so he’s got to be proud. He’s done a lot for the program. He recruited a bunch of California kids to go there. He’ll go down as one of the better college coaches in history. “I hope he enjoys his golfing time he gets now. His kids are going off to college – there’s nothing better than to watch your kids succeed and be a dad.”


PEOPLE

‘Chasing Cans’ is a Family Affair

Barrel racing is a shared love for the Melbys, a mother and daughter from Burneyville.

T

JANE MELBY CUTS AROUND A BARREL AS SHE RACES FOR A SUB-17-SECOND TIME ON THE COURSE.

PHOTO COURTESY JANE MELBY

hey chase 17 seconds of glory. That time, or preferably less, usually wins in the sport of barrel racing. “At the level we compete at, you have to be very disciplined,” says Jane Melby of Burneyville. “It’s like a full-time job, but you are doing what you love. It is long days, allnight drives, and it is rush … rush … rush … to prepare for 17 seconds or less.” In barrel racing, the rider guides a horse in an arena through a series of barrels in a clover leaf pattern. Control is as important as speed. The fastest rider and horse win. Tens of thousands of dollars, belt buckles, trophies, equine-related gear and memorabilia – not to mention bragging rights – are prizes that these competitors covet. Melby has ridden horses ever since she was a little girl. At an early age, she got the desire to compete in barrel racing. It was a love that stuck with her for a lifetime. She passed it on to her daughter, Cayla. Now both Melbys compete in bar-

rel racing all over the United States and Canada. Both have won numerous awards, which include 2X World Champion Barrel Racer, National Junior High Rodeo Finals Champion Barrel Racer and the Women’s Professional Rodeo Associate Rookie of the Year. On the outside, this sport might seem like a glorious fun time, but the realities are sacrifice and hard work, Jane Melby says. The sport has a lot grunt work, like taking care of a horse and stables, besides riding, practicing and getting from one city to another. Cayla Melby agrees: “It can be difficult. It’s a lot of struggles; 20 percent of the time things go right. The other 80 percent you are working on what went wrong.” A good rider has to be trained the same way a good horse is trained, Jane Melby says. The Melbys spend a lot of time practicing with their horses. Jane owns nine horses, and Cayla owns 16. They also teach other riders the fine art of barrel racing with clinics taught throughout the United States

and Canada. In addition, Jane Melby sells embryos from her champion mare, RC Back in Black, a phenomenal barrel racer named after AC/ DC’s hard rock classic. “RC Back in Black made my dreams come true,” Jane Melby says. “She was the mare I was riding when I qualified for my first National Finals Rodeo. I won over $150,000 in career earnings with her before she chipped her knee running into a turn-out pen.” These days, RC Back in Black enjoys life at the Royal Vista Southwest, an equine reproduction farm in Purcell. Growing up in northern Minnesota, Jane Melby says she had to learn about horses and barrel racing the hard way. “I tell young people wanting to get started that it takes a lot of ‘try,’” she says. “You need to be determined and have a strong work ethic. Having a horse and taking care of it properly is a lot of work in itself … not including learning how to ride and compete.” SHARON MCBRIDE

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

17


The State MAKERS

Stained Glass with Meaning

Richard Bohm works individually with clients and students to turn ‘noise into music … chaos into organization.’

I

RICHARD BOHM HAS WORKED WITH STAINED GLASS FOR MORE THAN 40 YEARS. PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

18

n the more than 40 years that he has worked with stained glass, Richard Bohm has created family and institutional treasures. In 1975, Bohm and his wife started Tulsa Stained Glass, making custom art to display in homes, business and churches. Bohm has designed stained glass for Boone Pickens Stadium at Oklahoma State University, Boston Avenue Methodist Church in downtown Tulsa and the Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis in south Tulsa. “I always encourage the client to think about how to make this stained glass more meaningful to them and have been doing that for years,” Bohm says. “We’ve had customers take windows from house to house to house

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

and box it up and they retire and take it to Florida. “It’s kind of nice that people value your work, and when you can put a meaning behind something that … is the highest level of art that you can do. You can go to school, you can increase your skill level and be the best at what you’re going to do, but if you can take that to the next level of making it meaningful, then you’ve achieved success.” In addition to working on commissioned pieces, Bohm helps others get in touch with their creative sides through classes that he teaches. “There’s a whole other process that many have lost, and that’s the creative process of design,” he says. “So what I do is when my students come in to class, before they ever sit down and learn about the glass itself, we do finger painting. They do finger painting based on my guarantee that I’m going to help them turn those finger paintings into a stained glass design. “They’re painting shapes, colors, forms. Through this, what I get to teach is art elements and art principles – all those types of things that people might not normally use in their everyday life.” During these three-hour classes, students create garden spirit sculptures and learn the basics of making stained glass. Bohm says people take the class for a variety of reasons, from date nights and birthday celebrations to coping with grief. He says the process can be therapeutic. Most of the glass used at “I teach them how to Tulsa Stained Glass comes take chaos and turn it from Kokomo, Indiana, as into harmony,” he says. well as some from Germany “Harmony is a repetition of and the Czech Republic. The line, shapes and color. It’s glass has a wide variety turning noise into music of textures, opacities and, and turning chaos into orperhaps most importantly, ganization. When you have colors. organization, it becomes “All glass has some core peaceful. If you can learn ingredients – sand, soda, to do this yourself and have ash, lime. They heat it up, that process in your head and they make glass,” Richof how to do it visually, ard Bohm says. “But, if you maybe someone is going want to make colored glass, to get the idea, ‘You know, you add metallic oxides to I don’t like my life the the dry batch and then mix way it is; maybe if I can it up. Then it goes into the get some organization and furnace [at] 3,000 degrees. apply these same kinds of [The color] is all in the core rules, maybe I can change before it’s ever made. That’s my life.’ That’s the way why it lasts so long. I mean, we’re going to change the you can’t take that color world.” out. It just gets richer.” BETH WEESE

CREATING COLOR


PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

BUSINESS

3D-elightful

Three-dimensional architectural printing provides astonishing clarity and detail … and elicits childlike reactions.

F

orget blueprints. Showing off structures in a 3D print is the newest tool in an architect’s visual and artistic communication palette. Brian Freese, principal with Freese Architecture, has utilized three-dimensional printing since 2013 and recently replaced the pricey first equipment with an upgrade. He says clients react positively to the tactile and visual sensations of holding miniatures of their buildings and admiring the works from all angles. The 3D capacity “also gives us an unparalleled ability to study an inprocess design concept or a finished solution both globally and in minute detail,” he says. Founded in 1994, Freese’s company is a full-services architectural and design firm, with areas of specialty including unique custom residences and commercial buildings that reflect the local culture, climate and history, and utilize current construction technologies, all with a modern aesthetic.

“Our solutions are decidedly modern and look of this era, but are warm and inviting,” he says. “I call our work Midwest Modern.” Freese describes people’s reactions to 3D prints as “an almost childlike fascination to what they see. Almost invariably, they want to touch the models and bend down and look inside these tiny buildings. I see ‘playtime’ written all over their faces. Then they want to see the machine itself. When we show them our 3D printer – it looks something like a small front-loading washing machine or big oven – it seems to demystify it a bit because the concept is rather simple once explained. “But they are fascinated with the 3D printed models themselves. Clients are amazed at the sight of their building or home in a built, miniature form. It is very gratifying, and a lot of fun, to see their reaction. They get a whole new level of understanding of the design and layout of their project. When we remove the roofs for them to see inside, they usually release an audible gasp.” Creating a balsa wood model by hand is time-consuming and laborious. This method has long been utilized by architects, who often share X-Acto blade war stories since the razor sharp cutting tool can be hazardous to hands and fingers “or any extremity for those of lower dexterity,” Freese says. Architects need models to study all elements of their designs, according to the All3DP.com. A specific project is often changed in order to get a perfect concept of an idea. Stored files in the 3D printer make it possible to change digital structures easily and print the model again. The architect can alter the digital model, try out variations on the fly and visualize problems easily. They architect can save time and effort, and build more accurate, cost-effective models with homogeneous surface structures. The 3D factor “has changed our business in ways I did not anticipate,” Freese says. “It definitely reinforces our reputation as a forward-thinking, progressive architectural firm. In addition to a great client presentation tool, it is a tactile, real-time medium to study alternative design options, the play of light, shade and shadow effects, and the overall form and proportion of a building, rather than being restricted only to a computer screen. It is a more visceral and elemental experience to study our designs than on computers, although we do a lot of that as well with computer modeling.” The future may mean more creativity or collaboration with clients due to 3D printing, but, for now and for Freese’s firm, 3D printing serves as a way to “cement our relationship with our clients. When we give a 3D print of a home project to clients, we’d better have tissues handy because they may just break down in tears.” TRACY LEGRAND

BRIAN FREESE SAYS CLIENTS ARE OFTEN FASCINATED BY 3D MODELS THAT ACCURATELY REPRESENT THE PLANS OF THEIR HOME OR BUSINESS. SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

19


The State INSIDER

Life After Girl Bands

Bartlesville’s Becky Hobbs has prospered in country music, but she got her start in all-girl rock bands. BECKY HOBBS, FAR LEFT IN EACH OF THESE PHOTOGRAPHS, FORMED OKLAHOMA’S FIRST ALL-GIRL BAND, THE FOUR FACES OF EVE. PHOTOS COURTESY BECKY HOBBS

20

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

Y

ou might know Bartlesville’s Becky Hobbs as a country star, with such hits as “Jones on the Jukebox” and “Hottest ‘Ex’ in Texas” to her credit. You might also know her as the co-writer of the enduring ballad “Angels Among Us” or the Conway Twitty chart-topper “I Want to Know You Before We Make Love,” to name only two of her many compositions recorded by country and pop artists. And if you’ve only encountered her work recently, you might know her as the co-creator and writer (with stage veteran Nick Sweet) of the musical Nanyehi – The Story of Nancy Ward, which has played in several cities since its 2012 debut. (It’s set to return to Tulsa’s Hard Rock on May 4-5.) What you might not know, however, is that the multitalented Hobbs was not only the organizer of Oklahoma’s very first all-girl rock ’n’ roll band, but, a few years later, an adviser to the notorious Hollywood music figure Kim Fowley, the man who master-

minded what is probably the bestknown female rock ’n’ roll group of all time, the Runaways. That happened in the mid1970s, when Becky lived in Southern California. But a decade earlier, inspired by an article she’d read in a Beatles fanzine about an all-girl group called The Lady Bugs, the College High School sophomore put together her own female rock ’n’ roll group. “I’d been in a couple of boy bands in Bartlesville – Epicurean Time Machine and Undetermined Mud,” she recalls with a laugh. “Aren’t those just terrible? The guys were all 16 or 17 and they thought they were really good. They were into Cream and fuzz guitar, and they came up with all these names.” Becky’s name for her own band was an apt one: The Four Faces of Eve. And after lots of practice, several personnel changes and a few gigs, the group attracted the attention of disc jockey Lee Bayley, who hosted KOTV’s Dance Party, a show featuring local rockers. “We started playing Dance Party, and that’s when Charlie Noel of Charlie Brown’s Guitars


got the idea of forming his own all-girl band and being the manager,” Becky says. The opportunity came at a good time for Becky who, in her own words, was “squabbling” with the other three Faces of Eve. “You know, females [in a band] could never get along,” she says. “I don’t know why. We were always after the same boy; there was jealousy; everybody wanted to be the lead singer. It was so stupid.” When Noel managed to bring Tulsa’s pioneering rock radio station KAKC and Pepsi Cola on board as additional sponsors, his idea for a new all-girl group took on a big-time aura. Auditions for the band, held in spring of 1968, brought in some 400 female rockers. Becky won the position of rhythm guitarist. (She’d soon switch to keyboards.) A contest was held to name the group, with the winning entry being Sir Prize Package. “That summer we had a lot of Sir Prize Package gigs,” Becky says. “I think one of our first might’ve been the Miss Tulsa Pageant. And we opened for the Buckinghams. By 1969, we were being booked by Mid-American Artists, burning up I-44 from Tulsa to Springfield. We wound up buying an old International Harvester truck, and I painted the hood of it like a big face, with lips and eyes, real psychedeliclooking. The police were always stopping us, thinking we were runaways.” In mid-’69, the group did run away, figuratively if not literally, from Noel, by redubbing themselves Wax Madonna during a tour in upstate New York (site of that summer’s Woodstock Festival). By the time Becky returned to Bartlesville for Christmas of 1970, she’d decided to leave Wax Madonna, which was by then a trio. Patti Quatro was calling her often from Detroit and offering her a spot in another all-female band, the Pleasure Seekers, which had recently been vacated by Patti’s sister Suzi, who was just beginning what would be an impressive solo career. Or, she could return to Louisiana, where she’d performed before Christmas, and rejoin a Baton Rouge-based band called Swampfox. “I just thought, ‘You know what? I’m sick of playing with females. I want to play with the boys,’” she says, and headed south. Flash forward to 1973. Becky and Swampfox’s Lewis Anderson (later to become an award-winning songwriter) were living in Hollywood and trying to break into the West Coast music scene. A friend back home had given them a couple of names of industry people, and one was Fowley, who by that time had not only amassed several credits in various facets of the music business, but was also, even by the generous standards of the early ’70s Hollywood scene, a true eccentric. Becky found out the latter when she called him, and he showed up at her door and demanded in vulgar terms that she fix him

something to eat “or I’m going to puke like a dog in the street.” “Oh, my gosh!” she says. “The hairs on the back of my little Okie neck stood up and I was sort of mad, but then I realized, ‘Well, I guess that’s just how he talks.’ “I could only cook tuna casserole and scrambled eggs, so I fixed him some scrambled eggs and we probably played him a few songs. We struck up a relationship. He would pay Lewis and me cash to drive him around Hollywood to his appointments. He was 6 foot 6 and thin, just skin and bone, very bizarrelooking. I think he’d had polio. There was something wrong with him that made him uncoordinated, and he didn’t drive. “Kim,” she adds, “was the first person who ever gave me money for part of the publishing [of a song]. Two of the first songs I had out there in L.A. were one I wrote by myself called ‘Paradise Is in Your Mind’ and another one Lewis and I wrote called ‘I’ll Be Your Audience.’ He said, ‘I want to co-publish those with you, and I’ll give you an advance.’ He gave me a $250 advance for ‘Paradise Is in Your Mind’ and Lewis and me a $250 advance for ‘I’ll Be Your Audience.’ To his credit, when Helen Reddy wanted to cut ‘I’ll Be Your Audience,’ [record-company executive] Artie Mogull wanted all the publishing. But Kim Fowley said, ‘Look, I’ll give up half of my half so we can get the cut.’ “When it came to business, he was fair,” she says. “He probably never made back that $250 from ‘Paradise Is in Your Mind’ because I don’t think anybody ever cut it.” In addition to his reputation as a music-biz hustler, Fowley was also known as a notorious Lothario. But, Becky says, he never made a pass at her, probably because he was working with both her and Anderson, her boyfriend. Fowley did, however, come to her with his allgirl band idea. “I knew I was too old for what he wanted,” she says. “I was 23, and he wanted 16-yearolds. But he asked me and I said, ‘Don’t bother with it. Somebody’s always getting pregnant and dropping out of the group. Everybody’s jealous of everybody else. It’s nothing but trouble.’” Despite Becky’s advice, Fowley went ahead with the Runaways. Becky went on to become a successful Nashville-based country singer and songwriter. And the two unlikely friends stayed in touch for the rest of Fowley’s life, taken by bladder cancer in 2015. (Becky Hobbs, with a band that includes Oklahoma musicians Rick Gomez and Don Morris, and her husband, Duane Sciacqua, plays Sept. 8 in Perkins for the Cimarron Breeze series of concerts. See cimarronbreeze. com for more information.) JOHN WOOLEY

BECKY HOBBS PLAYED IN SEVERAL GIRL BANDS BEFORE MAKING THE SWITCH TO NASHVILLE AND COUNTRY MUSIC. PHOTOS COURTESY BECKY HOBBS

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

21


PROMOTION

Stay Connected. Oklahoma on the Go. Visit JULY 2017

July 2017

OKmag.com

Visit OKmag.com for all the best from our magazine as well as bonus photo galleries, stories and additional content. OKmag.com delivers the best of the state straight to your phone, tablet or laptop.

Sign up for Our Newsletter

Not sure what to do this weekend? Sign up for our Weekly Hitlist at OKmag.com and get the best entertainment options each week delivered straight to your inbox. You’ll also receive a monthly newsletter so you can read each issue as soon as it hits the stands.

Oklahoma Magazine

Digital Edition

Can’t wait to read the newest issue? Check out our digital edition for an on-the-go experience of Oklahoma Magazine. Available at OKmag.com, our digital edition is the easiest way to check out the best stories in Oklahoma no matter where you are.

Get

Social

Love social media? So do we. Visit us on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter for your daily dose of photos, stories, prize giveaways and updates on Oklahoma.

FOLLOW US oklahomamag @oklahomamag OKLAHOMA

PLUS

Luxury Homes

Tulsa’s New Studio Row

okmag.com • 918.744.6205 • advertising@okmag.com

22

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

@oklahoma_mag

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA


Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Amaizeing

The corn crop plays a significant role in the economy and history of Oklahoma.

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

C

orn has been woven into the fabric of Oklahoma’s history since before the state gained its name. The multipurpose crop, which is thought to have originated in Mexico, fed and sustained many Native American tribes. The tribes introduced the crop to European immigrants and taught them how to plant and harvest it correctly. The grain plant is the most widely grown crop in the Americas, mostly due to its durability and ability to thrive in a variety of climates. There are a handful of different corn types – sweet, pop, dent and flint to name a few. Grits, animal feed, bourbon and ethanol are just a few of the many corn byproducts that fuel the state’s economy. According to the USDA state agricultural overview (nass.usda.gov), Oklahoma produces over 36 million bushels of corn annually for grain alone. So the next time you rip open a bag of popcorn or dig into a buttered cob, think about the enormous economic impact packed into those small but mighty kernels. SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

23


Life & Style

LEFT: A STAIRWAY TO THE THIRD LEVEL SEPARATES THE LIVING AREA FROM THE KITCHEN AND DINING AREAS. THE GRAY AND WHITE COLOR SCHEME IS INTEGRATED WITH BLUES AND SPLASHES OF ORANGE. BAR STOOLS LINE THE KITCHEN ISLAND, MAKING THIS SETTING AN INVITING AREA FOR CASUAL ENTERTAINING.

INTERIORS

Customized Bachelor Pad Ronette Wallace mixes modern and funky designs for a skinny, three-level townhouse with brilliant views of the OKC skyline. By M. J. Van Deventer • Photos by Reed Ewing

Y

ou could say Ronette Wallace is an interior designer who colors outside the lines. That is exactly what she did when John Morgia asked her to style the interiors for his new three-level, 2,200-square-foot, 21-foot-wide townhouse in Oklahoma City. John’s parents are of east Indian heritage, so he grew up appreciating brilliant, sensual colors. For his new home, he wanted a modern feeling and a crisp, minimalist style with colorful accents. “John was generous with trust in me to add fun, interesting pieces, many of them custom designed,” Ronette says. The townhouse was built by Adam Hawes’s design team at Innoluxe. The Toronto native has concentrated on the SoSA (South of St. Anthony) area just north of Downtown OKC.

24

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

25


Life & Style TOP: THE CONTRASTING TEXTURES OF COWHIDE AND CHROME MAKE A STRONG MASCULINE STATEMENT IN THE MASTER BEDROOM, WHICH INCLUDES AN OUTSIDE DECK. MIDDLE: THE MASTER BATH MIXES A VARIETY OF TEXTURES. A BUTLER’S CART, NEXT TO THE SHOWER, IS CLEVER AS WELL AS FUNCTIONAL FOR TOWELS AND TOILETRIES. BOTTOM: THE DINING AREA ON THE SECOND FLOOR FEATURES CUSTOM ART BY LESLEY LYNCH AND CUSTOM CHAIRS FROM LOREC RANCH COVERED WITH COWHIDE FOR A RUSTIC TEXTURAL NOTE.

26

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

“I love the modern feeling of this area,” Adam says. “It’s like a big city with tall ultramodern homes. Since I’m dealing with small lots, I have to be very thoughtful in my use of square footage in these new homes.” John invited Ronette to join the project in April as the townhouse neared completion. “John allowed me to mix textures with color while maintaining the integrity of a modern style,” Ronette says. “We created custom pieces and mixed those with urban and rustic accents to create a very fun, well-designed space that is perfect for a bachelor. Each room has a unique personality and the home flows very well.” Working with a neutral palette of white, gray and navy, Ronette completed the project to time with John’s June move-in. “Working with that color theme, I added a deliberate kaleidoscope of colors,” she says. “By using the colors purposefully and with discretion, I was able to create warmth within the coolness of the neutral colors.” Ronette has a creative design philosophy. “I don’t like to be restricted to a certain style,” she says. “I like integrating rustic pieces with modern touches to add warmth and interest to a room. I wanted modern mixed with some funky pieces.” The most unusual is a vintage painted truck door that reflects an industrial feeling. It’s a whimsical accent piece positioned between two stair levels. “Hanging it posed the greatest challenge of the project,” Ronette says. John’s townhouse has no garden, but each level includes an outside deck. Nature’s views come inside with a deck off the main living area on the second level and off the master bedroom and bath level. The rooftop deck provides an expansive view of OKC’s downtown skyline, which sparkles at night. As a designer, Ronette brings a diverse background to any project she tackles. She attended Bauder Fashion College in Arlington, Texas, for fashion merchandising, and later the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma in Chickasha. A pivotal move was taking courses from the Sheffield School of Design in New York in 2002. Then she established OTW Interiors, her “off the wall” design firm.


An inveterate shopper, Ronette scours antique stores and flea markets to find treasures for her clients. She also caters to several artisans who have served her well during her career. For John’s townhouse, she used custom art by Lesley Lynch of Edmond because “whatever I imagine, [Lesley] can create.” “I like to integrate styles that don’t adhere to strict design guidelines,” Ronette says. “I love to repurpose items my clients have. I find it more interesting to layer pieces that are vintage and new, modern and eclectic to give each project its own personality.” What she created for John is a home with a cohesive design throughout each level of the townhouse. “I like to feel that a home is well developed and interesting – that it has a story and it’s not just a group of pretty rooms,” Ronette says. “So when I was creating John’s design game plan for the townhouse, I followed my norm and colored outside the boundaries of modern design. I loved creating a space that was uniquely designed with John in mind.” John says, “ I loved the way Ronette incorporated my personality into every room.” EXPANDED PHOTO GALLERY WANT TO SEE MORE OF THIS OKC TOWNHOUSE? SEE OUR ONLINE PHOTO GALLERIES AND GET A CLOSER LOOK AT OKMAG.COM/WEB.

BOTTOM: A LONG WHITE LEATHER SOFA IS A DRAMATIC FEATURE IN THE LIVING AREA. AN OVERSIZED COFFEE TABLE ANCHORS THIS SETTING.

.

TOP: ONE OF THE GUEST BEDROOMS IS DRESSED IN A SOOTHING COLOR PALETTE OF GRAYS AND BLUES, ACCENTED BY THE WARMTH OF THE WOOD FLOOR. THE ABSTRACT IKAT PATTERN BEDSPREAD IS AN EYE-CATCHING FEATURE IN THIS ROOM. MIDDLE: COLOR ABOUNDS IN THIS SECOND FLOOR LANDING, SOFTENED WITH A COMFORTABLE WHITE CHAIR THAT IS THE STAR OF THE ROOM. CUSTOM COLORFUL PILLOWS ADD DESIGN INTEREST TO THIS COZY NOOK THAT IS PERFECT FOR READING AND RELAXING.

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

27


Life & Style

CIT Y LIFE

Two B’s … Two W’s Woodwork and wine are two reasons why Broken Bow has a million visitors a year.

B

roken Bow. Woodwork. Wine. An alliterative combination symbolizes old meeting new in this hub of forestry and tourism in far southeastern Oklahoma … as a million yearly visitors know. The Wood Art Capital of Oklahoma is the Forest Heritage Center in Beavers Bend State Park, alongside Broken Bow Lake. “When we started in 1976, we had no idea that it would become such a focus for woodwork,” Forest Heritage Center Director Doug Zook says. “[Hungarian] sculptor Peter Toth carved a piece in his ‘Whispering Giant’ series because Beavers Bend has over 50 species of trees. “That began our association with wood art. Toth’s sculpture in front our building is the most photographed object in the park.” The center has regular exhibits and teaches woodturning (using a lathe). The Masters at Work competition, Sept. 8-9, is an annual highlight. A half-dozen woodturners are “given specific projects and a time limit,” Zook says. “This year, it’s going to be on bowls. Everything created by the masters is sold or donated to benefit food banks throughout McCurtain County. We raised $10,000 last time.” Zook’s predecessor, Michelle Finch, remains on the forest center’s board and co-owns Girls Gone Wine. That winery, in its 12th year, is one of three within a few miles of each other on U.S. 259; the other two began the same day in March 2016. Finch’s father was U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project manager in the early years of Broken Bow Lake in the 1970s. Her husband, Terry Walker, was a park manager at Beavers Bend. “Our community worked hard to change the image of this area,” Finch says. “In the ’80s and ’90s, we had a crime problem, quite frankly, but it’s beautiful here. We showed that the forest industry and tourism can co-exist. We wanted to give kids a reason to stay.” Walker, incidentally, works at Girls Gone Wine and “recently got promoted from wine boy to wine stud. We’re even paying him a little bit now,” says Finch, laughing. Vojai Reed, owner of Vojai’s Winery, is the mother of Rhonda Reed, one of Finch’s partners. Vojai and her late husband, Charlie Reed, are the only spouses to have won prestigious national titles in bass fishing. Big names in the sport shop at her place.

28

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

FUN FACTS

“Jimmy Houston just came by yesterday,” she says. Cabins have existed since Beavers Bend began in the 1930s; development came in the 1990s when forests opened for cabins. In the past 20 years, the number has gone from 500 to 2,200, the Broken Bow Chamber of Commerce notes. Jesse King and her husband, who ran the Three Rivers Fly Shop from 1997 to 2016, converted their business into Fish Tales Winery last year. “The growth is just crazy,” she says. “There’s a lot of opportunity in this area.”

POPULATION 4,103 DEEP BLUE Broken Bow Lake is 185 feet, making it the deepest lake in Oklahoma and the fourth largest in the state in size. CON-CHITO The name of the Choctaw village that eventually became Broken Bow NEBRASKA? Broken Bow, Nebraska, whence came pioneer lumbermen Herman and Fred Dierks, who began a private community and named it after their hometown

BRIAN WILSON

HAPPY TRAILS Beavers Bend State Park has 16 miles of hiking trails. BIRDING EDEN McCurtain County is home to 324 species of birds. WOOD ART The Forest Heritage Center has 14 dioramas painted by Harry Rossoll, the artist who created the National Park Service’s iconic Smoky Bear.

PETER TOTH RESTORED “WHISPERING GIANT” BY ADDING AGING TO THE FACE TO REFLECT THE TIME SINCE IT WAS ORIGINALLY SCULPTED. PHOTO COURTESY FOREST HERITAGE CENTER


www.nathanharmon.com nathan@nathanharmon.com

3549 South Harvard, Tulsa 918-742-9027

T: 918.269.6284

22617 Nathan Harmon.indd 1

4/24/17 Tonis 11:01 2.indd AM 1

8/10/16 12:53 PM

Since 1964

Specializing in frameless heavy glass shower doors, mirrors, framed shower doors, glass tops and insulated glass units.

Don Tracy Glass Co. 1335 S. HARVARD â—? TULSA, OK 74112 OFFICE: (918) 744-1815 FAX: (918) 744-0917

www.dontracyglass.com

22827 Silex Interiors.indd 1

7/27/17 18222 3:14 PM Don Tracy Glass.indd 1

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29

12/14/14 4:39 PM


Life & Style H E A LT H

Head Impact

Know the risks, the symptoms and treatment needed for children and teens to recover from a concussion.

W

hether it’s through an organized sport or recreational activity, more young people are suffering from concussions. The American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine (AOSSM) reports a 60-percent increase in concussion incidence among those aged 5 to 24 from 2007 to 2014. “A concussion is any alteration of brain function caused by an impact to the head,” says Dr. Jennifer Norman, a pediatric neurologist at INTEGRIS in Oklahoma City. “This typically is associated with headache, dizziness, confusion, memory loss and difficulty concentrating.” The AOSSM also states that youths between 15 and 19 years old were the most likely to have a reported concussion and that male patients were

30

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

1.5 times likelier to have a reported concussion regardless of the sport. “It is incredibly important for children, parents and coaches to be educated in the signs and symptoms of a concussion,” Norman says. “If there is even a slight suspicion of a concussion, the athlete should immediately be removed from play until they can be evaluated. Athletes tend to be very competitive and will often sacrifice their own health for the team when in the heat of competition.” She says athletes are at high risk for severe injury or death if they return to play before the symptoms of a concussion have resolved. “If an athlete is hit again while they are recovering from a concussion – the ‘second hit phenomenon’ – the brain can suddenly swell,” Norman says. “In addition, an athlete continuing to push themselves physically or mentally while still recovering from a concussion will only lengthen the recovery process.” She recommends physical and cognitive rest until a medical professional determines the symptoms of the concussion have ceased. This period includes restrictions on electronics, schoolwork and physical activity. Dr. Theron Bliss, a family medicine physician specializing in sports medicine with St. John Health System in Tulsa, emphasizes the recovery process and says many adolescents don’t always follow the recommendations to

help modify symptoms. “Symptoms often don’t get better if kids are still on their phones, playing video games or trying to go to school,” Bliss says. “Many parents don’t want to keep their kids out of school, but then the symptoms will keep persisting and that tends to complicate treatment.” Parents should track the number of concussions and include that in a child’s medical history, especially in preseason physical evaluations. “If they have had too many concussions, we may have to keep them out of a contact sport based on their risk of having another one,” Bliss says. For youths who have had multiple concussions, Norman recommends several sports that minimize the risk of physical contact, such as golf, swimming, cross country, track and tennis. These sports allow kids the benefit of participating in athletics while minimizing the risk of recurrent head injury. “I tell all of my patients that doctors can fix a lot of problems,” Norman says. “They can replace your kidneys, liver, even heart. But you only have one brain, and there is no way to fix or replace it. Use your head wisely and save your brain.” REBECCA FAST

HEADS UP

DEVELOPED BY THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, HEADS UP IS A SERIES OF EDUCATIONAL INITIATIVES TO HELP IMPROVE PREVENTION, RECOGNITION AND RESPONSE TO CONCUSSION AND OTHER BRAIN INJURIES. RESOURCES ARE AVAILABLE FOR PARENTS, COACHES, ATHLETES, SCHOOLS AND SPORTS OFFICIALS AT WWW.CDC.GOV/HEADSUP.


Mommy Maids • Residential or Commercial • Call for FREE Estimates

Gift Certificates Available!

$75 for 2 hours of Basic Cleaning

Creating a New Conventional

Just mention this ad. Offer expires 09/30/17

2017

918.938.8222 www.mommy-maids.com

“It’s hard to compete with a Mom’s touch.”

18405 Mommy Maids 1-8H.indd 1

5416 S. Yale, Suite 300, Tulsa, OK 74135 918.779.3163 • www.rebellionenergy.com

7/28/17 22528 10:52 AM Rebellion Energy.indd 1

3/3/17 9:07 AM

Your doctor. Your health. Your way. With Castle Connolly Private Health Partners, LLC (CCPHP), you can experience a return to a more personalized, connected and collaborative approach to healthcare with your very own top doctors.

(918) 828-5000 INFO@TULSATECH.EDU

22847 Tulsa Tech.indd 1

8/22/17 8:55 AM

KENT HOFFMAN

to our Customers for voting us The Best of the Best.

CONSTRUCTION 821 W WILSHIRE OKLAHOMA CITY

Call (212) 367-1950 or visit www.CCPHP.net

405.607.4141 19347 Kent Hofman.indd 1

CCPHP works to empower and protect the physicianpatient relationship, helping physicians practice the way they intended, by putting patients first.

9/17/15 11:38 AM

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

22737 Castle Connolly.indd 1

31

6/6/17 3:42 PM


Life & Style

The Chrysalis of Cuba

D E S T I N AT I O N S

Havana’s lively arts scene, cultural delights, iconic imagery and jazz cafes emerge as Americans visit the island. Story and Photography by Gina Michalopulos Kingsley

C

uba crumbles, perseveres and changes. It greets, sizzles and gyrates. And when Cuba flaunts, Havana is its vibrant butterfly. “Mira, mira!” (Look, look!) is heard constantly due to contagious enthusiasm. Iconic images of rum, cigars, mojitos, coffee and salsa define most visitors’ itinerar

32

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

ies. Exorbitantly orange flamboyant trees lining Havana’s streets welcome you. A city founded in 1519, with neoclassical and baroque architecture, confronts you with a patina of sassy vintage cars, horse carriages, aquamarine, amaranth and art nouveau. Getting to Cuba has its challenges with visas and travel restrictions; internet and phone service is limited. However, two American millennials on a recent flight to the island looked forward to a “technology cleanse.” Under the people-to-people travel policy, we lodged at casas particulares instead of hotels. Staying with locals and dining at family-owned paladars directly support the people. On our first day, sultry sounds of thunder blended perfectly with the restaurant’s band. Within minutes, the rain ceased and provided a climate spectrum, from hot sun to cool breezes. A divine rainbow at dusk framed the stupefying


ERNEST HEMINGWAY USED THE VILLAGE OF COJIMAR AS HIS BASE FOR FISHING AND WAS THE BACKGROUND FOR THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA.

THE RELAXED STYLE OF THE HAVANESE PEOPLE PERMEATES THE CITY.

Fabrica de Arte Cubano. A multicourse dinner at Tierra, inside the gallery, was followed by DJs, modern dancers and provocative art. Earthy, fit Havanese have a relaxed style that defies definition. The food is not spicy and neither are the people. They don’t convey the frenetic pace of some cultures’ cigarettes and motorcycles; rather, one sees a purposeful walk to work with a smiling greeting, neither aggressive nor languid. Cuban culture fuses Afro-Latino backgrounds with blended religions of Spanish Catholicism and Nigerian voodoo, evident in museums. In the smoldering visuals of jazz cafes and galleries, dance and art juxtapose with governmental constraints. These conditions may contribute to people’s needs to lift their spirits through unfettered expressions, which they’ve mastered. Like a butterfly emerging from a worn-out chrysalis, the art scene thrives and soars. The resplendent colonial architecture of Old Havana’s cobbled streets hypnotized us as we sauntered through labyrinthine alleyways reverberating with jazz and salsa beats. Cortadito (Cuban espresso) breaks revealing Havana’s beauty reinforced our immersion as we powered through our itinerary. Cultural sightseeing filled our days,

A GIANT RENDITION OF REVOLUTIONARY CHE GUEVARA ON THE SIDE OF A BUILDING DOMINATES A HAVANA STREET.

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

33


Life & Style

and mojitos filled our nights. A neighborhood transformed by Jose Fuster’s artwork showcased mosaic-encrusted houses as homages to Barcelona’s Antoni Gaudi. Prancing horses pulled carriages. An Afro-Cubano dance performance was imbued with a trance-like spirituality and exotic costumes. Later, our private salsa lessons, with instructors from the awardwinning Tropicana, left us breathless. Then came the exotic descent into a rainforest riverbank. This verdant area with rushing waters revealed a Santeria blood sacrifice and cleansing ritual involving chickens. My wearing all white (like the folk dress of the Santeria religion) may have permitted me to take photos. After seeing Ernest Hemingway’s house, we had lunch at Bodega las Brisas, which included meeting an old fisherman displaying photos of himself with the famous writer. On the seaside promenade, we joined a strolling band, shaking maracas and singing along, “Viva America! Viva Cuba!” Dinner on the balcony of La Moneda Cubana overlooked the largest Spanish fort ever built. At sunset, among the palm trees, canons fired into cyclamencolored skies. Analyzing this time capsule destination while riding in a top-down convertible, we became exposed to a cityscape before the inevitable metamorphisis of tourism. Among transitions, Havana’s ebullience endures and is symbolic of the butterfly representing change, color and jubilation. And our salsa instructor, emphasizing our most important dance tip, essentially summed up our trip: “Remember! The most important thing is to have joy.”

THE COLORS AND JUBILATION EVIDENT THROUGH CUBA REMIND PEOPLE “THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS TO HAVE JOY.”

34

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


Buy

Local

www.traversmahanapparel.com

South Lewis at 81st • The Plaza • 918-296-4100

22830 BOK Center.indd 1 Bryan Waytula - “Girl of the Water”

7/28/17 22834 10:47 AM Travers Mahan.indd 1

(drawing) Best of Class

8/8/17 4:24 PM

12 TH ANNUAL

CHEROKEE ART MARKET 14

&

15

H

EROKE

E

C

OCTOBER

A

R

T

T

CherokeeArtMarket.com MARK

E

© 2017 Cherokee Nation Businesses. All Rights Reserved.

22821 Cherokee Art Market.indd 1

7/27/17 22831 11:57 AM Sherman, Texas.indd 1

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

35

7/31/17 11:01 AM


Fall Fashion Essentials As the weather cools down, keep your style hot with staples like booties, fur and velvet.

SHOES FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: CHLOE MULTI-STRAP PATENT LEATHER PUMPS, $880; JIMMY CHOO SUEDE PEEP TOE BOOTIES, $995; SALVATORE FERRAGAMO PATENT LEATHER FLOWER HEEL PUMPS, $595; JIMMY CHOO SUEDE PEEP TOE BOOTIES, $995; JIMMY CHOO STRETCH SUEDE POINT-TOE BOOTIES, $950; STUART WEITZMAN PEARL VELVET BLOCK HEEL BOOTIES, $575; TORY BURCH EMBROIDERED BOOTIES, $528; JOIE LACE-UP VELVET ANKLE BOOTS, $348; JIMMY CHOO LEATHER BOOTIES, $895, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

PRODUCT PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN

NICHOLAS

NAEEM KHAN

BALMAIN

ALTUZARRA

SONIA RYKIEL

MAX MARA

Life & Style

ST YLE


SCENE 1

Paula Love, Jeanne White-Ginder, Frederick Redwine, Justin Edwards; Positive Heroes Speaker Series, Oklahoma AIDS Care Fund, Oklahoma City

2

Kelly Moody, Suzanne Reynolds, Lance & Stacy McDaniel; The Art of Brunch, Oklahoma Contemporary, Oklahoma City

3

Jacquelyn LaMar, Latasha Timberlake, Tim Sowecke; Kehinde Wiley Members’ Preview, OKCMOA, Oklahoma City

4

Alisha Harter, Ann Hendrich, David Pynn, Pam Kiser, Sheila Stern; Regional Onboarding Center Expansion Celebration, St. John Health System, Tulsa

1

5

Roger Ramseyer, Rachel Hutchings, Devin Levine, Lauren Brookey, Henry Primeaux; Committee members for Vision in Education Leadership Award Dinner, Sept. 14; Signature Symphony, Tulsa

6

Lauren Houston, Steve Grantham, event chair and director for Green Leaf Gala, Oct. 7; Up With Trees, Tulsa

7

Cammie Laporte, Pat Daley, Gregg Conway, Karen Clark; Burn Co. event, Tulsa Boys Home, Tulsa

8

Betsy & Gerry Jackson, co-chairs of Red Ribbon Gala, March 3, 2018; Tulsa CARES, Tulsa

9

Debbie Naifeh, Teresa Goodbary, Matt Clark, Patti Horn, Teresa Sellers; Celebrity Wait Night, Upward Transitions, Oklahoma City

2 3

4

6

10

Ali, Jeff, Martha, Mike and Samantha Coffman; Martha & Mike Coffman are co-chairs for Renaissance Ball, Sept. 8; OKC MOA, Oklahoma City

11

Janet Chambers, Bill Chambers, Nicole Yoak, Tyler Yoak; Vintage ‘53 Dinner, Total Source for Hearing-Loss and Access, Tulsa

12

Mick Walsh, Mark Goldman, W.C. Goad, Kristine Stover; Behind the Scenes at the Lost Kingdom, Tulsa Zoo, Tulsa

5

9

EXPANDED PHOTO GALLERY THERE’S MORE FUN WHERE THESE CAME FROM. SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM OKLAHOMA’S PREMIER CHARITY EVENTS AT OKMAG.COM/WEB. 8

7

11

12

10

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

37


FACING PAGE LEFT: CARMEN MARC VALVO RUFFLE ONE-SHOULDER GOWN, $745; MANOLO BLAHNIK METALLIC LEATHER ANKLE-STRAP SANDALS, $745; MILLY “BITE ME” CLUTCH, $295; NEST HAMMERED DANGLE EARRINGS, $250; NEST TEARDROP FRINGE CHAIN BRACELET, $150; STEPHANIE KANTIS NUGGET BANGLE BRACELETS, $250 EACH, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE MIDDLE: SAMUELSOHN SUIT COAT AND PANTS, $1,450; DAVID DONAHUE WHITE SHIRT, $145; ZELLI ITALIAN CALF-SKIN SHOES, $475; ROBERT TALBOTT TIE, $98.50; JZ RICHARDS POCKET SQUARE, $50; JONATHAN WACHTEL AUTHENTIC CUBAN FIVE CENTURO CUFFLINKS, $150; MARTIN DINGMAN AMERICAN ALLIGATOR BELT, $650, TRAVERS MAHAN

Fall Into

FASHION The season’s trends and musthaves. Revisit crushed velvet, feathers, bold prints, vibrant reds, glitter, fur, denim, winter florals and plenty of booties and pumps. The world is your runway. Photos by Nathan Harmon

38

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

RIGHT: LES COPAINS LEOPARD JACKET, $1,295; LES COPAINS BLACK TURTLENECK, $195; LES COPAINS LEOPARD SKIRT, $445; SALVATORE FERRAGAMO POINT-TOE VELVET BOOTIES, $1,090; MILLY “I HEART ME” CLUTCH, $295; STEPHANIE KANTIS TWO-TONE DROP EARRINGS, $185; STEPHANIE KANTIS ORBIT NECKLACE CHAIN, $145; STEPHANIE KANTIS SUNBURST PENDANT, $385, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

Hair by Shawna Burroughs, Jara Herron Salon • Makeup by Starla Ward, StunningbyStarla Makeup Artistry • Models courtesy Brink Model Management and The Linda Layman Agency • Clothing and accessories courtesy Saks Fifth Avenue and Travers Mahan


SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

39


LES COPAINS PATTERNED KNIT JACKET, $795; LES COPAINS PATTERNED SKIRT, $365; JIMMY CHOO VINTAGE ROSE LEATHER PUMPS, $795; LOEFFLER RANDALL SUEDE CLUTCH, $295; LES COPAINS FUR SCARF, $470; ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE PYRITE AND LEATHER CLIP-ON EARRINGS, $345; MAJORICA ORGANIC PEARL AND STERLING SILVER RING, $115; ADRIANA ORSINI CRYSTAL CUFF BRACELET, $145; ADRIANA ORSINI PAVE CRYSTAL THREE-ROW BANGLE BRACELET, $160, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE FACING PAGE LEFT: ALICE AND OLIVIA FLORAL ROMPER, $295; JIMMY CHOO STRETCH METALLIC VELVET POINT-TOE BOOTIES, $895; LOEFFLER RANDALL LOCK FOX FUR TRIMMED LEATHER BAG, $550; STEPHANIE KANTIS SUBDUED DISC EARRINGS, $185; MAJORICA ORGANIC PEARL AND STERLING SILVER RING, $115, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE RIGHT: ALICE AND OLIVIA TUNIC DRESS, $295; STUART WEITZMAN PEARL BACARI VELVET BLOCK HEEL BOOTIES, $575; LOEFFLER RANDALL LOCK VELVET BAG, $550; ADRIANA ORSINI CRYSTAL SPHERE EARRINGS, $145; MOVADO BLACK STAINLESS STEEL BRACELET WATCH, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

41


LEFT: ALICE AND OLIVIA HARMON SATIN CAMISOLE, $195; ALICE AND OLIVIA CINA FEATHER PARTY SKIRT, $495; MANOLO BLAHNIK METALLIC LEATHER BLOCK HEEL BOOTIES, $995; REBECCA MINKOFF METALLIC LEATHER CLUTCH, $95; ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE SHELL TASSEL EARRINGS, $265; ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL STATION FAUX-PEARL NECKLACE AS BRACELET, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE RIGHT: ALICE AND OLIVIA RUFFLED VELVET DRESS, $330; STUART WEITZMAN PEARL-STUDDED SUEDE BLOCK HEELS, $455; MILLY RUFFLE ZIP-TOP LEATHER BAG, $250; MOVADO STAINLESS STEEL BRACELET WATCH, $695; ALEXIS BITTAR PAVE EDGE SEGMENT HINGE BANGLE, $275; ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE HINGE CUFF, $255; ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE CRYSTAL-ENCRUSTED SCULPTURAL HINGE BANGLE, $275, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

42

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


PETER MILLAR COLLECTION EXCURSIONIST TRENCH COAT, $898; PETER MILLAR COLLECTION 100 PERCENT MERINO WOOL SOFT COAT, $898; PETER MILLAR COLLECTION 100 PERCENT LORO CASHMERE SWEATER, $548; PETER MILLAR COLLECTION ALL-COTTON SPORT SHIRT, $228; PETER MILLAR COLLECTION VINTAGE-WASH JEANS, $198; PETER MILLAR COLLECTION SKYLINE SNEAKER, $278; W. KLEINBURG QUILTED SOFTCURED ALLIGATOR BELT, $450, TRAVERS MAHAN SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

43


THREE FLOOR CINNAMON GATHERED MIDI DRESS, $513; JIMMY CHOO LEOPARD-PRINT CALF HAIR PUMPS, $795; FURLA PATENT CLUTCH, $258; NEST MULTICOLORED DROP EARRINGS, $195; NEST SKINNY FACETED BANGLE BRACELETS, $250 EACH, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

44

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


DIANE VON FURSTENBERG LACE SHELL BLOUSE, $328; DIANE VON FURSTENBERG OVERLAY TAILORED PENCIL SKIRT, $368; JIMMY CHOO ANKLESTRAP PUMPS, $1,150; MILLY “SLAY” CLUTCH, $295; ADRIANA ORSINI PAVE LINK DROP EARRINGS, $175; ADRIANA ORSINI CRYSTAL CUFF BRACELET, $145; ADRIANA ORSINI PAVE CRYSTAL THREE-ROW BANGLE BRACELET, $160; MAJORICA ORGANIC PEARL AND STERLING SILVER RING, $115, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

FOR MORE FALL FASHION LOOKS AND A BEHIND-THESCENES VIDEO OF THE SHOOT, VISIT OKMAG.COM/WEB. SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


By Brian Wilson

Without any glamour, athletes face long bus rides, offseason jobs and personal sacrifice as they chase their dreams. A common perception of professional athletes is one of extravagant salaries, pampering and first-class accommodations and travel. But that lifestyle is only for those on sports’ top rungs. The vast majority of paid athletes compete in minor leagues, which are full of ambition, part-time jobs, overnight bus rides, goal-setting and pure passion for competition. These athletes, who can quickly be replaced in a lineup, cut from a roster or traded to another team, form unique bonds because of circumstances that are far from glamorous. And, as they all say, “Hey, I’m getting paid to play a sport I love.” Here’s a look at some minor leaguers and their workaday lives.

OILERS DEFENSEMAN DENNIS BROWN LIVES AND WORKS IN TULSA YEAR-ROUND. PHOTO BY KEVIN PYLE

46

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


Dennis Brown, Tulsa Oilers

“It’s not about money … it’s a love of the game.”

Born and raised in suburban Los Angeles, this hockey defenseman skates to work … not on ice blades but via his stereotypical California longboard. The second-year Oiler lives in the Y Lofts, three blocks south of his “office,” the BOK Center. He and his girlfriend, a Michigander, “enjoy Tulsa so much that we stay downtown to live,” Brown says. “Tulsa’s a great place to train and work in the offseason.” Ah, the offseason job. Until the mid-1970s, major league athletes had such employment to pay the bills. Only big names secured contracts allowing for comfort between seasons. Enormous television contracts and profitsharing changed that. But earning money when one isn’t playing is the norm in the minor leagues, as Brown attests. He is a shuttle driver for the Aloft hotel and a valet for the Mayo Hotel, both downtown. “I have mouths to feed, and I’m on an East Coast Hockey League contract,” he says. “Once the season stops, so does the contract. It’s tough sometimes because I also work out everyday. Some guys can close the door on hockey for four months, but I can’t. “There’s a lot of pressure to stay in shape. People want to take your job. Some people thrive in that environment, and some don’t.” Brown focuses on reaching the American Hockey League, just below the National Hockey League. “I have to make an impression and play well consistently,” he says. “When I was a kid, my goal was the NHL, but as you get older that changes. By the time you’re 14 or 15, you know the guys who are going to be top-flight. So I changed my priorities.” First was to play in the top American junior league, which he did. Second was to play four years on scholarship at a Division I hockey school; he went to Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. “It’s not about the money … it’s a love of the game,” Brown says. “The game’s been great to me.” SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

47


Brady Ballew, Tulsa Roughnecks

Since he was a young teen, this soccer midfielder has had two passions: business and his sport. Those shape what he does in Tulsa, his home for three years. “I read any book about people in business,” the suburban Seattle native says. “I wanted to know about their failures, not just their successes.” After playing on scholarship for four years at Seattle University, Ballew assumed he would take his marketing communications degree into the business world. “But I took a chance and paid $300 to enter a combine,” says Ballew, referring to a gathering where multiple professional teams examine a group of athletes. “There was something that David Irving [the Roughnecks’ technical director] saw in me.” Those skills are Ballew’s speed, ball distribution and teamwork. He has taken that third quality and dived into the community. In addition to working at lululemon, where he met his longtime girlfriend, Claire Spears, he became involved in numerous civic projects, such as the group that conceived the City of Tulsa’s new flag. He also made business connections, which led him and Spears, a Bishop Kelley High School alumna, to create Press Cafe and Yoga, opening in November in the Brady Arts District. The name comes

from brewing coffee in a French press and yoga techniques that involve pressing and putting pressure on muscles. “As far as I know, it’ll be the only hot yoga and coffee studio in the country,” Ballew says. “Most people who take yoga are women, and after or before classes they go to a coffee shop or a bar. We’ll be a one-stop place. And our yoga prices will be lower than most because we can supplement the cost with sales of coffee and wine. “Tulsa took me in and made me feel welcome. It’s pretty cool that at age 25 I’ll bring jobs to Tulsa with our business.” But during the season, soccer is his business. And while he skateboards to work like Brown (Ballew lives in the Jacob Lofts, two blocks from ONEOK Field), life in the United Soccer League includes 15-hour bus rides to Brownsville, Texas. “It’s tough not going to bed after a night game; instead, you climb in that bus,” Ballew says. “There’s professional fortitude involved. There’s a lot of sacrifice. But when you’re good as something, you want to keep doing it for as long as you can because you never know when an opportunity will come. “Still, I’ve always been a guy with a backup plan. For me, it’s Tulsa, a thriving place that’s on the edge of greatness – a small town feel with big city aspirations.”

“There’s professional fortitude involved. There’s a lot of sacrifice.”

48

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


“Every June, the Dodgers draft 40 guys who can take your place.”

DRILLERS PRESIDENT MIKE MELEGA COMPLIMENTS MATT BEATY FOR “HIS CONSISTENCY, CHARACTER AND ATTITUDE.” PHOTO COURTESY RICH CRIMI, TULSA DRILLERS

Matt Beaty, Tulsa Drillers

BRADY BALLEW SCORED THE FIRST GOAL FOR THE ROUGHNECKS AFTER THEY CAME BACK INTO EXISTENCE IN 2015. “HE IS A GREAT AMBASSADOR IN THE COMMUNITY,” TEAM VICE PRESIDENT BRIAN CARROLL SAYS.

When a bus becomes a de facto hotel room, which happens when the baseball team travels to Corpus Christi, Texas, for a series, camaraderie is essential. “We kind of dread the long, 10- and 12-hour bus rides,” the 24-year-old third baseman says. “But it’s not that bad with a good group of guys who joke around but also know how to be serious about the game. Our guys know when to be funny and when to be quiet.” Beaty’s offseason is tied to his wife’s work as a journalist. They have lived the past few years in Corpus Christi, where she was a reporter, but they don’t know where they’ll be after the Texas League season ends in early September. It could be Arizona, Tennessee or Georgia. “It’s tough to find work because few people want to hire you for such a short time,” says Beaty, who has sold ads for newspapers and taken other marketing jobs to make ends meet. Like most minor leaguers, Beaty trains nearly every day in the offseason because of the Los Angeles Dodgers’ competitive farm system. “Every June, the Dodgers draft 40 guys who

can take your place,” he says. “Plus, there are guys in independent leagues chasing you.” Beaty played at Belmont University in Nashville. He says many minor leaguers often live in the offseason where they competed collegiately. “Or they go where their parents live or where their spouses have jobs,” he says. “Regardless, it’s always good to spend those months with familiar faces.” The minor leagues are unpredictable because of numerous variables. For instance, a player’s batting average may suddenly rise or fall because he may only see a particular pitcher once a year. Maintaining an even keel is a necessity for survival. “When you’re way up, things can turn south immediately,” Beaty says. “I had a college coach who talked about white-hot coals. You can’t cook anything with really hot coals or coals that are just lit or almost burned out. You have to wait until they’re white for the best grilling. “We need to stay in that medium state of mind. Everything eventually works out, just not in the time frame you may have in mind.”

PHOTO COURTESY BROOKE CARROLL, TULSA ROUGHNECKS FC

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

49


ACES ofFACES

ACES ofFACES

ulsa

Your doctor. Your attorney. The teacher at your child’s school.

Tulsa

ACES ofFACES These are the faces you see when you do business locally in Oklahoma. These are people who are not only trusted names in their fields, but also as invested in the local community as you are. These are the people who can turn a business transaction into a personal connection. These are the people who choose to work locally and live alongside their customers. These are the professionals who help Oklahoma thrive by basing themselves inside the state they serve.

KC

ACES

OKC

These are the Faces of Oklahoma.

50

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


FACES FACES of of

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FACES ofFACES

of

Tulsa

Tulsa

FACES FACES of of

OKC

FACES

OKC

of

LANCE BRYAN, TOM FERGUSON, BEN KIRK, MICHAEL LINSCOTT, STEPHANIE KAISER PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

THE FACE OF LAW

Doerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson | www.dsda.com

D

oerner, Saunders, Daniel & Anderson’s rich history spans more than 120 years while serving Oklahomans in complex legal matters. Founded in Indian Territory in 1896, our lawyers were modern leaders who actively shaped our region to help pioneer success. We have represented many clients for decades, helping them grow, survive economic downturns and other hardships, and thrive during boom times regardless of where their business interests take them. Our history plays an 2 W. 2nd St., Ste. 700 Tulsa | 918.582.1211

important role in today’s contemporary society and business world – evident in our depth of experience and get-it-done attitude that each of our lawyers brings to the table. Our work ethic permeates our firm and is demonstrated by our lawyers’ passionate commitment to civic and charitable boards and organizations. Today, with over 50 attorneys practicing in three Oklahoma cities, Doerner is one of the oldest law firms in Oklahoma.

105 N. Hudson Ave., Ste. 1000 Oklahoma City | 405.319.3500

1800 N. Interstate Drive, Ste. 104 Norman | 405.319.3501 SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

51


S ofFACES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

S ofFACES

a

Tulsa

S ofFACES

C

OKC

S

TOM BOYCE, AUSTIN BOYCE, JOHN BOYCE

THE FACE OF HEATING AND AIR

A

Airco Service, Inc. | www.aircoservice.com

irco Service was founded in 1961 by John R. and Louise Boyce. After all the years in business, Airco has earned the third-generation family-owned reputation that Oklahoma customers trust. Airco takes pride in their workmanship with certified trained technicians, at delivering the best quality and customer service to their customers. Airco meets customers’ needs on service repairs and provides free estimates on equipment replacements. From heating, cooling, electric and plumbing, Airco is the “one call does it all” service company. With over 160 trucks and more than 200 employees, Airco provides service to both residential and commercial properties across the state of Oklahoma. 11331 East 58Th Street Tulsa | 918.252.5667

52

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

The company has received multiple awards, including the Dave Lennox Award for being among the top 25 Lennox dealers in North America out of 7,800 Lennox dealers across the country from 2008 to 2016. For the past three years, the EPA has named Airco Service to the EPA’s Century Club Award, which is given to 100 leaders in home energy efficiency each year. Public Service Co. of Oklahoma has named Airco as a Top Performer in its Power Saving program each year since 2010, and Airco has received the Oklahoma Natural Gas Partnership Award for Innovative Energy Solution Oklahomans have rewarded Airco Service for its dedication to its customers by naming the company as Best of the Best in Oklahoma Magazine from 2010 through 2017.

343 Magnolia Dr. Langley | 918.782.2263

4320 Charter Ave. Oklahoma City | 405.715.2665


FACES FACES of of

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FACES ofFACES

of

Tulsa

Tulsa

FACES FACES of of

OKC

FACES

OKC

of

NANCY KANDYBOWICZ, RN; ANGELA YOUNG; HEATH HANOCH, PT; SIERRA MARTIN, LPN; KIM MORRIS-PRICE; ELLEN GREGORY, RN PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

THE FACE OF ORTHOPAEDICS Center for Orthopaedic Reconstruction and Excellence www.corejenks.com

P

atient care is at our core. The Center for Orthopaedic Reconstruction and Excellence, also known as CORE, is an orthopaedic hospital offering expertise through its knowledgeable medical teams, medical services and trustworthy patient relations. CORE’s medical team provides compassionate service with the most effective, outcome-driven treatments available in orthopaedics and pain management. Unique in patient relations, CORE guides patients through their treatment process from pre-admissions to recovery, ensuring excellence at each stage of treatment. CORE’s facility has spacious, private in-patient rooms, complimentary Wi-Fi, a bistro and electronic monitoring of the patient’s movement throughout

the hospital. CORE serves the community with a 24-hour emergency room and technologically advanced facility, providing an atmosphere focused on patients and their caregivers. They specialize in orthopaedic surgery, including spine and pain management, as well as ear, nose and throat procedures. CORE’s dedicated team members strive for quality patient care resulting in better outcomes for a higher quality of life. Patient care is more than the physicians and technology, it’s about their compassionate staff coming together to provide the most healing environment possible for each patient. CORE ensures everyone, from those in Tulsa to the surrounding rural communities, access to first-rate, cost effective health care.

3029 W. Main St. Jenks | 918.701.2300 SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

53


ES ofFACES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

ES ofFACES

sa

Tulsa

ES ofFACES

C

OKC

ES

T

THE FACE OF INNOVATIVE HEALTH INSURANCE GlobalHealth | www.GlobalHealth.com

rust. It’s what drives GlobalHealth’s mission to deliver the best healthcare coverage in the industry. From its leaders to employees, the commitment to providing affordable and effective health coverage to Oklahomans is clear. GlobalHealth is a

54

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

health maintenance organization with an innovative approach to care, focused on member outreach and care management. GlobalHealth believes in comprehensive member engagement to earn the satisfaction and confidence of those it serves. The company is redefining the way members engage

Headquartered in both Oklahoma City and Tulsa.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

DAVID THOMPSON, NANCY REED, TAYLA HARRIS, DEE DELAPP, SCOTT VAUGHN PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

with their insurance provider by using a predictive analytics model that has proven effective in reducing the number of emergency room visits, admissions and re-admissions. This has translated into a 5 percent reduction in the company’s healthcare costs in 2016. GlobalHealth offers competitive benefits to Oklahomans who need it most. The company serves Oklahoma educators and state employees, Medicare Advantage members, federal employees and private employer groups. GlobalHealth is truly an Oklahoma staple – and its employees capitalize on their regional knowledge to help members find solutions that go beyond standard healthcare options. “Our member outreach program helps close

‘care gaps,’ which helps reduce emergency room and hospital admissions,” said Scott Vaughn, GlobalHealth president and chief executive officer. “This results in improved health outcomes that can be measured. We invest in proactive and preventive care so our members can have better overall health outcomes and our products remain more affordable.” Also joining Vaughn in the company’s leadership team are Dee Delapp, senior vice president and chief sales and marketing officer, Tayla Harris, senior vice president and chief financial officer, Nancy Reed, senior vice president and chief compliance officer, and David Thompson, senior vice president and chief operating officer.

SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

55


S ofFACES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE FACE OF OB/GYN

S ofFACES

a

Tulsa

Melanie Blackstock, MD www.obgyntulsa.com

S ofFACES

C

D

OKC

S

r. Melanie Blackstock grew up in Southern California and attended the University of California at Berkeley before graduating from the University of Oklahoma Medical School and serving her OB/ GYN residency at the University of Massachusetts. “I was blessed to be hired by Dr. Rhonda Lunn and Dr. Therese DeMouy to be their partner. They were two of the finest OB/GYNs I have ever known,” she says. “My practice has both evolved and stayed the same. I am still thrilled about every delivery and helping moms and babies be safe, happy and healthy. And robotic surgery is always fascinating, and women are going back to their lives in days rather than weeks. “ Blackstock says her practice has changed in other ways. She routinely counsels women on dietary issues to lead healthier and happier lives and has even provided the only FDA cleared laser program to kill fat cells. “I have found these methods to be very beneficial for my patients. We even treat men with problem areas- a first for me!” Please join Blackstock and her staff for an open house showcasing SCULPSURE for fat cell destruction and the MONALISA for vaginal rejuvenation on Tuesday, Sept.12th at her office at 5:30 p.m. Blackstock has been recognized for her dedication and care for patients by being selected by Oklahomans as one of Oklahoma Magazine’s The Best of the Best, most recently placing first among OB/GYNs for Tulsa in 2017. 6465 South Yale Ave. Ste. 310 Tulsa | 918.236.3000 MELANIE BLACKSTOCK, MD

56

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


FACES FACES of of

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FACES ofFACES

of

Tulsa

Tulsa

FACES FACES of of

OKC

FACES

OKC

of

DR. LANETTE SMITH PHOTO COURTESY LISA KLEEFELD, BYERS CREATIVE

THE FACE OF BREAST HEALTH

D

Dr. LaNette Smith | www.ocsri.org/breast-center

r. LaNette Smith is a board-certified, fellowship trained breast surgeon who works closely with other specialists to provide a multidisciplinary approach to breast care. Smith recently joined Oklahoma Cancer Specialists and Research Institute (OCSRI) to create OCSRI Breast Center, connecting two primary leaders in healthcare to create an even stronger cancer-fighting force. She previously practiced with Breast Surgery of Tulsa and now serves as the medical director for Breast Surgical Services at St. John Medical Center.

Smith was the first fellowship-trained breast surgeon to establish practice in northeastern Oklahoma and has been named a Top Doctor in Oklahoma for multiple years by Castle Connolly. She is a member of the American Society of Breast Surgeons, American Medical Association, Oklahoma State Medical Association and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. Smith provides consultation, diagnosis and treatment for women with breast concerns. Her goal is to provide a caring, comfortable atmosphere where all your breast health questions can be completely addressed.

1836 E. 15th St. Tulsa | 918.585.5658 SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

57


S ofFACES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

S ofFACES

a

Tulsa

S ofFACES

C

OKC

S

DR. JAMES CAMPBELL AND MALISSA SPACEK

THE FACE OF MEDICAL SPAS AND WEIGHT LOSS

BA Medical Spa & Weight Loss Center | www.baweightspa.com

B

A Med Spa & Weight Loss Center is Tulsa’s premier medical spa and weight loss center. Managing partner and founder Malissa Spacek, along with her partner and overseeing physician Dr. Campbell and their expert staff, designs weight loss packages to meet the unique, individual needs of each patient. At the BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center, we strive to improve the lives of our patients by helping them to reach their goals so they feel and look their best. Whether it be weight loss, Botox®, dermal fillers,

Coolsculpting®, Ultherapy®, hormone replacement therapy, or one of our many other services, BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center offers top-of-line medical spa procedures and treatments. Our goal is to ensure that every patient who comes through our front door leaves feeling that their expectations have been exceeded. From the moment they check in at the front desk to meeting with one of our various medical professionals, and even after they have left, our patients know they have been cared for by a staff who values their individual needs and treatment goals.

500 S. Elm Pl. Broken Arrow | 918.872.9999

58

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


FACES FACES of of

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FACES ofFACES

of

Tulsa

Tulsa

FACES FACES of of

OKC

FACES

OKC

of

GUY LEWIS

PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

THE FACE OF RESORT-STYLE RETIREMENT LIVING

G

Hyde Park at Tulsa Hills | www.hydeparktulsa.com

uy Lewis and the Hyde Park development team had a vision for Tulsa. They wanted Tulsans to have the option of retiring to a resort-style community without having to move across the country. From that dream, Hyde Park was born. Hyde Park features custom-built, right-sized homes by some of Tulsa’s finest builders. Ranging from 1,400 square feet up to 2,800 square feet, most of the homes are single story without any steps. No matter the size, each home includes at least two

bedrooms, two bathrooms and a two-car garage. Some homes feature a third bedroom or a room that can be used for multiple purposes. The magnificent $2 million “Hyde-Out” clubhouse serves as Hyde Park’s focal point and features an exercise room, dance studio, pickleball courts and conference room. A library with a gas fireplace and game room featuring shuffleboard, pool table and LCD TV are also available. Come and see why so many active 55 and older adults are grabbing their piece of Tulsa real estate and calling Hyde Park at Tulsa Hills home, sweet home.

8450 S. Phoenix Pl. W. Tulsa | 918.491.7720 SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

59


S ofFACES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

S ofFACES

a

Tulsa

S ofFACES

C

OKC

S

ASHLEY ZIMMERMAN, DENNIS PINE PHOTO BY MARY BETH EDE

THE FACE OF TILE AND STONE

A

Visions tile and stone, inc.

family-owned, Midtown business with a strong focus on its clients, Visions tile and stone, inc. got its start in Dennis and Lorrie Pine’s garage in May 2009. Based on word-of-mouth referrals, Visions quickly expanded into their second, larger showroom in 2013 and has been located in the Pearl District since September 2009. Their success is based off their experience: Dennis has 38 years of experience in the tile and stone industry, and Lorrie

has more than 35 years of accounting and financial industries experience, of which 27 have been in the tile and stone business. Clients are always treated with the same personal service you might expect from a smaller company. Visions’ personnel make their clients the focus of their business, greeting them at the door and creating a friendly atmosphere for every visitor. That level of customer care combined with a constantly refreshed selection of new products makes Visions tile and stone the top destination for tile and stone in Tulsa!

410 S. Peoria Ave. Tulsa | 918.592.1234

60

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


FACES FACES of of

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FACES ofFACES

of

Tulsa

Tulsa

FACES FACES of of

OKC

FACES

OKC

of

STEVEN GANZKOW, JAY HELM, ROBERT LEIKAM

THE FACE OF RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

A

American Residential Group | www.argtulsa.com

merican Residential Group (ARG) is a fully integrated multifamily real estate company focused on the development, acquisition and management of luxury residential communities in the United States. Robert Leikam serves as President of ARG and leads development and operations. He joined the company after a decade in commercial real estate lending. Jay Helm serves as Chairman and is a cofounder of the company, along with Steve Ganzkow who serves as Vice Chairman. Headquartered in Tulsa, ARG has acquired, developed, managed and subsequently sold more than 10,000 units in seven states since its inception

in 1997 (including Texas, Colorado, New Mexico, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee and Oklahoma). In the past 20 years, ARG has become the largest private apartment owner/developer in downtown Tulsa. As it continues to grow, ARG is actively seeking development and acquisition opportunities across the United States. What sets ARG apart from other multifamily developers is exactly what makes them successful – infill development in submarkets with a high barrier to entry. The company values its strategic partnerships with investors and co-developers. ARG is poised to implement its knowledge and unique abilities to bring best in class living to targeted growth markets nationwide.

2624 E. 21st St. Tulsa | 918.748.8636 SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

61


S ofFACES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

S ofFACES

a

Tulsa

S ofFACES

C

OKC

S

THE FACE OF CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS

V

Victory Christian School | www.vcstulsa.org

ictory Christian School is a K-12 Christian school that, in its pursuit of excellence, integrates a rigorous college preparatory curriculum with a distinctive biblical worldview

62

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

designed to ignite a passion for the Word of God while empowering our students to pursue and achieve academic excellence. VCS students daily thrive under outstanding instruction and skillfully develop in an environment designed to refine their God-given talents.

7700 S. Lewis Ave. Tulsa | 918.491.7720


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CHARICA DAUGHERTY, JENNIFER MILLER, JIM CHERRY, RYAN WAKLEY, CARMEN CAVANAUGH, CHRIS ROYAEL PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

Victory’s vast curriculum offers students the ability to academically engage in a course of study that provides advanced educational opportunities in our lower school. Students may secure high school credit in grades seven and eight and have the option to earn university credit through college concurrency and participation in classes offered by the AP College Board. The academic program at Victory Christian provides students with a well-rounded Christian view of the world. Victory’s purpose is to graduate students with academic competence, who know, serve and

love God and their neighbor. VCS is proud to have graduated eight National Merit Scholars in the last four years. Recognized as one of the top art programs in the country, Victory’s Fine Arts program seeks to cultivate the God-given talents of our students by providing a variety of venues for student learning and achievement in the arts. VCS also offers a spirited athletic program that regularly competes for state championships while holding fast to its core beliefs. It’s a good day to be a conqueror. March 2007 • Oklahoma Magazine SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

633


S ofFACES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

S ofFACES

a

Tulsa

S ofFACES

C

OKC

S

KYLEE MARTIN, BRENT STOKES, REBECCA HARTWIG PHOTO BY MARC RAINS

C

THE FACE OF STAFFING Catapult Staffing | www.catapultstaffing.com

atapult Staffing is proof that the best way to get ahead is by building relationships. The first office in Oklahoma City opened in April 2015 as a direct result between business relationships formed with Rebecca Hartwig, Brent Stokes and Kylee Martin, the owners of Catapult’s Oklahoma offices. The three had felt an instant connection with their similar goals, leadership style and passion. Out of that connection grew a tight-knit staff that considers itself a work family, which has helped the company flourish – the company grew 470 percent

between 2015 and 2016 and expanded into Tulsa in April 2016, focusing on finance, accounting, IT, engineering and professional services. Another reason for Catapult Staffing’s success is the relationship it builds with its clients. Hartwig says the company considers itself an extension of its clients, sharing the same goals and visions to help them find success in any economic environment. “We’ve been able to work with a lot of Oklahomabased companies, both in traditional and emerging fields, who have helped us grow,” Hartwig says. “We wouldn’t be able to do it without them.”

2525 Northwest Expressway Ste. 103 Oklahoma City | +1.405.242.4361

5801 E. 41st St., Ste. 707 Tulsa | +1.918.223.3600

64

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


By Tara Malone

Growing older doesn’t have to mean slowing down, especially with the benefits of staying mobile, social and engaged. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that the global population of adults over 65 will more than double by 2050 and that the growth of this group will continue to eclipse that of younger generations. As staggering numbers of baby boomers retire and humans live longer with good health, older adults seek ways to remain active and happy. It is crucial for older adults to participate in physical activities, mental challenges and social interaction. Luckily, there are many to choose from. With senior activity centers, public libraries, arts organizations and dance studios, older adults have many options to find activities that promote mental, physical and emotional wellbeing.

“I see us as a prevention provider for all aspects of health,” says Doug Paulsen, supervisor of the Woodson Senior Center in Oklahoma City. For decades, the center has offered everything from music lessons and gaming clubs to travel opportunities and language classes. “We address physical and cognitive health to participants who come here, and this provides deep social connections with one another,” Paulsen says. “But I also see us as making their life much richer, allowing them to participate in things they have not had time to in the past, and new activities that have come of interest for them.” Following are a few options that active older adults have in Oklahoma. SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

65


MUSIC CLASSES ARE A GREAT WAY TO EXERCISE THE MIND AS ONE AGES. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Volunteer Your Time

A major barrier for many who want to volunteer is simply time. For older adults enjoying retirement, that time can be well spent as a volunteer for a charitable organization, educational institution or library. For example, organizations like Meals on Wheels provide social connections and relationships not only for meal recipients, but for volunteers as well. Calvin Moore, president and CEO of Meals on Wheels Tulsa, says volunteers play a crucial role in the organization’s mission. “Wheels volunteers serve our recipients and contribute to their emotional and physical well-being by talking with, consistently visiting with and caring for them in various ways,” he says. “The meal delivered is extremely important to the overall health of our seniors, but we all need human connection to thwart feelings of isolation, loneliness and depression. Our volunteers are there, providing a smile, an encouraging word and a helping hand when needed.”

Take on Tai Chi

Low-impact exercises like tai chi improve balance and strength and are increasingly popular with older adults. Many organizations have partnered with the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative to implement tai chi programs for older adults. And according to Darrie Breathwit, adult and senior services librarian at Southern Oaks Library (Metropolitan Library System) in Oklahoma City, exercise isn’t the only perk. “The program provides an additional benefit to participants: the connection to community and friendships,” Breathwit says. “Tai chi members are bonded as a group and share information about various functions and activities around the surrounding community. Library programs such as tai chi promote not only the physical body through movement but also stimulate mental capabilities by learning new movements, and the social interaction with other members enriches a sense of community.”

Book It

If you can think of a type of book club, it exists. There are book clubs for mystery lovers, for nonfiction fans and, of course, for older adults. Breathwit says her library’s book discussion group fosters lifelong learning through explorations of both fiction and nonfiction. The group has been going strong for 16 years. Bookstores also often host bookworms for literary-themed meetings. These clubs are not restricted to face-to-face meetings, either; as the number of older adults using digital technology increases, online book discussion groups offer a wide variety of opportunities. And if none of these options sounds appealing, no worries – anyone can start a book club tailored to individual reading preferences.

Get Out of Town

Travel often means the chance to meet different people, explore exciting places and try new adventures. Many organizations offer travel opportunities tailored to groups of older adults; for example, 40 older adults who attend activities at OKC’s Woodson Center will hit the road in October for Albuquerque’s International Balloon Fiesta. Companies like Road Scholar provide national and international themed trips specifically for older adults, as do many university alumni associations and the AARP. Many of these travel opportunities are available for solo travelers, couples or larger groups.

66

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

Learn to Play

Many of us nurture the dream of someday learning to play an instrument; there’s no time like the present to pick a favorite and run with it. If you’re unsure about committing, many local music shops offer rentals, as well as lists of established music teachers to help you on your journey. Classes are also a great chance to come together with others who are musically minded. Activity centers for older adults, such as OKC’s Woodson Center, offer guitar classes that bring learners together in a group to pluck their way to expertise. Local philharmonics also provide opportunities for learning music in a social setting through such programs as the Oklahoma City Philharmonic’s “Be the Orchestra” and “Society of Strings.”


Be Crafty

Picking up new hobbies helps keep everyone’s mind agile and challenged, regardless of age. Virtually all craft stores offer classes in a variety of skills, from painting and pottery to embroidery and scrapbooking. Activity centers for older adults have a full calendar of meetings for people interested in creative endeavors, like writing or woodcarving, and local yarn or quilting specialty shops often host regular meetings where participants can gain crafty new skills and make friends.

ART CLASSES HAVE WIDE APPEAL AND ALLOW PEOPLE TO LEARN A NEW HOBBY WHILE MAKING FRIENDS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Get Your Game On

In the wide world of games, there’s something for everybody. Card sharks can join bridge, pinochle and rummy groups at activity centers to bring their A-games to fun, competitive challenges. Board game cafés like Loot and XP in Norman are treasure troves, with classics like Scrabble and backgammon as well as intricate themed games that yield hours of immersive interaction. Many cafés ask for a small fee in return for unlimited play time, and offer drinks and snacks in an environment friendly to all ages. Unsure what to play? Just ask to join a game.

CARD GROUPS FOSTER COMMUNITY AND KEEP THE MIND SHARP. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

67


Learn a New Language

Ready to say more than “hello” in Spanish? What about Welsh, or even Cherokee? The myth that only children can learn a second language fluently is just that – a myth. Many activity centers and libraries offer free classes for learners of all ages. Both the Metropolitan Library System in Oklahoma City and the Tulsa City-County Library System offer free access to language apps like Mango. Free phone apps like Duolingo provide a variety of language lessons that build and reinforce concepts for all skill levels.

Get Cooking

If you find yourself jealous when watching the culinary creations of The Great British Baking Show, envy no more. Recreational cooking classes abound and are regularly held by such groups as Edible Adventures at Platt College (campuses statewide) or The Girl Can Cook! in Broken Arrow. Specialty stores like the International Pantry in Norman also offer courses to bring out the inner chef in anybody, regardless of experience.

Become a Tutor

Older adults have a wealth of knowledge and experience to offer others. Signing up to become an adult literacy instructor or to tutor students in specific skills is a great way both to give back to the community and keep learning. Schools, libraries and adult education programs are in perpetual need of skilled adults willing to donate their time and expertise to helping others learn.

Sing Your Heart Out

Since 1992, groups like the volunteer musicians of the Tulsa Oratorio Chorus have given popular performances of the most famous works in classical choral music. International barbershop ensembles such as the Sweet Adelines have chapters in Oklahoma City and Tulsa and are always on the lookout for talented, enthusiastic singers. Many church organizations also have opportunities for older adults to raise their voices in song.

Tread the Boards

Whether you’re in it for the laughs or the limelight, whether you are acting onstage or making sure a show runs smoothly behind the curtain, participating in community theater helps older adults forge connections not only with other theatre participants, but with their communities at large. Theatre Tulsa and Oklahoma City’s Jewel Box Theatre often have casting calls, as do smaller community theaters in such areas as Bartlesville and Miami.

Head to the Library

J.K. Rowling said it best: “When in doubt, go to the library.” The activities previously described are just a few examples of the myriad programs that libraries offer for older adults. Some also schedule events like “memory cafés” for those with cognitive decline or early stage dementia and their caregivers to gather for socialization, activities and support. Individual libraries often need help with tasks like shelving or organizing book sales, and organizations like the Friends of Libraries in Oklahoma (FOLIO) are dedicated groups of volunteers who help libraries across the state. “Library programs provide a safe, familiar place for older adults to be engaged in lifelong learning through innovative programs, enriching individuals by creating community connections,” Breathwit says.

68

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

Dance it Out

Regardless of whether you want to shake it solo or bring a group of family and friends, dancing is a healthy, fun way to stay active and interact with others. While fitnessoriented classes like Zumba are available at most gyms or YMCAs, recreational activity centers and public libraries also have free programs for all ages. Dancing isn’t just limited to fitness moves either; some programs offer lessons on line or ballroom dancing to help older adults stay healthy and have fun.


BUILDING

BRIDGES

LINE DANCING CLASSES PROVIDE A WAY TO STAY ACTIVE AND TRY SOMETHING NEW.

The greatest dangers faced by Oklahoma’s older adults aren’t simply physical; many encounter social isolation if they become homebound, lose transportation or don’t have a close network of family and friends. “Social interaction has a different significance since so many live alone,” says Doug Paulsen of Oklahoma City’s Woodson Senior Center. “We incorporate a social component in many activities for this. There is still much research to come, but some findings show the importance of cognitive activities, especially for maintaining mental agility. This age group sees and experiences the decline of functions, so having a place to come to engage these to keep their vitality is of highest priority. And if we can combine that with fun and a warm hospitality, we can provide that public service.” Calvin Moore of Meals on Wheels Tulsa concurs. “Human interaction – conversation, a kind touch, a smile and the expectation of interaction with a consistently caring person – is so important to the vitality of human life,” he says. “We tend to take those things for granted.” Social interaction isn’t just important for emotional well-being; it can also play a crucial role in the neurological and physical health of older adults. Mark Fried, CEO of the Alzheimer’s Association Oklahoma Chapter, lists social isolation as one of the many contributing factors to the onset of dementia. For the 63,000 Oklahomans living with dementia and for those seeking to prevent it, Fried says, “Mental and physical vitality are proven to have positive health benefits no matter what age a person is.”

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

69


DWIGHT DURANT IS A 20-YEAR VETERAN OF THE OKLAHOMA HIGHWAY PATROL. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

70

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


By Brian Wilson

The 80-year-old Oklahoma Highway Patrol copes with its manpower crisis in numerous ways.

SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

71


A IN ADDITION TO THEIR DUTIES OF PATROLLING OKLAHOMA’S HIGHWAYS AND WORKING ACCIDENTS, THE OKLAHOMA HIGHWAY PATROL HAS MANY OTHER DEPARTMENTS THAT REQUIRE TROOPERS. PHOTOS COURTESY OKLAHOMA HIGHWAY PATROL

n often overlooked issue with budget freezes or cutbacks, especially in a growing state like Oklahoma, is that agencies fall behind in what they can offer with their services. The Oklahoma Highway Patrol is a perfect illustration. Oklahoma is quickly approaching 4 million residents, up about 6 percent since the 2010 census, but in that time the OHP has endured budgets restricting its operations. Higher population means more and longer commutes on highways, increased commercial traffic and, inevitably, more accidents and criminal activity. Yet the OHP is in a manpower crisis because it’s understaffed by more than 165 troopers, OHP chief Rick Adams says. “Right now, we have 785,” he says. “At minimum, we need 950 troopers and, ideally, we’d have between 1,104 and 1,150. This year alone, we’ve lost 10 to retirement, one to catastrophic injury retirement and one killed in action [Heath Meyer in July].” Adams reminds that troopers do not just patrol Oklahoma’s highways. The OHP has operations for aircraft, auto theft, criminal interdiction, evidence/contraband, asset forfeiture, Capitol patrol, commercial motor vehicle enforcement, training, lake patrol, investigations, dive teams, executive security, motorcycles, bomb squads, emergency response teams, tactical teams and numerous task forces.

‘YOU SAVED MY LIFE THAT NIGHT’ For older Oklahomans, a state trooper might be like grumpy Dan Mathews, Broderick Crawford’s persona on the 1950s TV show Highway Patrol. For younger drivers, the highway patrol officer might be that so-and-so who gave you a ticket when any number of speeders could have been stopped. Dwight Durant, a 20-year OHP veteran, alters those stereotypes. He speaks straightforwardly like Crawford’s character, though not to the extent of the actor’s classic line, “I eat punks like for you lunch.” And he writes his share of tickets.

72

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

“Thirty-nine percent of the troopers right now focus on multiple duties,” Adams says. “We’re barely keeping up with demand. The problem is how many of our guys are working their regular assignments [of] traffic duty but pull additional duty in other areas to keep up with mission demands.” Adams manages these challenges through calculated risks in public safety coverage. “We try to figure out where we can run a little thin in places,” he says. “We do our best to mitigate the problems with manpower. You can see that around our lakes with the reduced staff there and other locations.” Because of budget constraints, troopers had to limit their daily driving to 100 miles between December and June. Also, the past two training academies have been funded by the Oklahoma Turnpike Authority, a separate entity. The turnpike authority paid $5 million for the 2016 academy and has ponied up another $5 million for the academy beginning in January. The turnpike authority benefits from the relationship because many of the 30 troopers from the 2016 class got slotted to patrolling Oklahoma’s toll roads. However, only a few from the upcoming class of 30 or so troopers will have turnpike assignments. “Our turnpike system is one of the safest in the country, and we want to keep that up. Public safety is vital,” says Jack Damrill, the turnpike authority’s director of communications and facilities.

But Durant’s forte, his passion, his focus is interacting with people. “The last thing I want to do is write a ticket,” the 50-yearold trooper says. “If it needs to be written or if someone needs to go to jail, I’ll do it. But I want to have a good average of contacts, and that doesn’t matter if it’s helping someone change a tire or speaking to first graders.” One such interaction several years ago changed a person’s life. Durant made an early morning stop on the Creek Turnpike. The driver “obviously had had a late night, and I smelled marijuana on him. I told him that if

it was just a little bit, then I’d take care of it.” The man, in his early 20s, handed over the bag; Durant dumped the contents. Then they talked on the shoulder of the highway … for 90 minutes. “It was mostly just me listening to him because he quickly admitted that he had drug and alcohol and marital problems,” he says. “I could have written him a ticket or taken him to jail, but, you know, I’ve had my share of experiences and challenges, so I related to what he was going through. “So, I just talked with him like a big brother would.”


The OHP’s high visibility slows down speeders, but Damrill says the troopers’ presence is there because of the increase of activity on turnpikes. “Interstate 44 – which includes the Will Rogers, Turner and H.E. Bailey turnpikes – is a major thoroughfare in the United States, not just Oklahoma,” he says. “We’re seeing double-digit increases in commuter traffic. I-44 has increased commercial activity with big trucks. And it’s no secret that there is an increase in illegal activity because Oklahoma is right in the middle of the country and illegal materials go through our state.” While hoping that the state legislature can increase funding for the OHP, Adams appreciates the turnpike authority’s financial help. “Otherwise, it would definitely be a public safety crisis, not just a manpower crisis,” he says. “We’ll probably have even fewer numbers next year because of attrition. We need to be in a proactive mode. We need 70 cadets, not just 30, to walk across the stage every year through 2023.” Damrill concurs. “The academies keep up the number of troopers to what they need,” he says. “Our investment in the academy is that we have an interest in keeping the number of troopers up. We have between 125 and 130 on the turnpike system in Oklahoma. A few years ago, it was down in the 80s and 90s. We [the turnpike authority] pay for those troopers – their salaries, their cars. They are Department of Public Safety employees, but we pay for them.” And even those turnpike authority-funded troopers often handle additional calls and crises near them, which means troopers on other assignments have to fill in or segments of highways go unpatrolled. “Every one of the troopers, in a way, pulls double-duty,” Damrill says. “Troopers keep the turnpikes safe. If the DPS loses troopers, that draws from the number of troopers on the turnpikes.” Regardless of the problems, Adams remains optimistic, especially

Six months later, the young man saw Durant at a restaurant and came over to say that within hours of their encounter he had checked himself into a 30-day rehabilitation program. “I didn’t recognize him,” Durant says. “He looked completely different … really nice and clean. He was nothing like he was when I stopped him. “And he said to me, ‘You saved my life that night.’ I don’t think anyone in law enforcement had ever communicated with him like that before.” Durant, who serves as OHP’s public information officer in addition to patrolling highways, says every colleague

TROOPER QUALIFICATIONS

with his legions. He has had some retirements To become an Oklahoma Highway Patrol trooper, because of the increased one must go through the agency’s paramilitarydemand on what each type training academy and be a U.S. citizen. officer has to do, “but Some other qualifications include: my troopers consider AGE – At least 21 years old but no older what they do a calling. than 45 when an academy begins They stay motivated by themselves.” PHYSICAL FITNESS – The ability to do Trooper Dwight at least 32 sit-ups and 23 push-ups, Durant agrees. respectively, in a minute, and to run 300 “Morale for an indimeters in at least 64 seconds and 1.5 vidual trooper is good,” miles in at least 14 minutes, 15 seconds he says. “We come to EDUCATION – At least an associate’s work and do our jobs. degree or 62 semester hours from an acAnd, for now, we don’t credited college; or at least 32 semester have furloughs.” hours from an accredited college and Adams also notes three years of active or reserve military that the OHP, begun in service; or at least 32 semester hours 1937, has faced budget from an accredited college and an honproblems before and orable discharge from active or reserve survived. The Elk City military service High School, University For more information, go to jointheohp.com. of Central Oklahoma and U.S. Army War College graduate has seen many peaks and valleys in his 31 years with the OHP. His four-year anniversary as chief comes in November. “We’ll overcome this,” he says. “We’re not going to panic. I have faith that the legislators will do the right thing.”

has a story that has nothing to do with penalizing someone. Many troopers have warning-to-ticket ratios similar to his (Durant’s is 16 to 1). “We just want to make the roads safe with our visibility,” he says. “Nothing slows down a driver more or gets a driver off their phone quicker than seeing a trooper. Just our presence makes the roads safer. Reducing accidents is the whole key.” That’s why it was frustrating for troopers when they had to endure a 100-mile daily travel limit from December to June because of budget cuts. “We want to patrol the roads and make those contacts

with people, not sit at a desk at a headquarters somewhere,” he says. The graduate of Broken Arrow High School and Northeastern State University is the son of Bennie Durant, a longtime Tulsa troop commander who put in 28 years with the OHP. Between them, the Durants have worked with just about every kind of trooper in nearly a half-century of patrolling Oklahoma’s highways. “We have young guys making 20-30 stops a day; they’re going to save the world,” he says “But a guy like me will have fewer stops because we want those longer moments with people. You try to treat everyone like your neighbor.” SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

73


Preview By Mary Willa Allen

Autumn in Oklahoma means celebrating all the cultures, hobbies, music and food that make this state one of a kind.

74

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017


Because that’s a dangerously delicious combination.

PHOTO BY JEANNIE YORK

1

Watonga Cheese Festival

2

Combining two items ardently adored by Oklahomans, the Bluegrass and Chili Festival in Claremore aims to boost the city’s reputation as an ideal spot for travelers around the country with a weekend-long music and food extravaganza. “We hope to continue to impact the community economically and promote Claremore as a year-round tourist experience,” says Dell Davis, president of Claremore’s Chamber of Commerce. The festival hosts a chili cook-off on Saturday, and winners in certain categories will go on to compete in the International Chili Society’s World Championship Chili Cookoff later this year. Vocal competitions, car shows and a “kiddie koral” are just a few of the events to experience this year, along with outhouse races. Brave participants construct their own mobile latrines and race them down the street at the Claremore Expo Center. Winners receive $500 for their favorite charities. The festival runs Sept. 7-9 at the Claremore Expo Center. Visit bluegrasschilifest.com for more information.

Medicine Stone Music Festival If you’re looking for a weekend refuge from the struggles of your 9-to-5, grab a tent, a change of clothes and plenty of beer and head to the Medicine Stone Music Festival at Diamondhead Resort in Tahlequah. The festival began in 2013 and has experienced tremendous expansion; it has grown 283 percent since the inception, according to festival organizers. Red Dirt music, cultivated straight out of

3

Oklahoma, takes center stage at the festival, right where it all began. Marci Falk, festival organizer, says Medicine Stone began from “a long time idea from Jason Boland and the members of Turnpike Troubadours to create a festival that would bring the [Red Dirt] music back to Oklahoma, where the roots are. They play festivals all over the world, but there wasn’t anything like it in Oklahoma.” The festival runs Sept. 21-23. Visit medicinestoneok.com for tickets.

PHOTO COURTESY COLORED LION PHOTOGRAPHY

The Watonga Cheese Festival celebrates its 41st year with quilt shows, dozens of vendors, a cheese food contest (any dish with cheese is eligible to enter) and, of course, lots and lots of cheese tastings. The festival highlights the scrumptious food, of course, but also Watonga’s tight-knit citizens. “The festival wouldn’t be possible without great people from the community who make it all happen,” says Amy Adams, director of Watonga’s Chamber of Commerce. “Their energy and creativity have really been a blessing.” The festival runs Oct. 13-14 on Main Street. Visit thewatongacheesefestival. wordpress.com for more info.

Bluegrass and Chili Festival

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

75


Because what’s life without a little bit of action?

You’ll be hard-pressed to find an event this fall that does as much good as the Gatesway Balloon Festival, which supports the work and mission of the Gatesway Foundation. “At the core of the Gatesway Balloon Festival is the mission of the organization: to provide jobs, housing and life skills for individuals with intellectual disabilities such as autism, Down syndrome, spina bifida and many additional disabilities,” says Sarah Frey, Gatesway’s director of business development. The founder of Gatesway, Helen Gates, opened the nonprofit because of her son, Ronnie. “He was born with Down syndrome, inspiring her passion to help from a very personal level,” Frey says. Today, Gatesway serves more than 300 clients. You can help this nonprofit in the easiest way: attending the festival and enjoying kite shows, car shows, craft beers, laser tag and hot air balloon flights at dawn and dusk. The festival runs Sept. 15-17 at Broken Arrow Events Park. Visit gateswayballoonfestival.org for a full schedule.

5

76

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

Indigo Fest

Sustainability, environmental awareness and self-expression are the cornerstones of Indigo Fest. Haven’t heard of it? That’s because it’s the inaugural year. Co-founder Britt Johnson describes a tranquil refuge for artists, musicians and environmentalists. “You can expect a three-day camping experience, with over 40 bands on three stages that cover almost every genre, plus live painters, workshops … and the submersion into the elements of nature,” she says. “This event is a new movement between humans, nature and art within Oklahoma.” Keeping in line with the goal of environmental consciousness, Johnson has an ambitious goal for the festival. “Zero waste will be left behind, unless it is compost materials or plastics that can be recycled,” she says. “A ‘zero carbon footprint’ mindset will always be our intention.” The festival runs Sept. 22-24 at the Blue Doors at Tenkiller in Gore. Visit youarevenus.com/indigo for details.

PHOTO COURTESY INDIGO FEST

4

Gatesway Balloon Festival


AOPA Fly-In and Aviation Festival

6

It’s not every day you can get up close and personal with aircraft, but the AOPA Fly-In and Aviation Festival grants the rare opportunity. Along with the promotion of aviation safety and education, a major draw is the massive fly-in. “We are hosting one of four fly-ins for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association that will be held across America,” says Walt Strong, director of the Max Westheimer Airport in Norman. “Because this will draw from a region that covers much of Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkansas, Missouri, New Mexico and Louisiana, we expect some 550 general aviation airplanes to attend.” The festival runs Sept. 8-9 at the Max Westheimer Airport. Visit ou.edu/airport/events for details.

National Weather Festival

A

8

The OKC Regatta Festival brings in traffic from across the nation to the shores of the Oklahoma River and provides an aquatic event unlike any other in the state. “The Oklahoma Regatta Festival is the Boathouse District’s largest and most popular festival,” says Elizabeth Laurent, senior director of marketing and sales at the Boathouse Foundation. “On a national scale, it is an opportunity for masters, juniors and collegiate rowers to race against the top teams from across the country. From a local perspective, it’s one of OKC’s favorite fall events.” Food trucks, sprint racing, championship competitions in rowing, dragon boating and rafting, and all the RiverSports Adventure events you’ve come to love will be available to spectators during the festival. Plus, the grand opening of a building will round out the weekend. “We will be celebrating the culmination of the Aubrey McClendon tribute campaign with a special ceremony, lighting the newly named McClendon Whitewater Center,” Laurent says. The festival runs Oct. 5-8. Visit riversportokc.org for details.

PHOTO BY GEORGIA READ

Oklahoma Regatta Festival

7

What better place to explore the many facets of weather in the United States than in the heartland of Oklahoma? The National Weather Festival at the National Weather Center in Norman welcomes kids and adults alike to experience the many wonders of weather. Talk to and learn from Oklahoma City meteorologists, check out storm-chasing vehicles, watch drone demonstrations and take tours of the center – all for free. The festival takes place on Oct. 21. Visit nwf.nwc.ou.edu for more information.

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

77


Oklahoma Czech Festival

CELEBRATIONS

Because Oklahoma is a melting pot of stories and cultures.

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA CZECH FESTIVAL

9

You’ve got to Czech out the annual Oklahoma Czech Festival in Yukon in October. Kicking off with a parade in the morning, the day is filled to the brim with authentic dancing, singing, beer, food, petting zoos, craft shows and a handful of other Czechrelated activities. Marjorie Jezek, festival coordinator, stresses that the festival is all about “preserving our heritage and the Czech culture.” She highly recommends trying the kolaches – a Czech pastry with a dollop of fruit in the middle – which will be freshly baked and readily available to guests. The festival takes place Oct. 7 on Yukon’s Main Street. Visit czechfestivaloklahoma.com for details.

NE BEVEL PHOTO BY SHA

Linde Oktoberfest

78

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

10

One of Tulsa’s biggest parties waltzes into town this fall, complete with lederhosen, bratwurst and snitzel. That’s right – Linde Oktoberfest is back and bigger than ever. The celebration of all that is German overtakes River West Festival Park, Oct. 19-22. Enter your pup into the Dachshund Dash Race, or enjoy bier barrel racing, bratwurst eating competitions, arts and crafts markets and a bevy of incomparable German fare. Live music is around every corner, including country crooners, rock ’n’ rollers and authentic bands flown in directly from Bavaria for all music aficionados to enjoy. After looking at everything to experience, it’s easy to see why the festival has run strong for 39 years. “The annual tradition of celebrating authentic German culture [in] Oklahoma, coupled with the delicious foods and beers of Bavaria and so many things to see and do, brings people back,” says Tonja Carrigg, festival director. Linde Oktoberfest prides itself on authenticity; Carrigg says the event is modeled after the Munich Oktoberfest in Bavaria. “The decorations, music, food, beers, rides and fun are brought direct to America’s heartland to share the traditions and authenticity of Germany,” she says. Visit tulsaoktoberfest.org for more information.


PHOTO COURTESY SCOTFEST

11 Scotfest

Tulsa Greek Festival

12

Never forget; always remember: It’s the third week of every September … except this year, when the beloved Tulsa Greek Festival returns Oct. 5-7. The oldest running ethnic celebration in Tulsa transports its guests to Greece, and several advancements make 2017’s celebration even better – and worth the two-week delay. “We have a brand new facility this year

Scotfest centers around an admiration for Celtic music, and imports from across the nation – and even across the pond – make their way to Tulsa each year to teach Oklahomans just how special these Celtic traditions can be. “Scotfest 2017 brings with it a multitude of new and past musical crowd favorites,” says Rick Rutledge, director of festival development. Headliners include European band Celtica Pipes Rock, which Rutledge describes as “symphonic powerful rock with a twist of steampunk.” He also points to Chicago-based Flatfoot 56 and Philadelphia locals Barleyjuice as some of the weekend’s top entertainment. The National Lightweight Championship runs all weekend, when 10 tip-top athletes under 200 pounds compete to qualify for the world championship in Hungary later this year. Highland games like the caber toss, stone put, hammer throw and highland dance – Scotland’s competitive dance style dating to the 19th century – also take center stage. There’s a reason Scotfest is so beloved in the state: a strong link through history. “Scotfest shares a special bond with Oklahoma, where so many of the state’s counties are named after Scottish clans.” Scotfest runs Sept. 15-17 at River West Festival Park. Visit okscotfest.com for details.

that will be open just in time for the festival,” says Tonya Van Zandt, festival director. The new community center at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church ramps up the excitement. Plus, “several new contests will be going on through the event, including relays and food eating contests,” Van Zandt says. The food is glorious; gyros, calamari, loukoumades (honey puffs) and Greek coffee

abound. But Van Zandt has a caveat to that. “The Tulsa Greek Festival is more than just food,” she says. “It is a lively, fun-filled, family event complete with entertainment, shopping, scrumptious bakery items and church tours.” Guests can dance, dine, shop and take tours all weekend. Visit htgoctulsa.org for details.

SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

79


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST I am ready to get started taking care of my skin and fighting aging, but I don’t know where to start. Can you tell me where to begin? Whether you are new to medical aesthetics or not, one of the most important first steps is finding the right provider for you. We recomMALISSA SPACEK mend spending the time getting to know the providers available at your medical spa. For example, at BA Med Spa we have physician assistants, nurses, aestheticians, CMMs and various other medical professionals in order to offer a wide variety of services with specialist in each treatment in order to achieve optimal results for our patients. Once you have found your ideal practitioner we recommend you schedule a complimentary consultation. This allows you and the practitioner to go through all of your concerns and together develop an individualized treatment plan to help you reach your goals within your budget. For more information or to schedule a complimentary consultation, give us a call 918.872.9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

FINANCIAL ADVISOR Do I need long-term care insurance?

DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC®

The goal of long-term care insurance is to protect the policy owner from footing the entire bill of an extended stay in a healthcare facility, such as a nursing home or rehabilitation. It’s worth learning about your long-term care insurance options and make an informed decision. Here are some factors to think about:

• Your age and health may affect your eligibility. • Long-term insurance policies come in many forms. Compare components of policies side-by-side to see which plan makes sense for you. • Consider nursing homes in your area to determine whether you want to buy coverage on the higher or lower end of the spectrum. • Inflation protection can help offset rising costs of care by increasing your eligible lifetime benefits. Your financial advisor can help you calculate whether your projected future income and assets can withstand the cost of long-term care if the need arises. If there’s any doubt, a longterm care insurance policy may make sense.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

80

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

ATTORNEY AT LAW I was broad-sided on my way to work. The other driver left the scene but eventually returned after he was chased down by a witness. What recourse do I have? The driver may have criminal charges filed against him and be required to pay up to a $500.00 ESTHER M. SANDERS fine or face imprisonment for up to a year. You personally can request that the driver pay three times the amount of your damages for the property damage if you suffered only property damage. However, if you were personally injured as well, you can request any damages for property as well as medical bills, lost wages, mental and physical pain and suffering, as well as any disfigurement or other damages.

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free

PERSONAL TRAINER Why can’t I shed this weight? 1. Poor nutrition. No matter how hard you train, you can’t lose those pounds without proper nutrition. You must stop skipping meals, yo-yo dieting and eating processed foods. Also stop the intake of caffeine, cola and corn. Refined foods, white rice, alcohol, processed and JOHN JACKSON pasteurized foods serve to make you fatter. 2. Overtraining. There are detrimental aspects of traditional cardio training. Too much will create a hormonal environment that is not conducive to building muscle or weight loss. Also, if you are nutritionally depleted you will only drain your body more by exercising with no energy source. 3. Health and function. Make sure you have been assessed by a health professional who can properly assess adrenal, thyroid, sleep and digestive dysfunction. 4. Limits. It’s important to stress the body differently at all cost, but remember to listen to your body. 5. Balance. You must balance nutrition and smart exercise to eliminate fat. Also it is important to appreciate the body you are given.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

HOSPICE CARE My father has cancer and sadly is terminal. A family friend recommended we look into hospice care. How do we know if this is a good option for him? First, let me explain the requirements for hospice care. There are Medicare regulations in place to protect patients and their families that help determine AVA HANCOCK if a patient qualifies for hospice care. A person must have a life-limiting illness and a prognosis of six months or less left to live, and two physicians must make this determination and certify it in writing. At Grace Hospice, we will have one of our knowledgeable registered nurses evaluate your father to see if he meets these criteria. If he does meet them, then he and your family can choose to use his hospice benefit. At Grace Hospice, we provide care during the course of the disease and also provide support to the family throughout the duration of care and for a 13-month period of bereavement after the death. For more information or to schedule an appointment with a hospice nurse, please call 918-744-7223.

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL Is the cost of life insurance holding you back? Life can be expensive with important needs to cover beyond the essentials of food, shelter, and clothing. Events like a major home repair, a birth or wedding, or a longterm illness can really put a dent in your budget. As these life costs add RUSS IDEN up, we might not realize how much we’re spending. September is Life Insurance Awareness Month, and it’s a good time to think about how you can protect your family’s future. Many people think life insurance is out of reach, but it can be surprisingly affordable. Depending on the case, non-smokers can get $100,000 in coverage for less than $20 a month. With the average person spending about $584 a month on food, you can have coverage for about what you spend in one day on meals. Life insurance can be a valuable part of your family’s financial security. Overlooking this protection for your family could be a costly decision that leaves those you care about the most without the future they deserve. Consider making life insurance another essential to help protect the most important parts of life. If you have questions about life insurance, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Word Play at TJA The Jones Assembly in Midtown OKC doesn’t pun(t) when it comes to exquisite food and drink.

“TJA NAILS THE SCALLOPS: PERFECTLY SEARED AND CARMELIZED ON THE OUTSIDE WHILE TENDER AND JUICY WITH EVERY BITE.” PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

I

have an underlying desire to start this piece about a new, exceptional dining/live music venue in Midtown Oklahoma City with something mildly witty about “Keeping up

with the Joneses” or “Jones-ing for a new place to brunch,” but I resist. Regardless, when it comes to food and drink, this is a happy, hearty welcome to … The Jones Assembly. On the edge of Film Row once

lived a Ford, Lincoln and Mercury automobile assembly plant opened by Fred Jones, legendary automotive entrepreneur and local hero. Fast forward to 2017 and that “they just don’t build ’em like this anymore” structure is open to one of the most multi-purpose food and beverage operations in OKC. Chef de cuisine Brittany Sanger, the reckoning force behind the TJA menu as well as the huntress of locally sourced ingredients, was hospitable enough not to kick me

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

81


Taste out of her culinary domain when I arrived unannounced. The enclosed kitchen behind the main bar is expansive and shiny. Natural light from south and west windows pour in with an intensity that matches the full line of cooks manning their stations. The exquisite kitchen has a wood-fired oven, sauce stations, grills and live herbs growing within a cook’s reach to garnish and flavor every dish. TJA’s menu mixes French café fare with a touch of Mediterranean and a noticeable nod to Oklahoma. Creative and extraordinary starters include grilled octopus caramelized with a sweet Thai chili (think Sriracha style) glaze, resting on a mirror of labneh sauce, fresh lime and aromatic herbs. A bulbous serving of soft-flowing burrata cheese, lightly dressed with lavender oil and wheels of sharp blood orange, is accompanied by a grilled baguette cut on the bias. My favorite of the starters are dips and spreads. Many restaurants offer hummus and tzatziki, but not everyone pairs

ABOVE: THE BURRATA IS SERVED WITH BLOOD ORANGE, LAVENDER OIL AND MICRO BASIL. RIGHT: THE OCTOPUS HAS A THAI CHILE GLAZE WITH LABNEH, LIME, CILANTRO AND MINT. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

82

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

those with pimento cheese and a woodoven blistered round of bread. Like having choices on a charcuterie board, this presents choices with spreads. As for entrees, the steak frites took me back to summers in France, with not only an entrecôte cut of a beef, but a sauce l’entrecôte on the side (think béarnaise without the hollandaise) to dip your steak and fries. The scallops are next on my list. As a chef, I know if you cannot cook scallops properly and are unable to train your crew to cook scallops properly … do not have scallops on your menu. TJA nails the scallops: perfectly seared and caramelized on the outside while tender and juicy with every single bite. Accompanied with cauliflower puree, roasted

Brussels sprouts and a light drizzle of brown butter vin, this plate is delightful. With other gastronomic sensations, such as scratch biscuits, fried okra and deviled eggs, there is something for everyone, including the “I don’t know what any of this stuff is?” guest. The delicious bar and cocktail menu at The Jones Assembly is phenomenal. “A riff on the classics,” as explained to me by one of the bartenders upstairs on the mezzanine overlooking the impressive ground floor, describes what one might find on the cocktail end. For example: a classic French 75 begat TJA’s spicy, peppery version, the Jones 75, which definitely preps the palate for the meal ahead. Drinks are served with cloth, embroidered napkins for that authentic cocktail lounge feel. Other in-house cocktails include the Frose, a frozen slushy rosé wine cocktail with gin, strawberry and lemon, and the dreamy Disco Nap with tequila, Cointreau, sage syrup and blackberry. TJA has an impressive, diverse list for my fellow wine lovers. These grapes and blends have origins in Europe, South America and the West Coast … from Argentinian malbec to German gewürztraminer … by the glass or by the bottle. Bubblies are not to be ignored, with labels such as Schramsberg, Veuve Cliquot and Aubry Brut-Rosè for those celebratory occasions or no occasion at all, and a beer lineup would do any suds snob proud. TJA’s inventive beverages, along with it creative dining menu, will have you Jonesing for more. (I had to.) SCOTTY IRANI


2017

1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd. • Claremore, OK 74017 918-341-7333 • www.hammetthouse.com 22306 Hammett House.indd 1

8/24/16 10:33 AM

Celebrating our 54th Year OPEN 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. DAILY

918-742-4563

3310 E. 32nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma Across from Walmart Neighborhood Market

11798 PhillsDiner.indd 1

Advanced skin treatments and cosmetic dermatology.

Karen Weidner, R.N. Kristen Rice, M.D. Tracy Adams, L.E.

918-712-3223 1325 E 35th Street Suite B

5/2/14 21520 12:41 PM Utica Skin Care.indd 1

• View the top trends in kitchen and bath design • Enjoy an exclusive peek inside the area’s finest kitchens and baths • Explore the latest products for home owners

Reserve an evening of “World Class” Caesar Salad with Steak, Lobster, Chicken or Fish. Friday & Saturday night featuring Mark Bryan.

3109 South Yale • 918.743.1800 • celebritytulsa.com

7/27/17 22395 5:48 PM Celebrity Restaurant.indd 1

OCTOBER 2017

5/22/17 3:45 PM

K I TC H E N S A N D BAT H S

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA Advertise your business in this feature! Contact advertising@okmag.com 918.744.6205 Kitchen and Bath 1/2.indd 1

OKLAHOMA 7/25/17 10:38 AM

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

83


NOVEMBER 2017

Hungry for more

?

Chec k ou t ou r f ood i ssu e i n Novemb er.

LO C A L F L AV O R

FROM WASHING THE DISHES TO OWNING THEM BC Steakhouse serves great food as a family business.

Y

ou’ve come for the steak at BC Steakhouse, and here it is, glistening and grill-marked, sizzling in the plate in front of you, which it fills, being a thick bone-in ribeye weighing in at over a pound. There’s a mammoth baked potato, too, all for $25. What a bargain! Taste that steak and rich flavor explodes in your mouth. How do you make it so good, you ask the bartender. “We make our own seasoning, we use USDA Choice, and we cook on an open-flame grill. And then there’s the butter.” He knows because he’s not only the bartender but also, with his brother, the owner. Cesar and Enrique Escoto started poor (virtually penniless), washed dishes for years and slowly saved their earnings. This restaurant is their dream come true. The quirky decor, which features blue and yellow walls, a gleaming brass bar, plaster busts painted bright blue, luggage displayed as art, and a huge portrait of a cow, was designed by Cesar’s wife. The rotisserie chicken and salmon is good, Cesar tells you, and so is the huge $11 chicken-fried steak. But you don’t care. You want to eat that steak every day of your life. Cesar ambles off, gets a brush and soapy water, and starts to wash the steel taps on the soda machine. BRIAN SCHWARTZ

TOP: THE BONE-IN RIBEYE STEAK IS SEARED TO PERFECTION. BOTTOM: FOR NONSTEAK EATERS, BC STEAKHOUSE HAS OPTIONS SUCH AS BUFFALO CHICKEN SALAD.

918.744.6205 advertising@okmag.com 84 Food 1/2 V.indd 1

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

PHOTOS BY MARY BETH EDE

8/17/17 3:07 PM


MARKETPLACE

3742 South Peoria•Brookside

918.742.4777

RICHARD NEEL INTERIORS

home

2017

22829 Richard Neel Interiors.indd 1

2020 Utica Square www.hicksbrunson.com 918.743.6478

2017

featuring the sophisticated styles of

8/2/17 11:02 22828AM Hicks Brunson.indd 1

7/27/17 3:25 PM 2017

2017

North of Woodland Hills 6837-F S. Memorial Dr. North of Utica Square 2139 E. 21st St.

918.254.1611 Follow us on

10051 S. Yale, Suite 105 918.299.6565 DonnasFashions.com

22832 Visions.indd 1

8/8/17 22841 3:17 PM Donna's Fashion.indd 1

Love your pet? Show us!

Tag us in your pet pictures:

8/18/17 1:15 PM

ONE LUCKY WINNER will be featured in the November issue.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA Love your pets.indd 1

OKLAHOMA

or visit okmag.com/ pets to enter. 8/25/17 4:04 PM

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

85


CHEF ALEX FUENTES RUNS THE SHIP AT RED ROCK CANYON GRILL IN TULSA.

Taste

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN

C H E F C H AT

Taking Pride in His Work Alex Fuentes keeps his grandmother’s advice close to his heart during his career.

A PORK RIBS ARE AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THE CLUCK-N-OINK, A QUARTER RACK OF PORK RIBS TOPPED WITH HOUSE MADE BARBECUE SAUCE AND THREE PIECES OF ROTISSERIE CHICKEN, DRIZZLED WITH ROASTED CHICKEN JUS, AND SERVED WITH RED SKIN MASHED POTATOES AND CARROTS. PHOTO COURTESY RED ROCK CANYON GRILL

86

lex Fuentes, culinary manager at Redrock Canyon Grill in Tulsa, has worked in restaurants since moving to the United States in the early ’90s, but his favorite memory – and best advice – is from cooking with his grandmother when he was a child in Guadalajara, Mexico. “My best memory is my grandma telling me, ‘When you rush food, it’s not going to taste good. When you cook, cook really slow and take pride in what you do,’” he says. While Fuentes has always kept that in his mind as a chef, it isn’t the only lesson he carries from his grandmother. “She always told me food is like chemistry,” he says. “To me, it’s the same thing. If you add just a little pinch of salt, it’s going to taste different. You add just a little bit of sugar, it tastes just a little different. You add an herb – mint, basil, anything – to any dish, and it’s going to taste different.” Fuentes started as a busboy when he came to the States, but within a year he had an opportunity to work in the kitchen when the restaurant found itself short on staff one night.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

Once he had the opportunity, he made the most of it and told the kitchen manager he was willing to work as hard as it took to learn the craft. “I said, ‘If you can teach me, I’ll be right there beside you,’” Fuentes says. “And he had the time and patience to teach me. Then I started to read some books, and I started asking questions, and I started working with [experienced] people around me. That was the time I knew I was heading into the right career.” More than 25 years later, Fuentes still has that same love for learning. He scours books on cooking, practices constantly and uses the internet to learn skills or get new ideas. When he visits a restaurant, he enjoys introducing himself to the chef and complimenting him or her on what he likes about the restaurant. And as a chef himself, he enjoys the trend of chefs coming out of the kitchen to meet the guests. “I’m kind of shy, because usually the chef stays in the back,” he says. “But I meet a lot of new people and make a lot of new good friends. I like to talk to people and make sure everybody’s happy with the food. I want to be sure when they leave, they leave with a big smile.”


R A N D O M F L AV O R S

Upscale pub grub is redefined at Bricktown Brewery. Taps are filled with locally brewed beer, ingredients are sourced nearby and these guys know their burgers, pizza and bacon. With locations opening up across the Midwest, the brewery is a rapidly growing American fare phenomenon. Multiple locations in the Tulsa and OKC metros; bricktownbrewery.com.

CLUCK–N–OINK ¼ RACK PORK RIBS ¼ rack of pork ribs ½ cup 2 tbsp 1 tbsp 2 tbsp ¼ cup

PHOTO COURTESY BRICKTOWN BREWERY

THE HEART OF BRICKTOWN

brown sugar salt paprika white pepper granulated garlic

GREECE IN TULSA All the best restaurants start with a great story, and Savoy Restaurant’s began when Greek immigrant Nick Kelamis opened the joint in Tulsa in 1925. Fast forward several generations and one thing stays the same at this breakfast and lunch haven: a commitment to treasured family recipes like pastitsio (Greek lasagna), cinnamon roll bread pudding and stuffed bell peppers. 6033 S. Sheridan Road, Tulsa; savoyrestaurant.com

Combine brown sugar, salt, paprika, white pepper and granulated garlic and mix thoroughly to create rib rub. Cover the ¼ rack of pork ribs with rib rub. Smoke ribs for about 8 hours or until the thickest part of the rib reaches 160-170 degrees.

Baste ribs with bacon fat. Finish by cooking to taste.

PHOTO COURTESY SAVOY RESTAURANT

PHOTO COURTESY BROWN’S BAKERY

DO-NUT MISS BROWN’S

Early birds will be pleased to know that Brown’s Bakery in Midtown Oklahoma City opens bright and early – 5:30 a.m. – to serve up delectable items. Along with enough doughnut flavors to make your head spin, delve deeper into the sugar coma with cinnamon rolls, doughnut holes, cake and cookies. Savory items like sausage rolls are also available, should your sweet tooth need a break. 1100 N. Walker Ave., OKC; facebook.com/brownsbakeryokc. SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

87


CHIEF METEOROLOGIST

MIKE COLLIER

WORKING FOR YOU EVERY WEEKNIGHT

5:00 / 6:00 / 10:00


Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Straight from the West End London’s smash hit The Bodyguard makes its way to Tulsa this fall.

PHOTO COURTESY CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS

T

he concept is bewitching: a superstar vocalist is plagued with an alarming yet common problem for celebrities – a stalker. To rectify the situation, she hires a (rugged yet charmingly handsome) bodyguard to protect her. Both resist their attractions to each other in the beginning, but after a bucket full of drama and lots of singing, they fall in love. This is the basic plot to The Bodyguard, Celebrity Attraction’s newest import. Based upon the 1992 movie of the same name, the musical honors the fiery plot but kicks it up a notch, bringing Rachel Marron’s character (played by Deborah Cox) into the spotlight. Sprinkle in a handful of beloved Whitney Houston hits – “One Moment in Time,” “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” and the cover version of Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You” – and you have the perfect recipe for a night out.

The musical, which premiered in London in 2012, is wildly popular across the pond. “The London production was nominated for four Olivier Awards, and several of our staff members previewed the show and loved it,” says Kristin Dotson, CEO of Celebrity Attractions. “Because The Bodyguard is based on the very popular, international award-winning movie, we knew many of our patrons would already be familiar with the love story and be able to connect to the iconic music.” Judson Mills, who plays the bodyguard Frank Farmer during the U.S. leg of the tour, garnered the role from pure kismet: his college roommate, Alex Dinalaris, wrote the book for the musical. “We came up together, and when they couldn’t cast the role, he called me,” he says. Mills appreciates the long-standing history behind the musical and knows he has giant shoes to fill – those of Kevin Costner. SEPTEMBER 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

89


MARY WILLA ALLEN

IN TULSA PERFORMANCES CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS PRESENTS: DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID Through Sept. 3

PAC Based on one of Hans Christian Andersen’s most beloved stories, it’s a hauntingly beautiful love story for the ages. celebrityattractions.com

THEATRE TULSA PRESENTS: RAGTIME Through Sept. 3

PAC Celebrate our nation’s

PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS COURTESY CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS

Where & When

“What can I say – it’s an iconic film. Iconic role,” he says. “Costner made it simple and powerful on the screen, but it’s a challenge to bring that stillness and that confidence to the stage and maintain an interesting character to see from the 20th row.” The goal with any great performance is to transport its audience, and Mills wishes that and more for his Oklahoma viewers. Apart from enjoying themselves, Mills hopes viewers “take something socially relevant away from the interracial relationship and the father-son bond developed by Frank and Fletcher.” Dotson praises the movie for its uncompromising and gritty look at modern love, but warns against bringing the youngsters. “We try to program our seasons with a wide variety of productions – take the kids to The Sound of Music and your date to The Bodyguard!” she says. The show runs at the Tulsa PAC Sept. 26-Oct. 1. Visit celebrityattractions.com for tickets.

90

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

THEATRE POPS PRESENTS: MR. BURNS, A POST ELECTRIC-PLAY Sept. 8-17 IDL BALLROOM After

the collapse of civilization, survivors share a campfire and begin to piece together the plot of The Simpsons episode “Cape Feare” from memory. theatrepops.org

Sept. 13, 16-17, 20-21, 23-24

PAC This drama portrays

the true story of Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, Berlin’s most famous transvestite, who

A Fairly Good Time

org

TULSA PROJECT THEATRE PRESENTS: I AM MY OWN WIFE

FA M I LY / K I D S

tulsaprojecttheatre.com

CREATIONS IN STUDIO K Sept. 15-24

TULSA BALLET Now in its 11th year, this performance series continues to bring innovative and moving works by the world’s most in-demand choreographers to Tulsa. tulsaballet.org

CHITA RIVERA AND TOMMY TUNE: TWO FOR THE ROAD Sept. 19

BROKEN ARROW PAC Two

For The Road is a unique concert event that pairs two of Broadway’s most celebrated legends. brokenarrowpac.com

CHRIS BOTTI Sept.22 PAC Since the release of his

critically acclaimed 2004 CD When I Fall In Love, trumpeter Chris Botti has become the largest-selling American instrumental artist. tulsapac.com

THEATRE TULSA NEXT STAGE PRESENTS: GREEN DAY’S AMERICAN IDIOT

Sept. 22-Oct. 1

TULSA PAC Fed-up suburban youths struggle to find their places in a superficial society in this (in)famous rock-opera. theatretulsa.org

CONCERTS TULSA SYMPHONY PRESENTS: SYMPHONY IN THE PARK Sept. 1 GUTHRIE GREEN This event

The Oklahoma State Fair runs Sept. 1424 at the Oklahoma State Fair Park, and the Tulsa State Fair runs Sept. 28-Oct. 8 at Expo Square. Visit okstatefair.com and tulsastatefair.com for more information.

celebrates summer, the arts and the beautiful city of Tulsa.

tulsasymphony.org

TULSA SYMPHONY PRESENTS: FRIDAYS IN THE LOFT CHAMBER SERIES: MOZART Sept. 8 FLY LOFT The opening of the

2017-2018 Fridays in the Loft Chamber Series will feature one of Mozart’s grandest works for woodwinds, Serenade No. 10, Gran Partita.

TOTO, PAT BENATAR AND NEIL GIRALDO Sept. 8 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO AND RESORT Three

powerhouses take the stage.

riverspirittulsa.com

SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: THE ROARING ‘20S AND ALL THAT JAZZ Sept. 8-9

TCC VAN TREASE PACE The

PHOTO COURTESY COOPER DESIGN

There’s only one time during the calendar year when you can find almost every food known to man both fried and on a stick. Yes – that time is the fair, and yes – it’s back in both Tulsa and OKC this month. The Tulsa State Fair offers up all the beloved activities you’ve come to love: carnival rides and games, live music, delicious food and unique attractions like knight jousting on the midway, dinosaur exhibits for kids and heart-pounding rodeos. And as always, ingenious food combinations make their debuts this year. “There are several new food options, but two standouts are the bacon funnel cake and cinnamon roll sundae,” says Sarah Thompson, marketing director at the TSF. The Oklahoma State Fair brings Sky Eye Park this year: the largest portable Ferris Wheel in North America, standing a massive 155 feet tall. Cooking shows, performing pets and live shark encounters also make the OSF a can’t-miss event. Beneath the food, games and music, however, Thompson finds a deeper meaning in this annual occassion. “Fairs are events that bring communities together,” she says. “It isn’t just food on a stick or midway rides; it is an event where we celebrate achievements, family and our community’s spirit.”

greatness with this epic, passionate story about the struggles and triumphs of several families. theatretulsa.

survived oppressive regimes during the 20th century.

hot jazz of Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Bessie Smith and others take center stage as the limelight shines on the 1920s. signaturesymphony.org

CHAMBER MUSIC TULSA PRESENTS: CALIDORE QUARTET Sept. 9-10 TULSA PAC Prepare to be

captivated by the finesse and intensity of these dynamic young musicians. chambermusictulsa.org

BRYAN ADAMS Sept. 14

HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO Enjoy the music of legend Bryan Adams.

hardrockcasinotulsa.com

TULSA SYMPHONY PRESENTS: CLASSICS I: GALA CONCERT Sept. 16 TULSA PAC Acclaimed

pianist Jon Kimura Parker performs Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 2 as the featured soloist on TSO’s opening Classics Series Gala. tulsasymphony.org

STEVE MILLER BAND

Sept. 16

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO TULSA Steve Miller was a

mainstay of the San Francisco music scene that upended American culture in the late ‘60s. riverspirittulsa.com

DARREN KNIGHT Sept. 16 HARD ROCK HOTEL AND CASINO Enjoy the comedy style of Darren Knight.

hardrockcasinotulsa.com

JANET JACKSON Sept. 17 BOK CENTER Janet Jackson

returns to the live stage to give her fans everything they could hope for in one epic event.

bokcenter.com

JON BELLION Sept. 18 CAIN’S BALLROOM New

York-based singer/songwriter/ producer Jon Bellion is on his The Human Condition Tour III. cainsballroom.com

SIGNATURE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: FAMILY PORTRAITS Sept. 23


TCC VAN TREASE PACE

Featured pianist Horacio Gutierrez returns to Tulsa, home of his sister Mary, a long- time TCC instructor, to perform the fresh sounds of Prokofiev. signaturesymphony.org

JOAN JETT AND THE BLACKHEARTS Sept. 23 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO AND RESORT Joan Jett is an originator, an innovator and a visionary. riverspirittulsa.com

WILCO Sept. 24 BRADY THEATER See this

JENNIFER NETTLES Sept. 28

RIVER SPIRIT CASINO AND RESORT Superstar

entertainer Jennifer Nettles is one of the most admired and animated performers in a lifetime. riverspirittulsa.com

CHRIS ISAAK Sept. 29 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO AND RESORT Isaak’s stunning

first album of new material in six years brings a bumper crop of strong and intriguing songs. riverspirittulsa.com

Chicago-based alternative band. bradytheater.com

THE LANY TOUR: PART 2

TWO DOOR CINEMA CLUB

Sept. 25

to the tunes of stellar success Lany with special guest Dagny.

to the tunes of this Northern Irish indie rock band from Bangor and Donaghadee.

GARY CLARK JR. Sept. 30 CAIN’S BALLROOM Enjoy

COMMUNIT Y

TO INFINITY AND BEYOND

Tulsa Town Hall welcomes a meticulously selected handful of captivating speakers each year – from actors and writers to scien-

Sept. 29

CAIN’S BALLROOM Listen cainsballroom.com

CAIN’S BALLROOM Listen cainsballroom.com

the sounds of Gary Clark Jr. cainsballroom.com

THE GILDED GAZE

BRADY ARTS DISTRICT

PAC GALLERY Through the use of her signature gold and silver leaf backgrounds and use of pattern, Tulsan Marjorie Atwood incorporates the female figure in various forms.

This year-round, monthly event features all of the galleries, studios and museums as well as the part-time galleries in various shops opening their doors.

thebradyartsdistrict.com

MORPHOLOGY Sept. 1-22

LIVING ARTS Artist Elizabeth Brown develops works that culminate from change and progression. livingarts.org THE ART OF NEOWTA Sept. 1-Oct. 22

AHHA TULSA Northeastern

Oklahoma Woodturners’ Association presents the evolution of turning nature’s medium into contemporary art. ahhatulsa.org

WHEN IS A QUILT NOT A QUILT? THE PARADOX OF APPROPRIATION Sept. 1-Oct. 22

AHHA TULSA Explore the art of Jane Dunnewold at AHHA’s newest exhibition.

ahhatulsa.org

SOCCER UNDER THE SWASTIKA Through Sept. 3 SHERWIN MILLER MUSEUM OF JEWISH ART In Soccer

Under the Swastika: Stories of Survival and Resistance during the Holocaust, Kevin E. Simpson reveals the surprisingly powerful role soccer played during WWII. jewishmuseum.

net

CHEECH MARIN’S CHICANO ART COLLECTION Through Sept. 3

PHILBROOK This exhibition

presents the work of 26 artists from the renowned Chicano art collection of Cheech Marin. philbrook.org

Sept. 5-28

tulsapac.com

SECOND SATURDAYS

Sept. 9

PHILBROOK The second Saturday of each month has free art activities, tours and scavenger hunts. philbrook.org

THEODORE FRIED SHOW Through Sept. 17 SHERWIN MILLER MUSEUM OF JEWISH ART Come and enjoy the art of Theodore Fried.

jewishmuseum.net

BOTH SIDES NOW: JOYCE SCOTT AND SONYA CLARK Through Sept. 24 108 CONTEMPORARY

Through the use of glass, beadwork and fiber, 2016 MacArthur Fellow Joyce Scott and Sonya Clark highlight, challenge, uncover and discover race, representation and injustice.

108contemporary.org

FIBERWORKS 2017 Through Sept. 29

AHHA TULSA This 39th

annual exhibit provides Oklahoma fiber artisans an opportunity to showcase their work. ahahtulsa.org

AFTER REMOVAL: REBUILDING THE CHEROKEE NATION Through Jan. 21

GILCREASE This exhibition tells the story of the Cherokee Nation in the 19th century through the stark contrasts of the human experience. gilcrease.org

SPORTS TULSA DRILLERS GAMES Sept. 1-4 ONEOK FIELD Catch the

team in action for several homestands. Grab a hot dog and a beer and relax as the

PHOTO BY MUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY

Sept. 1

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA TOWN HALL

ART FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL

tists to doctors. TTH opens its 2017-2018 lineup with U.S. Navy Capt. Mark Kelly, a decorated astronaut with a lengthy list of stellar accomplishments. He has commanded two space shuttles – Endeavor and Discovery – and conducted NASA-funded research on the effects of space on the body. He also works as a space and aviation contributor for several news networks. Bernie Dornblaser, a program committee member for TTH, has a pun at the ready when asked what makes Capt. Kelly so special. “The committee thought Capt. Kelly would be the natural to ‘launch’ the 83rd season,” she says. But on a more serious note: “He will be a fantastic speaker because we haven’t had an astronaut in quite some time. With the advancement of our space programs throughout the years, we thought that Capt. Kelly would exemplify the TTH mission statement of ‘opening minds and stirring curiosities.’” Capt. Kelly speaks Sept. 15. For season subscriptions, visit tulsatownhall.com.

Drillers chase victory. milb.com

TULSA REINING CLASSIC Through Sept. 3 EXPO SQUARE Enjoy reining activities that will be sure to

PERFORMANCE

The Philharmonic Returns

The OKC Philharmonic kicks off its 20172018 season with the stylings of lauded pianist Richard Goode. The native New Yorker’s musical interpretations have filled hallowed halls around the world, from London, Budapest and Madrid to Stockholm, Antwerp and Helsinki. “Acclaimed worldwide, Oklahoma audiences will be thrilled by Richard Goode’s virtuosity and masterful interpretation of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, kicking off what is sure to be an exciting season of music to stir the soul,” says Susan Webb, marketing director at the OKC Phil. Known for his otherworldly playing and

interpretive insight, Goode brings emotional commitment to his material and makes every performance memorable. Webb encourages any and all with an appreciation for music to come and visit the philharmonic this season. “We strive to bring our community and state quality music grounded in thoughtful programing, elevated by high quality musicianship, and believe music enriches the rich tapestry that makes our growing city unique,” she says. Goode performs at 8 p.m. Sept 16 at Civic Center Music Hall. Visit okcphil.org for details. SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

91


enthrall audiences of all ages.

EXHIBITIONS ABOUND The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City is bustling with excitement as a handful of new exhibitions recently opened to the public: We the People: A Portrait of Early Oklahoma (Through Oct. 22); Cartoons & Comics: The Early Art of Tom Ryan (through April 1); and Life and Legacy: The Art of Jerome Tiger (through May 13). We the People combines the past and the present with never-before-seen photos from the Dickinson Research Center. “The photos come from Henry M. Wantland, when his family arrived in Oklahoma Territory and settled in Stillwater,” says Tara Carr, communications coordinator at the museum. “The photos show the people around him, the streets he walked on, the stores and churches he frequented and so much more – some of which can still be seen in Stillwater today.” Cartoons & Comics brings humor to art and presents a great opportunity for younger generations to enjoy the museum. “Cartoons & Comics shows the inspiration, humor and behind-the-scenes look into what inspired Tom Ryan to become an acclaimed Western artist.”

tulsareining.com

TULSA’S GREAT RAFT RACE Sept. 4 RIVER CITY PARK, SAND SPRINGS Get ready for the

third year of the Great Raft Race’s revival on the Arkansas River. Don’t forget your life jacket! tulsaraftrace.com

AMHR NATIONALS Sept. 7-17 EXPO SQUARE Come out ART BY JEROME TIGER COURTESY NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM

Where & When

ART

Life and Legacy honors a prolific Oklahoma artist on the 50th anniversary of his passing. “Having only painted for five years, Tiger produced hundreds of works of art and won numerous awards. The exhibition will celebrate the life and legacy of this remarkable painter,” says Carr. Visit nationalcowboymuseum.org for further details.

and enjoy the American miniature horses at this national competition.

Amphitheater Thrills

92

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

visits the amphitheater for a one-night event. Originally from South Carolina, the quartet fluctuates its sound among Christian, Southern, indie and country vibes for an eclectic mix of hits accessible to the masses. Special guests on the tour include “I Don’t Wanna Be” crooner Gavin DeGraw and up-and-coming quartet The New Respects. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the concert begins at 7 p.m. Visit thezooamphitheatre. com for tickets. PHOTO COURTESY DFC CONCERTS

Nestled between sky-high oak trees and red sandstone, the Zoo Amphitheater in Oklahoma City offers one of the most unique concert-going experiences in the state. The venue has welcomed a lofty list of legends, including Chicago, Willie Nelson and Marvin Gaye. The popularity of the venue stems from a variety of factors, especially the general admission lawn seating, stunning outdoor views and pristine acoustics. On Sept. 22, American rock band Needtobreathe

Sept. 9, 23, 30

CHAPMAN STADIUM Cheer on the Golden Hurricane in the first home games of the season. tulsahurricane.com

TULSA ROUGHNECKS GAMES Sept. 23, 30 ONEOK FIELD Enjoy a

night at ONEOK Field as the Roughnecks battle the LA Galaxy II and San Antonio FC, respectively. roughnecksfc.com

COMMUNITY BUTTERFLY MONTH September TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

Activities all month will focus on butterflies and include programs for children and adults. tulsabotanicgarden.org

VINTAGE TULSA SHOW Sept. 1-3 EXPO SQUARE This is

the largest antique show of the year for Heritage Event Company, with over 55,000 square feet filled with authentic treasures.

heritageeventcompany.com

KENDALL WHITTIER MERCADO Sept. 2, 9, 16,

23, 30

KENDALL WHITTIER DISTRICT The district’s

vision is to create a place that reminds visitors of the famous Mercado de Coyoacan, a vibrant arts market near the Frida Kahlo Museum in Mexico City. historickwms.com

BLUE WHALE COMEDY FESTIVAL Sept. 7-10 CAIN’S BALLROOM The

Blue Whale Comedy Festival is back in the Brady Arts District with even more comedians in stand-up, improv and film.

IN CONCERT

shetlandminiature.com

UNIVERSITY OF TULSA FOOTBALL HOME GAMES

Square’s long-held reputation as Tulsa’s premier fashion, retail and restaurant district. uticasquare.com

WOODY GUTHRIE SONGWRITER’S EVENING Sept. 16

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER The show features unplugged performances. woodyguthriecenter.org

MOTORCYCLE SWAP MEET Sept. 17

ADMIRAL TWIN DRIVE-IN

Unique motorcycles are on display at the meet, with parts for sale, too. jwswapmeet.com

MUSIC NIGHT Sept. 28 TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

Enjoy vocalist Erin O’Dowd at this relaxing night in the gardens. tulsabotanic.org

HAUNTED CASTLE HALLOWEEN FESTIVAL Sept. 29-Oct. 28

CASTLE OF MUSKOGEE

This festival has spooky attractions for everyone. Visit if you dare.

okcastle.com

MEDIEVAL FAIRE Sept. 29-Oct. 1

bluewhalecomedyfestival.com

9330 W. SOUTHFORK ROAD, SAPULPA Dress

SECOND SATURDAY ARCHITECTURE TOUR

standingbearpark.com

Sept. 9

633 S. BOSTON AVE. Each month these popular walking tours highlights some of Downtown Tulsa’s architectural treasures. tulsaarchitecture.org

OKLAHOMA AVICULTURAL SOCIETY’S EXOTIC BIRD FAIR Sept. 9 EXPO SQUARE The

up and enjoy food, music, performances and vendors.

WORDSMITHS AND THEIR GARDENS Sept. 30 TULSA BOTANIC GARDEN

Enjoy brunch with friends as Sarah Stecher shares the music, humor and intrinsic connections between poets and their poetry. tulsabotanic.org

CORNDOG CLASSIC Sept. 30

Oklahoma Avicultural Society, a Tulsa-based bird club, has served the needs of avian lovers in Eastern Oklahoma since the late 1980s.

TULSA EXPO SQUARE Bring your family and enjoy the fun at this seventh annual event.

BRICKUNIVERSE LEGO FAN CONVENTION 2017 Sept. 9-10

OKLAHOMA STATE SUGAR ART SHOW Sept. 30-Oct. 1 QUIK TRIP CENTER AT EXPO SQUARE Watch as

BrickUniverse brings the universe of the bricks together under one roof for fans of all ages. coxcentertulsa.com

oklahomasugarartists.com

okbirds.com

COX BUSINESS CENTER

FASHION IN THE SQUARE Sept. 15

UTICA SQUARE This free event celebrates Utica

corndogclassic5k.com

bakers compete in the Grand National Wedding Cake Competition to see mastery at work.


spectacular tennis before the classic. brucegweber.com

tulsalibrary.org

THIRD ANNUAL OKLAHOMA CHANGING WORLD PRIZE

leisurely evening in the book stacks surrounded by friends and benefits Tulsa City-Country Library’s Ruth G. Hardman Adult Literacy Service.

DAY OF CARING Sept. 8

CITYWIDE This is one of the nation’s largest days of community service to benefit the Tulsa Area United Way. tauw.org/dayofcaring

KALEIDOSCOPE BALL

Sept. 8

COX BUSINESS CENTER

The 40th anniversary event is a formal gala complete with dinner, cocktails and dancing to benefit Emergency Infant Services.

emergencyinfantservices.org

RESTAURANT WEEK Sept. 9-17

CITYWIDE Participating restaurants donate 10 percent of Restaurant Week menu sales to the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma to combat hunger in our state. okfoodbank.org

WESTERN DAYS Sept. 12 COX BUSINESS CENTER

This 21st annual fundraiser, featuring casual western fashion, benefits Saint Simeon’s Foundation. saintsimeons.org

BRUCE G. WEBER BLING BALL Sept. 12 TU CASE TENNIS CENTER

The kickoff party is a casual night of music, spirits, food and

BRUCE G. WEBER TENNIS CLASSIC Sept. 13-14 TU CAMPUS Cocktails,

hors d’oeuvres, raffles and great games comprise the Bruce G. Weber Tennis Classic. brucegweber.com

Sept. 24

PHOTO BY ERIK CAMPOS COURTESY THE UNIVERSITY OF TULSA

CHARITABLE EVENTS CHAPTERS: A CASUAL EVENING OF BOOKS, BARDS AND BITES Sept. 7 HARDESTY REGIONAL LIBRARY Chapters is a

WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER

The event recognizes LaDonna Harris, a citizen of the Comanche Nation who founded Americans for Indian Opportunity and was honorary co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington. woodyguthriecenter.org

CONCOURS FOR THE CURE Sept. 24

SOUTHERN HILLS COUNTRY CLUB Southern Hills is the perfect setting to sip champagne while viewing some classic and exotic cars. This event benefits the American Diabetes Association. diabetes.org

CATTLE BARON’S BALL

Sept. 29

RIVER WEST FESTIVAL PARK This event helps to fund

free services and programs for local cancer patients that are provided by the American Cancer Society. ccancer.org

TULSA ONE WALK Sept. 30 GUTHRIE GREEN The One Walk is the most powerful peer-to-peer fundraising program in the world for type 1 diabetes. The event benefits the Junior Diabetes Research Foundation in Tulsa. jdrf.org

SPORTS

FOOTBALL SEASON KICKS OFF Even the smallest hint of fall weather in the air means one thing for Oklahomans: college football. The cooler months bring thousands of passionate fans donned in school colors, face paint and many a foam finger to cheer on their favorite teams. The University of Tulsa Golden Hurricanes and Oklahoma State Cowboys faced off during their respective season openers on Aug. 31 in Stillwater, while the University of Oklahoma Sooners begin Sept. 2 at home

TOWER THEATRE American Idol winner and recording artist David Cook performs.

towertheatreokc.com

The Old 97’s perform.

diamondballroom.net

IN OKC

CODY JOHNSON Sept. 15 THE CRITERION See

PERFORMANCES OKC BROADWAY PRESENTS: DISNEY’S THE LITTLE MERMAID Sept. 5-10 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL

Come to see this classic American ballet.

armstrongauditorium.org

American country singer Cody Johnson. criterionokc.com

ROBIN THICKE Sept. 15-16 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Robin Thicke

Come fall in love with the magic for the first time – or all over again. okcbroadway.com

has established himself as one of the most respected singer-songwriters in soul and R&B music. riverwind.com

TOM SEGURA: NO TEETH NO ENTRY TOUR Sept. 8 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Tom Segura recently

This tribute to the music, life and times of Patsy Cline has been a breakout hit across the country. cityrep.com

CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL

TEXAS HIPPIE COALITION

released his third hourlong standup album, which sat atop the iTunes and Billboard Comedy charts for consecutive weeks. okcciviccenter.com

OKC BALLET AND ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM PRESENTS: THE FIREBIRD WITH RODEO Sept. 14 ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM

OKC BROADWAY PRESENTS: BEAUTIFUL, THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL Sept. 26-Oct. 1 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL

Long before she was Carole King, chart-topping music legend, she was Carol Klein, Brooklyn girl with passion and chutzpah. okcbroadway.com

CONCERTS JAMEY JOHNSON Sept. 1 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Eleven-time

Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Jamey Johnson is one of the greatest country singers of a generation. riverwind.com

DEVILDRIVER Sept. 3 DIAMOND BALLROOM

DevilDriver performs with special guests Soul Crisis, Wood ‘N Bone and Faova. diamondballroom.net

DAVID COOK Sept. 6

NORMAN The Space Science

JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT Sept. 24 THE CRITERION See the

samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

KEHINDE WILEY: A NEW REPUBLIC Through Sept. 10 OKC MOA The exhibition

YOUNG THE GIANT Sept. 28 THE CRITERION See this Los

JOE ANDOE: HORIZONS

criterionokc.com

FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART Contemporary artist

criterionokc.com

JENNIFER NETTLES Sept. 29 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Superstar

Sept. 16

entertainer Jennifer Nettles is an admired, animated performer. riverwind.com

Texas Hippie Coalition are the purveyors of their own patented Red Dirt/metal sound.

MATT STANSBERRY AND THE ROMANCE Sept. 30 TOWER THEATRE Matt

DIAMOND BALLROOM The thcofficial.com

THE MAVERICKS Sept. 21

TOWER THEATRE The Grammy-award-winning

FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK Sept. 1 PASEO DISTRICT Art

ART

JANET O’NEAL, JIM KEFFER Sept. 1-Oct. 1

JRB ART AT THE ELMS Enjoy the art of local creators O’Neal and Keffer. jrbartgallery.com

highlights the range of Wiley’s production. okcmoa.com Through Sept. 10

Joe Andoe was born and came of age in Tulsa, surrounded by churches, trees, highways and horses. ou.edu/fjjma

PICHER, OKLAHOMA: CATASTROPHE, MEMORY, AND TRAUMA Through Sept. 10

FRED JONES FR. MUSEUM

Stansberry and The Romance is an American rock ‘n’ roll band based in Oklahoma City. towertheatreokc.com

opening receptions showcase the new work of the gallery/ studio owners or the work of guest artists. thepaseo.org

Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning has developed a national traveling exhibition program for all to enjoy.

band with special guests Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls.

Angeles-based band with the Cold War Kids and Joywave.

CITYREP THEATRE PRESENTS: A CLOSER WALK WITH PATSY CLINE Sept. 14-17, 21-24

Mavericks have a neo-traditional take on country music, combining Latin rhythms and rock roots. towertheatreokc.com

OLD 97’S Sept. 15 DIAMOND BALLROOM

versus the University of Texas at El Paso. All teams play at home again this month – OU on Sept. 16 versus Tulane University, OSU on Sept. 23 versus Texas Christian University and TU on Sept. 9 vs. the University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Sept. 23 vs. the University of New Mexico; and Sept. 30 vs. the U.S. Naval Academy. For full schedules, visit soonersports.com, okstate.com and tulsahurricane.com.

UGLY BUGS Through Sept. 4 SAM NOBLE MUSEUM, NORMAN The Oklahoma

Microscopy Society celebrates 20 years of the Ugly Bug competition with an exhibit of 2016’s ugliest bugs. samnoblemuseum.ou.edu

COMETS, ASTEROIDS, METEORS: GREAT BALLS OF FIRE! Through Sept. 10 SAM NOBLE MUSEUM,

OF ART Todd Stewart’s photo-essay explores the otherworldly ghost town. ou.edu/fjjma

SECOND FRIDAY NORMAN ART WALK Sept. 15 NORMAN ARTS DISTRICT

This is a free, monthly celebration of arts and creativity in the Walker Arts District. 2ndfridaynorman.com

PROJECT SPACE Sept. 15-Oct. 20

IAO GALLERY With rotating exhibitions every month, IAO offers emerging artists a chance to exhibit in a more intimate setting. individualartists.org

JORDAN VINYARD AND KYLE LARSON Through Sept. 22

IAO GALLERY See local artists Vinyard and Larson at this exhibition. individualartists.org

SPORTS UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA FOOTBALL HOME GAMES

Sept. 2, 16

GAYLORD FAMILY OKLAHOMA MEMORIAL STADIUM, NORMAN Cheer the Sooners in their first home games of the season.

soonersports.com

OKC ENERGY GAMES Sept. 10, 17

TAFT STADIUM Cheer on the Energy against the Vancouver Whitecaps and its rivals, the Tulsa Roughnecks, respectively. energyfc.com

FULL MOON BIKE RIDE AND RUN Sept. 11 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Join other runners in a 5K through scenic downtown as the sun sets or try your hand at a leisurely bike ride.

myriadbotanicalgardens.com

MONARCH MADNESS 5K

Sept. 23

OKC ZOO The Oklahoma

City Zoo invites you to run a 5k (or walk 1 mile) at Monarch Madness. okczoo.org

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

93


Where & When

COMMUNITY DANCING IN THE GARDENS FEATURING ‘70S DISCO Sept. 1 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Put on your boogie shoes and hustle on over to the Myriad Gardens.

oklahomacitybotanicalgardens. com

SLIDE OUTTA SUMMER Sept. 2

MITCH PARK, EDMOND

Come out to the University of Central Oklahoma and send off the summer with music, food and fun. travelok.com

YOGA TUESDAYS IN THE GARDENS Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS This is a great,

all-levels class led by Lisa Woodard. Class participants should bring a yoga mat and water. oklahomacitybotanical-

gardens.com

CUB CLUB: JEEPERS KEEPERS! Sept. 7 OKC ZOO Bring your little cub as we learn about zoo animals through lessons, crafts, discovery stations and guided zoo tours. okczoo.org

WELCOME TO YOUR NEW PARK! Sept. 7 MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Join Maureen

Heffernan, executive director of Myriad Botanical Gardens, as she presents images of the park highlighting its new features and elements that will further the downtown renaissance. oklahomacitybo-

tanicalgardens.com

U.S. FOODS’ FOOD FANATIC TRADE SHOW Sept. 13

COX CONVENTION CENTER

Foodies, this one’s for you! Come out and enjoy the show. coxconventioncenter.com

RED, WHITE, AND ZOO!

Sept. 29

OKC ZOO Bring the family to

CHARITABLE EVENTS

OUTDOOR DINING SERIES

HUNGER ACTION MONTH

MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS Join us on the

NATIONWIDE This month-

Sept. 15

Meinders Terrace for an intimate dinner under the stars. oklahomacitybotanical-

gardens.com

OKC 50+ BETTER LIVE EXPO Sept. 16 COX CONVENTION CENTER

This event features more than 200 exhibitors, with seminars on health, wellness, nutrition, finance and travel. rmpshows.com

DAVID MEINZ Sept. 21 OKC TOWN HALL For

Sept.

Sept. 22

RENAISSANCE BALL Sept. 8 OKLAHOMA CITY GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Join

a silent and live auction, dinner, music and dancing. The event benefits the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

okfoodbank.org

the OKCMOA for a night full of dinner, cocktails and dancing.

okcmoa.com

BOOTS AND BOURBON Sept. 15

OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER This western-

themed tasting event acts as Bricktown Rotary’s annual fundraiser.

MESTA FESTA Sept. 24 PERLE MESTA PARK Mesta

INTEGRIS GOLF CLASSIC Sept. 18 GAILLARDIA COUNTRY CLUB This riveting event

Festa is an annual festival.

mestapark.org

OKC METRO AREA YOGA WEEK Sept. 24 OKC METRO Join the Gardens, Downtown OKC and lululemon for a week of community.

oklahomacitybotanicalgardens. com

PLAZA BEER WALK Sept. 27 PLAZA DISTRICT This monthly event features some incredible (and some rare) beers from Prairie Artisan Ales. plazadistrict.org

raises money to benefit the innovative work of INTEGRIS eHealth. integrisok.com

long campaign, endorsed by the Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma, works to inspire the community to take action against hunger in Oklahoma.

more than 25 years, health and wellness expert David Meinz has helped people enhance both their personal and professional productivity. townhall.publishpath.com

learn about why conserving plants and animals is so important. okczoo.rog

tinyurl.com/bootsandbourbon

BREATH OF LIFE GALA NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM The gala includes

okbreathoflife.eventscff.org

CATTLE BARON’S BALL THE CRITERION This event helps to fund services and programs for local cancer patients provided by the American Cancer Society.

duncanlittletheatre.com

ROBERT IRVINE Sept. 23 GRAND CASINO HOTEL AND

Walk benefits the Junior Diabetes Research Foundation. centraloklahoma.jdrf.org

BAD SEED Sept. 22-30 MUSKOGEE LITTLE THEATER The scene is

a small Southern town where Colonel and Christine Penmark live with their daughter, Rhoda. This is one of Broadway’s outstanding hits

prolific artist Bryan Adams. choctawcasinos.com

American singer-songerwriter Jake Owen. choctawcasinos.com

PEPE AGUILAR Sept. 15 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Four-time

Grammy Award and Latin Grammy Award Winner Pepe Aguilar graces the stage.

entertains 14,000 people each year, is more than just a rodeo competition. It’s a celebration of the western lifestyle.

elkcityrodeo.com

PBR: BUILT FORD TOUGH SERIES Sept. 2-3 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE The

toughest sport on dirt returns to the Colosseum. winstarworldcasino.com

JIM SHOULDERS LIVING LEGENDS RODEO Sept. 2-3 HISTORIC NICHOLS PARK, HENRYETTA This rodeo

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA’S GREAT RAFT RACE

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

many runs ranging from 5 to 50 miles. dowackadotrailrun.

com

THE CASTLE ZOMBIE RUN Sept. 9 THE CASTLE OF MUSKOGEE Green Country has been infected and The Castle is overrun! Feed your adrenaline urge by facing off against the zombie horde. okcastle.com

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL HOME GAME Sept. 23 BOONE PICKENS STADIUM, STILLWATER Cheer on the

PORT HARBOR DASH Sept. 23

PORT OF CATOOSA This

event includes a 5K, 10K and family fun run. travelok.com

riders and their equine compatriots compete.

94

DO-WACKA-DO TRAIL RUN Sept. 9 SANDY SANDERS WILDLIFE PRESERVE, ERICK Participate in one of

com

STEPHENS COUNTY FAIR AND EXPO CENTER, DUNCAN Watch as skilled

BONG HONG CAI AO Sept. 17 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE See Bong

Cowboys in their first home games of the season. okstate.

Sept. 8-10

A beloved Tulsa tradition, the Great Raft Race, was resurrected in 2015 after a 23year lapse. In its former heyday, the event welcomed over 600 rafts, 4,500 racers and 150,000 spectators to the Arkansas River for a hectic yet glorious day of fun. Now on its third year back, the race welcomes participants in kayaks, canoes, paddleboards, inflatable rafts and even

winstarworldcasino.com

SPORTS PRCA RODEO OF CHAMPIONS Sept. 1-3 BEUTLER BROTHERS RODEO ARENA, ELK CITY This rodeo, which

D&D BARREL RACE

CRAFTY RAFTS

Rubio returns to celebrate Mexican independence with her fans.

winstarworldcasino.com

cityofhenryetta.org

homemade contraptions to lazily float or hastily race down the river. Winners will be named in categories like Best of Show, Best Engineered Raft and Most Creative, so even if yours isn’t the fastest or the best, you’ll get points for flash. There is a bevy of options for spectators, as well, including a sand castle design challenge and rowdy finish line party complete with food trucks, games and music. The race is Sept. 4 on the Arkansas River. Visit tulsaraftrace.com for details.

PAULINA RUBIO Sept. 16 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Paulina

Hong Cai Ao (“When I Think of You”) in the Global Event Center.

BRYAN ADAMS Sept. 15 CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT, DURANT See

is in its 25th year and is an excellent family event.

COMMUNIT Y

the culinary challenges with Food Network star Robert Irvine. grandresortok.com

CONCERTS JAKE OWEN Sept. 1 CHOCTAW CASINO AND RESORT, DURANT See

cancer.org

ONE WALK Sept. 23 CHICKASAW BRICKTOWN BALLPARK The JDRF One

PERFORMANCES

short performances.

muskogeelittletheatre.com

winstarworldcasino.com

Sept. 22

AROUND THE STATE DUNCAN LITTLE THEATRE PRESENTS: EVENING OF SHORTS Sept. 8-9 MARLOW OPERA HOUSE Enjoy several

RESORT, SHAWNEE Enjoy

and sets your spine tingling.

danddbarrelracing.com

DAM J.A.M. BICYCLE TOUR Sept. 9 WHITAKER PARK, PRYOR

Enjoy rides of 31, 55, 71 and 101 miles. pryorchamber.com

RED RIVER RANCH ROUNDUP RODEO Sept. 29-30 STEPHENS COUNTY FAIR AND EXPO CENTER, DUNCAN This event features branding, pinning, wild cow milking and a host of other activities. travelok.com

ART

WOMEN’S POINT OF VIEW Sept. 2-Nov. 12 MABEE-GERRER MUSEUM OF ART, SHAWNEE Enjoy the center’s newest exhibition. mgmoa.org

STUART DAVIS: IN FULL SWING Sept. 16-Jan. 1 CRYSTAL BRIDGES, BENTONVILLE, ARKANSAS Over the

course of his 60-year career, Davis invented an artistic vocabulary of bold colors and strong forms, informed by his enthusiasm for jazz. crystalbridges.org

CHISHOLM TRAIL 150TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBIT Through Sept. 16 CHEROKEE STRIP REGIONAL HERITAGE CENTER, ENID Celebrate

the greatest cattle trail with a fascinating exhibit. csrhc.org

CHEROKEE HOMECOMING ART SHOW Through Sept. 30 CHEROKEE HERITAGE CENTER, PARK HILL Oklahoma’s premier

Cherokee art show has two divisions, traditional and contemporary. cherokeeheritage.org


CHIHULY: IN THE FOREST Through Nov. 13 CRYSTAL BRIDGES, BENTONVILLE,

ARKANSAS Dale Chihuly has been an innovator for more than 40 years, working in many media, including glass, paint and neon. crystalbridges.org

COMMUNITY MAYOR’S BLUES BALL Sept. 1-3

TOWN CENTER MAINSTAGE, MEDICINE PARK Enjoy local

musicians in this annual event. medicinepark.com

CHEROKEE NATIONAL HOLIDAY Sept. 1-3 THROUGHOUT TAHLEQUAH

This holiday celebrates the signing of the Cherokee Nation Constitution in 1839 with tournaments, competitions and celebrations. cherokee.org

WATERMELON FESTIVAL AND COMMUNITY FAIR

Through Sept. 2

MAIN STREET, RINGWOOD

This fair, which began in 1914, boasts volleyball tournaments, pageants and an ice cream contest. facebook.com/ ringwoodcommunityfair

PAYNE COUNTRY FREE FAIR Through Sept. 2

STEPHENS COUNTRY FAIR AND EXPO CENTER, DUNCAN Enjoy livestock

shows, exhibits and a carnival at this free fair.

pcexpocenter.com

FREEDOMFEST LABOR DAY CELEBRATION AND FIREWORKS Sept. 3 111 STAWHUN ROAD, PRYOR This annual holiday

celebrates the economic and social contributions of workers to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country and its communities.

pryorchamber.com

CHOCTAW NATION LABOR DAY FESTIVAL AND POWWOW Through Sept. 4 CHOCTAW NATION CAPITOL GROUNDS, TUSKAHOMA Visitors can

enjoy tribal heritage activities, an intertribal powwow, Choctaw cultural exhibitions, free concerts and carnival rides. travelok.com

FOOD TRUCK WEDNESDAYS Sept. 5 U.S. 62 AND JACKSON AVENUE, BLANCHARD The

parks department brings in some of the top food trucks in the state. cityofblanchard.us

KIOWA COUNTY FREE FAIR Sept. 6-10

KIOWA COUNTRY FAIRGROUNDS, HOBART Come and

enjoy this annual event. hobartokchamber.com

MUSTANG WESTERN DAYS

Sept. 8-9

1201 N. MUSTANG RD. The weekend is packed with opportunities for the old to rekindle some of their fondest memories and the young to begin making memories of their own.

mustangwesterndays.com

WINE’N ON THE CHISHOLM TRAIL Sept. 8-9 MAIN STREET, DUNCAN

This festival features Oklahoma wineries, live music and food. mainstreetduncan.net

WAGONER ANTIQUE TRACTOR SHOW Sept. 8-9 DUNBAR PARK, WAGONER

Enjoy antique tractors and farm equipment at this annual show.

oata116.com

WOOLAROC FALL TRAIL RIDE Sept. 9 WOOLAROC MUSEUM AND WILDLIFE PRESERVE, BARTLESVILLE The trail

ride covers about 15 miles of terrain that is rarely seen by the public. woolaroc.org

MASTERS AT WORK: WOODTURNING COMPETITION AND EXHIBITION Sept. 8-Oct. 15 FOREST HERITAGE CENTER MUSEUM, BROKEN BOW Artists compete to

become the master woodturner at this annual event.

forestry.ok.gov

ROADKILL CHILI COOK-OFF Sept. 9

DELAWARE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, JAY Sample some of the best chili in Oklahoma at this annual event.

jaychamber.com

CHISHOLM TRAIL 150TH ANNIVERSARY CATTLE DRIVE Sept. 12-17 POND CREEK, JEFFERSON

Ride the Chisholm Trail as is it celebrates the 150th anniversary of the first cattle that “headed north to Abilene.”

chisholmtrail150.org

GRAND NAUTICAL MARKET Sept. 16

REBEL MARINE, KETCHUM Visit for a day of

fun-filled shopping and food. 360grandlake.com

STANDING BEAR POWWOW Sept. 29-30

STANDING BEAR PARK, PONCA CITY Visit the

powwow to see inter-tribal dancing, contests and the crowning of Standing Bear Princess.

standingbearpark.com

TO SUBMIT EVENTS IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND THE STATE, HEAD TO OKMAG.COM/ SUBMIT-EVENT.

FILM AND CINEMA

Short Films Go Global Three Oklahoma theaters participate this month in the worldwide Manhattan festival.

Around Town

Short films form one of the most tantalizing yet frustrating niches in the world of cinema. At their best, short films provide budding filmmakers with a testing ground for ideas and characters that might act as springboards for future work while still hanging together as coherent, pleasing narratives in their own right. Without the burden of commercial expectations, directors of short films can take risks they might otherwise avoid, and many short films work at the edges of cinema’s avant-garde. The low stakes of short films have a downside because of the difficulty in seeing them outside the context of festivals. Even at those gatherings, they often get neglected in the rush to catch buzzworthy feature films. However, the Manhattan Short Film Festival puts these efforts front and center every year. The festival comes with a twist: Although it bears the name of a New York borough, it actually occurs simultaneously at theaters around the world so that viewers can vote for their favorite films. In Oklahoma, you can catch the festival at the end of September at Circle Cinema in Tulsa, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, and The Poncan in Ponca City.

At Home

One of the great comedies of this millennium is getting a much needed re-release on Blu Ray and DVD on Sept. 12. It’s hard to describe Hot Rod, made by comedy troupe The Lonely Island, other than to call it an instant cult classic, the sort of film seen by 50 people in theaters, all of whom champion it as a masterpiece. The story of a would-be Evil Knievel (Andy Samberg) out to impress his stepdad (and a girl), the

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE

PHOTO COURTESY TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM CORP.

film squirms with awkward, inexplicable moments. Like The Lonely Island’s videos for Saturday Night Live, the film also delights in surreal, whimsical touches, like a scene that uses only two words – “cool beans” – over and over in increasingly absurd ways. No one would accuse Matthew Vaughan’s 2014 action/comedy Kingsman: The Secret Service of being highbrow, no matter how much elegance comes with the film’s crisp suits and smooth British accents. What the film lacks in subtlety, it more than makes up for in pure dumb fun. This is a film where Colin Firth fights a churchful of fundamentalists and the heads of multiple world leaders explode into multicolored fireworks. This month, Vaughan brings a sequel to theaters, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, that will hopefully equal the first film’s gleeful absurdity. Taron Egerton returns as Eggsy, the lower-class bloke brought into the high flying world of espionage by Firth’s Harry Hart. This time out, the Kingsmen battle a new foe, played by Julianne Moore (underrated as a comic actress). The cast includes comic ringers Channing Tatum and Jeff Bridges, plus, most oddly, Elton John. As long as Vaughan keeps the pace zippy, Kingsman: The Golden Circle should be the perfect fall reminder of summer blockbuster fun. But be warned: The first film is definitely adults only. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

SEPTEMBER 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

95


C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S

Dr. Berrien Moore

I

n addition to being the director of the National Weather Center in Norman, Berrien Moore, Ph.D, holds several other titles that keep him busy. He is the dean of the University of Oklahoma’s College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, vice president for weather climate programs, and a professor, holding the Chesapeake Energy Corp. Chair in Climate Studies. Previous to accepting these positions, he was the director of the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space at the University of New Hampshire and the founding director of Climate Central. He was part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007, when it shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore, and he has also received the 2007 Dryden Lectureship in Research from the American Institute in Aeronautics and Astronautics and the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. We recently caught up with Moore and got his thoughts on ...

… the structure of the National Weather Center.

… the NWC’s pursuit to always be better.

I remember after the Moore tornadic events of three years ago, when they gave a very critical 17-minute warning, I talked to people from FEMA [Federal Emergency Management Agency]. They all said when they saw the path of the tornado, they thought the deaths would be in the hundreds. And I think it was 24. We had a team gathering three or four days after that, and the sense was it wasn’t the best it could have been. Until we get it to zero, nobody’s happy.

… changes in how severe weather warnings will be issued in the future. One thing that we’re really looking at hard is that society really is adopting the cell phone. The cell phone knows who uses it. It could know if the person is hard of hearing or if the person doesn’t have perfect eyesight. It would know where the person is and if the person is in a car. If you’re delivering information, it would be very important to exploit that. You would think we might move to a time when you’re getting custom forecasts that tell you what to do to find safety. The whole data delivery … that is a big, big deal.

96

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2017

… recent projects at the NWC.

We’ve just been awarded a $170 million grant from NASA that was highly competitive, with only one selected in the country. We were fortunate enough to be that one. We will be putting an instrument that measures the tree-made carbon gases in the atmosphere, and mapping that at about a 5-kilometer resolution every day for the Americas. So every day we will map out carbon gases on the atmosphere every couple of miles, wall to wall through the United States, Mexico, Brazil … every single day. And that really is a brand new capability. It’s never been done before. We will also be able to make measurements of photosynthesis and changes in photosynthesis, wall to wall, every day all through the Americas. This can be very, very valuable.

… what he is most proud of in his career.

Being here at OU. I think it’s just the character of the university and its commitment to excellence, all of which stems from President [David] Boren. I think it’s just a great opportunity to work here. This is a remarkable place. There are a lot of good universities – I’ve been at several – but OU is unique in terms of the underlying character and fabric of the institution and its commitment to stability and excellence.

PHOTO COURTESY THE NATIONAL WEATHER CENTER

I would say it is unique in this country, as far as I know. I know of no place like it. It brings together the federal government, through primarily five NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] laboratories or sections; state agencies and then the university. So you’ve got federal offices, state offices, the University of Oklahoma and then you have the center that really serves to help facilitate some of the interaction. And it really is remarkable.


Oklahoma Magazine September 2017  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you