Page 1

SEPTEMBER 2014

FALL FASHION

LUXE DELUXE

Gridiron Glory

The Friday night lights shine bright for these high school stars SPECIAL REPORT:

Oklahoma’s ENERGY ACTIVE YEARS

Coming HOME

VETERANS FACE

OBSTACLES

AFTER SERVICE


Capture, Share #uticasquare

uticasquare.com

#artinthesquare #localartists #saturdayfun #familydayout

Join us for Art in the Square. October 4th from 10am to 5pm. Enjoy the autumn air during Art in the Square, where you’ll discover watercolors, stained glass, pottery, woodcarving and other beautiful work from local artists. You can purchase their pieces, and discuss creativity to your heart’s content! Art alley will be in full swing for the kids with face painting and free cookies.


September 2 014 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

VOL. XVIII, NO. 9

FEATURES

46

Oklahoma’s Energy

The boom of the energy business continues to drive Oklahoma’s economy through industry and education.

54

Luxe Deluxe

This fall, fashion calls for lavish details, including fur, leather and wild patterns. Muted tones and nods to the ‘90s also add haute touches to hot outfits.

70

Gridiron Glory

Four of the state’s top football recruits are looking forward to their senior years of high school and helping their teammates win a championship title.

SPECIAL SECTION 76

Active Years

64

Healing Our Heroes

As Oklahoma soldiers return from combat and attempt to return to their lives, some struggle with assimilation. Fortunately, organizations and resources in the state are helping.

New & Improved!

OKMAG.COM

September 2014

SEPTEMBER 2014

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

FALL FASHION

LUXE DELUXE

Gridiron Glory

The Friday night lights shine bright for these high school stars SPECIAL REPORT:

Oklahoma’s ENERGY ACTIVE YEARS SEPT COVER.indd 5

2

Coming HOME

VETERANS FACE

OBSTACLES

AFTER SERVICE

ON THE COVER: ALL THE RIGHT ELEMENTS COME TOGETHER FOR THE ULTRA LUXURIOUS STYLE – INCLUDING OUR COVER LOOK FROM ABERSONS – IN OUR FALL FASHION PAGES. PHOTO BY NATHAN HARMON.

8/18/14 1:47 PM

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries. MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!


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Contents

DEPARTMENTS

30

The State

13

Celebrating its 52nd gathering, Norman’s Groovefest is the world’s oldest human rights festival. Thousands will gather to enjoy art, dance, music and each other at September’s event.

16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30

People 5 Qs Culture Art The Insider Oklahoma Business Scene Living Space

16

A Tulsa couple celebrates their empty nest by renovating a ’70s-era home. The design is an eclectic mix of Mid-century Modern and antiques that represent the couple’s history and travels.

36 40 42

Style Your Health Destination

36

Taste

89

Matt Kelley keeps Lucky’s Restaurant fresh in the mind when it comes to elegance and the simplicity of good food cooked well. Food writer Brian Schwartz visits Lucky’s to see what’s cooking now that Kelley’s brother and former French Laundry chef Brandon Benelli has joined the crew.

91 92 93

What We’re Eating Food Event Sweet Tooth

Entertainment

95

Jessica Fellowes may have the scoop on the next season of television’s Downton Abbey, but she’s not giving anything away when she visits the Tulsa Performing Arts Center this month. Fellowes is the first guest speaker of Tulsa Town Hall’s 80th anniversary season, and it promises to be a good one.

96

104

4

Calendar of Events

In Person

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

95

93


For generations, Saint Francis has been the hospital of tomorrow— anticipating and meeting the healthcare needs of the region it proudly serves. This legacy of leadership continues today as Saint Francis opens its Trauma Emergency Center and patient bed tower. This new facility houses an 85-bed trauma center and emergency room as well as 150 patient rooms. This expansion, the largest in the hospital’s 54-year history, represents Saint Francis’ commitment to serving the residents of Tulsa and eastern Oklahoma for generations to come. Saint Francis’ vision for the future is based on the same mission that it was founded upon—to extend the presence and healing ministry of Christ.

saintfrancis.com Saint Francis Hospital | 918-494-2200

You’re invited. Join us for an open house and an afternoon of activities to celebrate the grand opening of the Saint Francis Trauma Emergency Center and patient bed tower. 2 – 5 P.M. Sunday, September 7, 2014 61st and Yale Main Lobby Free and open to the community


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX ASSOCIATE EDITOR KAREN SHADE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS TARA MALONE, CHRIS SUTTON, JOHN WOOLEY GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER NATE PUCKETT DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SAMANTHA E. GRAMMER CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2014 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman TM Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2013

Member

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

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TM


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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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Nominate your company for Great Companies To Work For 2014.

To receive the nomination form, email editor@okmag.com.

2013

8Companies OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER8/16/14 2014 10:03 AM new Great 1-3 Strip.indd 1

September always seems a frantic time of year. The days are slowly getting shorter and cooler. School is back in session, but kids are still trying to find routine. Television networks are premiering new seasons. Thank goodness for football. For me, football season is akin to Christmastime for a young child. I start getting excited for the season around midsummer. I begin reading up on pre-season outlooks for my favorite teams. When the NFL broadcasts its annual Hall of Fame Game at the beginning of August, I know the season is here. By September, I am watching football most nights of the week. There are high school games to be viewed on Thursday and Friday nights. Saturdays are reserved for college football, with games played morning, noon and night. Sundays, of course, are when the pros take the field, and Monday features marquee NFL match-ups. Take Tuesday and Wednesday to recover, then repeat. Football (the American version) is one of this country’s great pastimes. Most players begin young, playing in peewee leagues, then moving through the ranks of middle and high school teams. The exceptionally talented will have the opportunity to play on Saturdays, suiting up for college teams across the country. The best among them will go even further. This month, we take a look at the state’s hottest high school football talent. Four of Oklahoma’s most gifted high school athletes are featured in “Gridiron Glory” (p. 70). The most enlightening conversations I had in working on this feature were with teens’ coaches. They spoke not only of the talent of their players, but also of their moral character – more than one mentioned that as great as their player’s skill is, he is a great person off the field as well. I found the humility of each player refreshing. In trying to wrangle a quote from Jalin Barnett, a right tackle for Lawton High School who wears a size 17 shoe, all he could say is that he loves the game. I asked him what makes him so good on the field. He fumbled around a few words, then quietly said, “my work ethic.” His coach, Richard Breeze, echoed that sentiment, then added, “As good a football player as he is, he’s even a better person off the field.” Jami Mattox Managing Editor

A SAFETY ON THE MIDWEST CITY HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL TEAM, WILL SUNDERLAND JR. LOOKS FORWARD TO FINISHING COLLEGE AND PLAYING FOR THE NFL. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.


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E XC L U S I V E : Owner Steve Aberson gives a personal tour through the hottest styles, accessories and ensembles for the fall and shows how to create a signature look at his Brookside boutique, Abersons.

N E V E R T O O O L D : Being single isn’t only a concern for 20-somethings. More seniors are back in the dating game, and it has its benefits.

S TAY CONNECTED

The State

What’s Hot At

OK

G R E Y O R G R AY: Sophistication to the max is what it’s all about in Oklahoma Magazine’s Fall Fashion. Check out some of our favorite looks online.

Watch our web exclusive videos for expanded coverage.

FA I R T I M E : Big state fairs mean it’s time to enjoy carnival games, rides and plenty of inventive and yummy fair food!

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The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

S TAT E

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GROOVEFEST.

Groove Is In The Heart

K

Norman’s Andrews Park hosts Groovefest in September.

ara Joy McKee remembers the first time she attended Groovefest in Norman – it was also the first time she volunteered. “As I entered the park, an elderly gentleman handed me a basket of flowers and asked if I would like to pass them out to the crowd,” McKee explains. Although she would not officially become an organizer for Groovefest until nearly a decade later, she recalls being inspired as a teenager then by the attendees’ passion for human rights.

Since 1986, Groovefest has urged Norman community members to change their world. The festival began as an “art in the park project” with about 50 participants – many of them members of the University of Oklahoma’s Amnesty International chapter – tossing Frisbees and playing in drum circles. Nearly three decades after that first gathering, much about Groovefest has changed. Now led independently of OUAI, the festival takes place once a year in September instead of biannually. It has expanded to include poets, bands, vendors, activists and speakers, and it attracts hundreds of attendees. But two aspects are unchanged: Groovefest is still about human rights, and it endures as one of Norman’s most beloved events. Aimee Rook, a member of the Groovefest art committee since 2005, says it is now the longest-running human rights festival in the world, and she credits the Norman community with the festival’s longevity. “It has been said [that] we are an arts community with a football team,” Rook says of Norman. “Our rich culture of education and arts is strong. Our thriving community appreciates festivals and truly values human rights in many ways through social services, generous churches, its [local] human rights commission, an educated police force, an active city council and a vocal community of elders and activists with a diverse point of view. “I sincerely think Normanites look forward to the festival because of the positive community and the beautiful park and to listen to a variety of music outdoors with family in the park,” Rook adds. Whether rain or shine, Groovefest goes on. Participants are drawn for another reason. “For many, they came because they went to Groovefest 25 years ago, when they were young, and now they bring their own kids to the event to learn about human rights and respect for others’ basic freedoms through music and arts,” says Rook. “… Normanites have a strong appreciation for music through public education.” SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

Norman is home to several other popular festivals, including Summer Breeze, Midsummer Nights’ Fair, the Norman Music Festival and Jazz in June. “Norman, and especially central Norman, is a unique community in Oklahoma,” says McKee. “As a college town, Norman has attracted intelligent, creative people and philosophical humanitarian types; and many of those same folks have stayed. The persistence of Groovefest is due in large part to the large number of very groovy townies who have chosen to stay in Norman and make it great! “Energetic flavors from the student population still enrich the Groovefest brew, but it is mostly homegrown goodness,” McKee continues. “At any given Groovefest, you are likely to find a diverse mix of townies and students – on their own or with family – who walk, bike or skate to the park each and every year for this event. It has become a sort of family reunion.” The lineup for this year’s Groovefest – Sept. 28 at Norman’s Andrews Park – will include such local bands as Brother Gruesome, Culture Cinematic, the Tequila Songbirds and more on the main stages. Vendors and food trucks – including The Loaded Bowl and Mariposa Coffee – will be there, too. The festival also hosts several familyfriendly activities, such as hula-hoops, face painting and dancing. Norman eagerly awaits the festivities, but the community has never lost sight of Groovefest’s roots: raising awareness of human rights causes. True to its theme, this year’s Groovefest program features a strong lineup of speakers, Amnesty International representatives and activists addressing a variety of human rights topics ranging from environmental issues to prison overpopulation. While broader topics, such as clean air, voter registration, education and free press are always an important part of the festival, this year also will focus on what Rook calls “hot local topics.” “Locally, we must stand up for clean water, access to alternative energy that benefits people more than corporations, effective strategies to reduce our expensive prison population and voting to improve free access to quality education and mental health in Oklahoma,” Rook says.

14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

“But really,” she continues, “we don’t parse out one human right over another. The idea is to respect individual rights to live, work and love without discrimination, abuse and torture for religion, age, gender, sexual orientation or political expression.” It’s also about providing basic access to food, clothing and shelter. “It benefits us all to be respectful and stick together,” Rook says. “We have far more in common than not. Building a positive and thriving local and global community without fear and intimidation is the key, and we work to do that through arts, music and human rights awareness.” McKee says Groovefest is most focused on actionable Groovefest is causes. entirely supported “There are plenty of things by volunteer efforts to be concerned about in this and sponsors. world,” McKee says, “but I find To help with the it more useful to focus most festival, contact on the things you can actually groovefest@gmail. affect.” com or visit the For example, Oklahoma festival’s website has the highest rate of female at www.groovefest. incarceration per capita in the org. You can also world, and a majority of the help by spreading women behind bars are there the word via Twitter for nonviolent drug offenses, (@NGroovefest) and McKee says. Facebook (Norman “Whom we vote for matters Groovefest). – TM in that regard,” McKee says, citing local legislators who support mandatory minimum sentencing for certain crimes. “There are always volunteers registering voters at Groovefest, and I hope they are very enthusiastic about it this year.” TARA MALONE

FOLLOWUP

London House calling

Plans to rebuild Woody Guthrie’s childhood home in Okemah have the long-anticipated project at a standstill. A group of Guthrie fans formed the nonprofit organization, the Woody Guthrie London House Inc., with the goal to reassemble the house the celebrated folk singer and artist lived in starting in 1913. The house, named for the family that owned it before the Guthrie clan, was built in the early 1800s. Under a city order, the dilapidated London House was demolished in the late 1970s by its last owner, the late Earl Walker, who saved the materials in the hopes of restoring the modest two-story home for a local attraction. When Dan Riedemann, a carpenter and owner of 19th Century Restorations out of Lawrence, Kan., took up the project with Johnny Buschardt and Matthew Bridwell of Road Work Entertainment, enthusiasm

among music fans began to build. The restoration would be completed by money raised through the sale of eight guitars specially constructed by Gibson Guitars from London House wood. When no one bought the guitars auctioned in the spring on eBay, however, Riedemann and Buschardt went their separate ways on the project, unable to agree on how to proceed. Bridwell, however, says the organization is still on track with the project, and that Gibson will auction the guitars in September. – Karen Shade


L I F E

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A B O U T

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The State

LEFT: JOHNNIE FLETCHER IS AN EXPERT ON OLD OKLAHOMA BOTTLES. RIGHT: FLETCHER PROUDLY DISPLAYS HIS COLLECTION ON SHELVES IN HIS GARAGE. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

PEOPLE

Buried Bottles

A Mustang man leads a group of adventurous collectors and historians.

I

t is no ordinary suburban garage wherein a box of brushes fashioned from buffalo bones more than a century ago rests alongside a similarly aged Chinese jar and a couple of Western-style guns, now largely consumed by rust. But then, the owner of this garage is no ordinary man. “I’ve always collected stuff,” says Johnnie Fletcher, a Mustang resident and founder of the Oklahoma Territory Bottle and Relic Club, whose members travel throughout the state and beyond, digging up artifacts of the American West with a pioneer spirit all their own. Utilizing a combination of historical maps and modern probes, Fletcher and his colleagues locate houses from pre-statehood days and obtain permission to dig a few feet into the ground where the outhouses once stood. Outhouses are the loci of refuse, including plenty of discarded physical objects. The strategy has worked surprisingly well over the years, Fletcher says. “We’re pretty good salespeople when it comes to getting permission,” he says. In fact, he has met with the threat of physical violence only once, OK THEN

16

ERIC MILLER

That Barbershop Chord

A popular art form in the late 1800s and early 1900s, barbershop harmony faded in popularity in the 1920s and may well have gone extinct were it not for the efforts of two Tulsans. Rupert Hall and O.C. Cash, two Tulsa businessmen, gathered 24 other men for a meeting in 1938 that eventually led to the founding of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA).

and that was from a renter in Kansas who stated his willingness to “bust a cap” on the friendly collectors. Homeowners, however, generally react positively to the results of a dig and with getting to keep some of the historic treasures uncovered in exchange for allowing access to their property. “Most people are kind of curious,” Fletcher says. “They really don’t think you’re going to find anything, so they’re pretty shocked when we dig up an old bottle out of their backyard.” While Fletcher’s efforts have taken him as far afield as New Orleans and yielded things as random as wooden bowling balls, his area of focus is pre-1907 Oklahoma bottles. For this was a land of Indian tribes and boomers and – once a town became big enough – bottling works. Various liquids – soda pop, alcohol, medicine, alcohol disguised as medicine – were once contained in these bottles, which stand on his garage shelves proud and unbroken, most of them handsomely embossed with names and points of origin like “Wagoner, I.T.” The “I.T.” stands for Indian Territory, where it all began, not just for Oklahoma but for Fletcher, whose yen for collecting can be traced back to his childhood on a farm about 15 miles from Hinton, where he would walk for miles in search of American Indian arrowheads. After a career that included stints in the Navy, with the police and ownership of an alarm company, Fletcher’s love for state history and the “Go West” era shines brighter than ever. “When you find something that someone’s thrown away, you have to realize that you’re the first person to touch it since they threw it in the garbage,” he says. “So it’s almost like having a connection with these people.”

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

A subsequent national convention was held the next year at Tulsa Central High School and drew more than 150 delegates and 50 quartets from 10 states, according to the Oklahoma Historical Society. Now, the first chapter of the SPEBSQSA is better known as The Founding Chapter of the International Barbershop Harmony Society, located in Tulsa. President David Roberts says it’s a privilege to be a member. “All of our members are proud to be mem-

bers of the founding chapter and stand a little taller when our name is announced at competitions … or when our chapter quartets are on stage,” he says. “Carrying on our tradition as founders is one of the things that defines our chapter, but we don’t live in the past. We’re all about being a part of our community and making the music that makes a difference in the lives of those we touch.” – Jami Mattox


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The State

SWAB SQUAD FOUNDER MARSHALL MATLOCK WANTS TO SAVE MORE LIVES BY INCREASING THE NUMBER OF BONE MARROW DONORS.

5 QS

Swabbing To Save Lives

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Swab Squad founder Marshall Matlock shares the story of his organization.

F

ive years ago, Oklahoma City resident Marshall Matlock received a bone marrow transplant that saved his life and inspired him to create the Swab Squad. The organization, which spreads awareness of the need for bone marrow donors, helps the Oklahoma Blood Institute expand its donor registry. In spring 2009, Matlock began having persistent joint pain. He was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), instantly admitted to the hospital and prescribed a course of chemotherapy. Matlock’s blood counts, however, failed to recover after two rounds of chemotherapy, making a bone marrow transplant his only chance for survival. As with 70 percent of patients in need of a donor, Matlock had no genetic matches among his family and relied on the Be The Match registry to find one. Within a few weeks, a match was found – a 19-year-old girl in Europe. What inspired you to create the Swab Squad? For two years, I knew nothing more than basic information about my donor. But in September 2011, I received a letter from my hospital with her name and contact information and was finally able to tell her ‘thank you’ for giving me the gift of life. To give back to the organization that saved my life, I knew I had to help grow the Be The Match registry. Although worldwide marrow registries now contain millions of members, seven out of 10 patients never find the donor they need. Determined to improve that number, a group of friends and family agreed to help me create the Swab Squad. We are a portable, pop-up marrow drive designed to easily integrate into popular events around the city and state. Our hope is that it provides a non-threatening, approachable place to talk about the need for marrow donors, dispel myths around the transplant process and recruit new donors for the Be The Match registry. What are the biggest myths surrounding the marrow transplant process? A big part of our Swab Squad mission is to dispel myths around the transplant process. Many haven’t heard of Be The Match or know the giant need for donors, but often, the ones who have [heard] arrive with misconceptions about it being a very painful process. I really enjoy bringing the news that 85 percent of donations are akin to a lengthy blood donation and that the other 15 percent, where marrow is taken from the hip, are done under general anesthesia with no pain during the procedure.

18

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

What are some success stories from your organization? We’ve been able to recruit more than 300 new potential donors for Be The Match in Oklahoma City since we started. Of those, two have come up as donor matches for patients in need of a transplant. It’s a great feeling to know our efforts can make it possible for cancer patients to get the second chance at life that I was given. How would you describe the relationships between marrow donors and recipients? It’s an amazing feeling to be walking around with my donor’s cells inside me. It’s a daily reminder of the sacrifice she made for me and how much I owe her and Be The Match for saving my life. There’s a single person on the other side of the world with whom I’m inextricably linked; I have her DNA, her blood type, even her allergies. That gratitude drives our Swab Squad mission; we want every patient to get the chance to fight. Moving forward, what new things would you hope to accomplish with the Swab Squad? In addition to continuing to recruit potential donors for Be The Match in Oklahoma City, we’d love to inspire groups in other cities in Oklahoma and beyond to join our effort to grow the donor registry. We really want to attack the percentage of patients finding a match and drive it up by growing the pool of potential donors. The first step in that fight is to make the public aware of the need for donors and to effectively communicate how the small act of a cheek swab can lead to the opportunity to save a life. We think it’s a no-brainer. NATHAN PORTER


N Y C & M I L AN / FA LL 2014 3 5 T H & P E OR IA AVE N UE / A B E R SON ST YLE .CO M


The State

CULTURE

Webbing History

Lacemakers explore history and techniques of a beloved art.

T

he word “lace” conjures up the image of doilies and wedding gowns to most people, but for the members of the Lacemakers Guild of Oklahoma, a rich history dances in their minds as they thread each delicate loop. “Lacemaking is part of the history of humanity,” says group librarian Sue Welch. “It connects us to our ancestors.” LGO founder Deborah Beever has studied this history since 1983 and can recount centuries-old stories of crime and conflict surrounding the esteemed craft that has become a peaceful pastime. “Lace became a huge industry, and competition between countries was fierce,” Beever explains. “Under one restrictive trade law, a lacemaker was forbidden to travel and make lace outside the boundaries of his or her country upon penalty of death. Due to these laws, smuggling became rampant and quite creative. Lace was inserted into loaves of bread, hidden in coffins and sewn into linings of clothing.” The lacemaking tradition lives on by the hands of the guild’s members. They gather monthly to share their work and learn from each other, finding comfort in this ancient skill. “Within the process is solace – a time

THE LACEMAKERS GUILD OF OKLAHOMA WILL HOST THE 20TH LACE EMBRACE EVENT, CELEBRATING THE CRAFT AND HISTORY OF LACEMAKING. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

of peace, reflection and the satisfaction of the completed web,” says Bart Elwell, LGO vice president and treasurer. “For many, lacemaking is a vacation from the chaotic beeps, buzzings and digital overload of today’s world, and yet it still stimulates the mind – honing skills of problem solving and cultivating creative inspiration.” It is a diverse and ever-evolving practice with a time commitment that can range from a few hours to several months, depending on the size and intricacy of the piece. Many lacemakers are drawn to a method called tatting that uses a simple device called a shuttle to guide the thread into a variety of designs. “The ring and chain pattern of tatting is very distinctive,” says LGO president Paula Barnes. “I also like that it cannot be replicated by machine.” The guild will share its art with the public on Oct. 4 during the 20th Annual Lace Embrace event at the Tri County Technology Center in Bartlesville. There will be demonstrations, classes and contests to help spread interest and enthusiasm about the craft. “It will always take a new generation to sustain the art of lacemaking,” says Elwell. “I am always surprised and encouraged to see the number of young lacemakers who attend regional lace days and international conventions. They are energetic, bring fresh ideas and have the confidence to jump right into an art form that has much to offer.” BETH WEESE

236

S TAT Oklahoma is home to three NCAA Division I schools: Oklahoma State University, The University of Oklahoma and The University of Tulsa. All three institutions have boasted their fair share of success on the football field, and though it’s a team effort, each school has had standouts. The three D-1 schools have seen a combined 236 players named to the All-American first-, second- or third-teams. It comes as little surprise that powerhouse OU has had the most players – at 154 – named to the team. OSU has had 51, and TU has had 31. All three university teams have high hopes for those numbers to increase during the 2014-15 season. – Jami Mattox

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014


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The State

THE NEW HELMERICH CENTER FOR AMERICAN RESEARCH WILL ADD SQUARE FOOTAGE FOR ARCHIVAL PROJECTS AS WELL AS RESEARCH. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

ART

Advancing Artifacts

Gilcrease Museum dedicates a new center for research. Gilcrease Museum is debuting the new Helmerich Center for American Research, an ambitious project that has been several years in the making, says Dr. Duane King, executive director for the new research center. In 2008, the City of Tulsa and The University of Tulsa entered into an historic partnership to preserve and advance Gilcrease Museum. In its new role as steward of the museum and its collections, TU is leveraging its nationally recognized academic expertise in western American history, art history, anthropology and archaeology to propel Gilcrease into a new era. “The research center has been our most ambitious project,” says King. “The support shown by the city and the Tulsa community has been remarkable. It shows how much the citizens of Tulsa care about this museum and its collection.” Since 2008, $58 million has been raised for improvements to Gilcrease Museum and museum operation. “The center is named after Peggy and [the late] Walt Helmerich,” adds King. “They provided the initial gift to make it all possible.” The Helmerich Center will add more than 25,000 square feet to Gilcrease, housing the museum’s library and archive, a paper conservation and digital laboratory, exhibition The Helmerich Center space and a research reading room, as well for American Research kicks as meeting and special events spaces. off its opening weekend Sept. 6-7 with a “The exhibition space will host art and series of events at Gilcrease Museum. pieces of the archive,” says King. “The first Activities include American Indian exhibit is on Native American artwork.” dancing, special exhibitions, lectures on The museum’s collection, which contains history and art, coffee demonstrations, books, manuscripts, maps and artifacts in music performances, Chautauqua-style addition to artwork, was given to the City of presentations and more for all ages. Tulsa in the 1950s. Events are free and open to the public. “The core of the collection was compiled For a complete list of events, visit by Thomas Gilcrease,” says King. “We are www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu. still adding today, yet very selectively. [The

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

collection at Gilcrease] really represents the story of the American experience. It is, today, one of the finest collections of American Western art and Native American material, ethnography and art. It is an extremely important resource for the city and the people who live here.” The archival collection contains some of the earliest documents printed in the Western Hemisphere, many of which have never been translated. Included are documents that relate to the conquest of the Spanish colonies, a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to a friend and containing details about the Declaration of Independence, many important documents about the formation of democracy in the U.S. and a large group of documents pertaining to relations between the U.S. government and American Indian tribes. “People are often surprised [that] something of this caliber is outside a major metropolitan area,” says King. “Tulsa has many important assets, and Gilcrease Museum is one.” LINDSAY CUOMO


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The State FREQUENT COLLABORATORS, ERIC CLAPTON (LEFT) AND THE LATE J.J. CALE INSPIRED ONE ANOTHER TO MAKE GREAT MUSIC. PHOTO BY BRIAN ROONEY.

THE INSIDER

A Tribute To Tulsa Sound

Tulsan Don White contributes his talents to an album honoring the late J.J. Cale.

W

hat seemed to be an offhand comment made during a sad occasion turned into something far greater for Don White, the veteran Tulsa-based singer, songwriter and guitarist. The occasion was the August 2013 funeral of White’s friend J.J. Cale, the man responsible in great part for popularizing that deep-groove, blues- and country-tinged rock ‘n’ roll style often referred to as the classic Tulsa Sound. Held on the West Coast, where Cale had lived, the invitation-only service included several of Cale’s hometown friends, including such well-known musicians as Jim Karstein, Jim Markham, David Teegarden, Jamie Oldaker, Jim Keltner and Steve Ripley. The comment came from Eric Clapton, a friend and tireless supporter of Cale ever since Clapton scored his first hit record with Cale’s composition, “After Midnight,” in 1970. Clapton subsequently spent quite a bit of time in Tulsa, recruiting his mid-’70s band from the area. “Everybody else who was there [from Tulsa] knew Eric,” recalls White. “When he was hanging around Tulsa, I guess I was on the road or something; anyway, I only met him that day, at the funeral. We were all kind of standing around the cemetery, talking, and Eric says, ‘I was wanting [Cale] to help me with my next record, but that

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

can’t happen now, I guess.’” The talk turned to another Tulsa legend, keyboardist Walt Richmond, who’d been working regularly with Clapton on tour and in the studio. “Eric said, ‘Oh, yeah, Walt’ll be on the next record.’ Then he looked at me and said, ‘You should be on it, too.’” White laughs. “I said, ‘How do you know I’m worth a damn? You’ve never heard me play.’” A few hours later, that was no longer true. Adjourning to McCabe’s Guitar Shop in Santa Monica, White and the rest of the Tulsa contingent joined others in remembering Cale with both words and music. When it came time for the latter, Clapton and White took the stage first, with Keltner on drums. “Eric played ‘After Midnight,’ I think, and then he said, ‘My whole career comes from two people: [famed Delta bluesman] Robert Johnson and J.J. Cale.’ “We played another one, and he got down, and Keltner got down, and I called up Markham and Karstein and [guitarist] Don Preston. We did about three or four songs, so Eric heard me play and sing,” he says. White’s been in the music business a long time – plenty long enough to know that more often than not, people talk about doing things they have no real intention of doing. Still, he says, he couldn’t help but think about how nice it would be to maybe “just get one rhythm guitar track on one song” on a Clapton album. He’d only had a couple of weeks to consider it when the phone rang. The caller on the other end identified himself as “Eric.” “‘Hi, Eric.’ I said. He said, ‘Eric Clapton.’” White laughs again. “I said, ‘How you doing, Eric?’ “He didn’t say, ‘I want you to come out and play on my new record.’ He’s not like that. He said, ‘I’m doing a tribute album to [Cale], and I thought maybe you’d like to come out and be in the band.’ “Well, that was too cool. I said, ‘You bet.’ And he said, ‘I thought maybe you’d like to sing two or three songs on it.’ So I went out there, and that’s what I did.” He did it in some pretty good company, too. As one of the featured vocalists, White is part of a stellar group that includes Tom Petty, Mark Knopfler, John Mayer, Willie Nelson and Cale’s widow, vocalist-guitarist Christine Lakeland. “One of the ones I do is called ‘Train to Nowhere,’” he says. “It ended up with Mark Knopfler and me in a sort of duet. It’s a Cale song, but it’s never been released. Christine found it. I think she brought in two or three that he’d recorded at his house.” Although most of the songs on the disc are Cale originals, it also includes a new version of the 1954 Ray Price country shuffle “I’ll Be There (If You Ever Want Me)” – a song Cale covered on his 1974 album, Okie. Clapton backs up White on the vocals for the new version, making for “a real country-sounding track,” White says. With “I’ll Be There” and its melding of country and rock ‘n’ roll, White returns to the sound that brought Cale into his Tulsa band almost a half-century ago. “Cale was already popular around town, and he’d go to Oklahoma City and record and make little records,” White remembers. “So he was kind of my idol before I ever met him. Then, I got to be friends


with [keyboardist] Larry Bell, and Bell was in that Tulsa clique. So all of a sudden, I was in that clique, hanging out with rock ‘n’ rollers. And I got to know Cale.” Like many of the area’s best players of the time, White played with trailblazing Tulsa rock ‘n’ roller Gene Crose, joining drummer Teegarden, bassist Norman Berg and keyboardist Skip Knape. Eventually, they started their own band, Skip and the Blue Notes, with White returning from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah on weekends to perform. “Cale would come out to our gigs and sit in,” White says. “I remember one night, he came out and played piano.” Eventually, White left college and took a job as an accountant at Sinclair Oil Company. But music still exerted a powerful pull on him, and he continued playing, joining legendary Tulsa vocalist Bill Davis’s group, Soul Incorporated. For about three years, White, like many other musicians, balanced a day job with nighttime and weekend gigs. Then, finally, he decided to take the plunge and go into full-time music. At the time, Cale had just returned home from California. “I saw him in his Volkswagen, and he said, ‘Hey, White. What are you doing now?’ “‘Well,’ I said, ‘I just left my job at the oil company and I’m going to start my own band.’ I’d never had my own band before. I said, ‘I’m gonna sing country music, but I’m gonna play like we play.’ “‘He said, ‘I’d like to play in a band like that,’ and I said, ‘Okay.’” So, for the next several months, Cale played guitar with White in a group that had a regular gig at Tulsa’s Stables Lounge – prior to its

days as an infamous strip joint. Then, “After Midnight” became a hit for Clapton, raising the profile of Cale, its writer. He left Tulsa and White’s outfit to reIMAGE COURTESY SURFDOG. cord his first album in Nashville. The two stayed in touch over the years, occasionally performing and recording together. And White kept several Cale songs in his repertoire, including one called “The Sensitive Kind,” which he sings on the new record. “Eric heard me sing it that night [at McCabe’s],” says White. “I’ve been doing that song for 25 years, so I already knew it. When I finished my solos on it, Eric said, ‘That’s great. I think that’s it.’ “I said, ‘Thank you for the opportunity.’ And I teared up and had to go off in the corner for five or 10 minutes. It was all because I had lost my friend.” Titled The Breeze (An Appreciation of JJ Cale), the new disc also includes contributions from Tulsa’s Markham, Karstein, Teegarden, Oldaker, Richmond and Keltner, with White playing guitar on three tracks. Other guests include such noteworthy musicians as guitarists Preston, Butch Trucks, Albert Lee, David Lindley and Doyle Bramhall II, along with harmonica player Mickey Raphael. SEVERAL TULSA AREA MUSICIANS, ALONG WITH NOTABLE ARTISTS LIKE ERIC CLAPTON, TOM PETTY AND WILLIE NELSON – COLLABORATED ON THE BREEZE, A TRIBUTE ALBUM TO THE LATE J.J. CALE.

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The State

OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Mutual Benefit Young And Seasoned Pros Work Together For Small Business Success.

O

klahoma and Tulsa have made the national news recently due to Green Country’s small business allure. Folks at the state and local chambers of commerce say young entrepreneurs are working with seasoned professionals, creating mutual assistance and success. “Small businesses create two out of every three new jobs in the Tulsa region and provide more than 55,000 jobs and an estimated payroll of $1.4 billion,” says Heather Davis, small business director for Tulsa Regional Chamber. “Small businesses comprise more than 80 percent of business here.” Tulsa’s Young Professionals (TYPros) organization – which is affiliated with the chamber – is one of largest of its kind in the U.S. It’s effective in helping young professionals start new companies. “That mass of young, talented people, together, generates excitement,” says Davis. To augment and build on this success, the chamber recently launched Tulsa Small Business Connection – a group of more than 40 business owners providing small businesses with the tools to build the connections needed to succeed in a competitive global environment. TSBC began under the leadership of Carey Baker, owner of ProRecruiters, a staffing and employment agency. Oklahoma’s comparatively low cost of doing business (11 percent less than elsewhere in the nation) and the state’s centralized location favor new enterprise, says Jessica Flint, entrepreneur manager for Tulsa Regional Chamber. One recent success story is the Marshall Brewing Company. Fourth generation Tulsan Eric Marshall became a brewmaster in Germany before bringing his knowledge back to T-town. “Marshall Brewing Company is a great example of the pay-off to all our efforts to keep our young people here and also coming back to the Tulsa area after college,” says Flint. Tulsa Regional Chamber Communications Manager Zack Stoycoff points to the interaction and positive overlap as “a grassroots uprising of community support,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

ERIC MARSHALL AND MARHALL BREWING COMPANY EXEMPLIFY SMALL BUSINESS SUCCESS IN TULSA AND OKLAHOMA. PHOTO BY JEREMY CHARLES

such as 1 Million Cups.” A weekly forum for entrepreneurs to make presentations and receive feedback from the business community and mentors, 1 Million Cups is found in cities and communities around the country and helps entrepreneurs help each other. The Forge – powered by TYPros – is “a start-up hub, a small business incubator that provides a trusted environment and a network of people, mentors and information needed to avoid the pitfalls that small-but-growing businesses face,” says Flint. Another youth-driven, business-friendly initiative is Cultivate918, a meeting held for “Tulsa’s Entrepreneurship Scene” every second Wednesday of the month at 5 p.m. at various locations (www.cultivate918.org). “The tradition of philanthropy is strong in Oklahoma,” says Davis. “And we are a hotbed of entrepreneurship with support from people who want to see small businesses succeed. One example is Sapiens Brands, a current tenant of The Forge, that is about to expand into their own space. They started with two employees and now have five after moving here from Los Angeles. They’ve fallen in love with Tulsa, and they got the support they needed to hit that $1 million revenue mark.” The Mine is a catalyst for social innovation meant to equip entrepreneurs and other creative minds via fellowships, programming and more. Davis points to The Mine as thrilling evidence of the impact of creative entrepreneurship and philanthropy coming together: The Mine is powered by The Forge, the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the Lobeck Taylor Family Foundation and the University of Oklahoma Center for the Creation of Economic Wealth. The Tulsa Small Business Connection will host the Small Business Summit and Crystal Star Small Business Awards on Oct. 3 at the Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. For information, visit www.tulsachamber.com. TRACY LEGRAND


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The State

SCENE

TOM TAYLOR, WENDY DRUMMOND, DEBBIE ZINKE AND TERESA NOWLIN ARE PREPARING FOR THIS YEAR’S KALEIDOSCOPE BALL, WHICH WILL BE SEPT. 5 AT THE COX BUSINESS CENTER.

THE ANNUAL GREEN LEAF GALA, WHICH BENEFITS UP WITH TREES, WILL BE OCT. 3 AT SOUTHERN HILLS COUNTRY CLUB. CASSIE REESE, BONNIE KLEIN, LAURA PARROTT AND KAYLA VAUGHN ARE AMONG THOSE PLANNING THE EVENT.

GEORGE KAISER, JULIE STANDING BEAR AND OSAGE NATION PRINCIPAL CHIEF GEOFFREY STANDING BEAR ARE PICTURED AT A RECEPTION HONORING THE PRINCIPAL CHIEF AT THE SUMMIT CLUB IN DOWNTOWN TULSA.

THE TULSA AREA UNITED WAY RECENTLY HOSTED A RECEPTION FOR THE ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY. AMONG THOSE IN ATTENDANCE WERE MARK GRAHAM, GERALD CLANCY, MEREDITH SIEGFRIED MADDEN, PETER MADDEN AND SCOTT VAUGHN.

AMBER RAYMON, WILLIAM DENISON AND LELIA MCCOY ENJOYED A RECEPTION HONORING OSAGE NATION PRINCIPAL CHIEF GEOFFREY STANDING BEAR.

MIKE GREENBERG, EDDIE SUTTON AND SHEL DETRICK GATHERED AT THE SIGMA CHI TULSA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 100 YEARS OF BROTHERHOOD ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION.

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The State ABOVE: A TULSA COUPLE CUSTOMIZED THEIR NEW HOME FOR ALL THE COMFORTS AND ENTERTAINING. BELOW: STYLISH WALK-IN CLOSETS REVEAL A BLEND OF ANTIQUES FROM THE ORIGINAL HOME AND NEW DESIGN.

L I V I N G S PA C E

Made For Two A Tulsa couple blends family antiques with the clean lines of Mid-century Modern design. Photography by Scott Miller

T

ransitioning from a Country French-style home where they reared their children, a couple of empty nesters decided they were ready for a change of style in a new home suited for entertaining. After discovering a 1970s-era home located in the Philbrook Museum area, the Tulsa couple solicited the expertise of husband-and-wife team John and Sherri Duvall, owners of Duvall Architects and Interiors in Tulsa. Tony Jordan, owner of contractors Jordan & Sons, handled the extensive 18-month renovation, although the planning process with the Duvalls began six months earlier. “The house was dark and dated,” explains Sherri Duvall. “Plus, the floor plan was very chopped up.” The goal was to create a series of open spaces that flowed seamlessly from one room to the next. And while the overall design is decidedly modern, it was important to the couple to incorporate treasured family antiques into the planning. The living room is a perfect example of the collaborative success between the Duvalls and the homeowners’ interior designer, Doug Deckard. The existing vaulted ceiling was accented with a custom multi-tiered light fixture, and the clean lines of the white upholstered pieces have been juxtaposed with existing antiques. New wood floors with a glazed finish were added throughout the house. The kitchen showcases one of the most dramatic changes. Not only was the small, dark space completely gutted, a wall was removed, blending the kitchen, eating area and den into a great room that’s both airy and bright. “She (the homeowner) likes to cook, and the couple enjoys entertaining,” says Sherri Duvall.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014


FROM THE NEW WOOD FLOORS TO THE MULTITIERED CHANDELIER HANGING FROM THE VAULTED CEILING, THE LIVING ROOM IS BRIGHTER AND REFLECTS THE OWNERS’ TASTES.

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31


The State

TOP: OLD PATIO DOORS HAVE BEEN REPLACED WITH THE NANAWALL SYSTEM THAT OPENS THE HOME TO THE OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE AND RENOVATED POOL. LEFT: CARRARA BLANCO TILE ON THE FLOOR ADDS LUXURY TO THE “HER” MASTER BATHROOM. ABOVE RIGHT: THE MASTER BEDROOM’S FURNISHINGS CREATE A SOFT AND RELAXING ATMOSPHERE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

She designed the kitchen layout and detailed the walnut cabinets with the homeowners’ input. The cabinets were then custom made by Sullivan’s Custom Cabinetry. The Duvalls also designed the custom Zink venta-hood with stainless steel straps fabricated by Tulsa’s Empire Laser & Metal Work. The spacious island includes a Galley sink, invented by Tulsan Roger Shollmier, while Deckard handled the inviting and fashionable faux leather bar stools. The Kartell pendant light fixtures are from SR Hughes.


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The State

CUSTOM-BUILT WALNUT CABINETRY LENDS RICHNESS TO THE CLEAN LINES OF MID-CENTURY MODERN STYLE IN THE UPDATED KITCHEN.

Nearby, a casual eating space was created with a curved, built-in seating area accented by a classic Mid-century oval Saarinen table by Knoll. The striking multiglobe light fixture is from Arteriors. The valance hides solar sunshades, controlled remotely. An eight-foot diameter mahogany inlay table captures attention in the dining room. Inherited antique chairs from the 1800s are casually blended with richly upholstered Parsons chairs. The three-foot diameter blown art glass light fixture is by famed Italian artist Paolo Venini and was purchased from an antiques dealer in New York. It sparkles against a quartzite wall covering on the ceiling and the platinum leaf adorning the dining room walls. In what had been a fourth bedroom, architect John Duvall created a “his” master closet and bathroom as well as a library. The original master bathroom was gutted and renovated for “her” with countertops of Sea Pearl marble and Carrara Blanco tile for the flooring. The original master closet was also renovated and detailed by Sherri

Duvall. The chandelier from the couple’s previous home was brought into the new. A combination of existing and new furnishings creates the soft and relaxing feel of the couple’s master bedroom. The area rug is custom made, and the milk glass Mid-century lamps were discovered in Dallas. A set of patio doors was replaced by the expansive Nanawall system, creating an extension of the house to an outdoor living area. John Pitezel, owner of JP Construction, renovated the existing swimming pool and also added a spa, while Clare Ashby, ASLA, created the landscape design. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON

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35


The State

STYLE

Must Haves For Fall

PORTOLANO GRAY CASHMERE GLOVES, $50, ABERSONS.

These five trends will not fail you this season.

GRAY DAYS ALICE AND OLIVIA BY STACEY BENDET HAND WITH RING SWEATER, $368, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. RALPH LAUREN GRAY TOGGLE COAT, $3,795, ABERSONS.

KATE KANYON PRINT SCARF, $325, ABERSONS.

WENDY BRIGODE GRAY PEARL NECKLACE, $1,938, ABERSONS.

B.MAY PRESSED CROCODILE LEATHER BAG, $912, ABERSONS.

AKRIS

JIMMY CHOO GLITTER CLUTCH, $775, BALLIETS.

DOLCE VITA BLACK LEATHER BOOTIES, $259, J.COLE SHOES.

MANOLO BLAHNIK METAL MESH PUMPS, $675, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

REED KRAKOFF GRAY HOBO BAG, $1,590, ABERSONS. SHALINI GRAY COCKTAIL DRESS, $2,840, ABERSONS.

MIU MIU GRAY HANDBAG, $1,450, BALLIETS.

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

PRODUCT PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN. MODEL PHOTOS COURTESY SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

HELMUT LANG OXUM COLLARLESS LEATHER JACKET, $1,295, ABERSONS.


ALL THAT GLITTERS

CARELLE 18-KARAT YELLOW GOLD AMETHYST AND DIAMOND CLUSTER RING, $4,365, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALEXIS BITTAR PEARL AND CRYSTAL REVERSIBLE NECKLACE, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

OLIVER PEOPLES ROSE GOLD FRAMES, $389, VISIONS UNIQUE EYEWEAR.

CARELLE 18-KARAT WHITE GOLD BLUE TOPAZ AND IOLITE CLUSTER RING, $3,300, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

BAILEY 44 NAVY FAUX LEATHER BUSTIER TANK, $169, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

GIVENCHY

MIU MIU GOLD CROSSBODY BAG, $1,150, BALLIETS.

FRANK LYMAN BEADED ANIMAL PRINT DRESS, $233, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

ALC BLACK LEATHER DRESS, $1,040, ABERSONS.

MANOLO BLAHNIK EMBELLISHED LACE PUMPS, $1,025, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

‘90S NOSTALGIC

JEFFREY CAMPBELL STUDDED BOOTIES, $210, J.COLE SHOES.

JIMMY CHOO LEATHER BAG, $1,225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PRADA LEATHER AND GROMMET CROSSBODY BAG, $1,995, BALLIETS.

BAILEY 44 RED PERFORATED TOP, $162, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

CLARE V. BLACK FUR CLUTCH, $220, ABERSONS.

VINTAGE CHANEL ROPE TWIST BRACELET WITH SIGNATURE CHARMS, $1,845, BALLIETS.

BIRKENSTOCK LEATHER SANDALS, $130, J.COLE SHOES.

ALTUZARRA

LIFE IS A JOKE KATE MOSS T-SHIRT, $52, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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JIMMY CHOO LEATHER BIKER TOTE BAG, $1,895, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

37


The State

IT’S A MAN’S WORLD

LEISURE SOCIETY TORTOISE SHELL FRAMES WITH KEYHOLE BRIDGE, $670, HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR.

PROENZA SCHOULER DRAWSTRING BAG, $1,325, ABERSONS. JIMMY CHOO LEATHER COLOR BLOCK BOOTIES, $925, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. JIMMY CHOO BLACK SUEDE AND LEATHER ANKLE BOOTIES, $925, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

CHLOE LEATHER PULL-ON BOOTIES, $970, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LES COPAINS KNIT JACKET WITH LEATHER BELT, $1,695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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REBECCA MINKOFF CALF HAIR SLIP-ON SHOES, $225, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

BLUE LES COPAINS WHITE BUTTONDOWN BLOUSE, $345, AND BLACK FUR VEST, $645, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

BURBERRY BRIT STRIPED JACKET, $595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

COLE HAAN BLUE OXFORDS, $198, J.COLE SHOES.

KATE KANYON PRINT SCARF, $325, ABERSONS.

TORY BURCH PATTERNED SHOPPER, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALL EN FOR SEVE IND SNAK E L K MAN RINT ANK P KS SKIN , $215, SA S N . A E JE NU E V A FIFTH

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38

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014


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39


The State YO U R H E A L T H

Hope For Your Heart

Many patients can live a full life even after a heart attack or heart disease.

I

n the past, suffering a heart attack or being diagnosed with heart disease meant a limited lifestyle – or worse, a limited life span. Today, however, through groundbreaking research and advancements in technology, patients have the possibility of overcoming these heart issues and achieving a full and active lifestyle. “We used to say that once the heart was damaged, it couldn’t get better,” says Dr. Wayne Leimbach, a cardiologist at Tulsa’s Oklahoma Heart Institute. “Now we know that’s not true. Patients can reverse the effects from a heart attack and heart disease, but it’s a slow process that can range from six months to several years.” He says that the field of cardiology has experienced great progress. For example, the Oklahoma Heart Institute now offers several life-saving surgical procedures to patients that weren’t available even five years ago. Heart disease refers to several conditions that involve the buildup of plaque along the walls of the arteries, known as atherosclerosis. As this plaque builds up, it can severely slow blood flow to the heart. If the plaque breaks away, it can form a blood clot, block blood flow and cause a heart attack. When the heart muscle is deprived of the oxygen it needs to survive, the result can be heart damage. Scarring will occur where the heart is damaged, and because scar tissue doesn’t contract, the heart’s pumping ability can be compromised. Leimbach says the keys to recovery can include prescription regimens that help regulate blood pressure, such as beta blockers or ACE inhibitors, but cardiac rehabilitation also plays a vital role in helping anyone improve. He emphasizes the importance of a healthy lifestyle: taking preventable steps like exercising, not smoking and keeping blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels low. “When you are physically fit, your body uses the oxygen in your blood more efficiently. This means your heart doesn’t have to work as hard to meet your body’s demands,” he says. “I have had patients

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

who have participated in cardiac rehabilitation say they feel better and stronger today than before they had their heart attack.” If you don’t think you could be at risk for a heart issue, consider these alarming statistics from the American Heart Association. Every 34 seconds, someone in the U.S. experiences a heart attack, and heart disease remains the nation’s No. 1 cause of death. Dr. Philip B. Adamson, a cardiologist and director of the Heart Failure Institute of the Oklahoma Heart Hospital in Oklahoma City, predominately deals with the end stages of heart disease and says that previously, heart failure was considered unavoidable. However, through a variety of proven therapies and state-of-the-art medical procedures, many patients have the chance to get their lives back. “The heart muscle is amazing,” says Adamson. “We have learned that when heart arteries are blocked, the heart muscle will quit squeezing in that zone, and in some cases, the muscle will essentially go into hibernation. We can then work to reduce the amount of scarring in that area and help return the muscle to its normal function.” Most recently, Adamson has been working on a life-changing development for heart failure patients. In June, the Oklahoma Heart Hospital and the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center implanted the first and only FDA-approved heart failure monitoring device, shown in studies to significantly reduce hospital admissions when used by physicians to manage heart failure. Patients suffering from heart failure are frequently hospitalized, have a reduced quality of life and face a higher risk of death. “The technology is remarkable and can serve as a springboard for future applications to other diseases,” says Adamson. “I think it’s going to change the way we look at and manage the disease.” REBECCA FAST


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

One Woman’s Journey

I

through Thyroid Cancer

t hit me like a ton of bricks,” says Lori Szymanski. Her biopsy was back and the news was shocking. It was thyroid cancer. “Eleven years ago, my doctor found a nodule on my thyroid, but it was benign, so I hadn’t had it checked since,” Lori says. In February 2014, Lori was diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer and she began searching for treatment options. That’s when she met Bradley Mons, DO, head and neck surgeon at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) in Tulsa. “Dr. Mons explained treatment options in a way I could understand. Because he was confident; I was confident, and I didn’t feel so scared anymore,” says Lori. Dr. Mons performed a total thyroidectomy, removing Lori’s thyroid gland. “For patients with papillary or follicular thyroid cancers, surgery can be an appropriate treatment option

Lori Szymanski

"This journey has brought me to a good place, mentally and spiritually."

that allows patients to resume their normal lives fairly quickly,” Dr. Mons says. Within a few weeks, Lori was back at her full-time job with a fresh perspective on life. “I feel really good,” Lori says. “This journey has brought me to a good place, mentally and spiritually.” In the U.S. alone, an estimated 40,000 cases of thyroid cancer will be diagnosed this year. Dr. Mons encourages patients to be proactive when it comes to thyroid health. “Thyroid nodules are fairly common,” explains Dr. Mons. “If you have a known thyroid nodule, have it evaluated yearly to assess if there have been any changes.” Dr. Mons performs head and neck surgical procedures, including laryngectomies, neck dissections, thyroidectomies, sinonasal tumor excisions, endoscopic sinus surgery and other ear, nose and throat and head/neck surgeries. By providing microvascular reconstruction surgery, he can also help to repair, reconstruct and restore physical deficiencies involving the head and neck region. “I have a great doctor,” Lori says, “Plus, nutrition, naturopathic and spiritual support. I have a whole team of people by my side. I am not alone.” No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America To learn more about Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa, visit cancercenter.com or call 888-568-1571.


The State

THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE IS BUT ONE OF THE WONDERS SAN FRANCISCO HAS TO OFFER VISITORS. PHOTO BY CAN BALCIOGLU, COURTESY SAN FRANCISCO TRAVEL ASSOCIATION.

D E S T I N AT I O N

If You’re Going… Forget about flowers in your hair – San Francisco is about reinvention.

E

very city assumes a characteristic and identity. Philadelphia is all for the underdog and industry. Paris is romantic. New York is for dreamers and the energy of endless possibility. San Francisco, however, is golden. There are those who say the City by the Bay is the American mainstay of colorful cuisine, culture and striking architecture. Yet, no matter how many times you’ve been to this jewel of central California’s coastline, there’s always more to discover beyond Haight-Ashbury, Victorian

row houses and Chinatown. San Francisco is constantly changing – keeping the world guessing and coming back for more. de Young Museum San Francisco’s most unique museum is also its oldest: The de Young Museum’s history goes back to the California Midwinter International Exposition of 1894. But the structures that housed exotic curiosities back then have long since given way to the copper-sheathed, eco-conscious facility that opened in 2005. Elements of the original Golden Gate Park institution, however, are

still everywhere. At a distance and from a certain angle, the museum’s tower looks like a space age Mesoamerican pyramid shooting through forest canopy. Up close, it’s a metallic-webbed arrowhead pointing the way to spectacular collections of ancient to modern art. www.deyoung.famsf.org The Exploratorium A spirit of experimentation prevails to this day in San Francisco, and nothing proclaims it more literally than The Exploratorium. At its founding in 1969 by Frank Oppenheimer, the original center at the city’s Palace of Fine Arts was a science funhouse, but the Exploratorium was moved a few years ago to the dramatically renovated Pier 15 on the SF Embarcadero. There, The Exploratorium takes on a new dimension of hands-on learning through more than 150 exhibits, each designed to make the experience of discovery both engaging and personal for all ages. www.exploratorium.edu

AT A G L A N C E

ARTIST AI WEIWEI’S EXHIBIT @LARGE: AI WEIWEI ON ALCATRAZ OPENS ON ALCATRAZ ISLAND THIS MONTH. PHOTO COURTESY FOR-SITE FOUNDATION.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

Access: Arrive by San Francisco International Airport. Public transportation includes bus, commuter rail, light rail, subway, streetcar, cable cars and taxi cabs. Climate: Temperate with highs in the upper 60s from late summer to October with lows in the upper 40s. The microclimate means temperatures can differ drastically from one part of town to the next. Main attractions: Golden Gate Bridge, fine dining, cable cars, Chinatown, Fisherman’s Wharf


The State

Ferry Building Marketplace: One of the things San Francisco does best is food, and this collection of vendors and restaurants is the place to go for fresh produce, just-caught seafood, artisan cheese, breads, wine and more. Locals get the pick of organic growers and producers – many working in traditional methods. Travelers get to see the variety and quality of agriculture products from the region. It also has several cafes and restaurants. www. ferrybuildingmarketplace.com Foodie Tours: San Francisco has so many culinary offerings, visitors couldn’t possibly take it all in. But they can get a taste of some of the city’s specialties through culinary tours. Edible Excursions (www.edibleexcursions. net) tours restaurants in the Mission District, Japantown, City Center, Berkeley and Oakland, while Avital Tours (avitaltours.com) offers

“insider access” to some of the best eateries in town. Local Tastes of the City (www.sffoodtour.com) opens the doors to North Beach, Chinatown and Little Italy with walking tours. Gourmet Walks takes guests to San Francisco’s fine gourmet chocolatiers, including Ghirardelli Square. The tour is a threehour walk, which means you can enjoy all the samples you want without guilt (www.gourmetwalks.com). The Winery Collective: San Francisco’s first multi-winery tasting room features the best of the state’s boutique wineries and producers. Visitors get to sample varieties from all over California as well as those made in the San Francisco area as they meet the winemakers. www.winerycollective.com

T R AV E L E R ’ S N O T E S

DIG IN!

SAN FRANCISCO’S CABLE CARS, WHICH ARE MORE THAN 140 YEARS OLD, ARE RECOGNIZED AROUND THE WORLD AND STILL SERVE VISITORS AND RESIDENTS ALIKE TODAY. PHOTO BY SCOTT CHERNIS, COURTESY SAN FRANCISCO TRAVEL ASSOCIATION.

THE FERRY BUILDING MARKETPLACE IS A FOOD LOVER’S PARADISE. PHOTO BY SCOTT CHERNIS, COURTESY SAN FRANCISCO TRAVEL ASSOCIATION.

A STAY AT LE MERIDIEN CHAMBERS HOTEL IS LIKE LIVING IN A HIGH-END ART GALLERY. PHOTO COURTESY MEET MINNEAPOLIS.

ist and critic of the Chinese government, is creating this art installation in Beijing because authorities forbid him to leave the country. www.nps.gov/alca SFJAZZ Center An old American music form found a new home in 2013 when SFJAZZ Center opened in the once-seedy Hayes Valley neighborhood. Innovation revived the district, now alive with restaurants and shops and an easy stroll from such music centers as Davies Symphony Hall and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. On stage, visitors will hear some of the hottest jazz artists today paying homage to the greats from Ethel Waters to Chet Baker. The third season at SFJAZZ opens this month with the Eliane Elias Trio. The rest of the season includes the Joshua Redman Trio, Caetano Velosa and Chris Botti. www.sfjazz.org

Madam Tussauds San Francisco The sixth Madam Tussauds gallery in the U.S. opened this summer in San Francisco. For most, the halls of life-like wax figures representing figures from history, sports champions and entertainment celebrities are as close as we’ll ever get to the real thing. Want to take a selfie with Rihanna, Muhammed Ali or Leonardo DiCaprio? Go for it – guests can get up close to all of them as well as Janis Joplin, Harvey Milk and others in the Spirit of San Francisco exhibit. Madam Tussauds San Francisco is located on Fisherman’s Wharf. KAREN SHADE www.madametussauds.com/sanfrancisco Alcatraz Island For a good part of the time that it’s been known as Alcatraz Island, “The Rock” in Hotel Zetta San Francisco: This star of the Viceroy Hotel Group has been called one San Francisco Bay has been fortified for the of the hottest new hotels for 2014 and praised for its high-tech quotient. Visitors purposes of keeping others out (as a U.S. will appreciate the custom touches and cool originality of space and design that’s army installation) or keeping people in (as anything but predictable. They’ll also observe that philosophy at work in everything a famous prison). Today, Alcatraz Island from the artwork to the hotel lobby chandeliers made from hundreds of pairs of is a National Historic Landmark, and the eyeglasses. www.viceroyhotelgroup.com/en/zetta National Park Service has found other uses Sir Francis Drake Hotel: It’s been said that San Francisco is the “most European” of for the land and now-closed prison faciliU.S. cities, and if you’re staying with Sir Francis Drake, you may be inclined to agree. ties, including as a center for local history, This Kimpton Hotel on Union Square welcomes visitors with Beefeater doormen and a bird sanctuary and space for inspired art is a historic icon. However, don’t let the Old World exhibitions. The island’s history makes touches fool you – Sir Francis is as trendy and consuch exhibits as the multimedia @Large: Ai temporary as they come. www.sirfrancisdrake.com Weiwei on Alcatraz, scheduled to open Sept. www.sanfrancisco.travel 27, especially poignant – Ai Weiwei, the outspoken Chinese artist, human rights activ-

S TAY I N S T Y L E

VISIT ONLINE

44

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014


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45


OKLAHOMA’S SPECIAL REPORT

ENERGY

The Sooner State continues to enjoy the spoils of successful energy companies, both large and small.

FIFTEEN YEARS AGO, movers and

shakers wondered what the next engine of Oklahoma commerce would be. Oil and gas reservoirs were tapping out, and wind power wasn’t advanced enough to pick up the slack. Small, independent oil and gas producers started falling out of the market. Then along came horizontal drilling. “The industry has dramatically changed from what it was. We drill horizontal wells almost exclusively now. If you tell someone you want to drill a vertical well, they look at you like you’ve taken leave of your senses,” says Kim Hatfield, CEO of Oklahoma City’s Crawley Petroleum.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

Hatfield runs a successful independent oil and gas production business. The company employs 43 and sports the culture of a family-run enterprise. It’s no ExxonMobile or British Petroleum, but that’s by design. Hatfield, like other small, independent producers, likes doing things his way. And he’s good at it. Being an independent producer doesn’t necessarily mean being small in impact. But the average independent


producer employs only 14 people, according to testimony delivered to the U.S. Congress in 2013 by Robert Sullivan, chairman of the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association and CEO of Sullivan and Company. With fewer people, resources and less capital to spread around, independent producers specialize, focusing entirely on the “upstream” side of the business: Finding and getting oil out of the ground any way they can. They’re behind 95 percent of the wells operated in the U.S., and they account for 68 percent of domestic production. Sullivan is eager to share the numbers that independent producers put on the boards year after year. As the chairman of the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association, he shared them with Congress on a few occasions. Independents account for more than three percent of the total U.S. workforce, provide more than 4 million jobs and generate almost four percent of the country’s gross domestic product. Successful operators demonstrate a commitment to excellence that makes them competitive players. Unlike larger companies, they’re not vertically integrated. They do not own refineries, and they do not pump gas. Yet they’re not relegated to the peripheries of the industry. They’re smack dab in the middle, finding and getting oil out of the ground with a precision and speed giving the big guys a run for the money. “The big challenges for us are, first, keeping up with technology. Second, this is a terribly capital-intensive game. All of this horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing is wonderfully effective but horribly expensive,” says Sullivan. With better technology, wells produce more, but the ante has been “upped.” Wells that cost $2 million in the late 1990s cost around $8 million today. Over the last decade, the cost of technology has increased by a factor of four, give or take a million. But without that technology – specifically, horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing – getting the oil out of the ground would be impossible. Staying on the cutting edge is challenging for smaller companies without the research and development resources of their larger competitors. “The industry is becoming more reliant on science and technology than it used to be. Keeping up is a daily challenge. We rely a lot on our geolo-

SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

47


gists, and it’s a learning curve. Every day we learn something. You take the same ingredients today and make a different cake than you made 15 or 20 years ago,” says Sullivan. It’s quite a cake, too. Business has been so good for independent producers over the last five years that OIPA is calling for an end to the federal government’s 30-year-old export ban. Thanks to shale fields, oil production has climbed to 1986 levels over the past five years. Being smaller means being leaner. It’s easier to find efficiencies and, of course, there are fewer mouths to feed. Chaparral Energy has learned how to squeeze more oil out of the ground. When vertical wells start tapping out, bigger companies move on. Chaparral Energy moves in. One of its two specialties is carbon dioxide enhanced recovery, reclaiming gas that would normally be released into the atmosphere and pumping it back into the well to increase pressure and output. When successful, it increases the well’s longevity by up to 15 percent. Chaparral is the third largest provider of enhanced recovery in the nation. It owns the largest recovery unit in the state, which is employed in Osage County. Independents can capitalize on their size to take advantage of oil finds and fields that aren’t big enough to capture the attention of larger, integrated producers. “If you discover a field that has the potential for a lot of wells, that really moves the needles for an independent. It makes a big difference. But the bigger the company, the bigger it needs to be to make an impact,” says Hatfield. Chaparral also goes for the “pure play” and specializes in local oil and gas holdings. The company recently divested itself of fields in Texas and New Mexico in order to concentrate on the mid-continent oil field. The two-year-old strategy has worked. With roughly 700 employees, Chaparral recently produced one million barrels in one month. “We’re not in North Dakota. We’re not in South Texas. We’re not offshore. We’re pure play in the mid-continent,” says Earl Reynolds, vice president of business development at Chaparral. “We believe that will benefit our shareholders because we’ll realize economies of scale. We’ll become much more efficient, and we’ll be more effective at being the best. Mother Nature gave us a great set of rocks to explore here, and we’re focusing all of our resources, capital and people on them.” The shale boom has legs, and as long as smaller producers keep their eyes on the prize, they’ll be poised to grow. But they’ll choose not to. For them, small is the most important ingredient of success. PAUL FAIRCHILD

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

MANAGING THE MOVING PARTS

Manufacturing companies play a vital role in Oklahoma’s booming energy sector.

With the advent of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, new oil wells are going up around the state at a record pace and with a rhythm that harkens back to Oklahoma’s original oil boom. Sitting behind those new technologies are dozens of others. Manufacturers and service providers are hustling to stay ahead of the curve. “In this day and age, information is not what’s important. It’s more about how you process it. We’ve got more information than we know what to do with,” says Thomas Hill, vice president of business development for Oklahoma City’s Kimray Inc. The 800-person company manufactures control equipment – valves, thermostats and the like – for the energy industry. The evolution of recovery and storage in the industry requires Kimray to stay on the bleeding edge. Technology is not the only thing that changes quickly. Regulations can change at the drop of a political hat, too. “We can move quickly if the industry changes or if environmental regulations change. We’re able to adapt our products to meet those needs,” says Sheri Vanhooser, vice president of sales and business development for Compressco, a manufacturing company that offers wellhead compression and other services that facilitate oil and gas recovery. The company has found a way to help its customers stay compliant with EPA regulations while also making it more profitable for the client company by increasing its productivity. Among other services, the company offers vapor recovery for storage tanks, driving up its clients’ profits by capturing natural gas that otherwise would go to waste and sending it to the sales line. Compressco operates its own manufacturing facilities. And while it maintains its headquarters in Oklahoma City, the majority of its employees are in the field with the company’s customers at locations around the world. Close contact with customers is key. Kimray shares a similar viewpoint. “The way we stay on top is with our relationships with our customers,” says Hill. “We’re in the field with our customers daily. We talk with them about what they’re doing and the challenges they face. We like to be right there helping them apply our products at the same time, looking at whether there are nuances that need to be developed or changed to help them meet their needs.” Staying current means keeping its employees up to date, as well. “I’m absolutely sold on training and educating our employee base,” says Hill. “I’ve got 800 employees. If I can get them thinking about the same thing and give them the tools and the opportunity to change process, then I’ve got a million ideas to work with. And most of them are good.” PAUL FAIRCHILD


PROUD TO SERVE OUR HOME STATE.

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THE ALTERNATIVES Wind, solar and combined forms of energy gain momentum in Oklahoma

O

klahoma is, indeed, where the winds come sweeping down the plains. That wind is used to create power for myriad uses; other alternative forms of energy are also making inroads into ways of life. “It does seem that alternative energy, like wind generation, is becoming more prominent in Oklahoma,” says Justin Alberty, corporate communications director for the Grand River Dam Authority. “New wind farms have been constructed in recent years, and the state’s electric utilities are beginning to add more wind to their overall generation portfolios. That is certainly the case for the Grand River Dam Authority. Today, our port-

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folio is diverse and balanced, with coal, gas, hydro and wind sources.” In March 2014, Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems America signed an agreement – the first of its kind in the Western Hemisphere – for a combined-cycle natural gas generation unit to provide low-cost reliable electricity for GRDA customers for decades to come. New gas generation, while not classified as alternative energy, is “expected to be the most efficient combined-cycle facility in the United States when it is completed in 2017,” says Alberty. The unit uses natural gas to fuel a combustion turbine generator; heat from that process is recaptured to produce steam to turn another steam turbine generator. According to Dan Sullivan, GRDA CEO and director of investments, the high efficiency unit is part of a long-term strategy to reduce the state’s reliance on coal. GRDA is also partnering with TradeWinds Energy to deliver low-cost wind energy projects, providing low-cost energy to 65,000 Oklahoma homes. “Oklahoma has an outstanding natural resource in wind, but what sets it apart for development is the state’s commitment to encouraging wind energy in a way that creates jobs and spurs investment in local communities,” says Sanjay Bhasin, TradeWinds’ senior vice president for business development. Harvest Solar and Wind Power in Tulsa has provided homeowners, businesses and government entities with solar and wind energy products for the last dozen years. “People are turning to these forms of energy for various reasons, including saving money and saving the world,” says Harvest owner John Miggins. “The majority of people are in it for their futures – especially to lock in their cost of energy use and to take advantage of the 30 percent federal tax credit that expires in 2016.” Demands for alternative energy in Oklahoma continue to grow. As the options are there for alternative energy, more will take notice and seek out the ability to purchase it. TRACY LEGRAND


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ENERGY ON THE

BRAIN Oklahoma’s oil and gas legacy is fueled by education.

W

hen it comes to hands-on experience as well as cutting edge, top-notch education opportunities in energy, Oklahoma is the place to be. “Energy, specifically the oil and natural gas industry, is the defining industry in Oklahoma, as published research has shown,” says Dr. Steven C. Agee, dean of the Oklahoma City University Meinders School of Business. “OCU is one of the leading applied economic research centers is this region, with economists from its Steven C. Agee Economic Research & Policy Institute conducting economic impact studies for the oil and gas industry as well as economic forecasting,” Agee says. “[The University of Oklahoma] has a world-class school of geology as well as an engineering school. Oklahoma State University also has an excellent school of geology, and [the University of Tulsa] has a well-known school of petroleum engineering. It also helps to have some of the most prominent independent energy companies located in Oklahoma City such as Devon, Chesapeake, Continental Resources, SandRidge, Chaparral, Linn and many others.” Guest speakers from the major oil and gas companies are frequent presences at the state’s schools to provide students with current material regarding events going on today and planned for the future, says Agee. OCU also has annual

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

energy conferences and works closely with partners such as GE Oil & Gas, which is building a new global energy research center near the school’s campus. OCU offers both a Master of Energy Management and a Master of Energy Legal Studies – the only two graduate energy programs in the U.S. that are accredited by the American Association of Professional Landmen. Energy is written all over The University of Tulsa. “In a very real sense, energy is at the very fiber of this institution,” says Dr. Gale Sullenberger, dean of the nationally ranked Collins College of Business at TU. Accredited for more than 50 years by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International, the most respected and recognized business accrediting organization in the world, the TU college is home to the National Energy Policy Institute and to the School of Energy Economics, Policy and Commerce, which offers both undergraduate and graduate programs focused on business aspects of the energy industry. “In recent years the energy industry has focused more specifically on business operations and processes than ever before, and the demand for robust, flexible, industry-focused business education has never been stronger,” says Dr. Tim Coburn, director of TU’s School of Energy, Economics, Policy and Commerce. “One of 10 such programs accredited by the American Association of Professional Landmen, our undergraduate degree in energy

management that focuses on land and business development is second to none; and our graduate Master of Energy Business degree, which is delivered online to participants throughout the country and internationally, preparing them to effectively manage energy organizations, is one of the largest and most extensive of its kind.” In addition to this lineup of energy business programs, TU’s College of Engineering and Natural Sciences, world-renowned for its longstanding support of the petroleum, geoscience, chemical and refining industries, includes the Tulsa Alternative Energy Institute and the McDougal School of Petroleum Engineering, one of the oldest and most prestigious of such programs. The university’s College of Law hosts the Sustainable Energy and Resources


Law program and serves as the academic home of the Energy Law Journal, which it co-publishes with the Energy Bar Association in Washington, D.C. The College of Law annually hosts the Chesapeake Energy Lecture and recently added a new online Master of Jurisprudence in Energy Law. TU is also home to Petroleum Abstracts, the most extensive and well-known bibliographic resource for information about the petroleum industry worldwide. Along with TU, the University of Oklahoma is one of seven U.S. schools to offer a degree for oil landmen. OU’s Mewbourne School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering combines teaching, research and service for an undergraduate program that includes intensive study of contemporary oil and gas issues, extraction methods, engineering processes and resource development, according to OU officials. U.S. News and World Report ranks OU’s program among the top five in the country. Petroleum engineering graduates may pursue master’s and doctoral degrees in petroleum engineering as well as a Master of Science in natural gas engineering management. Energy leaders are aging out and leaving a void. “There are thousands of employees in the energy industry,” says Agee. “Many of them are young and will be required to step into the shoes of soon-to-be retiring managers and executives. When Oklahoma experienced the oil bust of the 1980s, many young students stopped enrolling in energy-related university programs because there were few jobs available upon graduation. We essentially lost a generation of qualified people entering the energy industry ... The master’s degree program in energy management at OCU is designed to fill this gap and provide a rigorous background in organizational structure, strategic management, internal and external communications, energy economics, accounting for energy managers, operations management, financing energy investments and a capstone experience.”

“In recent years the energy industry has focused more specifically on business operations and processes than ever before, and the demand for robust, flexible, industry-focused business education has never been stronger.”

TRACY LEGRAND

SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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By Jami Mattox • Photography by Nathan Harmon

Fall outfits call for prints, fur and shimmer to the max.

LUXE DELUXE

MODEL COURTESY LINDA LAYMAN AGENCY. HAIR BY SHAWNA BURROUGHS. MAKEUP BY TAYLOR LEDBETTER.

RESS, ARE D ND-FL F HAIR -A IT F L BLACK EOPARD CA R SUEDE TORO OL ME AMELIA IMMY CHO LACK SHIM CITE, U B ;J $1,250 , $795, AND IS BITTAR L N EAR-O X S PUMP , $1,550; ALE RYSTAL CLIP GLES, $395 H C N CLUTC TONE AND LUCITE BA G, $275; S D MOON $395, HINGE ADORITE RIN BANGLE R , RINGS 25, AND LAB YSTAL INLAY AVENUE. 3 R TH AND $ A ORSINI C H, SAKS FIF N C ADRIA ETS, $70 EA L BRACE


VERSA C PRINT E LONG-SLEE J V PURPL ERSEY DRESS E LEOPARD E , COLLA LEATHER JAC $1,075, AND R, $1,94 5; MAN KET WITH FU AUBER R O G PUMPS INE SUEDE A LO BLAHNIK N , HOBO $645; JIMMY KLE STRAP B C EARRIN AG, $1,550; VA HOO METALL IC U G $2,810, S, $865, AND BEL TEARDR SAKS F O IFTH A GOLD CHAIN P , VENUE .

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AKRI S SHIR PUNTO T C PRIN WITH G REWNE C R T CROP PENCIL AFFITI T K LONGR S BLAC PED JAC SKIRT, $4 IM, $375 LEEVE 9 K , SUED K SUEDE ET, $1,39 5, AND R GRAFFIT I 0 LUCI E TOTE, $ PUMPS, ; JIMMY EVERSIB LE $ T CRYS E BANGL 1,225; AL 595, AND CHOO E DOR TAL STAC E, $395, L XIS BITT NAVY IT A A RING E CUFF B KED BRA BRADOR R HINGE C D CHA , $275, SA RACELET ELET, $2 ITE AND N 7 , K $1,13 EL ETCH S FIFTH AND LA 5, LABRA B E 0, BA A LLIET D HOOP C VENUE. RADORIT E S. LIP-O VINTA G N EA RRIN E GS,

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LAR GRA EIDA W SW Y TRO HITE LOA ING CO USERS BLOUS HAN FERS, AT, $2 , $378; E, $32 $33 DBAG $545; M,690, A LANV 0; PES I I 7 GLO ; POR , $1,55 AIYET ND BL N BLA RICO A T VER VES, $ OLAN 0; KAT BLAC CK CK E LEIS HOOP 112; RE O WIN KAN K SUE Y D KEY URE S EARR BECC E LEAT ON SC E A EYE HOLE OCIET INGS, LAN HER ARF, K $ Y WE BRI AR. DGE UNIS 275, A FORD , $5 EX F BER SIL75, S R A M ON HIC KS ES W S. BRU ITH NSO N

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BRUNELLO CUCINELLI SILVER TANK TOP, $950; RAG & BONE BORDEAUX JEANS, $196; MAIYET CHARCOAL GRAY LEATHER JACKET, $2,650; STUART WEITZMAN BLACK WEDGE BOOTIES, $465; THE ROW BACKPACK, $4,550; JIL SANDER BORDEAUX SCARF, $490; REBECCA LANKFORD SILVER HOOP EARRINGS, $275, ABERSONS.

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E SHEATH SATIN/PONT RJASON WU INE, $1,495; NA $695; RG BE AU IN PS, M DRESS PU K AC UEZ BL CISO RODRIG CH, $1,490; O-TONE CLUT GOLD EARLANVIN TW SE RO NKFORD REBECCA LA ERSONS. , AB RINGS, $462

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IU 5; M 50; 1,04 H, $1,1 $ , SS TC DRE D CLU HOOP N I E D LEY AIS QUILT ETCHE 0, CHA ,490, P O 3 K ETR BLAC HANEL S, $1,1 ACE, $1 ITH MIU TAGE C RRING NECKL LET W LA E A VIN -ON E LLION BRAC ,845, B DE E CLIP MEDA TWIST MS, $1 CK SU UE. AND ROPE CHAR O BLA AVEN E H O D AN ATUR MY CH S FIFT N SIG S. JIM 95, SAK LIET PS, $5 PUM

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AKR TUR IS PUN FUR TLENE TO JER C $300 STENB K, $29 SEY M COL ; ETRO ERG BL 5; DIAN OCK BIK LAR, $3 SHAW ACK LE E VON E FRIN R BOO ,195; M L WITH GGING HOO GE HA TS, $95 IU MIU FUR S, VAU P EAR NDBA 0, AND BLAC G K R $1,8 BEL GO INGS, , $1,45 BLACK 95, B 0; $ L ALL D LINK 655; AN GOLD IETS BRA D . CEL ET,

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MY ,245; JIM DRESS, $1 IU IC PRINT TIES, $995; MIU M H P A R G O ETRO UEDE BO $1,150; GOLD AND S Y V A N CHOO D LUTCH, , $195; AN UILTED C BLACK Q RDROP EARRINGS IETS. LL A A TE B , E STON FF, $255 GOLD CU ANTIQUE

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MILLY T O MISS J P, $175; DONN A AC $19,000 KSON’S FUR R DEGNAN SUED ;A E E SON’S. LEXIS BITTAR D SHEARED M SKIRT, $365; JIMMY L IN CHOO B ARGE CUFF, $2 K STROLLER ALEXIS , LA 45 B CLIP-ON ITTAR LUCITE, CK SUEDE PU , MISS JACKMPS, $5 MOONS EARRIN 95 T GS, $39 5, SAKS ONE AND CRY ; AND ST FIFTH A VENUE. AL

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HEALING OUR HEROES As more veterans return stateside from combat overseas, local organizations are helping them find home again. By Tara Malone

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AD.

HITEHE

SSELL W

TESY RU

COUR PHOTO

To call recent events

at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs a “scandal” would be kind. First, veterans and civilians alike reeled upon discovering the vast backlog of veterans’ medical claims. More recently, deception regarding waiting lists at many VA hospitals across the nation shocked the public, and led to the resignation of VA Secretary Eric Shinseki this past May. SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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“Accessing the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs may be a veteran’s most serious challenge to getting benefits and services there,” says Jim Lyall, a veteran of the

Vietnam War and associate director for the Tulsa-based Community Service Council. Where do these events leave the veterans of U.S. armed services, especially those in Oklahoma, a state that is home to one of the highest populations of veterans and National Guardsmen in the nation? “No state has deployed more soldiers per capita than Oklahoma,” says Carla Tanner, senior planner for the Community Service Council. “More than 63 percent of the National Guard has been deployed, either to Iraq or Afghanistan; over a third of those have been deployed multiple times. These National Guard or reservists often are faced with issues quite different from the ‘active duty’ soldiers. They leave and return, often without many of their co-workers, neighbors or friends recognizing that they left. When they return, they must fight for their jobs and reintegrate into their community without the supports that active-duty installations provide. Thus, they have an intense feeling of isolation. Their families lack the support they would usually receive at military installations.” Regardless of the vehicle through which a veteran serves, none return from a conflict unchanged, she says. “Approximately 20 percent of returning service members reportedly are returning with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), another 20 percent with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and many with physical

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ABOVE LEFT: COMBAT AND LOSING FRIENDS WHILE SERVING IN IRAQ AFFECTED RUSSELL WHITEHEAD (PICTURED) SO MUCH HE WENT INTO A DOWNWARD SPIRAL ON HIS RETURN HOME. PHOTO COURTESY RUSSELL WHITEHEAD.

RIGHT: ARMY VETERAN RUSSELL WHITEHEAD TODAY CREDITS THE TULSA COUNTY VETERANS TREATMENT COURT WITH HELPING HIM RECOVER AND FIND THE RIGHT PATH AGAIN. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT..

injuries. The returning vets report struggles with finding jobs, behavioral health issues, family struggles and feelings of severe hypervigilance, isolation and homelessness,” Tanner says. For many soldiers who have returned from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, their homecoming offers little relief. Despite a staggering array of addictions, mental illness and trauma, they often loathe seeking treatment. “In Oklahoma, a major challenge that veterans and the community must address is the aftermath of the multiple deployments of the Oklahoma National Guard and reservists,” says Rose Ewing, planning director of the Tulsa County Veterans Treatment Court. “Many of these veterans suffer with issues of PTSD, TBI and other mental health challenges, including depressive disorders and suicidal ideation. Many veterans live and breathe the warrior’s ethos of ‘don’t show weakness, don’t ask for help, don’t admit you’re struggling.’ To deal with these symptoms, many veterans turn to alcohol and drugs to manage.” Veterans face many other problems. “Many veterans cannot manage being exposed to large crowds, loud noises or unexpected movements due to their combat experience. This leads to many adjustment issues and creates difficulty in domestic situations and maintaining employment,” Ewing adds. Negative perceptions of seeking help often keep veterans from asking for it. “A huge barrier for veterans needing behavioral health help is the stigma that exists,” Tanner says. “They fear that having a record of receiving behavioral health services will keep them from furthering their military career or hinder their ability to develop a career in the police or fire departments.”


AMONG THE MANY INJURIES VETERANS CARRY BACK WITH THEM FROM THEIR DEPLOYMENTS ARE POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER, TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY AND MORAL INJURY, WHICH OCCURS WHEN FAITH OR PERSONAL VALUES ARE COMPROMISED BY PARTICIPATING IN OR SUPPORTING COMBAT ACTIONS. PHOTO COURTESY RUSSELL WHITEHEAD.

coming home: ptsd and traumatic brain injury

Sometimes veterans do seek treatment, but are denied. Tanner cites the example of Cody Young, a U.S. Army National Guard veteran of Afghanistan who was killed by a Tulsa police officer on May 20 after he fired a rifle during a standoff. She says it’s believed that Young was having a flashback, a psychological effect of PTSD. Young’s family claims that he sought help for his condition at local hospitals, as well as a VA hospital, but was denied treatment for an unknown reason. “This is happening all over our nation to our returning troops,” Tanner states. “We

can’t let another Cody lose his or her life because of the sacrifices they made to serve our country.” Among myriad mental health issues plaguing veterans, PTSD from the stress of combat, injury and extreme violence frequently factors into the picture. “PTSD is a failure to recover,” says Tanner. “In a normal recovery, the disruptive thoughts and emotions decrease over time, and a natural healing occurs. However, in those who don’t recover, they confront strong negative and intrusive thoughts and emotions. Those individuals with PTSD try to escape or avoid reminders of negative trauma-related emotions and thoughts.” Common reactions after a trauma may include depression, sleep disturbance, nightmares, drug or alcohol abuse, hyper-vigilance, risky behaviors, social withdrawl and aggression, adds Tanner. “The long-term effects or results are often a lack of intimacy and family stress, often resulting in divorce; difficulty maintaining employment; drinking and driving, resulting in frequent arrests; and an extremely difficult time reintegrating back into civilian life,” Tanner says. “These symptoms, if left untreated, can often lead the veteran to a feeling of complete hopelessness and can result in suicide.” Tanner has worked closely with the VA Hospital in Muskogee and praises their efforts to treat veterans’ mental health issues. But in the end, she says, it’s too much for one organization to face alone. “It is important for the communities in Oklahoma to step up and fill the gap,” she says. “Our agency had trained over 120 mental health providers with an evidence-based therapy to treat those suffering from PTSD and other behavioral health issues. The problem now is reaching those returning service members to let them know that help is available. Our 2-1-1 system is an excellent source of referral for any veterans in need of services and who haven’t been able to access the VA.” Lyall says that other alternatives exist. “With support from Wounded Warrior Project, the Tulsa Area United Way and other sources, the Community Service Council has helped community-based organizations to work alongside the VA to serve local veterans. We believe Oklahoma veterans return to families and communities, not military bases, so supporting them is a community undertaking, not solely the job of the VA,” he says. The CSC also provides soldiers with resources to heal from moral injury, which “results when one’s faith or personal values are compromised by participating in or supporting combat action,” says Lyall. Moral injury can occur with PTSD. Although it is not a psychiatric condition, veterans can experience lifelong guilt if it is not addressed, he says. “Over time, it is important for veterans to talk about their military experiences,” Lyall adds. “It is equally important for the rest of us to listen without judgment. Saying, ‘I’d like to hear about your military experience,’ can be helpful if you’re prepared to be a good, nonjudgmental listener. We can also encourage and foster communication with the VA, communitybased agencies and clergy when a veteran begins to struggle.” Among the numerous initiatives sponsored by the CSC is training for cognitive processing therapy to help local health providers treat conditions like PSTD. The CSC also offers military culture training to these providers and hosts a conference addressing the “Silent Wounds of War.” “The CSC has routinely brought veterans, family members, the VA, law enforcement, educators, employment specialists and others together with the goal of strengthening our community’s response to veterans,” Lyall says. As prevalent as PTSD, although somewhat less known, are instances of TBI, often caused by improvised explosive device detonation. In May, the Oklahoma legislature passed a law that will provide hyperbaric oxygenation treatments to veterans with TBI at no cost. It is believed that these treatments help the brain heal from its trauma and restore its normal functioning levels. “There have been cases where this has proved beneficial to people with traumatic brain injuries and PTSD,” says Shane Faulkner, public information officer for the Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs. “Suffering a TBI can change the entire world for someone. Unfortunately, this is a major contributor to the spike in suicide among veterans.” SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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coming home: addiction

One of the CSC’s most notable success stories is the establishment of the Tulsa Veterans Treatment Court. Among the first in the nation, this special court docket targets veterans who have committed nonviolent offenses and who suffer from addiction and substance abuse problems. Through a grant from the federal VA’s Supportive Services for Veteran Families program, the court also reaches out to homeless vets and their families to assist with housing support. “‘Leave No Veteran Behind and Honor Their Service’ is the Tulsa Vet Court motto,” says Ewing. The Tulsa County Veterans Treatment Court first convened on Pearl Harbor Day in 2008 to divert veterans charged with criminal offenses from jail and prison and to restore their pride and personal honor. “The criminal offense the veteran is charged with is often just a manifestation of the pain, anguish and torment that the veteran has been experiencing,” Ewing adds. Treatment courts work in partnership with the Veterans Health Administration, military service organizations, veteran mentors and other community partners to help veterans heal, whether the pain is physical or mental. Common misdemeanors and felonies brought up in the court include driving under the influence, assault and battery, domestic violence and drug addiction. These offenses often go hand-in-hand with gun charges. “Not surprisingly, veterans are trained to carry their weapon on their person 24-7, so when they are arrested for drug or DUI charges, often the weapon is in their posses

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THE COMMUNITY SERVICE COUNCIL’S JIM LYALL, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND A VIETNAM WAR VETERAN, AND CARLA TANNER, SENIOR PLANNER, WORK TO HELP VETERANS TRANSITION BACK INTO CIVILIAN LIFE AFTER A TRAUMATIC DEPLOYMENT. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

sion,” Ewing says. Criminal charges are not the only legal challenges veterans routinely face. “Many of the veterans we work with also have family legal issues, such as divorce, child custody and child support issues,” Ewing says. “Housing or financial legal issues are also quite common. It is rare

that a veteran has only the criminal case pending. Most of the time, veterans have multiple legal issues, including criminal, family and civil issues.” Tulsa County Veterans Treatment Court is one of four national mentor courts providing leadership and training to other districts seeking to implement a similar docket. In addition, “the veterans treatment court is expanding the mentor capacity to those who support the veterans as ‘battle buddies’ and advocates and [to those] who assist with other resources, such as housing and transportation.” The court program – which has a 96 percent participant completion rate – forever changed the life of veteran Russell Whitehead. A native of small-town Oklahoma, Whitehead enlisted in the Army as a health care specialist and was sent to replace combat medics who had perished in an explosion in Iraq. After losing friends and several acquaintances during his first deployment, Whitehead returned to Oklahoma, but it was not a happy homecoming. “Upon returning stateside, I began drinking again, but this time it was different,” Whitehead says. “It seemed as though I couldn’t drink enough. I couldn’t do anything enough to bring back those I lost, and it came to a point where I would have traded places with any of them, given the chance for them to live on and for me to have died in combat – a soldier’s death, an admirable way out of this life. I do not recall much from the first month or so home from deployment, due to my drinking. I was spiraling downward quickly.” When Whitehead was given the opportunity to attend paramedic school, he said it made him more hopeful about his next deployment, which was right around the corner. Perhaps this time, he would be able to save more of his comrades. But when he submitted to a urinalysis test, he failed. He was subsequently court-martialed and spent 45 days in jail.


“I had lost the one thing in my life I had loved doing,” he says, “and worst of all, I failed my soldiers.” Fast upon the heels of his release, Whitehead received his first DUI, followed quickly by APC (actual physical control) charges. He maintained his sobriety for six months before an encounter with his former comrades left him feeling isolated and hopeless. In quick succession, he earned his second and third DUIs. While filling out his paperwork to enter DUI court, he noticed an advertisement for the Veterans Treatment Court and quickly entered a plea. The treatment program was intense. A bracelet was attached to Whitehead’s leg to continuously monitor his blood-alcohol level, and he participated in counseling sessions multiple times per week. He submitted to random urinalysis testing and mandatory Alcoholics Anoymous meetings. At first, he says, it was overwhelming, but eventually, he began to look forward to the routine. In addition, he was given chances to restore his dignity. When the May 20, 2013, tornado devastated Moore, Whitehead was allowed into the damage zone as a medical first responder. He also was allowed to travel home to spend time with his family after he lost his father to liver cancer. “I was given respect and dignity in those days, two things I do not take lightly and will forever be grateful for,” he says. Today, Whitehead participates in the court’s mentoring program while working as a mechanical designer for a contract engineering firm in Tulsa. “I am now a changed man,” Whitehead says, “and I can give much of the credit to the people associated with the court. Let there be no mistake: Who you are is solely based on the decisions and path you choose in your life. My decision to change was my own, but without the wonderful people of the veterans treatment court, this path and these choices would have been hard-fought, if they were made at all.”

coming home: homelessness and unemployment

For many of Oklahoma’s returning soldiers, mental, physical and legal issues are only exacerbated by the challenges they face reintegrating into their families and society. Two of the top issues veterans face, particularly those plagued by mental illness and physical injury, are homelessness and unemployment. “For veterans who have become disabled physically or mentally, the need for housing with ongoing supportive services may be difficult to obtain,” says Gregory A. Shinn, associate director of Mental Health Association Oklahoma. “Though many disabled vets may be eligible for disability payments through the VA, this is a process that can take time. With little or no income, access to housing options is even more limited, and this can lead to veterans falling through the cracks and ending up homeless.” To qualify for veterans benefits, a veteran must have an honorable discharge, but not all veterans have the status, Shinn says. “Typically, somewhere between 15 and 20 percent of homeless individuals in a community are veterans. However, Tulsa is among the leaders nationally in reducing chronic homelessness among veterans,” Shinn adds. Offered through the Community Service Council, the Support Services for Veterans Families grant provides short-term case management and rental assistance, known as Rapid Re-Housing. The program aims to prevent homelessness and assist those who are already homeless. The VA’s Per Diem Program for homeless and disabled veterans at Yale Apartments provides transitional supportive housing with full services on-site along with ongoing case management and health and mental health care from the VA. The HUD-VASH (Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing) offers Section 8 subsidies and ongoing case management at Scattered Site Program-supported housing locations across the community. At last count, the Mental Health Association Oklahoma had 34 veterans in HUD-VASH units at multiple locations. Veterans may also have difficulty reentering the job market and require additional training to help them become more competitive. Tanner says the CSC has received multiple grants from the Wounded Warrior Project, including one funding employable skills training for veterans. Providing back-up support to many of these initiatives is the much maligned, if well intentioned, federal veterans affairs department. “The VA has been a fantastic partner with the Mental Health Association in Oklahoma for many years,” Shinn says. “The services offered and the professional staff have significantly improved

over time … We have seen significant reductions in the veteran homelessness, especially chronic homelessness, in the last few years.” Shinn says he believes that former VA Secretary Shinseki provided the leadership to end homelessness for veterans and made the resources available to local organizations to accomplish it. “I believe it is possible that Tulsa will be able to report zero chronically homeless veterans in the very near future – maybe in less than a year,” Shinn says.

coming home: what civilians should remember

What can Oklahoma civilians do to embrace their soldiers and help them overcome the challenges they may face when returning from combat? “The war experience is very, very different from day-to-day life in our great country,” Lyall says. “Adjusting back to civilian life can be challenging. Time, patience and support from others are extremely important. This is particularly true for family members and those responsible for the well-being (medical personnel, clergy, employers, etc.) of veterans. In this way, we all must take time to learn about military experience and support veterans and their families. Many Oklahoma veterans make a smooth and timely transition back to civilian life; others require support from us. We should be honored to give that support.” Ewing issues a call to action. “Please volunteer to help a veteran or his or her family,” she says. “Thank veterans for their services. Reach out to your co-worker, your neighbor … Let’s never forget the sacrifices that veterans make to ensure we keep the freedoms we hold dear and honor their service by volunteering in some capacity to help veterans or their families.” “As the war comes to an end and those who serve return home, the biggest challenge they face is being forgotten,” says Tanner. “The physical and emotional wounds of war will remain with those who serve and their families for many years … We must not forget. Let’s all pitch in and help. Look around you – in your kid’s school, in your faith community and even in your own family. None of us are untouched by this war. Many of these families are fighting to survive – they are caregivers or are just trying to figure out how to reintegrate their families. They need each and every one of us to care.” TARA MALONE SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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GRIDIRON GLORY By Jami Mattox

The chill of an early fall night, the roar of the crowd, the thwack of bodies smashing into one another, all fighting to get their hands on a coveted piece of leather, to be the one to carry it across the goal line for six points. This is Oklahoma football.

For most Oklahoma high schoolers, summer break is a chance to catch up with friends, earn a little extra money at a part-time job and enjoy being a teenager. For some, however, summertime is a time to work out, to practice drills, to improve their game. More than 340 school districts in Oklahoma, representing 44 districts in eight class sizes, offer football as an extracurricular activity to its students. According to Van Shea Iven, director of media relations for

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the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association, around 16,500 students played football during the 2012-2013 season. From small, eight-man football teams to the largest, most respected and feared 6A squads, players take the field each week with the intention of pushing themselves further. For most, the ultimate reward will be a winning season, perhaps a district championship. A handful will win it all and receive state championship rings and the public’s adoration for their efforts. While plenty of Oklahoma students go on to play college football, there are a few talented players who are recruited by elite programs around the country. Ranked nationally by sports websites and watched by some of the country’s most storied college football programs – think Alabama, Southern California, the University of Oklahoma – these players have the privilege of choosing their school and the squad they will suit up for. Certainly Jalin Barnett of Lawton High School, Marquise Overton of Jenks High School, Will Sunderland Jr. of Midwest City High School and Josh Wariboko of Casady School look forward to successful senior years, but their ultimate reward is yet to come. High school senior year is not the end of football glory for these players; it’s just the beginning.


PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

Marquise Overton

Jenks High School DEFENSIVE TACKLE Committed to the University of Oklahoma «««« Recruit ESPN 300 RANKING: No. 153 RIVALS.COM RANKING: No. 186

WHAT JENKS HIGH SCHOOL SPECIAL TEAMS COORDINATOR AND DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE RECRUITING CARL JOHNSON SAYS: “The first thing you notice about Q is that he’s physically dominating, and he plays that way. He plays hard every single play, and that’s hard for some big guys. He loves the game, plays with passion and he will be integral to our success this season. OU is getting themselves a really good football player and a very good young man.” SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Casady School OFFENSIVE LINEMAN Undeclared «««« Recruit ESPN 300 RANKING: No. 174 RIVALS.COM RANKING: No. 83

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

WHAT HE SAYS: “The expectations we have this year are very high. We have great coaches … We’re expecting nothing less than a SPC (Southwest Preparatory Conference) title this year.” WHAT CASADY SCHOOL HEAD FOOTBALL COACH KOBY SCOVILLE SAYS: “As a player, he is extra physical and tough. He’s one of our better linemen we’ve had. He can take out one guy, and he’s onto another … He’s nice, caring and outgoing on and off the field, and he’s rarely ever been arrogant. I don’t think I’ve ever heard him talk back to a coach. He’s always thankful.”

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Josh Wariboko


PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Will Sunderland Jr. WHAT HE SAYS: “I love the game of football. I have passion for it. My family likes football, and I have family members who played college football. My goal is to go to college and finish four years in three and be the first one in my family to play in the NFL.”

Midwest City High School SAFETY Undeclared «««« Recruit ESPN 300 RANKING: No. 220 RIVALS.COM RANKING: No. 136

SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Lawton High School RIGHT TACKLE Undeclared «««« Recruit ESPN 300 RANKING: No. 43 RIVALS.COM RANKING: No. 122

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WHAT HE SAYS: “My work ethic is what makes me so good.” WHAT LAWTON HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL COACH RANDY BREEZE SAYS: “Obviously, Jalin’s a very big man, but one of the things that makes him stand out [from other tackles around the country], he has the ability to pull, wrap around the center to the left, find a linebacker and knock a linebacker down. He benches over 350 pounds. He wears a size 17 shoe, and he’s still growing. He’s also very humble. As good a football player as he is, he’s even a better person off the field.”

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Jalin Barnett


SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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ACTIVE YEARS

The Road to “Coupleness”

With more than 150 combined years of wedded bliss among them, three couples share the keys to their successful relationships.

Couples who have been married for decades are respected and admired. But how exactly do two people come together to share their lives with such success and longevity?

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By Megan Morgan


FAITH AND DANNY BOUDREAU MET WHEN THEY WERE BOTH 23 YEARS OLD AND STUDENTS AT RUTGERS UNIVERSITY. PHOTO BY KAREN SHADE.

Danny and Faith Boudreau Married 42 years

One night in October, Danny and Faith met in the elevator at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., where they attended graduate school for social work. They were both 23 years old. “Danny usually played basketball that night, but because it was raining, he found himself at the library,” Faith says. “He asked me about being in a certain class with him, and I tried to reply coyly, even though I knew he was in that class. We exited the elevator and went to our separate desks at the library, but within minutes he approached me with a question about our mutual class – either indicating that he was not very smart or that he was interested in me.” They talked for the next three hours. Faith says she knew right away that something was different about Danny. “I phoned my mother late that night and told her that I just met the boy I am going to marry. She told me not to do anything foolish, and I didn’t. Although we started dating that next day, we did not marry until two years later,” Faith says. After 42 years of marriage, the Boudreaus remain together. The couple moved to Tulsa in 1973 when Danny began law school at The University of Tulsa. “We have been Oklahomans ever since,” Danny says. “Both of our children, a boy and a girl, were born here, too.” In the beginning, much of their attention was

given to their children and other parts of their lives, Danny says. “The early years of our marriage were consumed with raising our children, career issues and, in many respects, just growing up together,” he says. “The latter years have allowed us the time to focus on each other and the quality of our marriage.” And although having children proved to keep the Boudreaus very busy, Faith and Danny agree that the births of their children brought the happiest moments to their marriage. “They have provided us with immeasurable joy and a healthy dose of humility,” Danny adds. But no couple is lucky enough to soar from happiness to bliss throughout their entire relationship. Maintaining a successful marriage also means weathering the hardships together. One of the worst came in 2003, when Faith was diagnosed with Stage IV non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. “All at the same time, [Danny] was commuting from Oklahoma City to Tulsa during the week as part of his work. I was still working as a school counselor, and both of our kids were graduating from college. We also assumed responsibility for aging parents. And my progress in treatment was somewhat of a roller coaster ride,” Faith says. The couple says the entire family’s flexibility, stamina, loyalty and sense of humor pulled them through. “We also depended on a strong support

system of friends and family, faith and hope. We both have been diagnosed with serious illnesses over the years – Dan with rheumatoid arthritis and me with cancer. But we have learned that our love and ability to interact with others and to thrive need not be defined by those challenges,” Faith says. Today, Danny is a former lawyer and judge who now provides arbitration and mediation services. Faith is a clinical social worker, a job from which one never retires, she says. “I regularly volunteer at local schools, and I am one of the founding members of Celebrating the Art of Healing, an annual educational symposium for cancer survivors, their caregivers, adult family members and others,” Faith says. Members of the St. John Siegfried Health Club, the Boudreaus are committed to keeping physically fit. At 67, Danny plays adult competitive soccer and participates in national age-categorized tournaments. They both love to travel. And after 42 years of marriage, Faith and Danny can say that having a sense of humor, treating one another with respect and, most importantly, communicating are the important ingredients of a lasting relationship. “We now have a more mature and relaxed relationship. We know each other’s strengths and shortcomings, so we don’t need to compete or impress one another. Our communication has improved, and so has our patience with one another,” Danny says. SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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IVAN AND MARITA DEATSCH SAY THE SECRET TO THEIR SUCCESSFUL MARRIAGE IS MAKING TIME FOR EACH OTHER. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Ivan and Marita Deatsch Married 44 Years

When it comes to starting a family, Edmond couple Ivan and Marita Deatsch can’t say enough on the importance of “coupleness.” “Something that helps us has always been maintaining this idea of ‘coupleness.’ We make time for each other. Yes, creating a family means that you are really busy, but that family started out from two people, so time should be made for just the couple, too,” Marita says. The Deatsches know this by experience – they began their relationship by long-distance. They met while in college, but stayed connected when Ivan started working in Illinois as Marita finished school in Kansas City. “I was working with Firestone then,” he says, “and I’d get going after work on Friday and get to Kansas City that night. And then, I’d drive back on Sunday.” The couple kept their romance strong over the many miles for a year until Marita graduated and joined him. With Ivan’s job, the family moved around the U.S. several times (including to Edmond) before they moved back to Oklahoma for good. “Oklahoma has changed so much, but we were so happy to come back. Before, you

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could shoot a cannon through Oklahoma City and not hit anything. It’s such a great area to live in now. It’s where three of our four children live with their families, too,” Ivan says. Marita says the most testing part of their relationship through the decades was the frequent relocations. “We always had to pick up and move, and Ivan would usually move first because of his job, and then I would wait until we were able to sell the house. I never wanted to move, but then, I always ended up liking it when we got there,” Marita says. Ivan retired in 2009, and the couple says they are busier now than they ever were when they were raising their children. “We do a lot of volunteer work; you have to keep active. You work until you’re 60, but you’ll live another 30 years after that. You can’t sit around and play golf the whole time,” Marita says. She works with the nonprofit organization Positive Tomorrows in Oklahoma City as a reader and mentor for homeless children. Ivan is involved with the group Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), which provides car rides for low-income seniors who cannot drive on their own. Ivan drives seniors to doctor appointments and various

errands three to four times a week; each ride can take up to half a day. “We’ll do things like pick (seniors) up and take them to a doctor, and then help them fill out paperwork, too. We wait with them there and then usually take them to the pharmacy afterwards,” Ivan says. The Deatsches also stay busy by spinning other kinds of wheels. “We’re bicyclers, and we’ve gone on lots of biking trips,” Marita says. “We usually go with a group on a four- or five-day [riding] trip. We’ve probably taken near to 15 rides.” And with four happily married children, there are plenty of grandchildren. The Deatsches try to help their children get in valuable coupleness time with their own spouses. “We always encourage our kids to spend time alone with their spouses. It’s something that has always helped us, and since we are here and can help with the kids, we try to provide that for them,” Ivan says. Coupleness is crucial, but each person in the relationship should have individual pursuits, too, the Deatsches say. “You should always put your marriage first, but everyone also needs a sense of independence,” Ivan says.


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DR. REECE AND RUTH BOONE STILL ENJOY DAILY WALKS AND WATCHING FOOTBALL GAMES. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

Reece and Ruth Boone Married 72 years

Not many people have the chance to meet their great-grandchildren, but Dr. Reece and Ruth Boone, married for 72 years, are fortunate to count seven great-great-grandchildren in their family. “I’m not even sure how many grandchildren and great-grandchildren we have,” Ruth says, “but when we have a birthday party, we need a whole room just for us.” This Tulsa couple holds its annual family “re-Boone-ion” at St. Simeon’s Senior Community retirement home, where they now live. Last year marked the 35th anniversary of the family gathering. The Boones aren’t originally from Oklahoma; they met while both were in high school in Virginia. “That was the beginning of our long love story,” Reece says. “Ruth has even written a book about it. It’s called Dear Family.” The couple moved to the small town of Mooreland, Okla., where Reece set up a medical practice after spending eight years as a surgeon. “Northwest Oklahoma was fortunate to have a board-certified surgeon working in general practice in a rural area,” says one of

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the couple’s sons, Richard Boone. The Boones had six children – five boys and one girl – all raised in Mooreland. All six went to college and got degrees, and all of the boys played college football. “We definitely had a lot of sports in our marriage,” Reece says. Through the 1960s and ‘70s, Reece even had a pilot license and a small plane that he would fly to attend various football games in the region, creating a flight plan on many Saturdays and even standing in as an on-field medic for some games. “Our daughter learned the football language from the time she was very young. When she was a toddler, she could tell when something happened in a game, and she would call it,” Ruth says. The sports world is still a big part of the Boones’ lives. “We’re 93, and we are still paying attention,” Reece says. “Mostly, we watch football, but sometimes we’ll get interested in other sports, too.” Today, Reece is in a wheelchair, but he’s able to join his wife on her regular walks. Ruth walks two to three miles every day. “Mom has been an avid athlete all her life,” Richard says. “She was a race walker and has won every senior event in the Tulsa area. She’s

got enough gold medals to weigh her neck down if she tried to wear them all at once.” Ruth also has a lifelong interest in music, and the couple occasionally goes to the opera. “I’ve been to enough sports games that Reece can sacrifice every once in a while and go to the opera,” Ruth says. Tragedy struck the Boone family a few years ago when they lost a son to a heart attack. “It was a terrible thing, but we got through it with a lot of family love and time together,” Reece says. Continuing to love one another, even through hardships, has kept the Boones’ marriage strong. Living together in a small apartment, the Boones can focus on one another more than ever. Their concern for each other is the basis of their lives, Ruth says. “The success of our marriage is really based on love and on truth,” Reece says. “We’ve always been extremely happy that way. It’s been a beautiful life, and that’s because of all the beautiful things that have happened to our family and us. You should marry the one you love and be true to them.” His wife agrees. “That sounds perfect,” she says.


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Dating Revisited

S

Single seniors have many choices and considerations when it comes to dating again.

omeday, many people will face being single again, more so for seniors. Facing the loss of a spouse or ending a long-term relationship can create anxiety over wading back into the dating pool. Single seniors thinking of dating again should be aware of the benefits of meeting new people and possibly new relationships, but there are a few issues to consider. “Many newly or recently single senior adults, especially those from long-term relationships, face two choices after becoming single: isolate and retreat into themselves or get back into the social scene,” says Brenda Brinson, a licensed marital and family therapist with the Generations behavioral health program at Integris Southwest Medical Center in Oklahoma City. “The senior’s mental outlook often determines their quality and quantity of life. A new relationship at any age creates an excitement and newness for the individual. Seniors are no different.”

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Psychological and Physical Benefits

“There are many strong associations in medicine that a person involved in a warm, close relationship is less likely to be depressed,” says Dr. Laurence Rubenstein, M.D., chairman of the Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine in Oklahoma City. “In general a person in a stable [relationship] enjoys a longer life.” Rubenstein says seniors engaged in a caring, intimate relationship generally experience good physiological and physical outcomes. “As long as the person is healthy, a sexual relation is encouraged. Even in those situations when the inability exists, there’s a lot to be said for the comfort factor of closeness,” he says.

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out of dating if they are interested. Taking the first step back into dating following years in a long relationship will be scary, but the experience can be enriching. Most importantly, it’s important to be true to oneself and to others, whether you plan to use the old-fashioned route of meeting people in person or through today’s online dating scene.

Online Dating

Many seniors think of the Internet as the domain of Generation Y, yet the fastest growing demographic using social networking is ages 75 and older. Online dating sites offer a host of chances to find people with specific interests, faiths, politics, ages and hobbies. Besides dating, these websites also offer endless opportunities for new friendships and reconnecting with old friends, but beware – scammers, con artists and others with ulterior motives may be watching. Dating sites cannot prevent dishonesty, and some profiles stretch the truth. Those new to online dating should take it slow and pay attention to their gut reactions. Some popular sites offer safety tips for online dating that are always worth a look. They often advise users to not reveal too much personal information, including financial information. Another good guideline – online dating website users should not have those initial meetings at home. Only after getting to know someone better in person after a period of time is it a good idea to place that degree of trust. Lynette* is a divorced woman, who tried online dating. One match “talked the talk” on the telephone and presented a charming, friendly nature. He even sent flowers. “He asked me to come for a visit,” Lynette says. “I suggested he pick me up at my friend’s

house, which seemed safe. Feeling comfortable after a nice meal, I agreed to coffee at his home. When we went into his living room, I saw multiple framed pictures of myself from my Facebook page. Shocked and uncomfortable, I asked him to take me to my friend’s [house].” Another online dating user, Deedra* thought she took all the necessary precautions. When a man she agreed to meet told her on a first date that his birthday was the same day as her late husband’s birthday, she wasn’t too concerned. “On a second date, I discovered we shared a mutual friend,” Deedra says. “It helped me feel secure. He finally brought up exclusivity and said he had a feeling about our relationship’s future potential. He asked if I would consider dating only him for the next 30 days to see how the relationship evolved. “I agreed, having nothing to lose. I called our mutual friend, telling about the coincidence and our 30-day pact,” Deedra continues. “After a pause, they told me my new man was dating another friend from a dating site.”

The Real Thing

Not all dating experiences – online or not – will end in disaster. Often times, even the worse dates can turn into learning experiences that one can use to find the genuine thing. “I was like a high school kid discovering beer,” says Lynette. “[But] all I went through in discovery made me the person I am today, and that includes being happy with the choices I made. I was lucky enough to find somebody to spend the rest of my life with. It would never [have] happened if I hadn’t taken the chance.” RHONDA SHEPHARD *Some last names and other personal information have been omitted at sources’ request.

WHEN YOU’RE READY TO DATE AGAIN ... • • • • • • • • • •

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Start slow. Consider meeting people at gyms, grandchildren’s activities, classes for adults (such as drawing or language classes) or at church functions. Look into organizations or groups for specific interests (travel, politics, history, chess, cruises, etc.) Try something new, such as ballroom dancing, Tai Chi, zip-lines or a new career. Volunteer at hospitals, schools, museums and organizations. Beware of anyone who refuses to meet family and friends or anyone who refuses to introduce his or her family and friends. Beware of claims of status, position or wealth until proven. Beware of anyone who wants to be contacted only at very specific times. Be cautious of someone who asks for money or financial assistance or of someone with cash flow problems, despite claims of wealth. Trust your instincts, and have fun.


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THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR Is sex addiction real? You’ve probably heard of sex addiction, but you might be surprised to know that there’s debate about whether it’s truly an addiction, and that it’s not even all about sex. That’s a common misconception. It is no more about sex than an eating disorder is about COURTNEY LINSENMEYERfood or pathological gambling is about O’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR money. Sex addicts, in other words, are not simply people who crave lots of sex. Instead, they have underlying problems – stress, anxiety, depression, shame and fear – that drive risky sexual behavior. Those are some of the core issues that you start to see when you treat someone with sex addiction. Sex addiction is not used in the DSM-5, which is used to diagnose mental disorders. Instead, it’s termed as “hypersexual disorder.” By either name, it’s about people who keep engaging in sexual behaviors that are damaging them and/or their families. Examples are (typically) individuals who spend time and money on prostitutes, workers surfing the web for porn despite the risk of job loss or the person replacing intimacy with compulsive masturbation. Despite the danger, they return to the same behaviors, whether it’s Internet porn, soliciting sex, carelessly seeking affairs or any number of other high risk sexualized acts that jeopardize the framework of their life. Overcoming feelings of powerlessness is possible.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

VETERINARIAN School has started, and my pet seems to be experiencing anxiety due to changes in our family’s summer routine. Is there something that can be done? During the summer, your children and the family pet can develop a strong bond. Now there’s suddenly an empty DR. RODNEY ROBARDS and quiet house. This change in routine can cause your dog to suffer from separation anxiety or depression – to actually miss your kids. Signs of anxiety can present itself through shredding pillows and bedding, chewing on furniture, going to the bathroom in the house or tearing up anything in sight. In order to decrease your pet’s anxiousness, leaving your pet at home for short periods of time. Consider doggie daycare for prolonged absences. Don’t overstimulate your pet with highly emotional arrivals and departures. Increased exercise can relax your dog as well. New toys will keep him from being bored. Be sure to check with your veterinarian if any of these do not correct the anxiety.

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl., Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

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INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

BUSINESS BANKER What is net worth, and why is it important when applying for a business loan?

Why have homeowners’ insurance rates gone up everywhere in Oklahoma?

One of the most important factors that our bank considers when evaluating a business loan request is whether the client has sufficient net worth to qualify for a loan. Net SEAN KOUPLEN worth is a company’s equity or assets in excess of liabilities. This is the cushion a business uses to operate when their cash flow suffers. This cushion can be excess cash owned by the business or owners; it can also be equity and assets that can be turned into cash in tough times. We analyze the applicant’s financial statement to determine if the cushion is adequate. Sometimes, business owners mistakenly withdraw much of a business’ cash when things are good, and there’s no cushion available when times get tough. Business owners that have an adequate cushion demonstrate discipline in their finances, making them a great candidate for a business loan.

This is a pretty common question heard from policyholders on the eastern part of Oklahoma, as the larger weather events have been more concentrated around the OklaJARED PETERSON homa City region for the past 4-5 years. In weather catastrophe-prone states such as Oklahoma, although one region of the state may have experienced more weather activity than others in recent years, insurance companies typically look at weather losses over a 25-30 year span, not just 4 or 5. Insurance companies generally don’t like to create a large variance in premiums from one region of a state to another when they know that weather patterns can change over time, sometimes quickly. In addition, state regulators typically frown upon a company pounding policyholders with rate increases in just one region of a state versus spreading it across all policyholders. This is the “pooling of funds” effect, which insurance was built upon in the first place. If you would like to review your home insurance policy for price and coverage, contact an AAA agent nearest you.

Sean Kouplen, Regent Bank 7136 S. Yale, Suite 100 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.488.0788 www.bankregent.com

Jared Peterson, AAA Oklahoma 2121 E 15th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.748.1030 Jared.Peterson@aaaok.org

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT What are the benefits to using social networking sites for my business? There are many benefits. First, social networking helps establish a relationship with your customers and creates an ongoing conversation. And, if you are genuine with JESSICA DYER your prospects, it can instill a sense of trust in your company. Secondly, social media gives your business an online presence at a lower cost. So, you can save money and increase your SEO, which means that you’re more likely to be found on search engines such as Google. Also, it’s important to know that social media is more than Twitter and Facebook. Be sure to research the best social networking site for your business.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539-777-6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

PHYSICAL THERAPY I have tight hamstrings, and my physician has told me I need to stretch. Is this true? There are some cases that this is true, depending on your activities at work or with a sport. Traditionally, emphasis is placed on stretching muscles that have shortened, but TODD PETTY, PT/CSMT equal, emphasis has to be placed on correcting (strengthening) muscles that have lengthening. For example, during forward bending of the trunk, lumbar flexion can be a compensatory motion for limited hamstring length. This can lead to problems in the lumbar spine as we age over time. The most effective intervention is to address the length changes of all the muscles around the hip joints and spine, not only the shortened muscles. This requires the skills of a Physical Therapist to assess the entire spine and hips. Talk to you physician if you are having problems with your hamstrings or back.

Todd Petty, PT/CSMT Excel Therapy Specialists 918.398.7400 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. MARRIAGE COUNSELOR

HOSPICE CARE

My wife is constantly seeking my attention. Can you help me understand her better?

My father has cancer and is declining quickly. We’ve been discussing hospice care but are not sure how to determine if it is the best option. We don’t want to feel like we are giving up. Can you offer any advice?

The “pursuer” in a relationship secretly believes: My concerns mean nothing to my partner. It’s like I’m invisible; BRAD ROBINSON, LMFT

He doesn’t really care about my feelings;

The only time we’re close is because I’ve pushed for it; No matter how hard I try to break through the emotional distance it always seems to fail; He doesn’t really care that I’m upset; We can be physically close but I still feel alone; I know I get upset, but how else can I get his attention; There’s a barrier that keeps us from becoming close.

Brad Robinson, CEO Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Marriage Solutions 2121 S. Columbia Ave Suite 301 Tulsa, OK 74114 918.281.6060 www.MarriageSolutionsTulsa.com

LEGAL SERVICES How is the court system in Oklahoma organized? The state is divided into 26 judicial districts, each of which consists of one or more counties. Each judicial district has one or more district judges, as determined by statute, and each county within the BRAD BEASLEY judicial district has one associate district judge. Each judicial district may have one or more special judges (who serve at the pleasure of the district judges) based upon the population of the judicial district. Civil appeals from decisions of the district and associate district judges are filed with the Oklahoma Supreme Court, which consists of nine justices. The Oklahoma Supreme Court routinely assigns most cases to the Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals, which consists of 12 judges. Appeals from decisions of the Oklahoma Court of Appeals are heard by the Oklahoma Supreme Court. Criminal appeals are filed with the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals, whose decisions are final.

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

AVA HANCOCK

It is natural to feel that way, but let me assure you that choosing hospice care for your father simply means you are shifting focus to caring instead of curing. The first step is to meet with your father’s physician to discuss his care and diagnosis. If the physician determines that your father has six months or less to live, then hospice could be the best option. Our hospice team will work with your father’s physician to develop a plan for medical care, pain management and emotional and spiritual support for you and your family. Please contact Grace Hospice at 918.744.7223 for further information.

Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Are there any good treatments for skin laxity on my face and neck? We recommend Ultherapy for a non-invasive alternative for those wanting to treat the laxity on their face and neck. This is the only FDA approved non-surgical procedure to MALISSA SPACEK lift skin in these hard to treat areas. Ultherapy is a unique non-invasive, non-surgical procedure that combines ultrasound technology with your body’s own natural healing processes to lift, tone and tighten loose skin on the brow, neck, face and under the chin. Our patients achieve noticeable results without downtime. If you have any questions on Ultherapy or if you would like to schedule a complimentary consultation please call us at 918.872.9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT As a guy, I love the fall/winter season, especially when it comes to clothing. What will guys be wearing this year? Guys, prepare yourselves, because this fall is all about bringing personal style and textured layers back to your wardrobe. For example, start with a classic AUTUMN POHL Gingham button down covered with a solid half-zip cashmere sweater, layered with a fitted textured sports coat and finished off with a cashmere scarf. This look can be worn with a Euro-style trouser pant or something more casual like a pair a dressy jeans in a dark wash. Perfect the look with a pair of colored calf leather drivers, loafers or leather lace-ups.We tend to think dark colors and heavy materials when it comes to the cold season, but that is not the case this year. We have taken the classic cooler weather colors and added a brighter hue to really make the man stand out. This season, look for bold jewel tones, and be sure it works with your personal skin tones. Finally, think accessories. Usually it›s the women who master this area but men are finding that this only heightens the look when you complete it with a belt, cuff links and a trendy watch.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

How can I forgive and move forward with my fiancée? He went outside our relationship, and I understand his reasons, though not justifiable, and want to forgive and move forward, but I cannot stop being angry. AMY KESNER, PHD, LPC, LADC

To start, it is very important to understand what forgiveness is. Forgiving means that we agree to leave an event in the past and move forward; that we agree not to continue to punish the other person. It will be important to evaluate the following: What were the factors that contributed to the situation; what are your reasons for wanting to continue the relationship; are both parties willing to work on the issues; and how does focusing on the past help you move forward? Consider the following analogy: If you are driving in a car and you keep your focus on what is in the rear view mirror (what is behind you), what will eventually happen? Sometimes counseling can help put things into perspective by allowing a neutral person to assist you in this process. Couples can move forward from such things, but only if both parties are committed to rebuilding trust and addressing the issues in the relationship. Punishment gets you nowhere; it only brings more pain.

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

FOOD, DRINK AND OTHER PLEASURES

LUCKY’S RESTAURANT’S ROASTED HALIBUT WITH GRILLED EGGPLANT AND ASPARAGUS ON TOP OF A ROMESCO SAUCE IS AN EXPLOSION OF FLAVOR. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

The Elegance Of Simplicity

T

A new executive chef helps Lucky’s stay on top.

all and rugged with tousled hair, he’s the sort of man you’d expect to see hanging 10 above a soaring wave or relaxing aboard a luxury yacht. But Brandon Benelli worked for three years in the California kitchen of Napa Valley’s French Laundry, considered one of world’s finest restaurants, cooking alongside its owner, the legendary Thomas Keller. “It was the most challenging experience of my life,” he says. Before that, he graduated from America’s premier cooking school, the Culinary Institute of America. Then came travels in Europe – honing his skills by cooking at a trattoria in the ancient Tuscan town of Montevarchi, Italy. Somewhere in between, he spent a year as Hugh Hefner’s butler in the Playboy Mansion. And now, he is in Tulsa, taking a quick break moments before beginning the second day of his new job as the executive chef of Lucky’s Restaurant.

Next to him is his brother and new boss, Matt Kelley, also a CIA graduate, chef and owner of Lucky’s. When it opened on Cherry Street, Lucky’s was packed nightly for dinner by eager foodies wowed by sophisticated entrees such as the Riesling chicken, distinguished by a fruity, floral bouquet of wine with a hint of lemongrass contrasting with earthy enoki mushrooms in a rich stock. At brunch, guests craving Lucky’s eggs and chicken fried steak lined up out the door. In the years since those first days, Lucky’s has become even better. Kelley offers fun, creative, weekly specials like glazed slow-roasted pork belly with gingered carrot puree and red-eye gravy made from molasses, coffee, ham and bacon, as well as grilled bison with scarlet runner beans in a Oaxacan mole negro, blackberry compote and crispy red Russian kale. And now, Lucky’s enters a new era with Benelli. SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

T H E B UZ Z

Papa Ganouj

“I’ve been cooking as long as I can remember,” says Paul Wilson as he strolls through his new restaurant, Papa Ganouj. “When I was 12, I tried to invent a better hash brown for my grandpa.” With bright gray and salmon-colored walls, a laid-back staff, oak ornaments salvaged from the Mayo Hotel and mismatched crockery, Papa Ganouj looks like your average hipster hangout. But the kitchen is another story. There’s Heather Nail, who ran the kitchen at Doc’s Wine and Food and at Leon’s on Brookside. Seemingly at once, she sauces a plate of moussaka lasagna, chops a vaguely alien tropical fruit and seasons a frothy, pungent bouillabaisse with saffron, fennel and anise-flavored arak. There’s Roque Heidler, formerly of Juniper and Tavolo, stirring a bright, bubbling sauce of red pepper coulis as he uses his other ABOVE: BROTHERS BRANDON BENELLI (LEFT) AND MATT KELLEY MAKE CULINARY PERFECTION FROM THE SIMPLICITY OF GOOD FLAVORS AND FOOD. RIGHT: THE SEARED-TO-PERFECTION ROAST BEEF FILET SERVED AT LUCKY’S RESTAURANT WITH SHALLOT BACON PUREE, SWEET BIXBY CORN AND HOMEGROWN SHISHITO PEPPERS.

From their days cooking in California, where they had easy access to some of the finest produce anywhere, both brothers continue a solid practice. “I learned to source the finest ingredients and keep the food simple: simply prepared but perfectly prepared,” Kelley says. “I call it ‘the elegance of simplicity,’” Benelli adds. Everything is local, made possible through Lucky’s contracts with Southwood Farm & Market and Grogg’s Green Barn, both local businesses. Even the Lucky’s bar is sold on this idea. Bartender Liz Pounds – affable, graceful and dignified – uses only the freshest fruits and herbs to design her brews. “I’m a liquid alchemist,” she says. Benelli puts that philosophy to work in the kitchen. “Try this,” he says, brandishing an entrée he prepared and plated in fewer than 10 minutes – two chunks of fish and glistening green asparagus nestled in a corner of the dish with a bright scarlet swirl covering the rest of the plate. “That’s romesco sauce,” Benelli explains, “and the fish is halibut cheeks.” The taste yields an explosion of flavor that is the essence of beach living, sunshine and fresh-caught goodness. “Now that’s what I mean when I say ‘the elegance of simplicity,’” says Benelli. A few years ago, Kelley muses, you wouldn’t find a chef of Benelli’s caliber in Tulsa. “But things have changed a lot in the past five years, thanks to … all the brand new restauranteurs.” Benelli agrees. “It used to be just New York, San Francisco and Paris,” Benelli says, “but now it’s nationwide. It’s Omaha, it’s Atlanta, it’s Kansas City ... and it’s Tulsa.” 1536 E. 15th St., Tulsa. www.luckysrestauranttulsa.com BRIAN SCHWARTZ

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

ABOVE: THE HUMBLE COQ AU VIN BLANC IS A DELICACY AT PAPA GANOUJ. LEFT: PAPA GANOUJ’S ESCARGOT PLATE. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

hand to stretch handmade squid-ink pasta. “He’s our presentation guy,” says Wilson of Roque, who then uses a pair of tweezers to ornament an appetizer with orange zest, anchovies and Rose of Sharon petals from the bartender’s garden. Wilson, himself a master of technique and presentation, was barely out of his teens when he started working his way up from a dishwasher at an elegant bistro in Minneapolis. He bet his coworkers – seasoned chefs from France – that he could land one of the most coveted cooking jobs in America. They laughed; they lost. He worked alongside famed French Master Chef René Bajeux in New Orleans before Hurricane Katrina. Back in his childhood hometown, he’s cooked at The Kitchen on Brookside, Lunabread and Juniper. Wilson pauses to give directions to a sous chef. He starts dicing a humble yam. Many of the entrees are humble dishes – coq au vin, bouillabaisse, bourguignon, puttanesca – the French and Italian equivalents of chicken fried steak. “I love doing simple peasant food,” says Wilson, “and then vaulting it to the next level.” 1328 E. Sixth St., Tulsa. www.papaganoujtulsa.com – Brian Schwartz


W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

Revolve Pizza Kitchen The Italian-inspired Revolve Pizza Kitchen is taking pizza in new directions – 360 degrees, to be exact. The pizza ovens at the latest Oklahoma City pizzeria operate on a combination of gas heat and wood-burning fire as each pizza is rotated during baking. The result is a delicious, homemade pizza with premium ingredients served so quickly it will leave your head whirling. Revolve is the latest example of what Chef Eric Cooper calls the “fast casual” experience, and it’s already proving to be a popular addition to the ever-expanding array of culinary choices along the city’s Memorial Road corridor. While the ovens may be Italian-built, the atmosphere and flavors reflect the Sooner state. Try the Sweet and Smoky Okie with housemade barbecue sauce, mozzarella, bacon, chicken and Gorgonzola cheese; or taste the Spicy Southerner with spicy bourbon sauce, corned beef and Sriracha. Of course, you can always put your own spin on a fresh pie. 5500 W. Memorial Road, Oklahoma City. www. revolvepizza.com – Tara Malone THE SPICY SOUTHERNER AT REVOLVE PIZZA KITCHEN TURNS UP THE HEAT WITH SPICY BOURBON SAUCE.

S I M P LY H E A L T H Y

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

The Pint on Cherry Street Tulsa’s Cherry Street has something for almost any craving, and chances are The Pint on Cherry Street can fix it. The new restaurant opened recently in digs previously housing the popular White Owl. The Pint offers hungry patrons a varied selection of appetizers, sandwiches, soups, salads and entrees along with a wide selection of beer on tap and more than 30 varieties of bottled beers. Owner Andres Comacho, a Pennsylvania native, moved to Tulsa six years ago and worked at Bodean Seafood Restaurant, Southern Hills Country Club and The Mayo Hotel before opening The Pint. Wanting the space to feel more like a restaurant than a bar, Comacho replaced the upper level pool table with more tables. He also worked with the executive chef, Mitch Neely, to create a menu more upscale than what one is likely to find at a bar and pub. On the roster are house specialties such as mahi-mahi tacos with pineapple salsa, fish and chips, a buffalo chicken sandwich and a prime rib sandwich. THE PRIME RIB SANDDesserts are equally as rich – try a chocoWICH WITH PUB FRIES late chip cookie sundae or cherry shortcake. AT THE PINT ON CHERRY STREET. The Pint is also open for brunch on weekPHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT. ends. 1325 E. 15th St., Tulsa. 918.561.6119 – Jill Meredith

Fall arrives this month, making it a great time to bake something scrumptious and healthy. A few popular baking apples include Rome Beauty, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith and Honeycrisp. No matter which you choose, all apples are full of fiber and antioxidants and have fewer than 100 calories. Apples are also good for people dealing with high cholesterol and a history of heart disease. Try this recipe for an indulgent, but healthy autumn-inspired dessert. – Jill Meredith

Luscious Baked Apples 2 2 tbsp. 1/2 tsp. 2 tbsp. 2 tbsp. 1/2 tbsp. 1/2 c.

large baking apples brown sugar cinnamon chopped pecans raisins or dried cranberries butter apple juice

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Remove most of apples’ cores with an apple corer, leaving a little fruit intact at the bottom of each to hold the filling. In a small bowl, combine the sugar, cinnamon, pecans and dried fruit. Place apples in an 8-by-8-inch square baking pan. Stuff each apple with the mixture. Top each apple with half of the butter and add the apple juice to the pan. Bake 30-40 minutes until apples are tender, but not mushy. Remove from the oven. Spoon the accumulated pan juices over the apples and serve.

SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

THE RIB CRIB ROCK ‘N RIB FESTIVAL IS BACK WITH MORE GREAT BARBECUE AND ATTRACTIONS. PHOTO COURTESY BOK CENTER.

FOOD EVENT

In The Pits The Rock ‘N Rib Festival serves tasty fun for the whole family.

L

abor Day may be the last hurrah of the summer season, ushering in cooler weather and football. However, there is a celebration that promises to bring the fun of summer back – if only for four days. The sixth annual Rib Crib Rock ‘N Rib Festival returns to the BOK Center on Sept.

11-14. According to Brian Smith, special events manager for the BOK Center, the purpose of this free community event is to show the comFAV E S

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JILL MEREDITH

Urban Roots

For a restaurant that recently underwent a major makeover on national television, Urban Roots is feeling comfortable with its new atmosphere. Owner and Chef Chaya Fletcher opened Urban Roots to Food Network’s series Restaurant Impossible earlier this year to reboot the business she and her husband, Michael, started in 2010. After four years, the restaurant and homage to Oklahoma City’s Deep Deuce heritage had become better known for its outstanding live entertainment than for its kitchen creations, which some said fell short of the meticulously prepared, haute comfort food the chef had dreamed of creating. After the episode aired in April, the world got to see the new Urban Roots and a fresh new attitude. When you walk in these days, the color and sophisticated touches continue to hint at the flavor and appeal of catfish and grits, Cajun-seared tilapia, juicy pork chops and gumbo ya ya. Favorites like chopped brisket sandwiches (braised with red wine and served with garlic slaw), buttermilk chicken and waffles and baby back ribs (covered in mango-chipotle barbecue sauce) are better, too.

munity what the BOK has to offer. “We decided that we wanted to host some free community events so that even if someone can’t afford to buy a $100 Aerosmith ticket, they can still come and enjoy the BOK Center,” says Smith. The highlight of the festival will be a showdown among six teams of award-winning pit masters. Teams will prepare ribs, chicken, hot links and more in the area of Third Street and Frisco Avenue just outside the arena. Guests will have the opportunity to purchase samples of the teams’ work. The pit masters competing in this year’s competition include Johnson’s BBQ, Chicago BBQ Company, Desperado’s BBQ, Porky ‘n Beans, Big Boned BBQ and Porky Chicks BBQ. Besides great barbecue, concessions will also be available. Grilled corn, funnel cakes, popcorn, cotton candy, corn dogs and deep-fried pickles will be some of the offerings. Festivalgoers will also enjoy live music on the outdoor ONEOK Stage, a kids’ zone, additional cooking competitions featuring the pit masters along with area chefs, a mechanical bull, the Aporkalypse 5k run and a fun run. There will also be a new Whiskey Well attraction for whiskey and moonshine tasting on Sept. 12 and a fireworks display on Sept. 13. The Rock ‘N Rib Festival is a family event, and admission is free. For a complete schedule and more details, visit www.bokcenter.com.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

Entertainment is still part of the reason crowds pack Urban Roots on weekend nights, but it’s no longer the only reason. 322 N.E. Second St., Suite A, Oklahoma City. www.urbanrootsokc.com – Karen Shade

TAKE A BIG BITE OF THE CHORIZO QUESADILLA WITH SHRIMP, AN APPETIZER AT URBAN ROOTS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.


SWEET TOOTH

Not Your Grandma’s Cupcakes

Frequenters of Main Street in Broken Arrow are very familiar with Not Your Grandma’s Cupcakes, and it’s no wonder. That first bite of the boutique bakery’s offerings is an unforgettable experience. In May 2012, owner Sheila Hulsman opened the retail space. Since then, business has been sweet – so much so that Hulsman is in the process of expanding her store, and she recently bought a food truck. Prior to opening her storefront, Hulsman worked a desk job that left her bored and unfulfilled, she says. “I am way too creative for that and have way too much energy,” says Hulsman, who has a background in the hotel industry. She began baking cupcakes for friends, and they were met with rave reviews. After Hulsman was laid off in 2011, she decided to

THE POUR

turn her baking passion into a business. Hulsman offers up to 20 flavors from which to choose. Some of the most popular and creatively named are the Slow Poke (chocolate turtle cheesecake), Cha-ChaCherry Cheesecake, Lemon The Dream and Death by Oreo. Using social media to spread word of her business, Hulsman also found her creative cupcakes speak for themselves. And what they say is delicious. 1810 S. Main St., Broken Arrow. www.notyourgrandmascupcakescom – Jill Meredith

SHEILA HULSMAN OFFERS UP TO 20 CUPCAKE FLAVORS – INCLUDING BRINGING HOME THE BACON, SNOW WHITE’S DELIGHT, SLOW POKE, SIN IS IN, PEANUT BUTTER SURPRISE AND 24-CARROT BABY – AT HER BAKERY, NOT YOUR GRANDMA’S CUPCAKES. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

Oklahoma Wine Trails

As if sampling the homegrown wine industry didn’t already have an inherent charm, discovering the state’s wineries and vineyards has just become a little sweeter. Oklahoma Wine Trails – an initiative of the Oklahoma Agritourism Program and Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department – recently launched to showcase the state’s unique wine industry and its products. “We wanted to create a wine trail to, first, bring awareness to this booming industry here in Oklahoma and, second, to make it easy for visitors to hit the wine trail and experience how unique each vineyard and winery can be,” says Oklahoma Agritourism Program Administrator Jamie Cummings. The growth of Oklahoma’s wine industry has been substantial. In 2000, when State Question 688 passed, allowing wineries to sell their wines in tasting rooms and to wholesalers, there were four wineries registered to operate in Oklahoma. Ten years later, there were 51. Today there are more than 60. “That’s a 1,600 percent increase in the number of wineries in the last decade,” Cum-

mings says. The initiative consists of LAUNCHED THIS 10 unique trails THE mapped through- SUMMER, OKLAHOMA WINE out the state and TRAILS MAKE GREAT WEEKEND TRIPS highlights 31 AND YIELD UNIQUE wineries along EXPERIENCES. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAthe way. Trails HOMA AGRITOURISM. are given fun names like Everything is Coming Up Rosés, I’m Drawing a Blanc and Que Syrah, Syrah. They’re also grouped by region. To be on the wine trail, wineries must have a tasting room open to the public. The program began in July, but wineries have reported an increase in business since the launch of Oklahoma Wine Trails. According to a study funded by the Oklahoma Grape Industry Council, state-produced wine has an economic impact of at least $98.5 million in Oklahoma. Guests get a little out of it, too. “Visiting a wine trail can serve as a great weekend getaway or even a day trip to learn

about the wine making process and enjoy the delicious Oklahoma wines,” Cummings says. Guests can go to the trails website, www. oklahomawinetrails.com, to download a passport and trail map. Participating wineries also have them. When guests travel a trail, they will receive a numeric code for each of the wineries they visit to record in the passport. After all the codes for a particular trail are collected, guests then can go back to the website and submit them to receive a limited edition Oklahoma Wine Trails charm. Charms for each trail are distinct, collectible and perfect for dinner parties and entertaining. – Karen Shade SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

Downton Meets Downtown

PHOTO BY BEATRIX JACOT DE BOINOD.

F

Tulsa Town Hall kicks off its eighth decade of stimulating discussion with Jessica Fellowes and an insider’s view of Downton Abbey.

ans of Downton Abbey are so addicted to the continuing saga of the Crawley clan that they wait a whole year for answers to simple questions. Will Lady Mary be happy again? Will former chauffeur Tom ever feel like part of the family? Will the missing Michael Gregson return to Lady Edith? Will that plotting underbutler Barrow ever get his comeuppance? With so many questions in the air since the fourth series aired on PBS’s Masterpiece Classic earlier this year, followers of the English drama want answers. And Jessica Fellowes probably has them. The niece of Julian Fellowes, the creator of Downton Abbey, Fellowes has spent a fair amount of time on the set, gathering material for her two books on the subject – The World of Downton Abbey (2011) and The Chronicles of Downton Abbey (2012), each offering a behind-the-scenes look at the lavish production and the very real his-

tory of the early 20th century English society it portrays. Local fans will have the chance to query the journalist and editor this month. Tulsa Town Hall welcomes Fellowes as the first guest of its annual speakers series. Jessica Fellowes: Behind the Scenes of Downton Abbey opens the 80th anniversary season at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, 101 E. Third St., on Sept. 19. The event is available through subscription to the Tulsa Town Hall season. This season also includes celebrated author Bill Bryson (A Walk in the Woods), Fareed Zakaria (journalist and host of CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS), James Bradley (author of best-selling book Flags of Our Fathers) and “Puzzle Master” Will Shortz (crossword puzzle editor of the New York Times). Subscriptions are $75 each. Each talk will be followed by a luncheon with the guest speakers. Luncheon tickets are $20 each. For more about the new Tulsa Town Hall season, visit tulsatownhall.com. KAREN SHADE SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

IN CONCERT Bishop Allen

www.ticketstorm.com

Sept. 1 Opolis, Norman.

Wendy Colonna

Sept. 3 The Blue Door.

www.bluedoorokc.com

Islands Sept. 3 Opolis, Norman. www. ticketstorm.com Backwoods Bash Music & Camping Festival Sept. 4-6 Festival grounds

near Depew. www.backwoodsmusicfestival.com

Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder Sept. 5 Bluegrass & Chili Festival, Clare-

PHOTO COURTESY DAVID GERSTEN & ASSOCIATES.

more. www.claremore.org

PERFORMANCES

The Music Man in Concert Actress Shirley Jones will return to Oklahoma for a special celebration of a favorite American musical. The actress visited Tulsa for a screening of the film Elmer Gantry last year. This time, Jones will be in costume and on stage at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., Oklahoma City, for The Music Man in Concert – a one-night concert performance of the beloved Meredith Wilson musical play. The production stars Jones along with Patrick Cassidy as fast-talking salesman Harold Hill and a cast playing the good citizens of River City. Period costumes and a live orchestra move the concert through the story of romance and the necessity of music, but the music is the highlight of an evening that includes the unforgettable score and songs such as “Til There Was You,” “76 Trombones” and “Trouble.” The Music Man in Concert will be at 7:30 p.m. on Sept. 29. Tickets are available at www.myticketoffice.com.

PERFORMANCES Symphony in the Park Sept. 5 The Tulsa Symphony holds a special performance on the Guthrie Green stage. www.guthriegreen.com Detroit

Sept. 5-27 Carpenter Square Theatre stages the comedy (and Pulitzer Prize finalist) about a couple and their new neighbors next door. www.carpentersquare.com

A Conversation with Thomas Gilcrease Sept. 6 Gilcrease Museum hosts

a Chautauqua-style dialogue and presentation with Doug Watson, portraying museum founder

Thomas Gilcrease. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

The Phantom of the Opera

Thru Sept. 7 Hailed as “bigger and better than ever,” the Andrew Lloyd Webber extravaganza about a haunted man terrorizing a Paris opera house returns to Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.celebrityattractions.com

Macbeth

Sept. 11 Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park studies deadly ambition in the tragedy of a man who would rule Scotland at any cost. Myriad Botanical Gardens Water Stage. www.oklahomashakespeare.org

Heller Shorts: Taking the Fifth

Sept 11 The Heller Theatre Company is back with a new collection of short plays by local writers at Henthorne Performing Arts Center. www. cityoftulsa.org/henthornepac

George Gershwin’s Americana Sept. 12-13 Michael Rossi shows Tulsa what he’s got as he takes his first turn conducting the Signature Symphony in its search for a new conductor at the VanTrease Performing Arts Center for Education at Tulsa Community College. www.tulsacc.edu

Simply Great

Sept.13 Pianist Meng-Sheng Shen, winner of the 2013 Crescendo International Music Award, is the guest artist at Tulsa Symphony’s first show of the season at the Tu l s a P e r f o r m i n g A r t s C e n t e r. w w w. tulsasymphony.org

Friends & Lovers Sept. 13 Oklahoma City Philharmonic opens a brand new season of performances with the help of guest solo violinist Simone Lamsma at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcphilharmonic.org Kelli O’Hara and Ted Sperling Sept. 15 Oklahoma native and Broadway star Kelli O’Hara sings musical classics as Ted Sperling leads the Oklahoma City Philharmonic at Armstrong Auditorium in Edmond. www. armstrongauditorium.org

Boom

Sept. 20 Actor Rick Miller brings back his one-man multimedia show about the music, culture and politics that shaped the Baby Boom generation. Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. myticketoffice.com

Friends & Lovers with Simone Lamsma

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

Martha Graham Dance Company Sept. 20-21 The legendary dance group – one of

the oldest and most celebrated contemporary companies in the world – presents a body of work at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. myticketoffice.com

Lysander Piano Trio

Sept.21 Described as energetic, sensitive and brilliant, the trio brings virtuosic intensity to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice.com

Poetic Portraits Sept. 22-23 The Brightmusic Chamber Ensemble welcomes world-renowned baritone Randall Scarlata as the guest artist of the first concert for the 2014-15 season. brightmusic.org Hal Holbrook: Mark Twain Tonight Sept. 25 The winner of both Tony and Emmy awards brings his one-man play to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice.com

East Meets West

Sept. 25 Classics from Beethoven to Shostakovich and Copland open the fifth season of Tulsa Camerata at Philbrook Museum of Art. www.tulsacamerata.org

Creations in Studio K

Sept. 26-Oct. 5 Find out what Tulsa Ballet has been up to all summer with the new show in Tulsa Ballet’s studios. www.tulsaballet.org

Piano Guys

Sept. 27 The musical group playing popular music on piano and cello performs at the Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

The Music Man in Concert

Sept. 29 Actress Shirley Jones hosts this 50th anniversary celebration of the classic musical (Jones starred in the 1962 film adaptation) in a onenight-only costumed, concert-format performance at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www. okcciviccenter.com

Doyle Lawson & Quick Silver Sept. 5 Bluegrass & Chili Festival, Claremore. www.claremore.org

Adam Carroll

www.bluedoorokc.com

Sept. 5 The Blue Door.

Oak Ridge Boys

Sept. 5 Riverwind Casino, Norman. www.riverwindcasino.com

The Lacs Sept. 5 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net Parker Millsap

www.bluedoorokc.com

Sept. 6 The Blue Door.

Rhonda Vincent & The Rage

Sept. 6 Bluegrass & Chili Festival, Claremore. www. claremore.org

Bassnectar, Krewella, Zed’s Dead, Beats Antique Sept. 6 OKC Downtown Airpark. www.okcairpark.com

Jay Farrar, Jimmy LaFave, others Sept. 6 Guthrie Green. www.guthriegreen.com

The Kingston Trio Sept. 6 Rose State College Performing Arts Theatre, Midwest City. www.okcciviccenter.com The Time Jumpers Sept. 6 Features Vince Gill at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center. www.thepacba.com Washed Out

Sept. 7 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Godsmack, Seether, Skillet, Buckcherry Sept. 7 Zoo Amphitheatre.

www.thezooamphitheatre.com

Dennis DeYoung Sept. 8 Osage Casino, Tulsa. www.osagecasinos.com Delta Spirit

Sept. 9 The Conservatory. www.conservatoryokc.com

Clairy Browne & The Bangin’ Rackettes Sept. 9 Vanguard Music Hall.

www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Pokey LaFarge Sept. 10 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Clairy Browne & The Bangin’ Rackettes Sept. 11 ACM@UCO. www.

acm.uco.edu

Cold Ford

Sept. 11 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com

Medicine Stone Music Festival Sept. 11-13 Turnpike Troubadours, Jason Boland, Cody Canada, more. www.medicinestoneok.com

Terry Fator Sept. 12 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com Aaron Tippin Sept. 12 Cherokee Casino at Will Rogers Downs, Claremore. www. cherokeecasino.com The Old Crow Medicine Show Sept. 12 Rose State College Performing Arts Theatre, Midwest City. www.okcciviccenter.com

Kansas Sept. 12 Oklahoma State Fair. www. okstatefair.com Easton Corbin Sept. 13 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com


Corndog Classic 5k Sept. 20 Walk or run – just be sure to wear something fun and festive for this fourth annual run presented by the Tulsa State Fair benefiting area nonprofits. www.corndogclassic5k.com Legacy 35 Fighting Championship Sept. 26 Main event is the light heavyweight title bout between Myron Dennis and Leonardo Leite. Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com

IN CONCERT

Medicine Stone Music Festival For three days last year at Tahlequah’s Diamondhead Resort, Red Dirt music fans made the first Medicine Stone Music Festival an unexpected success. Many realized that it would attract a more than decent turnout, but the lineup brought thousands to hear the top names in the genre play fast and hard by the Illinois River. Now that the word is out, this year’s Medicine Stone Music Festival (Sept. 11-13) is expected to build further on the reputation of this very-Okie musical excursion. This year’s festival will have Jason Boland & The Stragglers and the Turnpike Troubadours (both bands founded the event) along with Cody Canada & The Departed, Shinyribs, The Great Divide, Reckless Kelly, American Aquarium, Micky & The Motorcars, Red Dirt Rangers and a host of other acts. Whether camping on the grounds or dropping in for a few hours, guests get a sense of the Red Dirt soul by virtue of the waters, cliffs and woods that make up the surroundings that are uniquely Oklahoma. Single-day passes to the festival start at $20 and $35. Three-day passes are $60 each at www.medicinestoneok.com. Aaron Behrens & The Midnight Stroll Sept 14 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

cainsballroom.com

Sept. 21 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

La Authentica Banda Jerez

Sept. 14 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com

Elvis Extravaganza

Sept. 16-17 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com

T.Z. Wright

Sept. 26 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Conor Oberst Sept. 18 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Josh Abbott Band

Sept. 2 6 C a i n ’s B a l l r o o m . w w w. cainsballroom.com

Vertical Horizon

Sept. 18 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com

Thompson Square

Sept.

19 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Rog Mahal

Sept. 19 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Jerrod Niemann

Sept. 19 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com Sept. 19 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com Sept. 19-20 Music grounds near Chandler. www. stonerivermusicfestival.com

Brantley Gilbert

www.bokcenter.com

Steve Poltz

bluedoorokc.com

Sept. 20 BOK Center.

Sept. 20 The Blue Door. www.

Charlie Daniels Band

Sept. 20 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com

Grand Funk Railroad Sept. 20 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com Demi Lovato bokcenter.com

Sept. 21 BOK Center. www.

Sebadoh

Sept. 21 Opolis, Norman. www. ticketstorm.com

Cedric Watson & Bijou Creole

Beatlemania Live!

Sept. 21 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com

Porter Robinson www. cainsballroom.com

Sept.22 Cain’s Ballroom.

Sept. 22 Vanguard Music Hall. www. thevanguardtulsa.com

One Direction

www.bokcenter.com

Sept. 23 BOK Center.

Spoon

Sept. 23 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Rob Zombie

bradytheater.com

Sept. 23 Brady Theater. www.

Sept. 29 Tulsa State Fair, www.

Interpol Sept. 30 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Arum Rae Sept. 30 The Conservatory. www.conservatoryokc.com Bridgit Mendler Sept. 30 Tulsa State Fair, www.tulsastatefair.com

OSU Football

www.soonersports.com v. Missouri State Sept. 6 v. UTSA Sept. 13 v. Texas Tech Sept. 25

Sept.26 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. www.grandresortok.com

TU Football

Eric Paslay

Tulsa Drillers

Sept. 27 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918. com

Turbogeist Sept 27 The Conservatory. www.conservatoryokc.com Michael Martin Murphey

Sept. 27 Freeland Center, Bristow. freelandcenter.org

All That Remains

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers Sept. 28 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com

Tommy Emmanuel Sept. 28 Rose State Performing Arts Theatre, Midwest City. www. okcciviccenter.com truTV Impractical Jokers 28 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Sept.

www.soonersports.com v. Tennessee Sept. 13 www.tulsahurricane.com v. Oklahoma Sept. 6 v. Texas State Sept. 27 www.tulsadrillers.com v. Springfield Aug. 30-Sept. 1 v. TBD Sept. 3-4 v. TBD Sept. 7

Rumble on the River X

Sept. 6 Scheduled feature fight on the ten bout card will be between undefeated featherweight fighter Jarrett Rouse and Jaymee Jones of the Xtreme Fighting League. River Spirit Casino. www.riverspirittulsa.com

Bunion Derby & Sock Walk

Sept. 13 Don’t let the name fool you – you’ll still need your shoes for this event named for the longdistance foot race won in 1929 by a farm boy from Foyil. Race takes place in Tulsa. 918.445.4457

PRCA Extreme Bulls

Septemberfest

Sept. 6 Families get to visit Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin at the Governor’s Mansion for a day of historical reenactments, exhibits and demonstrations. www.ok.gov/ governor/mansion.html

American Girl Doll Bingo Sept. 6 Games with prizes for children at Gilcrease Museum. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu Disney On Ice: Let’s Celebrate! Sept. 11-16 Mickey and Minnie throw a party on the ice at Oklahoma State Fair Park with characters both classic and new. www.okstatefair. com

Aesop’s Falables Sept. 11-21 Aesop’s Fables are set to music and great fun at Tulsa Spotlight Theatre. www.spotlighttheater.org

SPORTS

Brian McKnight

Sept. 27 Tulsa State Fair, www.tulsastatefair.com

Sucre

Newsboys

tulsastatefair.com

OU Football

Dale Watson The Martha Graham Dance Company

FAMILY

Family Force 5 Sept. 29 Tulsa State Fair, www.tulsastatefair.com

Sept. 26 7 Clans Paradise Casino, Red Rock. www.firstcouncilcasinohotel.com

Sept. 26 Tulsa State Fair, www.tulsastatefair.com

S.O.S. Band

Stone River Music Festival

Sept. 24 Cain’s w w w .

Kelsey K Sept. 25 Tulsa State Fair, www.tulsastatefair.com

Drive-By Truckers, Lucero Sept 17 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Hogan & Moss String Band

Machine Gun Kelly

B a l l r o o m . cainsballroom.com

Brian McKnight Sept.25 First Council Casino & Hotel, Newkirk. www.firstcouncilcasinohotel.com

For King & Country Sept. 15 Oklahoma State Fair. www.okstatefair.com

tional kayak and canoe racing hits the Oklahoma River with big competitions (including a Master World Cup race and World and Pan Am Championships), titles up for grabs and even some dragon boat racing (PaddleFest) thrown in. www. boathousedistrict.org

Sept. 28 Tulsa State Fair, www.tulsastatefair.com

Kacey Musgraves Sept 2 5 C a i n ’s B a l l r o o m . w w w. cainsballroom.com

Twenty One Pilots Sept. 15 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

ICF Canoe Marathon World Championships Sept. 26-28 Interna-

Thomas Rhett

Sept 21 Guthrie Green. www.guthriegreen.com

Limp Bizkit

Kelli O’Hara

Sept. 19-20 Come for the bull riding action, stay for the concerts with Jerrod Nieman and the Charlie Daniels Band that follow at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com

Bright Nights: Chemistry Sept. 12 Stay up late at Science Museum Oklahoma and its cool program for kids that offers a sleepover that’s also an educational experience. www. sciencemuseumok.org Aqua Tots Sept. 18 Monthly story time in the Shark View Room at Oklahoma Aquarium. www.okaquarium.org Disney On Ice: Let’s Celebrate! Sept. 25-28 Mickey and Minnie throw a party on the Expo Square Pavilion ice with characters both classic and new. www.tulsastatefair.com

Day Out with Thomas

Sept. 26-Oct. 5 Thomas the Tank Engine pulls into the Oklahoma Railway Museum to hang out with fans a n d c e l e b r a t e a d v e n t u r e . w w w. oklahomarailwaymuseum.org

Hank the Cowdog: The Case of the Missing Cat Sept. 26-Oct. 10 When

his nemesis gets into trouble, only Hank can save the day with Oklahoma Children’s Theatre. www. oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

ART Arts Festival Oklahoma

Thru Sept. 1 See hundreds of fine artwork pieces in a festival environment with activities and music

SEPTEMBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa.com

Focus on Favorites ongoing The Gilcrease Museum exhibit highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

CHARITABLE EVENTS Phantom Unmasked

Sept. 1 Join Oklahoma City’s CityRep Theatre for a Labor Day cabaret and live auction event benefiting Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. The night is presented by the cast of the touring production of Phantom of the Opera and CityRep. www. okcciviccenter.com

PHOTO BY VADIM LISHCHUCK.

Green Leaf Gala Patron Party

SPORTS

ICF Canoe Marathon World Championships Some see canoing as a leisurely activity to fill vacation hours on the lake. To others, it’s a full-on sport filled with action and passion for the race. In a few weeks, Oklahoma City will be witness to the best – the Boathouse District is host to this year’s International Canoe Federation Canoe Marathon World Championships and Pan Am Champions (Sept. 25-28). At the same time, the ICF Canoe Marathon Masters World Cup (Sept. 24-25) will be at stake. What it means for Oklahoma is that hundreds of world-class canoe and kayak athletes from more than 30 countries will settle in for a long weekend of serious competition, which sits well for Oklahoma City as it continues to build its reputation as a state-of-the-art site for water sports. For spectators new to canoe marathon racing, the excitement will become apparent as athletes paddle a lap, charge onto the dock and sprint over land with their boats before returning to the water for another lap. Need more excitement? The Paddlefest Dragon Boat Festival takes place Sept. 27. For more, visit www.boathousedistrict.org. at the 36th annual event at Oklahoma City Community College. www.occc.edu/afo/

Welcome to Mad Dog, TX

Sept. 5-25 Living Arts of Tulsa presents a multimedia art show by John Bryant. www.livingarts.org

Hillary Le

Sept. 5-27 Tulsa Artists Coalition Gallery. www.tacgallery.org

Twists and Turns

Sept. 5-Oct. 26 108 Contemporary in Tulsa holds the world premiere of a joint show between Israeli artists Aleksandra Stoyanov and Zemer Peled. The exhibition features Stoyanov’s striking tapestries and Peled’s amazing ceramics. The show will go on tour nationally after it closes in Tulsa. www.108contemporary.org

Oil and Wood: Oklahoma Moderns George Bogart and James Henkle Thru Sept. 14 The Fred Jones Jr.

Museum of Art shows work from two professors emerti of the University of Oklahoma School of Art & Art History. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Gods and Heroes: Masterpieces from the École des Beaux-Arts Thru Sept. 14 About 140

paintings, sculptures and works on paper dating between the 17th and 19th centuries go on exhibit at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, bringing focus on the influential European school of fine art. www.okcmoa.com

Fever & Flash: Pop in the 1970s Sept. 14-March 15 Pop art’s hold into the 1970s is the focus of a new exhibition at Philbrook Downtown, examining the contributions of Claes Oldenburg, Eduardo Paolozzi and others. The exhibit also features an album of Polaroid photos by Andy Warhol. www.philbrook. org

Wunderkammer and Totemic Taxonomy Thru Sept. 15 Brandice Guerra’s Wunderkammer mixes art and natural history’s curiosities, Fall in the Woodlands at the Garvan Woodland while artists Peter Froslie and Cathleen Faubert present Gardens Totemic Taxonomy, interpreting people’s relationship to Theodore Fried: Pivotal Moments objects and symbols, at Science Museum Oklahoma. www.sciencemuseumok.org in Twentieth Century Art Thru Sept. 7 Works by the Hungarian painter at the confluence of eras and schools in modern art go on exhibit at Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art. www.jewishmuseum.net

Beauty Within Thru Sept. 7 Philbrook Downtown exhibits the jewelry, drawings, ceramics and prints of Hopi artist Charles Loloma and looks at his innovative use of materials and technique. www.philbrook.org

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American Encounters

Thru Sept. 15 The five-piece exhibit subtitled AngloAmerican Portraiture in an Era of Revolution, demonstrates how the art of portraiture evolved in American and European painting in the 18th and 19th centuries. American Encounters is on exhibit at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. www.crystalbridges. org

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

Monet and the Seine: Impressions of a River Thru Sept. 21 Philbrook Museum

focuses on Claude Monet’s intimate connection to the river Seine in an exhibit bringing together pieces from across his career. www. philbrook.org

ACANSA Arts Festival

Hard Times, Oklahoma, 1939-40 Thru Oct. 26 Photographs by Russell Lee documenting the struggles of rural Oklahomans during the Great Depression for the Farm Security Administration create a portrait of history and heritage at Philbrook Museum of Art. www. philbrook.org

Sept.23-28 Work by emerging and established artists is featured in the festival committed to educating and enlightening the community about the arts. The inaugural “Southern” festival will have musical, theatrical, visual and performing arts in venues throughout Little Rock and North Little Rock in Arkansas. www.acansaartsfestival.org

Allan Houser: A Celebration

Chandelier & Other Luminous Objects Thru Sept. 25 Metal, glass, wood,

presents this collection of more than 50 works by the revolutionary artist who made his name in painting scenes of the Dust Bowl-ravaged southwest and Midwest with undulating lines. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

paper and other materials both traditional and not go into Living Arts of Tulsa’s exhibition of 40 art chandeliers and other lighted art objects. www.livingarts.org

Cowboys of Influence

Thru Sept. 28 A new photo exhibit at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum focuses on the careers of world champion bull rider Lane Frost and rancher Robert C. Norris. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Kachinas From the Red Earth Collection Thru Sept.30 Nearly 100 distinct Kachina dolls of the Hopi and Pueblo cultures are featured in a special exhibition demonstrating the art and their significance at Red Earth Museum. www.redearth.org

Thru Nov. 2 Philbrook Downtown features the paintings and influence of Oklahoma artist Allan Houser on the centennial of his birth year. www.philbrook.org

Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary Thru Nov. 30 Gilcrease Museum

Born of Fire: Ceramic Art from Regional Collections Thru March 2 Fired clay takes many forms in this exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark., and explores its use and art through time and around the world. www. crystalbridges.org

Identity & Inspiration

Ongoing Philbrook Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s extensive collection of American Indian artwork and artifacts. www.philbrook.org

TAC@AHHA

Recent Acquisitions of Photography and Works on Paper Ongo-

Art with Purpose: The Work of E.W. Deming Thru Oct. 12 Gilcrease

ing Artwork in a variety of media and styles collected over the past five years by the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art go on display for the public. Works include photos by Laura Gilpin, prints by Andy Warhol and more. www.ou.edu/ fjjma

Thru Oct. 4 Members of the Tulsa Artists Coalition hold their 26th annual juried group exhibition at the Hardesty Arts Center with artwork across all media and disciplines. www.tacgallery.org

Museum presents an exhibit of 30 rarely seen works from the permanent collection by the artist, who painted scenes of daily life among various American Indian tribes. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

Opening Abstraction

Ongoing Philbrook Downtown exhibits abstract work in all its manifestations. www.philbrook.org

Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour

Sept. 2 Tulsa nonprofit Up With Trees honors special guest scientist and philanthropist Jane Goodall at the patron party for its upcoming gala. www.greenleafgala.org

Ace High Sept. 4 Get in on the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s dinner and benefit auction event that celebrates cowboy culture and Western art. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org Chapters: A Casual Evening of Books, Bards and Bites Sept. 5 The

Tulsa City-County Library invites three favorite authors (David Berg, John Searles and Laurence J. Yadon) to Hardesty Regional Library to talk about their works and share insight with an audience in support of the Ruth G. Hardman Adult Literacy Service. www.tulsalibrary.org

United Way Campaign Kick-off Sept. 5 The United Way of Central Oklahoma’s next big campaign begins at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark to aid local nonprofits and communities. www.unitedwayokc.org

Kaleidoscope Ball Sept. 5 This colorful bash at the Cox Business Center helps Emergency Infant Services provide emergency care of children five and under to families in need of assistance. www.emergencyinfantservices.org Renaissance Ball: Late Night Sept. 5 Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club is where you’ll find cocktails, light hors d’oeuvres, great music from the SoulSations and fun in the name of raising money for the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com

Day of Caring

Sept. 5 Volunteers work on hundreds of projects helping the Tulsa Area United Way associate agencies in the annual fundraiser campaign kick-off. www.tauw.org

OMCA Charity Golf Tournament Sept. 8 The Oklahoma Municipal Contractors Association tees-off to play and benefit the J.D. McCarty Center with a tournament at Twin Hills Golf & Country Club, OKC. www.jdmc.org

Junior Achievement Classic Sept. 8 The annual benefit golf tournament for Junior Achievement Tulsa gets underway at Owasso’s Patriot Golf Club. www.juniorachievement.org

Saint Simeon’s Western Days Sept. 9 The 2014 event at Expo Square promises great fun and activities, including a formal dinner, silent and live auctions and more benefiting the Saint Simeon’s Foundation. www. saintsimeons.org

Bruce G. Weber Tennis Classic Sept. 9 Enjoy cocktails, raffles, hors d’oeuvres and a great match benefiting Saint Francis Children’s Hospital at the University of Tulsa’s Michael D. Case Tennis Center. www. brucegweber.com

2014 Tulsa Cattle Barons Ball Sept. 12 A gala event with Western flair, the benefit for the American Cancer Society includes dinner, entertainment, live and silent auctions and more at the Post Oak Lodge. www.cancer. org

Red Balloon Event Golf & Gala Sept. 12 The day begins with a swing on the golf course and ends with a splashy gala at the Hard


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Entertainment

entertainment, crafts and ceremony demonstrations. www.templetulsa.com

Tulsa Greek Festival

Sept. 1820 Experience the culture, traditions and foods of Tulsa’s Greek community and the long-established festival at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church. www.tulsagreekfestival.com

Oklahoma Indian Summer Festival Sept. 18-21 Bartlesville brings back its

big weekend featuring the American Indian and Western art market, American Indian storytelling and a powwow at the Bartlesville Community Center. www.okindiansummer.org

Jessica Fellowes: Behind the Scenes of Downton Abbey Sept. 19 Tulsa Town Hall welcomes the author of two books about the hit PBS television series Downton Abbey and niece of the series’ creator to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. tulsatownhall.com

ART

Twists and Turns When Tulsa gallery 108 Contemporary opened its doors in the Brady Arts District in the fall of 2012, spectators to the months of construction on the old Mathews Warehouse and several other properties surrounding wondered what the finished products would have to offer. Today, we have the Guthrie Green, the Woody Guthrie Center, the Hardesty Arts Center, the Zarrow Center for Art and Education and the gallery that has brought one fascinating exhibit after another to this arena of creativity. Formerly the Brady Craft Alliance, 108 Contemporary continues that cycle of provocative works with the world premiere exhibition Twists and Turns, a joint show of works by Israeli artists Aleksandra Stoyanov and Zemer Peled. Stoyanov weaves in the complex life of Israel, creating striking and contemplative tapestries. Peled’s figure-like ceramics invite hours of study and focus to decipher not only its process but its intention. Twists and Turns opens Sept 5. at 108 E. Brady St. in Tulsa. After it closes on Oct. 26, the show will go on tour nationally. For more, visit www.108contemporary.org. Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino to support childhood cancer research. www.piercephillipscharity.org

Route 66 CPA Run Sept. 13 The 1-mile fun run and 5k run for the Crime Prevention Network will begin at The University of Tulsa’s Chapman Stadium. www.okcpn.org 19th Annual Global Vision Awards Dinner Sept. 17 The Tulsa Global Alliance’s

dinner and awards presentation at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame honors those who share their unique contributions and world perspective with community. www.tulsaglobalalliance.org

Tulsa Charity Flight Night

Sept. 18 The inaugural event featuring aerial entertainment, a live auction and raffle plus engineering innovation and creativity takes place at R.L. Jones Riverside Airport and benefits the Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance and Tulsa Fab Lab. www. tulsaflightnight.org

The Evening of Giving

Sept. 18 The Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa raises funds for the Lindsey House, providing housing, assistance and budgeting education to homeless mothers with children. The gala evening is part of the Remodeled Tulsa Tour and takes place at the Tulsa Garden Center. www.tulsahba. com

2014 OKC Cattle Barons Ball

Sept. 19 A gala event with Western flair includes dinner, entertainment, live and silent auctions and more benefiting the American Cancer Society at Coles Garden. www.cancer.org

25th Annual 12x12

Sept. 19 The Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition holds the special exhibit and auction of artworks at Science Museum Oklahoma to help artists realize their potential. www.ovac-ok.org

Mini Laps

Sept. 20 Little Light House students put on a parade with amazing costumes and props to support their school. www. littlelighthouse.org

walk for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation will be at the Guthrie Green. www.tulsa. jdrf.org

Bike MS Oklahoma

Sept. 20-21 Take the two-day trek and challenge on Historic Route 66 to benefit the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. www.nationalmssociety.org

Angelo Prassa Golf Tournament Sept. 22 Benefit tournament for Bishop Kelley High School at Cedar Ridge Country Club. www. bkelleyhs.org

Breast Cancer Shootout

Sept 23 Oklahoma Project Woman takes aim at breast cancer with a fundraiser skeet shoot at the Tu l s a R e d C a s t l e G u n C l u b . w w w. oklahomaprojectwoman.org

ZooBrew IV Sept. 26 Sample the newest recipes from some of the state’s most creative artisan breweries at this event for Oklahoma City Zoo that includes food from the area’s best restaurants. www.okczoo.com

Sept. 4-14 The American Minature Horse Registry will hold its annual show of outstanding Shetland ponies and other small breed horses at Expo Square. www.exposquare.com

Bluegrass & Chili Festival

Sept.

4-6 Claremore gets its foot tapping with Ricky Skaggs & Kentucky Thunder and Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver plus other acts as well as some mean competition for the best bowl of chili in town. www.claremore.org

India Fest Sept. 6 Celebrate the colorful dance, culture and traditions of India with the India Association of Greater Tulsa at Expo Square. www.iagtok.org

Coweta Fall Festival

Sept. 11-13 Get into the spirit of the season with live music, food, carnival rides and more in Coweta. www. cowetachamber.com

Rock ‘n Rib Festival

4th Annual Walk for Wishes Sept. 27 Step out with

Hal Holbrook: Mark Twain Tonight!

Sept. 11-14 Enjoy the delicious competition as pit masters attempt to win the prize and visitors’ appetites at the BOK Center. Also look for the new attraction, the Whiskey Well sessions. www.bokcenter. com

Oklahoma State Fair

Walk to End Alzheimer’s

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

AMHR Nationals

from all over the region head for Bull Shoals, Ark., to compete for the “Best of” title and more. www.bullshoalslakeviewrotaryclub.org

Walk to Cure Diabetes 100

Concours for the Cure Sept. 28 Vintage, classic, antique and exotic – some of the finest examples of automobile excellence are part of this sumptuous evening at Southern Hills Country Club benefiting the American Diabetes Association. www.diabetes.org

Medium” brings her live show and readings to the audience at Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Arkansas Championship Hillbilly Chili Cook-Off Sept. 6 Cooks

MIX Sept. 27 Philbrook Museum of Art rocks Cain’s Ballroom in downtown Tulsa with music and craft cocktails by Tulsa’s best mixologists. www.philbrook.org

Sept. 20 The

Theresa Caputo Live: The Experience Sept. 3 Caputo from TLC’s Long Island

ONEOK Field to help the Susan G. Komen Foundation fund advance research, education, screening and treatment of breast cancer. www. komentulsa.org

An Evening of Wine and Roses

Sept. 20 Walk for the Down Syndrome Association of Central Oklahoma at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark. www.dsaco.org

Buddy Walk

18th Susan G. Komen Tulsa Race for the Cure Sept. 27 Join the race at

Art in Architecture Sept. 30 Dinner, live music and art are on the menu of this special night for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation at the Henry Zarrow Center for Art & Education. www. cff.org/chapters/tulsa

Make-a-Wish Foundation Oklahoma at Oklahoma City Zoo to make a dream come true for a terminally ill child. www.oklahoma.wish.org

Sept. 19-20 Hot air balloons takeoff over Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs for the annual festival that also includes arts, crafts, helicopter flights, pony rides and more for the family. www. gatesway.org

colors at Garvan Woodland Gardens near Hot Springs, Ark., along with a mum festival and more. www.garvangardensorg

McDazzle Fun Ball

Sept. 26 Sample great food and an outstanding collection of wines in the rose garden at the Tulsa Garden Center. www.tulsagardencenter.com

Gatesway Balloon Festival

27 Join the Alzheimer’s Association at the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark. www.alz.org

The Foundation Cup Sept. 29 Play through for the Foundation for Tulsa Schools at Cedar Ridge Country Club at this four-person scramble. www.foundationfortulsaschools.org

Sept. 25 The black tie gala for Tulsa’s Ronald McDonald House features a cocktail reception, dinner, live music, auctions and more at the Cox Business Center. www.rmhtulsa.org

Kacey Musgraves

Sept.

COMMUNITY Fall in the Woodlands Sept. 1-30 Enjoy the Japanese maples and other trees in fall

Sept. 11-21 Fair fun is back, along with fair food, rides, exhibits, concerts and a rodeo. Check it all out at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com

ShalomFest

Sept. 14 Temple Israel welcomes all to celebrate Jewish life, thought, culture and food. The celebration includes music,

Art on the Hill

Sept. 19-20 Visit with artists as they demonstrate and showcase their work at Rogers State University in Claremore among live entertainment and activities. www. rsu.edu/artonthehill

Scotfest Sept. 19-21 Get ready for another year of Highland games and Scottish tradition set to bagpipes, drums, bands and more Celtic entertainment at River West Festival Park. www. okscotfest.com The Sanctuary

Sept. 19-Nov. 1 The Oklahoma City haunted attraction opens early for Halloween. www.thesanctuaryokc.com

Fairy Ball on Paseo

Sept. 20 Celebrate the imagination at this annual tryst for all ages in Oklahoma City’s Paseo District. www. thepaseo.com

Hound Dog Blues Festival

Sept. 20 Find the feel-good blues with Moreland & Arbuckle, Andy Frasco and other blues acts at Chandler Park in Tulsa. www.hounddogblues. org

Skiatook Pioneer Day Festival Sept. 20 Residents honor the past with fun found in a modern-day carnival in Skiatook. www. skiatookchamber.com

Sam’s Club National BBQ Tour Sept. 20 The winners of five cook-offs in other states hit Midwest City to decide who is the ultimate pit master. www.kcbs.us/samstour

Persimmon Hollow Village Arts & Crafts Fall Festival Sept. 20-21 Find

unique crafts in a fun atmosphere at the Broken Arrow antique shopping center. www. persimmonhollowvillage.com

15th Annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ Motorcycle Rally Sept. 24-27 The

nation’s largest charity motorcycle rally takes participants through the Ozark Mountains for scenic beauty, entertainment and more starting from Fayetteville, Ark. www.bikesbluesandbbq. org

Tulsa State Fair Sept. 25-Oct. 5 The fair is back at Expo Square with all the food, rides, attractions and fun that are its hallmarks. Look for concerts, culinary shows, petting zoos and more. www.tulsastatefair.com


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Living Arts Animation Festival

Entertainment

Sept. 26 See some of the coolest, most original short, animated films at the Guthrie Green. www. livingarts.org

Pelican Festival Sept. 26-27 Bird watchers welcome back the American white pelicans migrating to Grand Lake o’ the Cherokees with a festival in Grove. www.grandlakefun.com Plaza District Festival Sept. 27 See what makes the Plaza District one of Oklahoma City’s fastest growing areas at this event filled with art, music and vendors. www.plazadistrictfestival.com Oklahoma State Sugar Art Show Sept. 27-28 Designer cakes take the cake at the judged show at Expo Square. www.tulsastatefair. com

Groovefest Sept. 28 Local bands, poets, speakers and artists fill Norman’s Andrews Park with good vibrations to celebrate human rights. www.groovefest.org Arts Council of OKC’s Sunday Twilight Concerts Thru Sept. 28 Don’t

miss these mellow evening concerts at the Great Lawn and band shell at Myriad Botanical Gardens. www.oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com

COMMUNITY

Fall Festivals The leaves are turning to their fall colors, and that means its time for some of our favorite festivals. India Fest brings the colorful culture and traditions of India’s diverse communities to Expo Square each year. The India Association of Greater Tulsa presents another year of dance and music performances, Indian clothes, food and henna painting on Sept. 6 (www.iagtok.org). The following weekend, take a trip to Temple Israel and its annual ShalomFest celebration of Jewish life, thought, culture and food. The event takes place Sept. 14 and includes music, entertainment, crafts and ceremony demonstrations (www.templetulsa.com). The weekend after, three major festivals offer an array of experiences. The Tulsa Greek Festival brings America’s Hellenic culture, traditions and foods to guests at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (www.tulsagreekfestival.com) on Sept. 18-20. Across the river, Scotfest drums up with Highland games and Scottish traditions set to bagpipes, drums and Celtic music from then and today at River West Festival Park (www.okscotfest.com) on Sept. 19-21. A short drive to Claremore and the Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs gets you to the Gatesway Balloon Festival, Sept. 19-20, and a weekend of hot air balloons, arts, crafts, helicopter flights, pony rides and more for the entire family (www.gatesway.org).

Movies in the Park Thru Oct. 31 Tulsa’s Guthrie Green screens favorite comedies and dramas Thursday evenings through Halloween. www.guthriegreen.com To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

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OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR or email to events@okmag.com.

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TEN-YEAR-OLD HANNAH HEWETT, WHO HAILS FROM TAHLEQUAH, IS A NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP SPRINTER. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

IN PERSON

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Hannah Can

A 10-year-old Tahlequah athlete is golden on and off the track.

annah Hewett describes herself as “a bit of a diva,” but perhaps she has a reason: She is an award-winning athlete at the age of 10. Hewett, who lives in Tahlequah, set the record for all four running events in the Junior National Disability Championship in Rochester, Minn., in 2013; and this year in Edmond, she took home the gold medal in all four sprint events (60, 100, 200 and 400 meters) and archery at the Endeavor Games. One of Hewett’s goals is to participate in the Paralympics one day. Born with bilateral tibial hemimelia, meaning she was born without the tibia bones between her knees and ankles, Hewett has been a double above-the-knee amputee since

104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER 2014

she was nine months old. It may explain her competitive spirit. “I have probably always been competitive because I have always had to fight to keep up with everybody else,” Hewett says. In addition to being born without tibias, Hewett’s arms are fused at the elbow, which limits movement in her fingers. She has had three hand surgeries, and her family is looking into reconstructive surgery for her elbows. Hewett has many other talents and skills beyond track. She’s also good at limbo and playing hide-and-seek. She also loves to swim and play basketball and soccer. Kim Hewett, her mother, says that her daughter’s condition “has made us more in tune with others with disabilities. It has also

challenged us to overcome our own shortcomings. There are no excuses.” Her father, John Hewett, was recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. “Hannah has been an inspiration to him in overcoming his challenges,” says Kim Hewett. “I once shared with her that I looked forward to the day when we would both be whole,” John Hewett says. “I would no longer have Parkinson’s, and she would have both legs. She pondered that for a moment and replied, ‘Daddy, I think I am pretty whole as I am.’” Keep up with Hannah Hewitt and find out where she’s competing next on her Facebook page, “Hannah Can.” SHAUN PERKINS


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