Page 1

JUNE 2015

TOP DOCTORS 155 PHYSICIANS IN 57 SPECIALTIES

20 love Oklahoma Reasons to

80 THINGS TO SEE AND DO

Tulsa OnTwo Wheels

r eat GREGIONAL

TRAVEL DESTINATIONS

+SUMMER WEDDING GUIDE


Capture, Share #uticasquare

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#summer, #familyfun #brunchmates #uticasquare

Summer. Time to slow down, relax and enjoy outdoor dining at its finest. Whether it’s breakfast, brunch or dinner with friends and family, Utica Square is the perfect place to nosh with syle. Make your next dining rendezvous one to remember, at Tulsa’s most exclusive venue.


VOL. XIX, NO. 6

FEATURES

48

Beyond State Lines

June 2 015 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

We love Oklahoma, not only for what’s within our borders, but also for what’s just beyond. From outdoor adventures, art and entertainment to shopping, dining and relaxation, there are great regional destinations for every type of traveler.

54

Tulsa On Two Wheels

In the last decade, cycling in Oklahoma has let off the brake, steering full speed into the mainstream. As more people begin pedaling, interest grows, bike shops and other related businesses surface and races and cycling events become increasingly popular.

63

2015 Top Doctors

Whether getting a regular checkup or dealing with something more serious, finding the right doctor for your specific needs is important but can also be timely. When your health is at stake, worrying about finding the right doctors should be the last thing on your mind. Top Doctors makes that decision easy and allows

43

20 Reasons To Love Oklahoma

Oklahomans are a proud bunch, and it’s evident why. In a state with great music, culture, entertainment, sports and history, you don’t have to travel far to find reasons to love Oklahoma.

SPECIAL SECTIONS 76 79

Senior Facilities Summer Wedding Guide

June 2015

JUNE 2015

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

TOP DOCTORS

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

155 PHYSICIANS IN 57 SPECIALTIES

20 love Oklahoma Reasons to

ON THE COVER: KRISTEN CHAPMAN IS A at re GREGIONAL MEMBER OF THE TRAVEL TULSA TOUGH DESTINATIONS WOMEN’S RACING TEAM. 80 THINGS TO SEE AND DO

Tulsa OnTwo Wheels

+SUMMER WEDDING GUIDE June cover.indd 3

2

OKMAG.COM

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

5/14/15 2:56 PM

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!


IN THE FIGHT TO ELIMINATE CANCER. St. John Medical Center and MD Anderson Cancer Network® are teaming up in the battle against cancer. With combined cancer-fighting research and expertise, we are providing Oklahomans with a higher level of cancer care. To schedule an appointment with a St. John physician certified by MD Anderson Cancer Network, please call the St. John PulseLine at 918-744-0123 or visit www.stjohncancercenter.com.


Contents

DEPARTMENTS The State

13

The perfect boot should fit like a glove, and that’s exactly what James Smith of Blucher Boots aims for when creating custom boots for his customers.

16 18 20 22 24 26

People OK Then The Insider Oklahoma Business Scene Living Space

34 38 40

Style Your Health Destination

13

Nature’s brilliance mixes with colorful furnishings and organic surfaces throughout Jim Roth’s energyefficient home in Oklahoma City.

Taste

91

Fried chicken is an American favorite, and no one does it better than Eischen’s, the state’s oldest bar, located in Okarche.

94

On Wheels

Entertainment

97

The OK Mozart International Music Festival continues sharing world-class music with Oklahomans and brings a lineup exploring an array of Italian sound and culture to its 31st year.

98

104

4

Calendar of Events

In Person

97

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

3426

91


Healthcare for life. For generations of families in this area, Saint Francis Health System has been a constant in their lives. Our facilities have been there when they needed care. Our medical professionals have kept them well, helped them recover from illnesses and provided comfort when it was needed most. Our technology has brought medical breakthroughs here. The women and men of Saint Francis Health System are proud to be a part of the lives of the people we serve. We are honored to provide healthcare for life.

saintfrancis.com Saint Francis Hospital | The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis | Warren Clinic | Heart Hospital at Saint Francis | Saint Francis Hospital South | Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital | Saint Francis Broken Arrow


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX

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LOVE IN BLOOM Let Oklahoma Magazine help you plan your special day!

Oklahoma Wedding Show Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 Expo Square Central Park Hall Booth spaces now available. Oklahoma Wedding Issue returning January 2016.

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2015 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily TM represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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For more information, call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com. Wedding.indd 1

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Angelo Cuzalina, M.D.


THE VOTES ARE IN!!

GINA HANCOCK IS AN AVID TULSA CYCLIST AND RIDES FOR TEAM TOM’S. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

LAHOMA OK

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BEST of the BEST 2015

MA

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LOOK FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST OF OKLAHOMA. COMING IN JULY. Don’t miss this exciting issue.

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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

3/17/15 1:01 PM

I haven’t pedaled a bike in more than 20 years. I grew up in the country, outside the city limits of a small town. On weekends and during the summertime, riding my bike was something I enjoyed. I’d ride to the neighbor’s house to go swimming or just for a visit. I’d ride down the gravel road that ran in front of my house and see just how far I could get. Sometimes, when I was lucky, my mom would load up my bike, and I’d go meet a friend at a nearby lake; we would ride our bikes around and around the paved roads surrounding camping sites and playgrounds. My bike was lavender. It had white handlebars that were brown where my little hands would continuously grip them. I sometimes left my bike parked under a tree in our yard, and as a result, the grips on the handlebars were sticky with sap residue. I still remember the smell of rubber mixed with the sap, dirt and other elements of the country. I eventually outgrew that bike, but I never replaced it. I have friends that cycle regularly, and I often grow wistful when hearing them speak of cycling for sport or for fun. I found myself with that same feeling when reading the profiles in this month’s feature about the culture of cycling in Oklahoma (“Tulsa On Two Wheels,” p. 54). Reading recounts of those who spend the day chained to their desk and take to their bikes to break free on the weekends made me nostalgic for the days of racing around on two wheels, standing up on the pedals and pushing them backward for a skid-worthy stop. Cycling is alive and well in Oklahoma. In Tulsa, the sport enjoys an enhanced focus during the summer months, when Tulsa Tough and leisurely rides along River Parks trails take center stage. If you’ve been at all interested in riding a bike, do it this summer. Rent a bike, buy a bike or borrow a bike: Just get out there and pedal. It’s a great way to travel, to exercise or to relax. Also in this issue: We traveled across the state and came up with 20 great reasons to love Oklahoma (p. 42). Of course, there are countless reasons to love our great state; we’ve narrowed this list to focus on the wealth of culture, art and outdoor activities Oklahoma offers its residents. We also look at destinations outside our state’s borders and honor the 2015 Top Doctors. Jami Mattox Managing Editor


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D A D ’S L O O K I N G H I S B E S T With Father’s Day coming up, our focus this month is on that special guy in your life. We all want dad to look great, and with the help of Travers Mahan Clothing, we are doing just that. In this month’s web exclusive video, we give dads ideas for simple ways they can spruce up their look, without breaking the bank. We cover topics including easy-to-learn instructions on tying the best looking tie and common mistakes when it comes to tailoring a suit. Is he preparing for an upcoming business meeting? Does he plan on enjoying Sunday morning fishing? For any occasion, when it comes to dads looking their best, Travers Mahan Clothing has the answers.

S TAY CONNECTED

The State

What’s HOT At

OK B I C YC L I N G The weather couldn’t be nicer in Oklahoma, and a great way to enjoy the outdoors is by going on a bike ride. If you are looking for a friendly place to pick up a new bicycle or parts for an existing bike, look no farther than the Oklahoma Five. This month, we take Oklahoma’s popular bike shops for a spin and tell you which places have the best selection, most affordable prices and friendliest staff. Picking out a new bike can be intimidating, and even the smallest decisions can have a long-term impact on your overall experience. Our guide isn’t limited to bicycles themselves. Looking to join a cycling team? Want to go on a laid-back group ride on the weekends? Take off those training wheels, strap on your helmet, and let us push you in the right direction.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

5/13/15 2:43 PM


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The State ALL THINGS OKL AHOMA

The CenturyOld Boot

JAMES “SMITTY” SMITH OWNS AND OPERATES BLUCHER BOOTS, THE OLDEST BOOTMAKING COMPANY IN OKLAHOMA, LOCATED IN BEGGS. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

James Smith carries on the Blucher legacy.

T

hirty-three miles south of Tulsa’s high-rises sits an unassuming building on the quiet Main Street of Beggs. In the lower left corner of the shop window hangs a slatted wooden sign for Blucher Boot Company. “The legend continues since 1915,” it reads. Below that, “Fairfax, Oklahoma” is carved. A passerby may find the location on the sign to be a bit curious. However, it is actually a snippet of the company’s long history – a nod to its first stop in Oklahoma. The full story begins quite a bit earlier and a bit farther north. In the early 1900s, G.C. “Gus” Blucher moved from Nocona, Texas, to Cheyenne, Wyo., in hopes of starting a venture of his own. “Gus Blucher worked for Justin [Boots] until 1913,” says James Smith, the current owner of Blucher Boots. “He wanted to go somewhere where he knew there wasn’t a manufacturer in that particular area.” In 1915, Blucher opened the Blucher Custom Boot Company. A few years later, the operation moved to Olathe, Kansas. “He wanted to be closer to [the] central part of the United States, to the railroad for shipping and receiving,” says Smith. In 1932, less than two decades after the company was founded, Blucher passed away at the age 57. In the ‘60s, the company was relocated to Fairfax. Then, after 30 years of bootmaking in Osage County, the shop moved again, to Okmulgee in 1997. When the calendar

flipped to 2001, Smith bought Blucher Boots and moved it to Beggs, where, today, it shares a building with Cross Country Leather. James “Smitty” Smith has spent a lifetime making boots, much like the company’s founder did through the turn of a century. “I went to Oklahoma State Tech when I got out of high school, and they offered a shoe, boot and saddle course,” says Smith. “I was there just long enough to learn a little bit of bootmaking, learned just enough to get me in trouble.”

After completing the two-year program, Smith made boots for a few different companies, some of which did not fare as well as Blucher over the years. He worked for Blucher Boots in the ‘70s, left to work for another company in Texas and then rejoined Blucher the year the company moved to Okmulgee. At the current location in Beggs, Smith is Blucher Boots. Each pair is handmade by him, crafted with precision that only decades of practice can afford. In this mass-produced, on-demand age, a newcomer to the shop may JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

be taken aback by the two-year waiting list. “You put your deposit down and get in line,” says Smith. People are willing to wait, though. The boot is worth it. It takes Smith about a month to make a pair, and that extra time makes for a durable and perfectly fitted product. “Generally, once I fit somebody real good, they get spoiled rotten,” he explains. “They just keep a pair on order.” Blucher Boots is one of the oldest companies that still makes custom boots. While other boot manufacturers have implemented computerized machinery, Smith makes each pair just how Gus Blucher would have. “I’ve even got one of the original sewing machines that I still sew the vamps and counters and pull straps on with,” he says. “It was bought brand new in 1915. So nothing’s really changed that much.” Smith makes the original catalog styles that people would have chosen from when the shop was new. “There’s about 38 different original stitch patterns for folks to choose from,” he says. Many of the patterns are quite ornate, featuring butterflies, doves, flowers and cattle. He also takes requests if a customer wants to design their own. This part of the process happens to be Smith’s favorite. “It is an art,” he says. “Cutting out the inlays, drawing things up.” Smith goes through many arduous steps before the artwork is added, and those steps are crucial to making a boot that conforms to that famed fit.

Pull Strap

Shaft

Vamp

Outsole

Welt

DOZENS OF LASTS HELP SMITH CRAFT EACH PAIR OF BOOTS. SMITH SEWS VAMPS, COUNTERS, STITCH WORK AND PULL STRAPS ONTO EACH PAIR OF CUSTOM-MADE BOOTS WITH SEWING MACHINES ORIGINAL TO THE COMPANY.

“You come in, and I’ll take your measurements and outline of your foot,” Smith explains. “After you’ve picked out your materials that you want for your foot and top and style of boot, I’ll come out here and fit a wooden last on your measurements. That’s the wooden form that I’ll make the boot on.” Some of Smith’s lasts date back to the 1920s. “After I fit the lasts, I’ll cut out your tops and paste them together, sew them,” he says. “I have to crimp the vamps. That gives it the basic shape of the foot.” He then sews the vamps to the top part of the boot. Once the boots are sized correctly and the toe is put on, he attaches the sole – trimming, shaping and sewing it until it is just right. He then puts the heel on and grinds it into the proper shape. Finally, he puts the color on the bottom of the boot. When a customer receives their much-anticipated pair, inside they will find a stamp that says “Blucher Boot Company, made expressly for,” and under that, their name will be penned in ink. A pair of boots custom made and impeccably tailored for that one individual. A pair of boots they can enjoy for several years. “They last quite a long time,” says Smith, modestly. “They certainly outlast a boot you buy on the shelf.” A hundred years after the company was founded, Blucher Boots continue to impress. The same sturdy boots that were worn by John Wayne in the 1930s are still worn worldwide by boot lovers today. “With your working cowboys, it’s part of their equipment,” says Smith. “For protection and for riding, it’s essential.” And, according to the Blucher website, “they’ll never lose a Counter stirrup.” Not all Blucher customers have to worry about that, however. Many just seem to appreciate the intricate craftsmanship Heel Cap involved in making the classic boot. “The old saying is ‘We make boots for the famous, the infamous and people just like you and me,’” he says. BETH WEESE

14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015


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The State

PEOPLE

Native Son

Eyakem Gulilat explores place and identity through his photography.

B

EYAKEM GULILAT IS A NORMAN-BASED PHOTOGRAPHER WHOSE WORKS HAVE BEEN DISPLAYED IN EXHIBITS NATIONWIDE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

16

orn in Ethiopia, raised in Austin, Texas, and now a resident of Norman, Eyakem Gulilat has been many places and navigated many life situations. He brings that sense of hybridity to his powerful photography, which examines the intersection of topics charged with meaning: religion, race, ethnic identity. In these photographs, he often uses the physical land of Oklahoma – what he calls a hodgepodge of cultural spaces – as a meeting place for various identities, offering the potent idea that home means not uniformity, but the convergence of difference. One of Gulilat’s early major projects, called The Promised Land, perfectly captures his mission of unearthing diversity in un-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

likely places. “I’m interested in those stories that are not heard … I’m attracted to stories of minorities,” says Gulilat, which helps explain the attraction of the subjects in The Promised Land, where Gulilat photographs residents of Boley, Okla., a town with an unusual makeup. Founded more than a century ago as an African-American community, Boley has retained that composition except for one major flux: In the 1970s, the town saw a wave of Mennonite immigrants who were fleeing unrest in Mexico. Gulilat deftly captures the coexistence of the two groups, a not-quite community of marginalized groups. Gulilat’s most ambitious project to date has raised his profile nationally. His project Collaborative Self caught the interest of the curators at the Crystal Bridges Museum, where it was recently displayed. The project crystallizes Gulilat’s preoccupations into one space. The idea is simple but profound: Gulilat juxtaposes pictures of people of various ethnicities, all wearing traditional Ethiopian clothing, with pictures of himself, held together by photos of the Oklahoma landscape. Gulilat says he was inspired by a desire to tell his own story of his Ethiopian heritage, a background known to most Westerners only through pictures of starvation and deprivation. “I am trying to undo what has been done by this invention of photography,” he says, explaining that he hopes to complicate the often frozen, totalizing images provided in photographs of his native country. This is a desire he continues to explore in his newest project, due to go on exhibit soon in New York City. A Mother’s Prayer pushes this examination of Ethiopian identity even further, showing Gulilat himself recreating scenes from his childhood in Ethiopia, in the wilderness of Oklahoma. It’s a stunning project, one that highlights the power of the art by one of Oklahoma’s most exciting young artists. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS


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The State

1916

THE CENTRAL LIBRARY IN DOWNTOWN TULSA OPENED 50 YEARS AGO.

Carnegie Library opens in Tulsa at Third Street and Cheyenne Avenue

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA CITY-

1930

COUNTY LIBRARY.

First bookmobile rolled across Tulsa

1939

Introduced portagraph machine to photographically reproduced articles

1957

Friends of the Public Library organization is formed

1961

Tulsa County voters approve the creation of the Tulsa City-County Library System

1965

Central Library opens at Fourth Street and Denver Avenue

OK THEN

Facelift At Fifty

Celebration, ongoing renovation marks golden anniversary.

T

he Tulsa Central Library opened its doors in 1965. At the time, the war in Vietnam was escalating, the space race was in full swing, The Rolling Stones were on a world tour, the Voting Rights Act was passed and Malcolm X was assassinated. In the summer of that year, the new, 135,000-square-foot library opened with a grand ceremony. This month marks the Central Library’s golden anniversary. There will be celebrations throughout the month of June and into July to commemorate the date, says Gary Shaffer, Tulsa City-County Library CEO. However, for now, its doors will remain closed due to a $50 million renovation. Central Library closed on Aug. 30, 2013, so it could endure a multi-level makeover. The anticipated grand reopening date is summer 2016. Each floor is scheduled to be completely renovated to better serve its customers. “Libraries are no longer book warehouses; they are more about ‘people’ space,” says Shaffer. “Today’s libraries are places where children first discover the world; where people access technology of all kinds, find resources for work and education, build job skills, seek employment, start a business or nonprofit venture, search for health information, gather for meetings, socialize and learn at all stages of life.” Once complete, the lower level will be a place to convene, says Shaffer. It will include an outdoor children’s garden, which will be used for family movie nights as well

18

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

as educational programming opportunities. The second lower level will be a place to cultivate and will include the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation Education and Ideation Center, a place where children and teens learn as well as engage. The main floor will be a place to create, with a café with outdoor seating, a new materials marketplace, a children’s area, a media production lab and a creation station. The second floor is a place to collaborate. It will include eight, glass-enclosed study rooms, two conference rooms, a center for library innovation, print and electronic collections and a literacy lab, says Shaffer. The third floor is a place for content. This floor will include a health information center, a nonprofit resource center, a business and legal center, a computer lab, a one-of-a-kind Oklahoma collection, as well as reference and government documents collections, says Shaffer. Through the years, the Central Library has served thousands of people throughout Tulsa County. It has housed an in-depth research library, a telephone reference service, periodicals and newspapers, a large print collection and several well-used meeting rooms. When the Central Library was opened in 1965, a dedicatory plaque with a time capsule was placed on the main stairwell. As a part of the 50-year celebration scheduled for this summer, another time capsule will be placed alongside the original one; both are to be opened in 2065. SHARON MCBRIDE

1971

Tulsa Library Trust established with initial deposit of $10

1972

Computerized microfiche catalog introduced

1977

Card catalogs replaced by microfiche catalogs

1981

Computerized circulation system tracks check-ins and check-outs

1988

Telephone dial-up access allows computer users to access library catalog

1990

Microfiche catalog replaced with 64 on-line public assess computers

1998

Established Web presence for online access to library services

2000

First self-check machines introduced

2002

Transitioned media collection away from VHS to DVD

2006

Downloadable audiobooks introduced

2010

Ebook collections began

2011

Introduced first mobile app

2012

Added streaming music, movies and comics

2013

Added downloadable newspapers and magazines Timeline information courtesy Tulsa City-County Library.


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The State

THE INSIDER

Full Circle

Author Teresa Miller reflects on a successful career in writing and education.

I MILLER POSES WITH RENOWNED JOURNALIST AND AUTHOR DAN RATHER, WHO WAS A GUEST ON A 2013 EPISODE OF WRITING OUT LOUD. PHOTOS COURTESY TERESA MILLER.

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f you’re an active writer and/or reader from this part of the world, you probably have an idea of how much we all owe Teresa Miller. As executive director of the Center for Poets and Writers at OSU-Tulsa, as host of the even longer-lived TV program Writing Out Loud (currently airing Mondays at 10:30 p.m. over OETA) and, of course, as a noted author herself, Miller has been relentlessly enriching the lives of those with a literary bent for more than two decades. Since she’s leaving the Center for Poets and Writers in a few months to pursue, as she terms it, “an unexpected opportunity to do another novel,” this seems like a good time to not only celebrate Teresa Miller, but also to take a look at how she came to be such a force in literature and the arts. We’ll start in Tahlequah, her hometown, a place she admits she “didn’t really appreciate. “I was dreaming about living in other places and having experiences in writing and in acting,” she explains, “which was my main interest when I was a kid.” After going through the Tahlequah school system, she acted on her dreams, heading to New York to study at the well-known American Academy of Dramatic Arts. “Acting was my first choice as a career,” reflects Miller. “I just didn’t

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

have any aptitude for it. I didn’t fit in at all. So my instructors asked if there was any other profession I’d considered. I said – and I got a lot of encouragement,” she notes with a laugh. “They were the first big boosters of my becoming a writer.” In fact, by that time she’d been writing for years. At 17, while still living in Tahlequah, she’d submitted a play of hers, The Tragical History of America, to a theatrical agent in New York. “Talk about ambitious,” she says with another laugh. “It was written as a Greek play with a chorus and everything. She was a top agent and was really interested in it until she found out where I lived and how old I was, and then she pretty much tossed it aside.” In her early 20s, Miller began her first novel. A couple of years later, an agent picked it up out of the agency’s slush pile (the term for a stack of unsolicited manuscripts), took it home to read over the weekend and came back to work impressed. “She called me and told me she could sell it,” Miller recalls. “I thought there had to be some catch, but they sold it to Playboy Enterprises, and it ended up under the imprint name of Seaview Press. I didn’t realize that Seaview was Playboy until I got a check with an embossed bunny in the corner. That was not something my grandmother was too keen on, but any moral reserve she had about it was compensated for by the fact that there was actually money coming in.” Having returned to Tahlequah after her AADA experience, Miller was called to New York once again to do publicity for the book. Titled Remnants of Glory, it was a multigenerational novel loosely based on some of her grandmother’s stories and experiences, and it created a considerable stir. “There were real high expectations for it,” she says. “One of my agents thought they could bill it as the American version of The Thorn Birds. People were interested in it for a movie. People like [renowned writers] Alice Munro and John Gardner read it and liked it. Everyone was very much looking forward to my second book. And I developed a writer’s block. “I’d told my grandmother’s story – in fiction, of course – but I’d used it as a basis. I had owned her words, but I hadn’t owned my own words yet. I needed to grow as a writer, and I was so intimidated by the process and fearful of making mistakes that I just couldn’t step up and be the writer I needed to be.” It would be years before Miller completed another book. Meanwhile, she became a writing and literature instructor, and the early ‘90s found her teaching at Rogers State College in Claremore. There, she developed a campus radio show with some of her creative


writing students, which turned out to be the precursor to her highly successful Writing Out Loud TV program, which debuted a little later on RSC-TV. “At that time, we did 15-minute segments that they could wedge between shows, and they were live,” she recalls, referring to the television program. “We were such a low-budget operation that we just had these lawn chairs, without any cushions. Our first guest was Joe Carter, from the Will Rogers Memorial, and he was too polite to say anything. But then we had the children’s author Bessie Holland Heck, and after it was over, she said, ‘You know, if you don’t get yourself some better chairs, your people are going to get waffle butt!’” All of the RSC instructors at the time were required to develop special projects in addition to their classroom work, and that mandate gave Miller the excuse to address something she felt was lacking in her own life. “I couldn’t write at that stage, but I missed writers,” she explains. “What I longed for in my own life was the company of writers. So my first thought was, ‘Well, I’ll do a book festival.’ I had a friend who’d done book festivals in Tahlequah for years, and I’d help with them, and I thought, ‘I ought to be able to do that here.’ I began by inviting a lot of people who’d been on the show, and they recommended other people. So for our first festival we had 30 nationally known writers and a surprisingly good turnout.” That happened in 1995, with Miller organizing it under the name The Oklahoma Center for Writers. In subsequent years, she, the organization and the Celebration of Books moved to what was then known as the University Center at Tulsa, then to the University of Oklahoma in Norman and finally to OSU-Tulsa, her base of operations for the past 17 years. Although she stopped doing the Celebration of Books several years ago in favor of events that, she says, “focus on individual writers and their work,” The Center for Poets and Writers has continued to shine like a beacon over Oklahoma’s literary landscape. Guests at the center’s events 20774 Travers.indd have included more than a dozen Pulitzer Prize-winning authors, along with hundreds of other nationally known writers. “Even though we brought in some wonderfully high-profile people like Maya Angelou, who was one of my favorites,” she notes, “it was with the hope that they would cast a spotlight on what we have here in Oklahoma – captivating, engaging authors that we too often take for granted.” Her last event, in conjunction with Tulsa Town Hall, is an appearance by Sue Monk Kidd, author of The Secret Life of Bees, on Oct. 1. A few weeks later, Miller is scheduled to leave the OSU-Tulsa campus and the unique, invaluable literary outreach organization she created. “It’s been wonderful, and I want to leave when it’s at the top,” she says. “I still intend to remain professionally active in the arts. But a lesson I’ve been trying to share is that if you want to write, now’s your time. “So I’ve come full circle. I started as a writer – that’s what made all of this possible – and now, all these different connections and my work through the Center have made it possible for me to become a writer again. And in order to do my best work, I’m MILLER HAD A LOVE OF BOOKS just going to have to make that a FROM AN EARLY AGE. top priority.”

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The State OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Time To Shine Small businesses and relocations benefit from region’s positives.

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hether it’s a movie filming in the city or a mom-and-pop shop debut, Tulsa is a haven for small businesses and firms. One indicator includes an increase of gross state product by 4.2 percent, compared to 2.2 percent overall growth in the nation’s gross domestic product, according to the Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy 2014 report. “Oklahoma is not only economically advantageous to those starting a business, but the state’s business-friendly climate and history of entrepreneurial culture makes the state fertile ground for innovation and small business endeavors,” says Leslie Blair, legislative liaison and public information officer for the Oklahoma State Department of Commerce. “Small businesses in Oklahoma have access to an array of business financing programs and small business support services. Some services across the state include small business training, networking opportunities with local chambers and the availability of business incubators and free international trade services.” This entrepreneur-friendly reputation is backed by several studies and reports,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

perhaps most recently by WalletHub, which listed the city in the top five in the country for access to capital, lower cost of living, corporate taxes and workforce education; Tulsa ranked No. 1 for industry variety. Larry Weatherford affirms this assessment. He is the public affairs officer for the Small Business Administration and serves as the state’s veterans business development officer. “Oklahoma is ideal for veterans to come and start a business after their military duty because their retirement checks will go further,” says Weatherford. “And for all businesses, there is a benefit to this great global position by shipping product via the Port of Catoosa. Then there is Tulsa’s comparatively lower cost of business for fixed costs such as rent and fuel.” While known for strength in the energy sector, other industries also thrive in the Tulsa region, says Clarence Fisher, president of Tulsa IM, an international marketing consulting and fulfillment firm. “Tulsa is a great place to do business, especially for those in manufacturing or tech fields,” Fisher says. “There’s an air of entrepreneurship here – you can feel it. Nearly everyone you run into works for or owns a

small business and can relate to the goals and challenges that small businesses face. We’re all building something. City officials continue to create programs to attract and keep small businesses. There are tons of free and low cost resources, including mentoring to aid new business owners in achieving success. Tulsa’s also centrally located, so meetings in San Diego or Atlanta are similar distances apart. It’s also a great place to raise a family. Tulsa’s full of good people.” Melissa Parchman, president of Tulsabased health insurance brokers Magoon & Associates, spends her days helping small businesses with health insurance. “I have found being a small business owner in Tulsa to be very easy and rewarding,” she says. “The population is very friendly and seems to enjoy doing business person to person. Being a small business allows me that opportunity to still have hands-on experience with my clients. The health insurance industry has changed the way we do business and made my expertise even more valuable.” Help in many forms is available to those thinking of starting a small business, including the Small Business Administration’s programs like SCORE, in which successful business owners mentor entrepreneurs free of charge, says Tara Pennington, SCORE program support assistant. In addition to counseling, in many cases assistance in obtaining and guaranteeing commercial loans is also available. TRACY LEGRAND


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The State

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The State

MATTE FINISHES ENSURE THAT THE NATURAL BEAUTY SURROUNDING THE HOME’S EXTERIOR SHINES.

L I V I N G S PA C E

Room To View A secluded and wooded setting inspires an energyefficient, evergreen home.

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Photography by David Cobb

ature was the perfect inspiration for the contemporary home Jim Roth envisioned in a forested area in northeast Oklahoma City. Roth knew Oklahoma City’s back roads well. As a county commissioner for 10 years, he was familiar with the charm of country living. When he found the secluded nine-acre site on which his home now sits, he surveyed the rolling terrain and numerous trees that provided filtered sunlight and shade. “I walked the ground,” he recalls. “I studied the sun to see how it would play throughout the home and at what hours of the day it would be at its brightest, or its ebb. I sited the house based on those studies. The southern side of the house was built lower to gain solar heat in the winter.” A visionary, Roth looked beyond a cinder block house, too many cedars, two rusty pickups and three piles of industrial waste.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015


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The State A SALT-WATER POOL IS A COOLING SPOT FOR ROTH AND HIS TWO DOGS. BELOW: ORGANIC MATERIALS, INCLUDING TREES CLEARED FOR THE RENOVATION, ARE USED THROUGHOUT THE HOME.

“Ecologically, the property was very happy,” Roth says. He studied the plant life and wildlife and carefully preserved existing habitats. His environmental concern saved a colony of tree frogs and encouraged rabbits and deer to roam freely where they already resided. Some trees were repurposed to create furnishings and cabinetry. For every tree used, a new tree was planted. “I wanted to minimize my footprint,”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

Roth says. “I wanted to put down roots, as I didn’t plan on building again.” His goal was to build an evergreen house, in design, construction and décor. With his focus on conservation, Roth provided architect Jay Yowell, of JY Associates, with an energy-efficient checklist for which the home was supposed to include. Roth called for sustainability, environmentally friendly materials, a LEED-certified commercial roof with a heat-reflecting rub-

ber membrane, passive solar glass panels, insulated concrete and Styrofoam-formed walls, geothermal heating and cooling units and wells and a built-in fresh water well and waste service. “Building a green home is a paradigm shift for most Americans,” Roth explains. “I wanted to make a long-term investment in an energy-efficient home.” It took two years of design consultation before one spade of dirt was turned. The


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The State A SPACIOUS UPPER PATIO LOOKS OUT OVER THE SWIMMING POOL AND PROVIDES A VIEW OF DOWNTOWN OKLAHOMA CITY’S SKYLINE. THE LINES OF THE HOME RUN PARALLEL TO THE HORIZON. THE HOME’S EXTERIOR WAS DESIGNED WITH MAXIMIZING ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN MIND.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

U-shaped home was built evenly with the horizon. “Horizontal lines do make people feel more comfortable than vertical,” Roth notes. “Glass and metal awnings were designed to deflect the sun away from south-facing windows in summer, conserving cooling expenses. These energy-saving concepts made a big difference in comfort and efficiency.” During his first year of residency, Roth tested the home’s efficiency and comfort. He also established a buffalo grass lawn and chose resilient plants to tolerate Oklahoma’s mercurial weather. Roth found the exterior

drought tolerant and a survivor of several flash floods and droughts. The interior features abundant glass that brings the outdoors into the living areas. The stained concrete floors are warm brown and complement the rich wood and vivid color accents in art and two jewel-tone turquoise chairs. “All the interior materials are organic; no shiny surfaces compete with nature,” Roth says. “The matte finish is easy on the eye. What the house frames in nature is art enough for me.” A second story adds architectural interest.


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It includes a guest suite, abundant storage and an office. A favorite view is downtown’s iconic Devon Tower and the Capitol Dome. They are framed by blackjack oaks and blue skies – nature’s backdrop for Roth’s country sanctuary. A stylish upper patio offers expansive countryside views. It overlooks the salt-water swimming pool, safer for pools than frequent chlorine infusions, Roth says. It’s also a more soothing swim for Roth and his precious Golden Retrievers, Boo and Bella Rowdy. “Living here is peaceful and serene,” Roth says. M.J. VAN DEVENTER

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G

Can Old Treat New? New treatments for a deadly brain tumor can offer hope to patients.

lioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has recently made headlines for both its lethal effects and the discovery of potential new life-saving treatments. A grade IV brain tumor, GBM is typically very aggressive, spreads quickly and is highly malignant. The average survival rate is 14 months to two years. “Glioblastomas differ from other brain tumors because its primary origin is in the brain. It typically also doesn’t metastasize outside of the brain,” says Dr. Kiran Prabhu, a board certified radiation oncologist with INTEGRIS in Oklahoma City. “Symptoms often exhibit very rapidly and can include headaches, nausea and vomiting from intracranial pressure as well as seizures and partial paralysis. The type of symptoms a patient experiences may vary upon which part of the brain the tumor is in. Glioblastomas also have tentacles that invade the adjacent brain tissue which makes complete removal of the tumor very difficult.” Over the years, Dr. Patrick P. Han has worked with many GBM patients. He is a board certified neurosurgeon and the medical director at St. John Neuroscience Institute in Tulsa. He is also the co-medical director at St. John Heyman Stroke Center. “Glioblastoma multiforme arises largely from astrocytes, which are the supportive cells of the brain that provide nutrition and protection for neurons, the functional cells of the brain. Normally, these astrocytes help form the blood-brain barrier, which plays a protective role. In the case of treating GBM, however, delivery of chemotherapy becomes very difficult because the blood-brain barrier can prevent the passage of chemotherapy agents to the tumor,” says Han. “In addition, the tumor grows rapidly and spreads along the white matter pathways of the brain, making surgical resection difficult.” Han says the tumor can grow to a large size before symptoms emerge, which can make operating on the tumor very risky. He adds that unlike other areas of the body that allow for much more aggressive surgical removal with margins, such as a nephrectomy for kidney cancer or a mastectomy for breast cancer, the aggressive surgical removal of GBM is not largely performed in adult

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

patients because of the risk of neurological complications. However, Han says the current typical treatment for GBM includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy. “The goal of surgery is to make a tissue diagnosis with biopsy and hopefully – if the anatomical situation allows for surgical removal or debulking of the tumor – to reduce the cancer burden in the brain,” says Han. While there is ongoing research and various clinical trials for GBM treatments, the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University Medical Center recently earned attention for its Phase I clinical trial for recurrent GBM patients and its use of the poliovirus – specifically PVS-RIPO. Han explains that PVS-RIPO is a genetically engineered poliovirus that has had a piece of genetic code of a cold-causing rhinovirus spliced into the poliovirus genome. “PVS-RIPO is being directly injected into recurrent GBM in humans with encouraging early results,” says Han. “This PVS-RIPO naturally infects almost all cancer cells because the receptor for poliovirus is abnormally present on most tumor cells. PVS-RIPO kills tumor cells but not normal cells based on specific biochemical abnormalities only present in cancer cells.” As these clinical trials continue, the ultimate goal is to establish PVS-RIPO as a possible therapy for brain tumors. “The immunotherapy at Duke University is very promising,” says Prabhu. “At first there was only surgery to treat this tumor, but then we added radiation followed by chemotherapy, which really changed the paradigm for treating GBM. We are learning more about tumors at a molecular level, and with this knowledge we’ll hopefully be able to provide new treatments, help increase survival rates and offer patients a better quality of life.” REBECCA FAST


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The State D E S T I N AT I O N

Rocking Roots

Head to northwest Arkansas for a weekend of great music and food.

D

uring the sleepy months of summer break, Fayetteville, Ark., enjoys a break from the raucous crowds of co-eds calling the hogs. In August, those University of Arkansas students storm back into their picturesque college town, and the residents of Fayetteville celebrate the end of summer with the Fayetteville Roots Festival, three days of music, food and culture. When Oklahoma native Brian Hembree partnered with renowned chef Jerrmy Gawthrop to begin the Fayetteville Roots Festival, which had its inaugural event in 2010, he viewed the event as a deviation from the traditional music festival. “We definitely call it a food and music festival,” says Hembree. “Jeremy is on the forefront of the local and organic food movement

THE LINEUP

Fayetteville Roots Festival Aug 27-30 This year’s music lineup features a who’s who of roots and folk music, including several renowned Oklahoma artists. On Friday, Broken Arrow native JD McPherson headlines the main stage. Bearden, Okla., native John Fullbright and Tulsan John Moreland will also play to the audience. Roots musician and regular Cain’s visitor Pokey LaFarge is also scheduled to take the main stage on Friday. Saturday’s main stage features festival headliner Punch Brothers, along with a trio of Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz and Aoife O’Donovan. Hembree and his wife, Bernice, who play as Smokey & The Mirror, will also take the stage for a set. On Sunday, the legendary Watkins Family Hour, along with Fiona Apple, Don Heffington and other special guests, will wow the crowds on the final night of the main stage. Texan Jimmy LaFave and Devon Sproule are also scheduled for the Sunday slot.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

THE FAYETTEVILLE ROOTS FESTIVAL BRINGS ROOTS MUSIC, LOCAL FOOD AND CULTURE AND HERITAGE TO NORTHWEST ARKANSAS EACH YEAR. PHOTOS BY JEREMY SCOTT.


Eat Local

A festival food court will feature local restaurants using ingredients from local farms to feed festival-goers. Gawthrop’s first restaurant, Greenhouse Grille, along with Brick House Kitchen, Ella’s Restaurant and Pure Joy Ice Cream are among those who will set up shop in the food court on Friday and Saturday of the festival. Another aspect crucial to the mission of the Fayetteville Roots Festival is giving back. This year, the festival will partner with Feed Fayetteville and Fayetteville Public Schools to bring fresh, nutritious food to school children and those in need.

FROM TOP LEFT: THE LOCAL FOOD MOVEMENT IS CENTRAL TO THE FAYETTEVILLE ROOTS FESTIVAL PHOTO BY MEREDITH MASHBURN.

JOHN FULLBRIGHT WILL PLAY THE FESTIVAL’S MAIN STAGE ON FRIDAY. PHOTO BY VICKI FARMER

DEVIL’S DEN STATE PARK IS LOCATED SOUTH OF FAYETTEVILLE.

[in Arkansas], and he has set the tone in Fayetteville.” The food at the festival is rivaled only by the musical acts. Restaurants partner with farmers to bring a taste of local food to festival-goers. On Saturday, the Fayetteville Farmers Market sets up shop in the middle of the festival, allowing attendees to shop the bounty of northwest Arkansas. A chef’s competition will pit local chefs using local ingredients against one another.

Stay In Style

The Chancellor Hotel is within walking distance of the festival and offers festival-goers a special rate. www.hotelchancellor.com Inn at Carnall Hall is located on the University of Arkansas campus and offers a variety of well-appointed rooms. Located within a half-mile of festival activities, it’s removed from the hustle and bustle of Dickson Street. www.innatcarnallhall.com

While You’re There

• Swing north to the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville. www.crystalbridges.org • Head south to Devil’s Den State Park for picturesque scenery and hiking and cycling trails. www.arkansasstateparks.com • Take a stroll through the scenic grounds of the University of Arkansas campus. www. arkansas.edu JAMI MATTOX

TIPS • Tickets to the festival are expected to sell out, so purchase quickly. • No ticket? No problem. Visitors will have access to free radio broadcasts, workshops and programming. • Stock the car with an ice chest to keep purchases from the Fayetteville Farmers Market fresh.

VISIT ONLINE www.fayettevilleroots.com

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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BUFFALO ROAM HERE.

20

American bison once grazed upon the plains of modern-day Oklahoma. Today, these majestic creatures can be spotted in a few places around the state. On the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in northern Oklahoma, around 2,500 bison roam the land and help balance the delicate ecosystem on the largest protected area of tallgrass prairie left. More than 650 bison call the Wichita National Wildlife Refuge home in southwest Oklahomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wichita Mountains. Pawnee Bill Ranch is home to a herd of bison that lives alongside other animals native to Oklahoma.

Reasons to

Oklahoma There are many reasons to love our great state: beautiful parks, rich cultural heritage and the adventures that await around every corner. And what better time to explore the great opportunities Oklahoma offers for education and entertainment than in the care-free summer months? By Jami Mattox BUFFALO GRAZE AT WICHITA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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IT’S A WATER WORLD.

MEDICINE STONE IS HELD YEARLY IN TAHLEQUAH. PHOTOS COURTESY MEDICINE STONE.

PHOTO COURTESY CLINTON WATER-ZOO.

Oklahoma has plenty of shoreline, despite being a land-locked state, and with more than 200 lakes, water sports are popular in the state. The Blue Hole Park, located outside of Salina, is a summer destination for those seeking to cool-off from scorching summer temps. Floating the Illinois River is also a popular water activity for families and friends during the summertime. The Water-Zoo, located in Clinton, is Oklahoma’s first indoor water park and offers a splash pad, wave pool, lazy river and plenty of water slides. For those who enjoy being on top of the water instead of in it, the Cherokee Queen offers riverboat rides on Grand Lake.

WE’VE GOT RHYTHM, WE’VE GOT MUSIC. Oklahoma is steeped in musical tradition. From the strums of Woody’s guitar to the raucous performances of Red Dirt, the state’s music festival scene offers audio stimulation for all. Enjoy tributes to the Dust Bowl Troubadour at The Woody Guthrie Folk Festival (July 8-12) in Okemah. The third annual Center of the Universe Festival (July 24-25) in downtown Tulsa will bring popular rock acts to the masses and provide a platform for local acts. The Backwoods Music Festival

(Sept. 4-6) in Stroud is three days of music and camping with a variety of musical acts, from country to metal to electronic music. Dusk ‘Til Dawn Blues Festival (Sept. 4-6), began by the late blues legend D.C. Minner, celebrates its 25th year of bringing legendary blues acts to festival-goers in tiny Rentiesville. Medicine Stone (Sept. 24-26) is a celebration of Red Dirt music in Tahlequah and will feature festival founder Jason Boland and his band, The Stragglers.

There are also great museums featuring Oklahoma’s history in music. Woody Guthrie Center in Tulsa Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame in Muskogee American Banjo Museum in Oklahoma City

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

WE’RE HOME TO THE LONGEST STRETCH OF ROUTE 66 IN THE COUNTRY.

There’s more than 400 miles of it here. And, of course, there are lots of sights to see along the vast stretch of the Mother Road. Consider stops at Stroud’s Rock Café, POPS restaurant and fueling station in Arcadia and the Oklahoma Route 66 Museum in Clinton.

OKLAHOMA IS IN THE MOVIES.

In tiny Wakita, Okla., the Twister Museum commemorates the movie released in 1996 and set in Oklahoma. Celebrate movies in downtown Okla-

homa City at this year’s deadCenter Film Festival June 10-14. Take a self-guided tour of sites featured in August: Osage County.


More than just a college mascot, Oklahoma cowboys brought national attention to the state, and the state is constantly celebrating cowboy culture. Will Rogers Memorial Museums, located in Claremore and Oologah, commemorate Rogers and his contributions to the stage, screen and written word. The Gene Autry Oklahoma Museum pays homage to Autry, a B-Western movie star, and to the other actors who popularized the craft. The Tom Mix Museum, located in Dewey, features movie memorabilia and other artifacts that belonged to the Western star. The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, located in Oklahoma City, is full of Western art, historical relics and American Indian artifacts.

The Arcadia Round Barn was restored two decades ago and now greets visitors along Highway 66 just east of Edmond. Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park is the largest example of folk art in Oklahoma. Find it on Highway 28A in Chelsea. The Blue Whale, located along Route 66 in Catoosa, is one of the

most recognizable objects to those living in northeast Oklahoma. A 20-foot replica of Paul Bunyan watches over Bud’s Cycle Salvage & Auto on Highway 8 in Aline. A cement mixer tank painted like a space capsule can be found on Winganon Road near Talala.

OKIES GO TO SPACE.

SHAWNEE NATIVE GORDON COOPER.

Oklahoma has played a vital role in the history of space exploration. Learn about the aerospace industry and famous astronauts from Oklahoma at three great museums. • Stafford Air & Space Museum in Weatherford • Tulsa Air & Space Museum & Planetarium • Oklahoma Aviation and Space Hall of Fame, housed in the Science Museum Oklahoma in Oklahoma City.

PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART.

PHOTO COURTESY WILL ROGERS MUSEUM.

WE HAVE THE OUR BEST ROADSIDE COWBOY TRADITION ATTRACTIONS. RUNS DEEP.

THE STATE IS HOME TO DINOSAUR BONES

(AND OTHER PREHISTORIC WONDERS). Visit some of the world’s oldest artifacts at these sites. • Sam Noble Museum of Art • Museum of the Red River • Museum of Osteology • Cimarron Heritage Center

THERE’S WORLD CLASS ART.

Visit one of these museums to see works from world-renowned artists. • Oklahoma City Museum of Art • Gilcrease Museum • Philbrook Museum of Art • OSU Museum of Art • Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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EVEN IN LARGE CITIES, NATURE’S RESPITE IS NEVER TOO FAR AWAY.

THERE ARE OPTIONS FOR CAVE DWELLERS.

Oklahoma’s unique topography has created caves all over the state, perfect for exploring. Robbers Cave State Park houses an infamous cave that reportedly hid famous outlaws in sandstone hills and cliffs. Alabaster Caverns State Park has a cave made entirely of the rare form of gypsum, the only gypsum cave in the U.S., and it’s open for tours. Turner Falls Park is tucked away in the Arbuckle Mountains and features three caves that are open for exploration.

WE’RE MORE THAN JUST FOOTBALL AND THE THUNDER.

Escaping hectic city life is easy with urban hiking trails. • Martin Park Nature Center provides 2.5 miles of hiking trails that meander through woods and grasslands on the west side of Oklahoma City. • Oxley Nature Center, located in north Tulsa, offers 10 hiking trails for various levels. • Turkey Mountain in south Tulsa offers both hiking and biking trails.

Summertime in Oklahoma belongs to baseball and soccer. Catch Minor League Baseball teams, the Oklahoma City Dodgers and the Tulsa Drillers, and root them on during home stands at their respective downtown ball fields. The Oklahoma City Energy FC are enjoying a successful season at a new stadium, while in Tulsa, the Tulsa Roughnecks FC of the United Soccer League and the Tulsa Athletics of the National Premier Soccer League light up the pitch.

YOU CAN STILL DRIVE IN TO CATCH A FLICK. A few Oklahoma cities still QUARTZ MOUNTAIN RESORT, ARTS & CONFERENCE CENTER. PHOTO COURTESY OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM.

PLENTY OF LODGING.

The state’s parks are teeming with beauty. There’s nothing better than a family retreat or long weekend away at one of the lodges in these parks. Try the Lakeview Lodge at Beavers Bend State Park, The Lodge at Sequoyah State Park or Quartz Mountain Resort, Arts & Conference Center.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

OUR FRUIT FESTIVALS ARE THE BEST.

This summer, mark your calendars for the McLoud Blackberry Festival July 3-4, the Porter Peach Festival July 16-18 and the Rush Springs Watermelon Festival Aug. 8., to indulge in nature’s sweetest delights.

offer the ultimate drive-in experience. Chief Drive-in in Chickasha Admiral Twin in Tulsa Tower Drive-in in Poteau Winchester Drive-in in Oklahoma City


OKLAHOMA IS HOME TO 39 SOVEREIGN NATIONS.

And to their histories. Discover the past and present of Oklahoma’s tribes at the many heritage centers and museums dedicated to the American Indian’s legacy. Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogee Standing Bear Park, Museum & Education Center in Ponca City Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur Cherokee Heritage Center in Tahlequah Red Earth Museum in Oklahoma City

STUNNING ARCHITECTURE CAN BE FOUND THROUGHOUT THE STATE.

In cities large and small, architectural wonders abound. Tulsa Foundation for Architecture hosts Second Saturday tours, which meet at the Mayo Hotel and consist of an hour-long guide of Tulsa’s remarkable downtown buildings. Price Tower, in Bartlesville, is the only skyscraper designed by renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Take a guided tour of the building and take a peek into a 19th-floor executive office as well as the H.C. Price Company Corporate Apartment. Claremore’s Belvidere Mansion was built the same year that Oklahoma became a state. Victorian design runs throughout the impressive home. Built prior to statehood in Billings, the Dr. Renfrow-Miller Museum, once known as the “Castle on the Prairie,” features a metal-domed roof, a hexagon-like exterior and four rock chimneys.

OUR ROOTS STRUCK OIL.

There’s plenty of proof all around. Several oil derricks and pumpjacks stand around the state, including on Main Street in Barnsdall, at the Oklahoma State Capitol, at the Oklahoma Oil Museum in Seminole and one of the tallest derricks on display: The Parker Drilling Rig #114 in Elk City.

CHICKASAW CULTURAL CENTER.

PHOTOS COURTESY CHICKASAW NATION.

WE HONOR OUR VETERANS.

Museums and memorials pay homage to the thousands of Oklahoma veterans that have fought and paid the ultimate price in wars both stateside and overseas. Large or small, these tributes are worth a trip. Wake Island Veteran Memorial in Bristow Oklahoma Veterans Memorial in Oklahoma City World War II Military Service Memorial in Tuskahoma Oklahoma Veterans Cemetery in Oklahoma City U.S.S. Batfish in Muskogee

IT’S HOME TO 3.8 MILLION UNIQUE INDIVIDUALS. And we all know that Okies are the best!

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Beyond

StateLines For every type of traveler, adventure awaits in surrounding areas.

By Brittany Anicetti

One thing we love about Oklahoma is its location, surrounded by great states that offer fun day-trips, weekend getaways and long, extended vacations. You don’t have to travel far from home to enjoy quality time with your friends and family. Cross over the state line to visit our neighbors: Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Texas, Colorado and New Mexico. Travel a tad bit farther for the excitement that awaits in Arizona and Louisiana. In each of these states, there’s something to do for every type of traveler.

The Outdoors Slide Rock State Park

Sedona, Ariz Slide Rock’s slippery creek bottom offers its guests a natural waterslide. Glide across a smooth, red-sandstone surface and careen over the edge down into the swimming hole below.

RIGHT: THE VAST WILDERNESS OF BOULDER, COLO. BELOW: VISITORS OF BEAVER LAKE ENJOY A DAY ON THE WATER WITH PADDLEBOARDS. PHOTO COURTESY ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND TOURISM.

Big Bend National Park

Texas Here, more than 150 miles of trails welcome outdoor enthusiasts to explore its 1,100-square-mile, 800,000-acre wilderness. River, desert and mountain habitats make up Big Bend’s landscape, and hiking, bicycling, water adventures through the park’s five river canyons and horseback tours that range from short, hour-long trips to multi-day camping excursions are available. Hueco Tanks State Park & Historic Site

El Paso, Texas Hueco Tanks’ rocks entice climbers, hikers and explorers from all over the country. Whether hanging from its sheer rock faces or hiking over its bulging boulders, Heuco Tanks is a great destination for outdoor fun. Because it’s such a unique environment, only 70 guests are allowed in its self-guided area at one time, and guests are required to watch a 15-minute orientation video before treking out alone.

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Beaver Lake Open Space & Mountain Parks

Boulder, Colo. This mountainous terrain is home to more than 50 miles of bike trails, welcoming its visitors’ wheels and gears for exercise and exploration. With more than 145 miles of hiking trails, escaping into silence, solitude and beautiful scenery is easy. Waters teeming with bass, bluegill and trout provide fun catches, and boulders and sheer rock walls offer exciting climbs that provide challenges for any skill level.

Rogers, Ark. This 28,370-acre lake offers boating, skiing, fishing, swimming and camping. With more than 2,000 acres of campgrounds, Beaver Lake offers more than 650 individual campsites along its shores. Facilities include picnic sites, swimming beaches, hiking trails, boat launching ramps and amphitheaters. Get lost in adventure on the waters and shorelines of this beautiful destination.


Arts & Education Museums and Galleries

Santa Fe, N.M. Named a Top Ten International City for Art by Reuters in 2012, this quaint mountain town is a go-to destination for art and education. Uncover its rich history and art by exploring the New Mexico Museum of Art, Georgia O’Keefe Museum and Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, along with Canyon Road, downtown Lincoln Avenue and the Railyard District. Arkansas Art Trail

Ozark Mountains, Ark. Explore these 11 sites to unearth nature, art and culture unique to Arkansas. Daylong, driving adventures take visitors across Arkansas’ scenic landscape to must-see destinations: Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville Square, War Eagle Mill, Harrison Square and more. With the ability to hit all 11 sites in three days, this one-of-a-kind way to experience Arkansas can be accomplished on a short trip to the Ozarks. Tlaquepaque Arts and Crafts Village

Sedona, Ariz. Designed with a traditional Mexican village in mind, Tlaquepaque sits on the banks of Oak Creek. This quaint, relaxing destination is a great place to find local artisans exploring all mediums of art. Sculptures, ceramics, glass, contemporary and Southwestern fine art paintings, weavings, photography and more can be found here.

HIGHLAND PARK VILLAGE IN DALLAS, TEXAS, IS A TOP SHOPPING DESTINATION.

ABOVE: THE NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART IN SANTA FE WAS BUILT IN 1917, BUT ITS DESIGN WAS BASED ON 300-YEAR-OLD ARCHITECTURE. PHOTO BY CHRIS CORRIE.

RIGHT: WAR EAGLE MILL IS ONE OF THE FASCINATING STOPS ALONG THE ARKANSAS ART TRAIL. PHOTO COURTESY ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND TOURISM.

Dallas Museum of Art

Dallas, Texas Its history begins in 1903 in the Dallas Public Library where the first exhibit was held. Since, the museum has shared with its community and its visitors artists from around the world that span the last 5,000 years. 2015 marks the second year of DMA Friends, a free membership program that rolled out in partnership with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Denver Art Museum and Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

Shopping

PHOTO BY PETER A. CALVIN, COURTESY

Pearl Street Mall

HIGHLAND PARK VILLAGE.

Boulder, Colo. Situated in the heart of downtown Boulder and buzzing with entertainment, local businesses, shopping and dining, Pearl Street Mall’s four-blocklong shopping strip offers shoppers a unique experience where people-watching, windowshopping and strolling the streets is all part of the fun. Rocheport

Rocheport, Mo. Find yourself strolling Rocheport’s peaceful streets where shopping is a relaxing and gratifying experience. With shops and galleries open all year long, Rocheport welcomes visitors during every season. Shop for art, antiques, home décor, pottery and ceramics, handwovens, jewelry and more. Downtown Eureka Springs

Eureka Springs, Ark. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this destination is about more than great finds. Its

La Vallita: Historic Arts Village

San Antonio, Texas This block of galleries and shops has been a Historic Arts Village since 1939. With art from all over the region, stroll La Vallita’s cobble stone streets and uncover oil paintings, sculptures, watercolors, metal art, rock art, textiles, copper wares, pottery, jewelry, stained glass and regional folk art.

unique architecture is the perfect backdrop to a stroll along its narrow, rolling streets. Weave in and out of antique, art and clothing boutiques and leave with a bit of history in your bag. Highland Park Village

Dallas, Texas At Highlight Park Village, shopping is paired with the village’s rich history, a legacy that makes it a one-of-a-kind shopping destination. Constructed in 1931, Highland Park became the first shopping center in America. Its high-quality style and apparel continue enticing nationwide shoppers for a stroll through the village. Country Club Plaza

Kansas City, Kan. Coined the “Crown Jewel” of Kansas City, The Plaza’s morethan-150 shops nestled in its 15-block district charm shoppers from around the country. High-end fashion stores and those local to Kansas City mix and mingle allowing delighted shoppers to uncover boutiques, couture clothiers, chocolatiers, salons and fine jewelry stores all in one location. JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Relaxation Spa Anjali

Avon, Colo. More than 27,000 square feet of Beaver Creek Resort is home to Spa Anjali, which provides its guests escape into tranquility with healing traditions from the Rockies, Alps and Himalayas. Restore your mind and body with masks, wraps, massages, facials, meditation, yoga classes and nature hikes. Amenities include an outdoor saline lap pool, three infinity hot tubs and access to its Athletic Club. Bathhouse Row

Hot Springs, Ark. The Historic Bath House Row in downtown Hot Springs includes eight bathhouse buildings, all constructed before 1923. The only bathhouse that remains operational today, Buckstaff helps its visitors experience one-of-a-kind relaxation with thermal mineral baths and Swedish-style massages.

FROM TOP: BUCKSTAFF IS THE ONLY OPERATIONAL BATHHOUSE LEFT ON BATHHOUSE ROW IN HOT SPRINGS, ARK. PHOTO COURTESY ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION.

RELAX AT THE PEACEFUL AND SERENE OJO CALIENTE MINERAL SPRINGS RESORT & SPA IN NEW MEXICO. PHOTO BY JULIEN MCROBERTS.

ALL GUESTS OF SPA ANJALI CAN ENJOY THE WESTIN RIVERFRONT’S OUTDOOR POOL AND INFINITY HOT TUBS OFFERING AMAZING EAGLE RIVER AND BEAVER CREEK VIEWS. PHOTO COURTESY SPA ANJALI.

Miraval Life in Balance

Tucson, Ariz. Miraval Spa focuses on the whole body when guiding its guests to rejuvenation. Ayurveda, body renewals rituals, energy balancing, hair, skin and nail care, massages, specialty bodywork and more will leave guests relaxed and restored. Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort & Spa

Ojo Caliente, N.M. A peaceful and serene destination, Ojo is the only hot spring worldwide with four different minerals in its water. Those who submerge into its pools resurface renewed and rejuvenated. Escape to one of Ojo’s three outdoor pools for private relaxation. Cleanse in a mud bath or enjoy soothing massages, water therapy and other relaxing treatments. Peaks Resort & Spa

Telluride, Colo. Breathe in the beauty surrounding this Rocky Mountain resort and release all unwanted stress. As Colorado’s largest spa, Peaks will help you sink into serenity through its spa treatments and salon services. Go deeper with meditation, yoga, pilates and an oxygen lounge.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015


Entertainment Stubb’s Bar-B-Q

Austin, Texas Austin has always been a music mecca. Stubb’s opened in 1968 in Lubbock. In the 1970s, music and Stubb’s were magnetic, with the likes of Joe Ely, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash sharing their sounds. Now in Austin, the Stubb’s name continues its legendary stature, as does the music played there. Red Rocks Amphitheatre

Morrison, Colo. Known as one of the greatest entertainment venues in the world, Red Rocks’ stage welcomes some of the best artists in the industry. The incredible red rocks the venue is named for jet upward, enclosing the venue and amplifying its sounds, and when the sun has set, the sky is absolutely breathtaking. A trip to Red Rocks is a trip to another world. 100 Shows, One City

Branson, Mo. Branson is buzzing with entertainment and fun. With more than 40 stages scattered throughout this colorful city, show tunes, rock concerts, acrobats, rodeos, theater, museums, theme parks and more bring Branson to life. However long the stay, whichever shows are seen, Branson gets a standing ovation. FROM TOP: AUSTIN, TEXAS, HAS A THRIVING AND VIBRANT MUSIC SCENE. BRANSON, MO. IS A TOP DESTINATION FOR FUN AND ENTERTAINNMENT. IT’S NOT A TRIP TO BRANSON WITHOUT A STOP AT SILVER DOLLAR CITY, AN AWARD-WINNING THEME PARK. PHOTO COURTESY WWW.BRANSON.COM

RED ROCK AMPHITHEATRE IN MORRISON, COLO., IS A TRIP TO ANOTHER WORLD. PHOTO BY STEVIE CRECELIUS, COURTESY CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER.

THE ALBUQUERQUE INTERNATIONAL BALLOON FESTIVAL, OCT. 3-11. PHOTO BY RON BEHRMANN.

Festival Season Wakarusa Festival

Mulberry Mountain, Ozark, Ark. June 4-7

Telluride Bluegrass Festival Telluride, Colo. June 18-21

Arise Music Festival Loveland, Colo. Aug. 7-9

Telluride Film Festival Telluride, Colo. Aug. 29 – Sept. 1

Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta Albuquerque, N.M. Oct. 3-11

Austin City Limits Festival Austin, Texas Oct. 3-5 and 10-12

Voodoo Music Experience New Orleans Oct. 31 – Nov. 1

Fun Fun Fun Fest Austin, Texas Nov. 6-8

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Food and Drink Wineries and Breweries

Albuquerque, N.M. Sonoma and Napa aren’t the only two Western regions that produce fabulous wine. Plan a trip to Albuquerque and tour its many wineries and breweries for a different tasting experience that’s closer to home. Also look out for its wine, beer and culinary festivals throughout the year. The Big Easy

New Orleans, La. Only a 10-hour drive stands in the way of a long-weekend getaway in New Orleans, where flavors and dishes unique to The Big Easy are hard to replicate anywhere else. Gumbo, crawfish, jambalaya, red beans and rice, beignets, po-boys and more are exceptional served up in this easy-living town. Keel’s Creek Winery

Eureka Springs, Ark. Uncork and unwind at Keel’s Creek, an eight-acre plot that has been cultivating eight varieties of grapes for the last 10 years. Just three miles from the Eureka Springs’ city limit, Keel’s Creek offers tasters a selection of flavors right across our border. Space City

Houston, Texas Houston boasts more than 10,000 restaurants offering flavors from more than 70 countries, and while new restaurants continue to open their doors to hungry patrons, there’s something about the decade-old tastes around the city that serve up a bit of history with their bites. Food and Wine Classic

Aspen, Colo. Every June, the three-day Food and Wine Classic in Aspen attracts tasters from across the country with more than 70 celebrity chefs and wine experts who offer up great bites and sips, lead wine seminars and host cooking demonstrations.

FROM TOP LEFT: NEW MEXICO IS ONE OF THE OLDEST WINE PRODUCING REGIONS IN NORTH AMERICA. PHOTO BY JEFF GREENBERG.

AN ATTENDEE OF JAZZ FEST IN NEW ORLEANS ENJOYS CRAWFISH TAILS. PHOTO COURTESY NEWORLEANSONLINE.COM.

THE FOOD & WINE CLASSIC IN ASPEN, COLO., IS A THREE-DAY FESTIVAL EVERY JUNE. PHOTO BY JEREMY SWANSON.

OKRA CHARITY SALOON IN HOUSTON DONATES 100 PERCENT OF ITS PROCEEDS TO CHARITY. PHOTO BY JULIE SOEFER, COURTESY GREATER HOUSTON CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU.

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1,000

Restaurants with Unique Options for Every Palate

75

Varieties of Hand-Crafted Chocolate Truffles at Cocoa Dolce

52

Weeks of Live Music and Performances

45

Bars Within the Old Town District

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Remarkable Weekend Getaway in Wichita, Kansas

The Keeper of the Plains, Wichita, Kansas A vibrant nightlife and a surprising number of restaurant choices. Extraordinary friendliness and convenience. One remarkable city for your next weekend getaway.

Plan your getaway at VisitWichita.com


OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

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years ago, her memory was flooded with the good feeling of riding a bike again. She had ridden regularly as a young woman, but she forgot the feeling of freedom that comes with riding a bike until she began pedaling on the Schwinn, which belonged to a client of her personal training studio. “It felt like there could have been a book written about me called A Girl And Her Bike,” Walton recalls. Now a spin instructor and director of St. John Siegfried Health Club, Walton still shares her experience with others who may have forgotten what freedom feels like on the saddle of a bike. Bicycling today is a popular and growing hobby among Oklahomans. Whether for fun, for health or for stress relief, residents are strapping on helmets and taking to streets and trails for fun and for exercise. The culture surrounding cycling is also growing in Tulsa. With the annual Saint Francis Tulsa Tough event bringing thousands into downtown to celebrate the sport each June, the interest in cycling and demand for the latest and greatest technologies in gear and equipment have never been greater. It was with this in mind that Oklahoma Magazine looks into the culture of cycling. We talk to several cyclists who take to the pedals for various reasons. We also explore what is being done to make Tulsa a more bicycle-friendly city and discuss Tulsa Tough and the culture surrounding its descent onto downtown Tulsa each year. – Jami Mattox

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Public perception does not seem to view Tulsa as a bike-friendly city. In reality, the League of American Bicyclists officially named the Tulsa region as a Bicycle Friendly Community due to the more than 100 miles of extensive trails connecting most suburbs and all converging toward downtown – with more “bicylification” just ahead. James Wagner is dismissive of the mile and a half he commutes by bike to his job as the Indian Nation Council on Government (INCOG) principal transportation planner. “I’m not hardcore, spandex wearing,” he says. He knows folks who pedal themselves many miles to work and tally more every weekend. But exactly how every person on a bicycle fares on Tulsa’s street and back roads is very much on his mind. “We were chosen as bronze-level Bicycle Friendly also due to our Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee for the entire region,” says Wagner. “It’s led by professional bike racer Nathan Leigh and recognized by the City of Tulsa. Winning the friendly designation also meant receiving suggestions for improvements including educating the community about the three-foot-passing law because too many motorists don’t know that they should stay a minimum of three feet away from cyclists.”

E 4 1s t S t S

Wagner has led INCOG’s bicycle-themed promotions for many years, including Bike To Work Week the second week of May each year. New endeavors include bicycle commuter trains, which are comprised of cyclists who meet at predetermined times and locations and travel en masse to help those who are new to bicycle commuting. He also looks ahead to some ambitious plans to help Tulsa ascend up the ranks from “bronze” Bicycle Friendly up to “gold” or even “platinum.” The Go Plan project is a $4 million City of Tulsa Bicycle Pedestrian Master Plan to identify projects that will increase friendliness between bicyclists and motorists in the metro area. It lays out where bike lanes should be and where new trails are needed to connect to existing trails. The plan is currently in the prioritization phase, but Wagner says the first new bike-friendly revamping will likely occur on Third Street downtown all the

way to connect to east Tulsa. This is already a very low traffic volume area, so reducing the number of motorist lanes to add a bike lane will be easy. Wagner and team have just finished a business plan for a Bike Share program. A limited Bike Share – mostly for leisure – currently exists where users can simply rent a bike from a Bike Station. INCOG envisions Bike Share as expanded to accommodate those who want to use the bikes to commute. The program is in the fundraising phase and will come together as a result of donations and grants, he says. The Bike Share program will be integrated with Go Plan recommendations, and eventually a person could be linked to easily ride from many Tulsa locales to the downtown area. The plans will also link up The Gathering Place to the overall connectivity. If there is one thing that bicyclists wish motorists would understand, Wagner says, it is that bicycles are considered a vehicle by state law. “Folks often wonder why cyclists don’t ride on sidewalks,” Wagner says. “Studies show that it is much safer on the street because, for example, someone backing out of a driveway is tending to look for a fast-moving object like a bicycle. In several areas it isn’t even legal to ride your bike on a sidewalk. Let’s share the road!” – Tracy LeGrand

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Rent-A-Bike

No bicycle? No problem! Thanks to Tulsa Townies, a bike rental service, Tulsans can take advantage of the area’s biking trails without investing in expensive equipment. Seventy-five bicycles are available for rent at the city’s cycle stations located along Riverside at 19th Street, 41st Street and in Jenks at 96th Street. Though rentals are free, a credit card is required. The bikes, provided by the Warren Medical Research Foundation, are pink in honor of Saint Francis Health System, as well as to prevent theft. For more information about bike rental as well as maps of trails, visit www.tulsa-townies.com. – Jami Mattox

Pedals And Pours Like most bike bars, Soundpony is a clubhouse for its community of cyclists of the pedaling kind, though all are welcome. With a birthday party in May that celebrated its ninth year, Soundpony fans filled the space to cheers their favorite hangout spot. An environment that nods to the lifestyles of owners Mike Wozniak and Josh Gifford, who attended the University of Oklahoma together and have always been in the service industry, as well as most of the patrons that enjoy Soundpony – entertaining, cycling, health, community, friendship, fun – its décor and attitude don’t represent a theme successfully pulled off, but rather what fits when creating a meeting place for their friends and other like-minded individuals. “This is our life,” Gifford says. “All this stuff on the walls, it’s not Mike and I’s, it’s all our customers bringing us things … we have national championship jerseys in here, those people live in Tulsa.” More than just a place for cyclists to grab

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a cold brew after a long ride, Soundpony is a supporter of local musicians, which makes for an entertaining evening for its fans while allowing artists to share their music with the masses. And what’s a cyclist bar without a cycling team? Team Soundpony is “an eclectic, all-inclusive, competitive crew of lads and lasses that encourage all participants regardless of skill, age, sex or race,” according to the team. “If you’ve ever ridden a bike before, you can join our team,” Gifford says. The inclusivity and eclectic mix of people that make up its cycling team is exactly what fills Soundpony each day after 4 p.m. 409 N. Main St., Tulsa. www.thesoundpony.com – Brittany Anicetti

Biking Benefits

When we were children, learning to ride a bike was a rite of passage. We started off with training wheels, then shed them once we learned to balance on two wheels. We would ride for pleasure, for sport and to get from one place to another. Ann Walton, director of St. John Siegfried Health Club in Tulsa, says that the beauty of the bicycle is that it can provide both pleasure and exercise. “The bicycle could kill two birds with one stone,” she says. “It is good for going to work, getting groceries, even if you’re going shopping or visiting a friend. It gets you from point A to point B, and you’re also getting the health benefits the bicycle brings.” Walton says that bicycling works both the upper and lower body as well as provides a cardio workout. It’s ideal for all activity levels. “If you’re overweight, it’s a good activity to get a cardio workout in because it takes weight off your joints,” she says. “Also, for the older population, if they’re suffering from arthritis, it relieves joint inflammation. There are tri-bikes – those with three wheels – if you have balance issues.” For those who prefer to ride indoors, Walton adds that cycling indoors, utilizing stationary bikes or at a spin class, provides just as good a workout as cycling outdoors. “Spinning may improve endurance,” she says. “When you’re outside on a bike, you’re coasting downhill a lot. There is a lot of working, then not having to work. On a stationary bike or during a spin class, you can work a full hour. It’s all about how much you want to challenge yourself.” She recommends that those interested in cycling rent a bike and ride on a flat, level surface for 30 minutes to an hour before investing in a new bicycle and gear. Those interested in beginning a spin class should visit with the instructor 10 to 15 minutes prior to class to learn the basics. – J.M.


KIRSTEN CHAPMAN IS A MEMBER OF THE TULSA TOUGH WOMEN’S RACING TEAM. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

The Cycle Life:

KIRSTEN CHAPMAN

A pharmacist by trade, Chapman met her husband while training to do competitive cycling. Four sons and many races later, the Chapmans are often seeking “the competitive fun of racing our bikes,” she says. “We compete when he’s training me and I spend a lot of time chasing after him. He says he gets an adrenaline rush to try to not let me beat him.” Chapman, a long-time employee at Baptist Medical Center in Oklahoma City, began riding with a co-worker in 1994, and other than breaks to raise small children, has ridden both for charity and as a member of the Tulsa Tough Women’s Racing Team since.

“With only one child, it was easy to keep training as I would pull my son behind me in a carrier riding out at Lake Hefner,” says Chapman. “That helped me keep my competitive edge. Then, later, with more kids, we would go cheer my husband on. Now I’m riding again myself, and I appreciate the benefits. People talk about how biking reduces stress, and it does do that. But for me a big plus is the emotional benefit. Say I go for a ride at Lake Guthrie – I’ll take time to get off my bike and look at the lake and just cleanse my mind, happy to be away from the urban area I work in.” – Tracy LeGrand JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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TANNER CULBREATH BIKES TO WORK MOST DAYS OF THE WEEK. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

The Cycle Life:

TANNER CULBREATH

For Culbreath, it was a 2004 course in mountain biking at Oral Roberts University that led him to adore the sport and eventually bike competitively for Team Air Assurance. “Now my entire family rides,” he says. “My wife will put our 2-year-old on a strider, and off we go. For adult riding, we go with different groups including the Wednesday Night Riders and Oklahoma Flyers. And I ride to work in about any weather. I find that once I get to my job teaching at Jenks High School from that eight-mile trip from my home, I feel exhilarated. It’s just great to move yourself, to be self-powering. As a high-energy guy, I find it selfmedicating to ride and get my heart rate up to get the day really going.” – Tracy LeGrand

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Ten Years Tough

It’s an exciting weekend. “It’s NASCAR on two wheels and spandex,” says Chris Cagle, a Tulsan and Category 1 racer on the Tulsa Wheelmen for USA Cycling who participates in Tulsa Tough each year. “From crashes, incredible speed and street parties, each event at Tulsa Tough offers them all.” When he’s not riding, Cagle works in the oil and gas industry in Tulsa. “It’s not every day that working stiffs like me get to line up with professionals and take turns at 40 miles per hour,” he says. “This will be my 10th consecutive year to race in the Pro 1 Category at Tulsa Tough. I believe Mat Ankney and I, friend and fellow Tulsan, are the only two riders able to make that claim. It’s always an important event for me. It’s our opportunity to showcase Tulsa to cyclists from all over the world.” Since its conception in 2006, Saint Francis Tulsa Tough has become one of the leading racing events in the United States; the weekend includes three days of criterium races, two days of Gran Fondo rides and the come-as-you-are, all-ages Townie Ride. “Tulsa Tough was forged by great Tulsans that loved cycling and believed that we could host a premier event,” Cagle says. Each year, the celebration brings Tulsa’s own teams along with top cyclists from around the world and enthusiastic fans to Tulsa’s streets for exciting races and an exceptional, weekend-long party. “For cyclists, it’s on the calendar early in the year,” Cagle says. “For spectators, it’s evolved into a can’t-miss spectacle.” Friday and Saturday of Tulsa Tough are filled with great races that lead up to the biggest spectacle of all: Crybaby Hill. “It’s a one-of-a-kind, PG-13-, at times R-rated street party,” Cagle says. “The hill itself is part of Sunday’s Riverview. Early on, the guys at Soundpony, Mike Wozniak, Josh Gifford, Andy Wheeler and Micky Payne, recognized that hill as being a great spot to see the cyclists up close and in slow motion. Those guys have done what they do best and have made Crybaby Hill fun for everyone.” “There’s nothing else like it in the country,” says Wheeler.

“There’s no race where there’s no barriers, adds Josh Gifford, co-owner of Soundpony, a cycling bar in downtown Tulsa. “Almost all the high-level races, if there are more than 1,000 fans, they have barriers blocking the fans from the racecourse…Tulsa Tough has allowed us to keep this little section barrier-free. So it feels like you’re in the race, like you’re a part of it.” While the riders may be celebrating a little less at the base of Crybaby Hill, the rambunctious crowd cheers them on. “The crowd is amazing and the energy contagious,” Cagle says. “It gives us that little extra when we need it most.”

I’ll Cry If I Want To

Cagle credits Gifford with bestowing Crybaby Hill with its famed moniker. Gifford recounted the naming for us. “It was year two [of Tulsa Tough], we house hosted a team called Legacy, and there was a junior rider on the team staying at our house, and he had a bad race day on Saturday. “He was complaining and crying about his race day, and his mother made fun of him by tying a baby doll to his handle bars … I said, ‘Well hey, let me have that baby, I’m going to taunt some people on that hill,’ and as riders would come up the hill, the lower category riders who I was able to keep up with, I’d run next to them with this baby and yell at them, ‘What’s the matter, its just a baby hill, stop being a crybaby.’ “The next year, there were renegade people making T-shirts that said ‘Crybaby Hill.’ … It just kind of exploded from there. Now the neighborhood wants to build a moment calling it Crybaby Hill. The Tulsa Tough people have actually trademarked it but given us rights to the name. “… It [was] the time when Lance Armstrong was winning all his Tour de France [titles], and we were already excited about European bike racing, and it was new to Oklahoma to have this caliber of a bike race. And we took this attitude from TV that we had seen from all the crazies at the Tour de France, and we brought it to this tiny hill in Tulsa.” – Brittany Anicetti

Saint Francis Tulsa Tough June 12-14 • Downtown Tulsa • www.tulsatough.com


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MEMBERS OF TEAM ISOCENTRIC, FROM LEFT: ESTHER THAIS, TERESA COLMENERO, NANCY KARRER, LESA DEMARNI CROMER, LORI MCCARTY, MARGEAUX MCENTIRE AND JAIME WATTS. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

The Cycle Life:

TEAM ISOCENTRIC Throughout the country, cycling is a sport dominated by men. However, as interest in women’s cycling continues to grow, more opportunities are popping up for women participating in the sport. Karrer, a cyclist and advocate of females in the sport, is a member of the Isocentric cycling team, a group of seven women who are

dedicated to furthering women’s participation in the sport. “It’s a way for women who are into cycling who are fairly good at it to take the leap to the next step to start racing,” Karrer says of the team. “We find these women, and say, ‘Hey, what do you want to do? What are your goals?’ We get them into their first races, and they have this team of support so they are not

We asked Tulsa cyclists:

What’s one thing that cyclists new to the sport should know?

“Get good shoes. Get good equipment.” – Frank Boyer, Team Isocentric Manager

on their own.” The team is sponsored and managed by Frank Boyer, a cyclist since 2011. He says the team provides the same experience to its female members as male teams have. “We provide a venue for racing for women,” he says. “We keep it small so we can provide really good resources instead of haphazardly giving them a team shirt.” – Jami Mattox “Get involved in some cycling community. There’s tons of group rides all over Tulsa and Oklahoma, so it’s really important for people to get involved in groups because that’s how they learn to increase their skills and learn from other people how to shift, how to drag, equipment and essential things. I’ve ridden with people all my life, so that’s how I’ve learned how to ride.” – Nancy Karrer, Team Isocentric “Learn how to fix a flat before you actually need to.” – James Holcomb, Tulsa Wheelmen

“Find a bike shop that you like and where you feel you can develop a long-term relationship … You need them to tell you all the things you don’t know. You need them to help you purchase the right size bike and then make the adjustments for you.” – Denis Mink, Tulsa Bicycle Club

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“Find a group to ride with once a week. You will meet some of the most fascinating people and develop lifelong relationships. There is a group ride for every level in Tulsa and Oklahoma City. If you want to be a successful racer, you need the support of fellow cyclists/teammates, family, friends and most importantly your spouse. Don’t take any of their support for granted.” – Chad Cagle, Tulsa Wheelmen


GINA HANCOCK IS PLEASED TO SEE MORE WOMEN ENTERING CYCLING.

PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

The Cycle Life:

JAMES O’BRIEN

O’Brien was seeking a way to deal with excess weight and tried biking. From 265 pounds of “sitting in a La-Z-Boy recliner” to 184 pounds, this Tulsan has tossed his heavy meds and joined the biking community with fervor. He rides or races for Bixby Bicycle Works, Lee’s/Trek, Lifetime Fitness Club and Tulsa Bicycle Club. “I do both leisure and team riding by riding with several different local groups, and now I ride five days a week with a 230-miles-a-week average. This is coming back from a time about 12 years ago when I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, high cholesterol and gout, which all took heavy medication and got my weight out of control. Now, with my doctor’s approval, I don’t take any medications.” O’Brien wishes that “people at large would realize that peoples on bike are husbands, wives, sons, daughter, we’re your Wal-Mart greeter, your trash man, and your kid’s teacher - so please remember to be safe and look out for bicyclists.” – Tracy LeGrand

The Cycle Life:

GINA HANCOCK

Hancock was raised in South America and moved to Tulsa as a teenager. She is now director of clinical operations for St. John Health System and an avid cyclist. “Now we compete, and we’re sponsored by Tom’s Bicycle Shop in Tulsa. I was competitive a few years ago, but now I’ve backed off and enjoy more riding for the social aspect like the scheduled rides on Saturday and Sunday. Sometimes we’ll go as much as 100 miles on a Sunday, depending if someone in our group is training for an event.” Hancock met her fiancé, Bryan Duball, riding competitively. As she was often the only woman in a group of riders, she has learned that “you watch yourself get stronger when riding with a group of guys who are helping to push you to the next level and see yourself get stronger and stronger,” she says. “For a while I was the only girl in our group, but lately it is great to see more women come out and join the sport.” – Tracy LeGrand

JAMES O’BRIEN SHED MORE THAN 80 POUNDS BY CYCLING. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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FIGHTING. WINNING. SURVIVING.

together

From Left to Right: Mark Genesen, MD, Ali Moussa, MD and Daron Street, MD, FACOG.

Tulsa Cancer Institute congratulates Mark Genesen, MD, Ali Moussa, MD and Daron Street, MD, FACOG for making the Top Doctors list. Our patients and staff appreciate your compassion and dedication! Top Doctors are nominated by their peers in an extensive survey process of thousands of American doctors each year. These Top Doctors’ medical educations, hospital appointments, training and much more, are screened by the Top Doctors research team. Tulsa Cancer Institute is a physician-owned group practice with the largest team of medical oncologists, nurses and associates under one roof in Oklahoma. We have locations in Tulsa, Stillwater, Bartlesville and McAlester so patients can stay close to home during their treatments.

Our services include: Research • In-House Laboratory • Radiation Chemotherapy • On-Site Pharmacy

 Follow us on Facebook! facebook.com/tulsacancerinstitute

We are proud to be named a certified cancer center by the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI©) — an affiliate of the American Society of Clinical Oncology — for meeting the highest standards of quality.

12697 E. 51st Street South Tulsa, Oklahoma 74146

(918) 505-3200

tciok.org


Top Doctors

2015

Top Doctors

Children are taught at a very early age that doctors are healers. Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bump on the head or an earache, a visit to the doctor can be scary but reassuring when we are young. As we age, however, the visits are for more serious causes: a found lump, an irregular mole, unexplained fatigue. But still, we look to doctors, with their white coats of hope, to diagnose, inform and reassure us. Navigating a world of medical tests and procedures is scary, but having a compassionate and skilled physician at our sides makes it much easier. Oklahoma is home to thousands of physicians whose practices range from primary care to specialties like rheumatology and surgery. The physicians recognized in the 2015 Top Doctors list have been chosen by peers who believe these 155 individuals represent the best in providing medical care in the state. We encourage readers to use this list to help make informed healthcare decisions for themselves and their family.

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Top Doctors

Allergy & Immunology

AMY Z. STAUFFER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Warren Clinic, 6565 S. Yale Ave., Suite 902, Tulsa, 74136, 918.502.5960

CHRISTIAN S. HANSON Hillcrest Hospital South Hillcrest Medical Center, Oklahoma Heart Institute, 9228 S. Mingo Road, Suite 200, Tulsa, 74133, 918.592.0999

JANE T. PURSER Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa St. John Medical Center – Tulsa Allergy Clinic of Tulsa, 9311 S. Mingo Rd., Tulsa 74133, 918.307.1613

Colon & Rectal Surgery

DAVID W. HARRIS Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Warren Clinic, Springer Building, 6160 S. Yale Ave., Floor 2, Tulsa, 74136, 918.497.3140

WARREN V. FILLEY Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic 750 NE 13th St., Floor 3, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.235.0040

Cardiac Electrophysiology KAREN J. BECKMAN OU Medical Center OU Physicians, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 2E, Oklahoma City 73104, 405.271.7001

Cardiovascular Disease

CHARLES BETHEA INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma Integris Heart Hospital, 3433 NW 56th St., B Building, Suite 400, Oklahoma City 73112, 405.947.3341 PAMELA CRAVEN Oklahoma Heart Hospital 4050 W. Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.608.3200

PHOTO COURTESY CTCA.

JEFFREY A. CROOK Norman Regional Hospital Norman Heart & Vascular Associates, 3500 HealthPlex Parkway, Suite 200, Norman, 73072, 405.515-2222

Dr. Ritwick Panicker MEDICAL ONCOLOGY

C A N C E R T R E AT M E N T C E N T E R S O F A M E R I C A

Panicker is certified in hematology, a specialty that focuses on malignant and non-malignant blood disorders and internal medicine. His drive to learn more about the medical world started long ago. “As a child, my family doctor, whom I was enamored with, and my mother, who was my role model, inspired me to become a physician very early in life,” he says. “As a resident, I cared for a young leukemia patient. His spirit and courage inspired me to become a cancer doctor.” Panicker says his success can be attributed to three things: “My overwhelming desire to practice evidence-based medicine; the knowledge that I am practicing state-of-the-art, cutting edge medicine in my field; and my passion for providing high quality care for my cancer patients.” Treating cancer is complicated, but because of oncologists like Panicker, the odds of remission and survival are getting better every day. “There has been an explosion of treatment options for cancer patients,” he says. “Personalized medicine, which individualizes the treatment of each patient’s cancer based on the unique genomic characteristic of their cancer, is fast gaining momentum. Finally, immune therapy, which unleashes the body’s own immunity to fight cancer, has been a major breakthrough.” – Beth Weese

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DOUGLAS A. HORSTMANSHOF INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma INTEGRIS Advanced Cardiac Care, 3400 NW Expressway, C Building, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.713.9900 RICHARD KACERE St. John Medical Center – Tulsa St John Heart Institute Cardiovascular Consultants, 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 500, Tulsa, 74104, 918.748.7650 ALAN M. KANESHIGE Hillcrest Medical Center Hillcrest Hospital South, Oklahoma Heart Institute, 9228 S. Mingo Road, Suite 200, Tulsa, 74133, 918.592.0999 DWIGHT W. REYNOLDS OU Medical Center OU Physicians, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 2E, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.7001 MUHAMMAD SALIM Norman Regional Hospital HealthPlex Hospital, Norman Heart & Vascular Associates, 3500 HealthPlex Parkway, Suite 200, Norman, 73072, 405.515.2260

Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

REBECCA S. DAILY OU Medical Center OU, Child Psychiatry, 920 Stanton L. Young Blvd., WP 3470, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4219

Child Neurology

DAVID J. SIEGLER Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa St. John Medical Center – Tulsa, Child Neurology of Tulsa, 6465 S. Yale Ave., Suite 320, Warren Medical Building, Tulsa, 74136, 918.493.3300

GARY D. DUNN OU Medical Center OU Physicians, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4G, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.1400

Dermatology

JEFF ALEXANDER Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa 6565 S. Yale Ave., Suite 503, Tulsa, 74136-8306, 918.494.8333 RAYMOND L. CORNELISON INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma 3727 NW 63rd St., Suite 205, Oklahoma City, 73116, 405.608.4494 LAWRENCE J. GREGG Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E. 21st St., Tulsa, 74114, 918.749.2261 DONALD RICHARD SEIDEL Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E 21st St., Tulsa, 74114, 918.749.2261 THOMAS STASKO OU Medical Center OU Physicians Dermatology Clinic, 619 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6110

Diagnostic Radiology

DOUGLAS P. BEALL Clinical Radiology of Oklahoma 1800 Renaissance Blvd., Edmond, 73013-3023, 405.601.2325 ELIZABETH JETT OU Medical Center OU Breast Institute, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 3E, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4514 KELLY N. MCDONOUGH OU Medical Center – Edmond OU Breast Imaging of Oklahoma, 2601 Kelley Pointe Parkway, Edmond, 73013, 405.844.2601 DEBRA S. MITCHELL OU Medical Center – Edmond OU Breast Imaging of Oklahoma, 2601 Kelley Pointe Parkway, Suite 101, Edmond, 73013, 405.844.2601

Family Medicine

LAMONT E. CAVANAGH Hillcrest Medical Center OU Medical Center, Sports Medicine & Family Medicine,1111 S. St. Louis St., Tulsa, 74120, 918.619.4400 W. DEAN HINZ Norman Regional Hospital 3400 W. Tecumseh Road, Suite 300, Norman, 73072, 405.912.3120

Gastroenterology

MARKHAM NIGHTENGALE Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Adult Gastroenterology Associates, 6465 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1002, Tulsa, 74136, 918.481.4700 HARVEY A. TATUM Hillcrest Medical Center Utica Park Clinic, 1145 S. Utica Ave., Suite 701, Hillcrest Physicians Building, Tulsa, 74104, 918.582.6544 WILLIAM M. TIERNEY OU Medical Center VA Medical Center – Oklahoma City, OU Physicians, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4E, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.8478

Geriatric Medicine

INSUNG KIM Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa 6160 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.497.3650 LAURENCE Z. RUBENSTEIN OU Medical Center OU Physicians Senior Health Center, 1122 NE 13th St., Suite 150, Oklahoma City, 73117, 405.271.3050 PETER A. WINN OU Medical Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Center, 900 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.3537

Gynecologic Oncology

REBECCA G. STOUGH Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City Breast MRI of Oklahoma, 4300 McAuley Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.749.7077

MARK C. GENESEN Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Tulsa Cancer Institute, 12697 E. 51st St., Tulsa, 74146, 918.505.3200

TIMOTHY L. TYTLE Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City Radiology Consultants, 4300 W. Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.752.3324

ROBERT S. MANNEL OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 NE 10th St., Suite 2100, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.8707

Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism

DARON G. STREET Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Hillcrest Medical Center, Tulsa Cancer Center, 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146, 918.505.3200

D. ERIK ASPENSON Hillcrest Medical Center Oklahoma Heart Institute, 9228 S. Mingo Road, Suite 102, Tulsa, 74133, 918.592.0999 MARY Z. BAKER OU Medical Center VA Medical Center – Oklahoma City, OU Physicians – Endocrinology, 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.1000

JOAN L. WALKER OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 NE 10th St., Suite 2100, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.8707

Hand Surgery

THOMAS W. EWING Norman Regional Hospital Oklahoma Orthopaedic Institute, 1020 24th Ave. NW, Suite 100, Norman, 73069, 405.447.4999


Top Doctors STEPHEN W. MIHALSKY OU Medical Center – Edmond Mercy Hospital– Oklahoma City, 105 S. Bryant St., Suite 407, Edmond, 73034, 405.348.5060 GHAZI M. RAYAN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma OU Medical Center, 3366 Northwest Expressway, D Building, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.945.4888

Infectious Disease

DOUGLAS A. DREVETS OU Medical Center OU Physicians – Infectious Disease, 711 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Suite 430, Presbyterian Professional Office Building, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6434

DAVID N. SCHECK Hillcrest Medical Center Infectious Disease Specialists Tulsa, 1145 S. Utica Ave., Suite 800, South Physicians’ Building, Tulsa, 74104, 918.582.6343 DAMON L. BAKER Oklahoma State University Medical Center OSU Internal Medicine, 717 S. Houston Ave., Floor 3, Suite 300, Tulsa, 74127, 918.382.5064 LISA FARHOOD Deaconess Hospital – Oklahoma 5401 N. Portland Ave., Suite 220, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.604.4321 MICHAEL GEBETSBERGER Hillcrest Hospital South Utica Park Clinic, 9001 S. 101st E. Ave., Suite 230, Tulsa, 74133, 918.392.5470

JOHN M. KRODEL Norman Regional Hospital Norman Clinic, 950 N. Porter Ave., Suite 300, Norman, 73071, 405.329.0121 EILEEN C. WEST OU Medical Center – Edmond 14101 N. Eastern Ave., Suite E , Edmond, 73013, 405.359.0919

Interventional Cardiology

RALPH DOUGLAS ENSLEY Saint Francis Heart Hospital Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Warren Clinic Cardiology, 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite A100, Tulsa, 74136, 918.494.8500 JOHN R. HARVEY Oklahoma Heart Hospital Oklahoma Heart Hospital, 4050 W. Memorial Road, Floor 3, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.608.3800

More than one-third (34.9 percent, or 78.6 million) of U.S. adults are considered obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control. “Obesity in Oklahoma has stabilized,” says Dr. Hamilton Le, the medical director for INTEGRIS Weight Loss Center. “Thirty percent of Oklahomans are considered medically obese, and another 35 percent are considered overweight.” Oklahoma’s adult obesity rate was 32.5 percent in 2013, the highest it has been since at least 1990, according to a report from Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, two health-focused nonprofit organizations. Obesity is a complex medical condition that involves genetics, environment, cultural and psychosocial and socioeconomic conditions, says Le. “Committing to a healthy weight involves consistent eating, healthy food choices, appropriate portions, regular physical activity, good sleep habits and healthy water consumption,” says Le. What causes someone to be overweight or obese? Overweight and obesity are the result of caloric imbalance, says Le. “The dietary and physical activity behaviors of children and adolescents are influenced by many sectors of society, including families, communities, schools, child care settings, medical care providers, faith-based institutions, government agencies, the media and the food and beverage industries and entertainment industries,” says Le. “Education through consultations with your doctor and a dietitian can help formulate a plan toward healthier habits.” – Sharon McBride

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Weighing In

Dr. Mary Baker

ENDOCRINOLOGY OU PHYSICIANS

Baker is an endocrinologist at the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center in Oklahoma City. Baker received her medical degree at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where she now shares her insight with future generations of doctors. She says her commitment to education is one of her greatest strengths. In 2009, Baker received the David Ross Boyd Professorship, an award given to faculty members who consistently demonstrate outstanding teaching, guidance and leadership for students. It is an honor that Baker has earned through dedication to her students. “My greatest achievements of my career have been the young people I have had the privilege of teaching who have gone on to become physicians and teachers themselves,” she says. As an endocrinologist, Baker deals with diseases affecting hormones and glands. She spends her time researching diabetes, thyroid disease, pituitary disease and osteoporosis. “My field has exploded with new diagnostic tools as well as new drugs – particularly to treat diabetes,” she explains. “I think over the next few years, the impact of genomic medicine will grow.” Baker also serves as associate chief of staff for Education at the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center, where she hopes to continue to enhance and expand medical education. – Beth Weese JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Top Doctors NAJI E. KARAM St. Anthony Hospital – Oklahoma City INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma 608 NW Ninth St., Suite 6100, Oklahoma City, 73102, 405.272.8477

LUKAS HARAGSIM OU Medical Center VA Medical Center – Oklahoma City, OU Physicians – Nephrology, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4E, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6842

AGHA K. KHAN Oklahoma Heart Hospital – South Campus Oklahoma Heart Hospital, 5224 E. I-240 Service Road, Floor 2, Oklahoma City, 73135, 405.628.6265

PRANAY KATHURIA Hillcrest Medical Center St. John Medical Center – Tulsa, OU Physicians – Internal Medicine, 591 E. 36 St. N., Tulsa, 74106, 918.619.4888

WAYNE N. LEIMBACH JR. Hillcrest Medical Center Oklahoma Heart Institute, 1265 S. Utica Ave., Suite 300, Tulsa, 74104, 918.592.0999

Maternal & Fetal Medicine

CHARLES P. MIRABILE JR. INTEGRIS Baptist Regional Health Center Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City, The Perinatal Center of Oklahoma, 4140 Memorial Road, Suite 321, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.748.4726 JOHN R. STANLEY III Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma, The Perinatal Center of Oklahoma, 4140 W. Memorial Road, Suite 321, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.748.4726

PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

Medical Oncology

Dr. Richard Kacere CARDIOLOGIST

S T. J O H N H E A LT H S Y S T E M

As a cardiologist, Kacere emphasizes the importance of prevention in protecting one’s heart. “Most chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, diabetes and hypertension, are either caused by or significantly influenced by our lifestyle choices,” he says. “What we put in our mouths and what we do with our feet matter more than we care to admit.” Kacere encourages his patients to change their perspective rather than rely on pharmaceutical fixes. “I spend a lot of my time with patients focusing on what they can do in their daily lives to positively influence their health,” he says. “Rather than adding on more medications to get a desired result, I love to see a patient take personal responsibility for their own health and make meaningful, long-lasting lifestyle and risk factor changes.” With heart disease topping the list of dangers in America, Kacere’s wisdom and skills are in great demand. “The thing I truly love about my profession is that I have been given the privilege and honor to come alongside people during some of their hardest and most vulnerable times in their lives,” he says. “The patients that I am seeing are often in the midst of a life-threatening or life-altering experience, and they let me into their lives to help them through this difficult period. I’m very grateful that God has given me this opportunity to be of service in this way.” – Beth Weese

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SHERRI S. DURICA Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City Norman Regional Hospital, Mercy Oncology, 701 E. Robinson Ave., Suite 100, Norman, 73071, 405.321.4644 ALI H. MOUSSA Hillcrest Medical Center Tulsa Cancer Institute, 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146, 918.505.3200

RITWICK PANICKER CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center 10109 E. 79th St., Tulsa, 74133, 918.286.5000 GEORGE B. SELBY OU Medical Center OU Physicians, Hematology/Oncology, 800 NE 10th St., Floor 2, Suite 2500, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.8299 ALEDA TOMA INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma Deaconess Hospital – Oklahoma, Cancer Specialists of Oklahoma, 3525 NW 56th St., Suite D-100, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.942.9200

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

MARILYN B. ESCOBEDO Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center 1200 Everett Dr., North Pavilion, Floor 7, Room 7504, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.5215

Nephrology

JAMES E. BOURDEAU St. Francis Hospital – Tulsa Hillcrest Hospital South, 6465 S. Yale Ave, Suite 507, Tulsa, 741367807, 918.481.2760 BENJAMIN D. COWLEY JR. OU Medical Center OU Physicians – Nephrology, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4E, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6842 JOSE EL-AMM INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute, 3400 NW 56th St., Suite 700, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.949.3349

Neurological Surgery

SHON W. COOK Community Hospital – Oklahoma City INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma, 11317 S. Western Ave., Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 73170, 405.310.6977 EMILY FRIEDMAN Northwest Surgical Hospital Community Hospital – Oklahoma City, 3433 NW 56th St., Suite 750, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.945.4900 TIMOTHY B. MAPSTONE Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Medical Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Dept. of Neurosurgery, 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 4000, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4912

Neurology

KERSI J. BHARUCHA OU Medical Center OU Physicians, Neurology, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5B, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.3635 EDUARDO A. DE SOUSA OU Medical Center OU Physicians, Neurology, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5B, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.3635 DAVID LEE GORDON OU Medical Center OU Physicians, Neurology, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5B, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.3635 RODNEY L. MYERS Hillcrest Medical Center Utica Park Clinic, 1245 S. Utica Ave., Suite 330, Tulsa, 74104, 918.560.3823

Obstetrics & Gynecology

JOHN MARTIN BEAL St. John Medical Center – Tulsa Tulsa OB-GYN Associates, Williams Medical Plaza, 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 800, Tulsa, 74104, 918.747.9641 GRANT R. COX St. John Medical Center – Tulsa Tulsa OB-GYN Associates, Williams Medical Plaza, 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 800, Tulsa, 74104, 918.747.9641 JOSEPH ROY JOHNSON Oklahoma State University Medical Center Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa, 717 S. Houston, Suite 200, Tulsa, 74127, 918.586.4500 MUKESH T. PAREKH Deaconess Hospital – Oklahoma Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City, Northwest Obstetrics & Gynecology, 5622 N. Portland Ave., Suite 240, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.943.6288

Ophthalmology

RAY M. BALYEAT St. John Medical Center – Tulsa Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa, The Eye Institute, 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 400, Tulsa, 74104, 918.749.2220 GARY T. DENSLOW Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Hillcrest Medical Center, Pediatric Eye Associates, 4606 E. 67th St., Suite 400, Tulsa, 74136, 918.481.2796 MARC A. GOLDBERG St. John Medical Center – Tulsa The Eye Institute, 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 1010, Tulsa, 74104, 918.584.4433 P. LLOYD HILDEBRAND OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Institute, 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.1096 REBECCA K. MORGAN OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Institute, 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.1793 JAMES M. RICHARD INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma Children’s Eye Care, 11013 Hefner Pointe Drive, Oklahoma City, 73120-5050, 405.751.2020 R MICHAEL SIATKOWSKI OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Institute, 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Room 512, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.1094 GREGORY L. SKUTA OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Institute, 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.7806

Orthopaedic Surgery

BRADFORD BOONE Oklahoma Surgical Hospital Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa, Eastern Oklahoma Orthopedic Center, 6475 S. Yale Ave., Suite 301, Tulsa, 74136, 918.494.9300 SCOTT J. DUNITZ St. JohnBroken Arrow Tulsa Bone & Joint Associates, 4802 S. 109th E. Ave., Tulsa, 74146, 918.392.1400 CHARLES H. FUNDERBURK JR. McBride Clinic Orthopedic Hospital McBride Clinic, 1110 N. Lee St., Oklahoma City, 73103, 405.230.9270 WILLIAM A. HERNDON Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians, 1200 N. Phillips Ave., Suite 3A, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.2669 TIMOTHY A. PUCKETT OU Medical Center 825 NE 10th St., Suite 1C, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.2663 CARLAN K. YATES McBride Clinic Orthopedic Hospital McBride Clinic, 1110 N. Lee Ave., Oklahoma City, 73103, 405.230.9746

Otolaryngology

KEITH F. CLARK St. Anthony Hospital – Oklahoma City Oklahoma City ENT Clinic, 535 NW Ninth St., Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 73012, 405.272.6027


Patient-Centered Cancer Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility.

As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home.

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer 800 NE 10th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73104

centers in the Instituteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-6822 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


Top Doctors P. DAVID HUNTER St. Anthony Hospital – Oklahoma City Oklahoma City ENT Clinic, 535 NW Ninth St., Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 73102-1049, 405.272.6027

Pain Medicine

CHRISTOPHER A. PASKOWSKI Norman Regional Hospital Oklahoma Otolaryngology Associates, 3650 W. Rock Creek Road,Suite 110, Norman, 73072, 405.364.2666

DARRYL D. ROBINSON Community Hospital – Oklahoma City Oklahoma Sports Science & Orthopaedics, 3110 SW 89th St., Suite 102, Oklahoma City, 73159, 405.703.4950

IVAN WAYNE OU Medical Center 13904 Quailbrook Dr., Oklahoma City, 73134, 405.271.5950

Pediatric Cardiology

DAVID W. WHITE SR. Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Tulsa Spine & Specialty Hospital, Eastern Oklahoma Ear, Nose & Throat, 5020 E. 68th St., Tulsa, 74136, 918.492.3636

RITA M. HANCOCK Oklahoma Center for Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine 3110 SW 89th St., Suite 200C, Oklahoma City, 73159, 405.759.2663

EDWARD D. OVERHOLT Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City, OU Children’s Physicians, 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Suite 2F, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4411

Pediatric Endocrinology

KENNETH C. COPELAND Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Medical Center, OU Children’s Physicians, Pediatric Diabetes/Endocrinology, 1200 Children’s Ave., Suite 4D, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6764 DAVID H. JELLEY Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa, Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center, 4444 E. 41st St., Suite SCC1B, Tulsa, 74135, 918.619.4803

Pediatric Gastroenterology

STEVEN FITTS Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, 591 E. 36th St. N., Tulsa, 74106, 918.619.4323

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Drink Up

Dr. Terence Herman

RADIOLOGICAL ONCOLOGY STEPHENSON CANCER CENTER

In 2006, Herman became the radiation oncology chair at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. Previously, he held the same position at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in San Antonio. While his expertise in radiological oncology is well known, the patients he treats at the Stephenson Cancer Center in Oklahoma City benefit from his training as a medical oncologist, as well. “I was one of the early proponents for using chemotherapy and radiation in a combined fashion to treat solid tumors,” he says. “I have been able to fashion a unique job because I do both types of oncology. The types of cancers I primarily treat are leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas and gastrointestinal tumors.” His interest in oncology developed as he encountered those who were pioneers in the field. That research is now being used to develop new drugs, and today Herman is the one inspiring others as he combines those drugs and his skills with radiation to find new ways to combat cancer. “This is a time of unprecedented development of chemical agents to treat cancers,” he explains. “For instance, we will begin to treat patients with proton irradiation in a few months. The advantage of this radiation modality is that it gives a better pattern of energy deposition than photon irradiation. However, the deposited energy kills cancer cells no better than photons. First in the laboratory and then in the clinic, we will test chemicals which should make the protons more cytotoxic.” – Beth Weese

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A common recommendation is to drink six to eight, eight-ounce glasses of water or other fluid every day, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, some adults may need more or less, depending on how healthy they are, how much they exercise and how hot and dry the climate is. Hydration is key to proper metabolic function, says Dr. Mitch Duininck, the residency director at In His Image. “Many people in our society are chronically dehydrated due to caffeinated drinks, drinks with high sugar content and lifestyles that don’t allow for adequate time and scheduling for proper hydration,” says Duininck. “All body systems are vitally dependent on adequate hydration, especially our digestive system, cardiovascular, renal system, neurologic and immune system.” According to Duininck, it’s okay to add a little flavor to your water to make it tastier. “Flavoring of water is not a problem, but one should avoid doing so with caffeinated or sugarbased products,” says Duininck. If you think you are not getting enough water, these tips from the CDC may help: • Carry a water bottle for easy access when you are at work or running errands. • Freeze some freezer-safe water bottles. Take one with you for ice-cold water all day long. • Choose water instead of sugar-sweetened beverages. This can also help with weight management. Substituting water for one 20-ounce sugar sweetened soda will save you about 240 calories. • Choose water when eating out. Generally, you will save money and reduce calories. • Add a wedge of lime or lemon to your water. This can help improve the taste and help you drink more water than you usually do. – Sharon McBride


A NATIONAL REPUTATION FOR EXCELLENCE As one of the nation’s most comprehensive organ transplant centers, INTEGRIS Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute (NZTI) is well-known for its expertise in handling the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys and pancreas. More than 3,000 of these organs have been transplanted in 25+ years at Oklahoma’s largest multi-organ transplant facility. With their considerable experience in working with major organs, it’s no surprise that NZTI provides far more than transplant services: • Liver

and pancreatic cancer surgery • Advanced Heart Failure Program • Ventricular assist devices and total artificial hearts • Intestinal Rehabilitation Program • Pulmonary hypertension management It’s no wonder people from all over the region are traveling to NZTI.

integristransplant.com 405-949-3349

Hepatology (management of cirrhosis, end stage liver disease, tumors and metabolic liver disease) • Advanced gastroenterology • Pediatric gastroenterology/hepatology • Interventional ERCP & endoscopic ultrasonography •


Top Doctors JUDITH O’CONNOR Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Hospital, Gastroenterology, 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Suite 9E, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6549

Pediatric HematologyOncology

RENE Y. MCNALL-KNAPP Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians, 1200 Children’s Ave., Suite 10A, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4412

MARTIN A. TURMAN Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians, 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4409

Pediatric Pulmonology

JAMES A. ROYALL Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians, Divison of Pediatric Pulmonology, 1200 Children’s Ave., Suite 9A, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.2006

Pediatric Surgery

EDWARD G. FORD Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1305, Tulsa, 74136, 918.494.9450

Pediatric Urology BRADLEY KROPP Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s – Pediatroc Urology, 1200 Children’s Ave., Suite 7D, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.3800

OREN F. MILLER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma, 10901 E. 48th St. S., Tulsa, 74146, 918.749.8765

Pediatrics

JAMES E. FIELDS Norman Regional Hospital Premiere Pediatrics, 500 E. Robinson, Suite 2600, Norman, 73071, 405.364.6432 EILEEN M. FOX Norman Regional Hospital Premiere Pediatrics, 500 E. Robinson St., Suite 2600, Norman, 73071, 405.364.6432

PHOTO COURTESY SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM.

WILLIAM H. MEYER Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians, 1200 Children’s Ave., Suite 10A, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4412

Pediatric Nephrology

Dr. Mary-Jane Barth

P E D I AT R I C CARDIOTHORACIC SURGEON S A I N T F R A N C I S H E A LT H S Y S T E M

Barth treats very young and vulnerable patients who are dealing with serious heart conditions. “Pediatric cardiac surgery is always challenging, so we are all learning all the time,” she says. “It is never routine or boring.” Barth says she loves working with children and their parents and becomes very close to them during their medical journey. “The entire team – from therapists, nurses, to PICU physicians and anesthesiologists and surgeons – sometimes become an extended family with our patients who have very complex heart defects. This is both rewarding and difficult at times because, as you can imagine, there are some things that no one can fix.” Barth says she wants to bring awareness to congenital heart disease. While cardiac issues that come later in life are well known, most people are not aware of the challenges that accompany cardiac issues that develop prenatally. “Because the surgical results have improved so much, the population of adult patients with heart defects that they were born with has grown tremendously,” she explains. “While some of the defects we work on are repaired completely, some will require future surgeries and virtually all require monitoring. We have been successful in caring for infants who 20 years ago would almost certainly have died, and as a result, we are generating a population of children who do not have more than half a functional heart. These kids will have their own set of challenges in their futures. Everyone loves the cute baby, but we must continue to be devoted to the young adult who develops from that baby.” – Beth Weese

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Brain Games

Dementia is a general term for a decline in mental ability severe enough to interfere with daily life. Memory loss is an example, says The Alzheimer’s Association. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia. Some risk factors for dementia, such as age and genetics, cannot be changed. But researchers continue to explore the impact of other risk factors on brain health and prevention of dementia. Some of the most active areas of research in risk reduction and prevention include cardiovascular factors, physical fitness and diet, says Dr. Jimmie D. McAdams, the medical director of Senior Behavioral Health at Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital. “In general what we do to keep our heart healthy may have the greatest effect on our brain, but there is evidence to show that education and continued learning of new things help in slowing cognitive decline even in the face of dementia,” says McAdams. “Any game that requires planning and reasoning, such as card games, board games and word games – including word finding and crosswords – can be beneficial.” It is estimated that five million Americans aged 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By 2050, unless more effective ways to prevent and treat the disease are identified and implemented, the prevalence may triple to as high as 13.8 million people. The likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s doubles about every five years after age 65, says the CDC. Alzheimer’s disease is now the sixth leading cause of death and fifth among adults 65 to 85 years of age. – Sharon McBride


One of America’s Best, Right in Your Hometown Norman Regional Health System has again been recognized by Healthgrades® as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery™. In addition to Norman Regional being selected as one of Healthgrades® America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery™ in 2015, we have also been named among the Top 10% in the Nation for Overall Orthopedic Services and Spine Surgery™. As well as a FiveStar Recipient for Total Knee Replacement, Hip Fracture and Back Surgery™ in 2015. You don’t have to travel far for the best care. It’s right in your own hometown. • Recipient of the Healthgrades® 2015 Orthopedic Surgery Excellence Award™ • Recipient of the Healthgrades® 2015 Spine Surgery Excellence Award™ • Named Among the Top 10% in the Nation for Overall Orthopedic Services in 2015 • Named Among the Top 10% in the Nation for Spine Surgery in 2015 • Five-Star Recipient for Total Knee Replacement for 6 Years in a Row (2010-2015) • Five-Star Recipient for Hip Fracture Treatment for 8 Years in a Row (2008-2015) • Five-Star Recipient for Back Surgery in 2015

NormanRegional.com


Top Doctors

PHOTO COURTESY INTEGRIS.

Medicating For Life

Dr. John Chaffin

C A R D I O VA S C U L A R S U R G E R Y INTEGRIS

Chaffin completed his first heart transplant in 1985. “I was fortunate enough to be involved with the beginning of a cardiac transplant program at INTEGRIS Baptist Hospital and joined the team there after the third cardiac transplant,” he says. Thirty years later, the transplant team has completed more than 500 transplants, and Chaffin has been involved with most of them. As the chief of the cardiac transplant department at INTEGRIS, he has helped develop the cutting-edge program. “My partners and I at INTEGRIS are the only surgeons in the state of Oklahoma who perform thoracic organ transplant, including hearts and lungs, as well as placement of total artificial hearts and left ventricular assist devices for mechanical support of patients with advanced cardiac disease,” Chaffin says. Near the end of his time at college, his path into the medical world took a bit of a detour when he had to fulfill a commitment he made to the military. In exchange for financial support he had received, Chaffin was sent to Vietnam to work with a medical evacuation team. It was during that time that he decided he wanted to become a surgeon. Chaffin’s focus on patient care is the driving force behind his success. “I have always felt that I was in a win-win situation in that I am given the opportunity on a daily basis to make a difference in people’s lives and hopefully extend both the length and the quality of their survival,” he says. “I get to practice the specialty I love at a hospital that has been very supportive of me and the evolution of our cardiac surgery practice.” – Beth Weese

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It is estimated that 82 percent of American adults take at least one medication and 29 percent take five or more, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Medicines are used to treat infectious diseases, manage symptoms of chronic diseases and help relieve pain and suffering. Medicines are generally safe when used as prescribed or as their labeling describes. There are, however, risks in taking any medicine. “Some medicines are used to treat conditions, which are inherited, or which are due to a malfunction of the immune system,” says Dr. Rachel Franklin, medical director at OU Physicians Family Medicine. These medicines, or medicines like them, will more likely have to be taken for life, says Franklin. While others, depending on their scope and why they were prescribed, might be taken for a shorter duration of time. “Some medicines, such as blood pressure or diabetes medicines, might not have to be taken forever,” says Franklin. “Illnesses that are related to poor diet, obesity, smoking or other conditions a person could change, can be improved or reversed if that person adopts an optimally healthy lifestyle. I have had patients who were able to stop their blood pressure medicines after they lost weight.” However, Franklin cautions, all medicines have side effects, and all should be routinely monitored by a physician for continued safety and effectiveness. “You should never stop a medicine without first talking to your doctor about it,” says Franklin. – Sharon McBride THOMAS L. KUHLS Norman Regional Hospital Norman Pediatric Associates, 808 Wall St., Norman, 73069, 405.321.5114 JILL S. WARREN OU Medical Center OU Pediatric Physicians, 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Suite 6A, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6827 VICTOR T. WILSON HealthPlex Hospital 700 Wall St., Norman, 73069, 405.360.7337

Plastic Surgery

PAUL R. CALLEGARI Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Hillcrest Hospital South, 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1050, Tulsa, 74136-8330, 918.494.8200 CHRISTIAN EL AMM OU Medical Center 825 NE 10th St., Suite 1700, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4864 JUSTIN MICHAEL JONES INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma Jones Plastic Surgery, 8106 N. May Ave., Suite J, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.848.3459

ARCHIBALD S. MILLER III Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center, Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery of Tulsa, 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 315, Tulsa, 74136-8316, 918.492.2282

Psychiatry

PHEBE M. TUCKER OU Medical Center 920 Stanton L. Young Blvd., WP 3442, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.4488 JILL K. WARNOCK OU Medical Center OU-Tulsa, Department of Psychiatry, 4444 E. 41st St., Floor 3, Tulsa, 74135, 918.619.4400

Pulmonary Disease

RICHARD M. BREGMAN Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Saint Francis Sleep Disorders Center, 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 628, Tulsa, 74136, 918.502.5600 FRED GARFINKEL OU Medical Center OU Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Clinic, 591 E. 36th St. N., Tulsa, 74106, 918.619.8700

GARY T. KINASEWITZ OU Medical Center OU Physicians – Pulmonary Medicine, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 2500, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.7001 DAVID C. LEVIN OU Medical Center OU Physicians Building, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 2500, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.7001 DANIEL A. NADER CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center Cancer Treatment Centers of America, 10109 E. 79th St., Tulsa, 74133, 800.788.8485

Radiation Oncology

TERENCE S. HERMAN OU Medical Center Oklahoma Univ Health Sciences Center, 800 NE 10th St., Suite L-100, Oklahoma City, 73104-5417, 405.271.5641 J. SPENCER THOMPSON OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 NE 10th St., Suite L-100, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.3016


October 2015

THE MEDICAL ISSUE Don’t miss our annual look at the state of medicine, from public health concerns to the latest innovations.

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Top Doctors Rheumatology

TIMOTHY L. HUETTNER Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa St. John Medical Center – Tulsa, 5555 E. 71 St., Suite 7100, Tulsa, 74136, 918.491.9007 JOAN T. MERRILL OU Medical Center Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, 825 NE 13th St., MS 22, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.7805 IRA N. TARGOFF OU Medical Center OU Physicians, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.8478

Surgery

BRIAN BOGGS Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City Mercy Clinic, Breast Surgery, 4200 W. Memorial Road, Suite 708, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.749.7023 WILLIAM C. DOOLEY OU Medical Center St. Anthony Hospital – Oklahoma City, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4500, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.7867 ALAN B. HOLLINGSWORTH Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City 4300 McAuley Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.936.5455

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

CHRISTOPHER W. LENTZ INTEGRIS Baptist Regional Health Center INTEGRIS Paul Silverstein Burn Center 3300 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.552.2857

Dr. Mark Genesen

GYNECOLOGICAL ONCOLOGY TULSA CANCER INSTITUTE

Genesen’s focus is on “trying to provide the same care in others that you would want to have for yourself, family or friends,” he says. Genesen says that providing this care is much more streamlined today than it was in the past. He says patients are now able to work with one doctor throughout their treatment rather than bouncing between several in different specialties. “For us, specifically in gynecological oncology, we have been trained to be the one-stop shop,” he explains. “So a patient comes in with a problem, we make an assessment, what it might be and what’s the best path moving forward with it. If it is something that requires surgical care – GI tract, urinary tract – we do all of that.” Genesen says one of the most challenging aspects of his job is making sure patients have access to the specialists that they need. Once they do, he makes sure that they get the highest quality of treatment possible. Genesen says it’s to his patients’ benefit that Tulsa Cancer Institute has culled networks of relationships and resources over the years. “If there’s something that’s new that’s going to make a difference to our patients … [we] make sure that they have the best care available to them,” he says. – Beth Weese

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JAMES R. MCCURDY Norman Regional Hospital Norman Surgical Associates, 500 E. Robinson, Suite 2300, Norman, 73071, 405.329.4102

RUSSELL G. POSTIER OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center, 800 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.1632

SCOTT K. LUCAS St. Anthony Hospital – Oklahoma City 608 NW Ninth St., Suite 2110, Oklahoma City, 73102, 405.310.3028

DENISE L. RABLE Lakeside Women’s Hospital – Oklahoma City 10900 Hefner Pointe Dr., Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.552.0400

GOYA V. RAIKAR Oklahoma Heart Hospital – South Campus 5224 E. I-240 Service Road, Floor 2, Oklahoma City, 73135, 405.628.6815

LANETTE F. SMITH St. John Medical Center – Tulsa Hillcrest Medical Center, Breast Surgery of Tulsa, 1836 E. 15th St., Tulsa, 74104, 918.585.5658

Urology

BEVERLY TALBERT OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center, Breast Oncology, 800 NE 10th St., Suite 2300, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.7226

Thoracic & Cardiac Surgery

MARY-JANE BARTH Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis Warren Clinic, Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite 2403, Tulsa, 74136, 918.494.1710 R. MARK BODENHAMER Oklahoma Heart Hospital Oklahoma Cardiovascular Associates, 4050 W. Memorial Road, Floor 3, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.608.3800 JOHN CHAFFIN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – Oklahoma 3433 NW 56th St., B Building, Suite 670, Oklahoma City, 73112, 405.951.4345 IOANNIS MICHAEL KARAMICHALIS Saint Francis Heart Hospital Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis Warren Clinic, Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite 2403, Tulsa, 74136, 918.494.1710

MICHAEL S. COOKSON OU Medical Center OU Medical Center, Dept. of Urology, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6900 DANIEL J. CULKIN OU Medical Center OU Physicians Urology, OU Medical Center, Dept. of Urology, 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 73104, 405.271.6900

Vascular & Interventional Radiology

VANCE MCCOLLOM Mercy Hospital – Oklahoma City Mercy Hospital, Interventional Radiology, 4300 W. Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, 73120, 405.936.5775 THOMAS E. WILEY III Saint Francis Hospital – Tulsa Saint Francis Hospital – Radiology, 4111 S. Darlington Ave., Suite 700, Tulsa, 74136, 918.743.8838

Vascular Surgery

JOHN BLEBEA OU Medical Center St. John Medical Center – Tulsa, 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 600, Tulsa, 74104, 918.634.7500

Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. is a healthcare research and information company founded in 1991 by a former medical college board chairman and president to help guide consumers to America’s top doctors and top hospitals. Castle Connolly’s established online nomination survey process is open to all licensed physicians in America and is promoted through a variety of mail, email, fax and other broad distribution platforms to encourage the highest levels of participation. Nominating physicians, including the medical leadership of hospitals, are asked to identify highly skilled, exceptional doctors. Castle Connolly’s physician-led team of researchers follows a rigorous screening process to select top doctors on both the national and regional levels. Careful screening of doctors’ educational and professional experience is essential before final selection is made among those physicians most highly regarded by their peers. The result – we identify the top doctors in America and provide you, the consumer, with detailed information about their education, training and special expertise in our paperback guides, national and regional magazine “Top Doctors” features and online directories. Doctors do not and cannot pay to be selected and profiled as Castle Connolly Top Doctors. Physicians selected for inclusion in this magazine’s “Top Doctors” feature may also appear as Regional Top Doctors online at www.castleconnolly. com, or in one of Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors guides, such as America’s Top Doctors® or America’s Top Doctors® for Cancer.


C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S Saint Francis Health System congratulates those Warren Clinic physicians and Saint Francis affiliated physicians who were named among Oklahoma Magazine’s Top Doctors for 2015. We thank them for their dedication to patient care, commitment to excellence and for improving the lives of those in our community.

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SENIOR LIVING

Level Of Care Selecting a living facility for yourself or a loved one should be about comfort.

A

ging is a factor out of our control, but finding the necessary communities and living arrangements, care and support as we age should not be. Eventually, many of us reach a point when living at home is more of a burden than a benefit, when joining a community where everything from socialization to medical care is within close reach makes sense. Knowing all the facts about senior living options and the benefits that each provide can help us make the most informed decisions for ourselves or for our loved ones. At different stages throughout senior years, changes occur that alter our wants and needs. Independent living communities, assisted living and nursing homes are available at each stage to help every individual get the most out of life.

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Independent Living

For active seniors and those who are able to take care of themselves but are looking for access to more socialization and interaction, buying or renting within a retirement or independent living community allows them to join a population similar to themselves with shared interests and abilities. “Four emerging fundamental truths underpin this new era,” Generations, a Journal of the American Society on Aging said in a January 2014 article. “Residents want autonomy and community; the chance for meaningful activity; a feeling of being valued in their community; and social connection within and outside their community.” Within these communities, individuals can still benefit from total freedom with the satisfaction that other adults their age, exercise, activities, entertainment and emergency help are right at their fingertips. “Designed for seniors who require little or no assistance with the activities of daily living, independent living units provide services for residents such as housekeeping, laundry and meals,” the Assisted Living Federation of America (AFLA) says.

sisted living may be a better fit. “The growth [in assisted living residents] is due, in part, to consumer demand because consumers prefer to age in place – at home or, at the very least, in a community facility with a home-like environment, regardless of their medical condition,” AgingToday, a newspaper of the American Society on Aging, said. “Assisted living facilities are a great choice for those who can’t live on their own, but do not need nursing care,” AARP says. “A combination of housing, meals, personal care and support, social activities, 24-hour supervision and, in some residences, health-related services is usually provided.”

Nursing Home

When medical issues prevent seniors from taking care of themselves and they need constant care and attention to either rehabilitation or maintain a comfortable life, a nursing home is usually recommended. “A nursing home provides care of chronic conditions or short term convalescent or rehabilitative care, for which medical and nursing care are indicated,” ALFA says. Nursing homes are not always permanent. A resident of an assisted living facility who has a fall may check into a nursing home to receive the necessary attention to fully recover. “Nursing homes usually distinguish between skilled care and custodial (or intermediate) care,” the Alzheimer’s Association says. “Examples of skilled care are physical therapy after a joint replacement or a stroke, nursing services such as IV therapy, dressing changes for a stage three wound or new tube feedings. [Custodial care] typically includes assistance with most activities of daily living such as assistance with eating, dressing, bathing, medication management and walking.” According to Medicare, when choosing a nursing home, you should take into account a few different factors: quality of life, quality of care, availability, staff, food and dining, policies, security, preventive care, which hospitals they work with in an emergency, licensing and certifications, services and charges and fees. Making the choice, whether for yourself or a loved one, to move away from home into one of these communities is a big change and can be overwhelming. Feeling confident in your decision, the amount of care needed and the community chosen, will make the move more relaxed when the time comes. Researching and visiting multiple communities may help make the decision and moving process easier.

“At different stages throughout senior years, changes occur that alter our wants and needs. Independent living communities, assisted living and nursing homes are available at each stage to help every individual get the most out of life. “

Assisted Living

If an independent living community does not include all the support that you or your loved one needs, you may begin looking at other options. The once-overwhelming and unimaginable thought of living anywhere but home may change when simple, day-today routines and habits can no longer be performed on one’s own. At this point, with the increased need of care and support, as-

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Summer Wedding Guide

Details of the Day

T

Be prepared and know what to ask when lining up the particulars of a wedding.

Photography by Chris Humphrey Photographer he life-altering question has been asked, the response was “yes,” and now before the vows can be exchanged, it’s time to choose the date, book the venue, buy the dress, rent the tux, select the flowers, pick the food – and the list goes on. Planning the ideal wedding day can be a tremendous amount of work, and sometimes couples forget a few of the niceties. We have got you covered.

Consider Professional Help

Planning a wedding can drive any couple crazy, and while getting a therapist may seem like the solution, that’s not the kind of help you need. Hiring a professional planner can take the stress of planning your perfect day down a notch or two. Joe Mathis, event producer and owner of J.A. Mathis, has been planning events for 20 years and has experienced it all. “I see [the event planner’s] role as taking away the headaches of the planning process or providing the extra team needed at the event,” he explains. “Sometimes a client may feel like they lose control of their event by having an outside planner, but I personally hope they have more control of the event and the areas that are important to them.” When meeting with clients, Mathis likes to go through the couple’s ideas, dreams and expec-

tations for their wedding. “My first meeting is always about getting to know them, thinking about their event and where I can best help them,” he says. “At some point, I love to meet with both sets of parents and even bridesmaids and groomsmen. The more everyone is on the same page the better the day goes.” With expertise on his side, Mathis has seen his fair share of wedding mishaps. The number one problem he sees couples struggle with is listening to all the outside influences. “They forget to make it ‘their’ wedding,” he says. “They do what they think they are supposed to do rather than what really represents them and their family.” Couples can avoid the disagreements by making a list of priorities. They should ask themselves what is important and know when they are willing to make exceptions. “Planning a wedding can be great practice for marriage,” Mathis says. “There needs to be a lot of give and take. In fact, the bigger concern to me is when one, either the bride or the groom, has all of the say, and there isn’t conversation JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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and thinking things through. It is really about the couple – not just about the bride.” Knowing what to ask your event planner can be a challenge, but what couples need to remember is the basics. You need a date, time of day for your nuptials, a place in mind, an idea of who you want to invite (your venue may determine how many guest you invite and vice versa), the types of food and drinks you like, and know how much you can spend. “Many couples go out and get their venue or line up details and then try to make it all happen,” Mathis says. “My favorites are the ones who come to me before they spend any money, and we talk about date choices, venues and details together. It makes everything else fall into place easier.” Planning a wedding is about priorities. Typically the largest expense is reception (party) and decorations (flowers), Mathis says. When thinking about the expense of food, he also says couples should ask themselves, “What style does our family celebrate special occasions?” For a family who normally does pizza on paper plates, it might be awkward to do a seven-course, $200-per-plate meal on fine china. “I’m not saying you can’t do it,” he says. “I think many family gatherings are much more informal, and then when we try to do a reception that is extremely formal, it can confuse everyone.”

Find the Right Place

According to Barbara Casey, general manager for The Campbell Hotel, there is a lot to contemplate when selecting the right venue for a wedding and reception. Couples sometimes have to decide what is more important to them: the date they get married or the venue. You may have your heart set on a luxury hotel on June 20, but it may not be available. “If a couple wants to get married in a more popular month like June or July or September, it is best to start looking even more than a year out,” Casey explains. “Other dates are easier to find a space open, but you never know unless you check. Also, the most expensive day for a venue is Saturday, followed by Friday, then Sunday, with weekdays being even more economical.” Casey reminds couples to consider whether the space is large enough for the amount of guests they are planning to invite, and keep in mind possible catering issues (does the venue allow outside vendors or do you have to purchase food from the venue?). Some venues will give you the reception room for free if you order a certain amount of food from their catering department. “They should ask if there are any additional

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Summer Wedding Guide fees such as tax or gratuity or is the price all inclusive. Also, specifically ask what is included with the room rental,” says Carla Waller, director of sales at The Campbell Hotel. When searching for the perfect location, be sure to ask about parking, guest accommodations (if you’re looking at a hotel), media options, guidance and presence of event staff for set up and preparation, what is included in the event venue price, and note the look and ambiance of the space. “You should consider what you want your overall vision to be and if that venue fits your vision,” Waller says. “Knowing what theme or atmosphere you are looking for allows your time with the venue manager to be well spent.” Researching venues ahead of visiting is always a plus. Waller suggests requesting information to be emailed about the venue before taking a tour to ensure that it is within budget.

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Learn What’s Blooming

A wedding would not be complete without decorations, especially flowers. The flowers are the finishing touch that sets the theme to make any wedding day exceptional. Every couple wants their wedding to be memorable, and the flowers or arrangements should reflect their specific taste and personality. As one of the most costly expenses of a wedding, a couple needs to think about the time of year before selecting the right floral arrangement. “It is best to stick with flowers that are in season and not necessarily what’s in style,” advises Elizabeth Wallis, owner of Petal Pushers. “Also, try not to pick a holiday or a day around holidays because the price for flowers goes up as the demand rises.” She not only instructs couples to explore the flower options for the season, but to also

have a good understanding of what they don’t like or want in their arrangements. “It makes it easier on a florist if they know what you absolutely don’t want in your wedding bouquet or arrangements,” Wallis says. “Search in magazines and look around to see what you like before going to the florist.” Wallis also thinks it is imperative to trust a florist. “I think the most important thing is that you feel comfortable with the florist,” she says. “You must feel like they understand what you want for the wedding and the reception.” Always make an appointment to get the best information concerning cost and what is in season, Wallis advises. “I prefer appointments because it allows me to get to know the bride and helps me to


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Summer Wedding Guide

determine the best flower options,” she says. “I can’t provide an accurate cost estimate without knowing the details.” Some brides buy or rent the vases or containers before going to the florist, but Wallis says brides should meet with a florist before purchasing anything. “You never know what a florist may already have on hand or be able to get for you,” she says. Wallis says the most important flower arrangement is the bride’s bouquet, but other essentials include bouquets for the bridesmaids, boutonnieres for the groom and groomsmen, and if the budget allows, corsages or boutonnieres for the mothers, fathers and grandparents. “Including aunts and uncles can really start to add up, so couples need to decide what is important to them and what their budget will allow. It’s also nice to have flowers during the ceremony, but it isn’t necessary. It is about what you can afford,” she says.

Hors D’oeuvres or Plated Meal?

Deciding what to serve beyond cake may be a task for some soon-to-be-wed couples. You also don’t want to be that couple known for having terrible food at the reception, or if your budget is tight you may worry about how you will afford to feed your guests. Before you begin tasting the food and picking the wine that will fuel your guest during your celebration, it is essential that you have your venue booked. Some venues don’t allow outside catering, so you don’t want to meet with a caterer before you know where your soiree is happening. Samantha Thomas, event catering and marketing director at Andolini’s Pizzeria, says the venue can also affect what a catering company would recommend. “It helps to have your date and venue set so it gives the caterer an idea of what direction the couple is going with the wedding,” she explains. “It also determines what foods we might suggest and makes it easier for us [caterers] to help them choose the perfect menu for their big day.” The common theme of planning a wedding is to know the budget or know how much you are willing or able to spend. Thomas says this is especially important when selecting the food. “If a couple has their budget before they start a tasting it helps us guide them better in selecting foods from our menu,” she says. “I hate to show them a platter option that they love, but it is outside of their budget.” Most caterers can work with couples and their budget, but they should have realistic expectations.

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Summer Wedding Guide

“There are plenty of ways to cut corners, and we will work to get as much food into your budget as possible, but you have to let your caterer know what you want and what you’re able to spend,” Thomas explains. “People are always shocked at how expensive food is for their event, but if you do your research before choosing a restaurant or caterer, it helps. Most list their prices online, and this will save you time.” Thomas encourages couples to attend wedding shows. Often, food vendors and caterers will offer discounts or free food if couples book tastings with them at shows. Couples should also consider the time of year when picking the menu for their gathering. Thomas suggests, for outdoor venues, especially during the warmer months, colder food items and lighter hors d’oeuvres like vegetable or antipasto platters. However, if the reception were in a rustic indoor cabin in the fall or winter months she would advise comfort foods like meaty pastas or pizzas and heavier hors d’oeuvres. While some food options are better for the various seasons, Thomas agrees that most appetizers can be served year-round. When it comes to selecting a menu, it isn’t just the food couples should focus on. Couples should also ask the caterer how the food would be presented and served. “You don’t want to expect your salad in a pretty bowl, and the caterer shows up and it’s in an aluminum pan,” Thomas explains. “It’s the little details and finishing touches that you should ask about, and www.marriott.com/tultd never assume something is being provided.” 918-508-2333 Thomas sees a lot of couples stress over pleasing the guests, and her last bit of advice is to not worry about whether the Johnsons at table two are going to like the gourmet mac and cheese. 5/12/15 10:24 AM “Ultimately, you should remember that this is your special day, and it is sweet to think of others but it is impossible to make everyone happy,” Thomas adds. “It’s going to be okay if you don’t please everyone.”

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Planning a wedding can be overwhelming, but it begins with setting a budget. Everything else will start to come together once you have set your finances for your wedding celebration. Also, remember the particulars are important, but weddings are about much more than having the perfect dress, the ultimate venue or the right kind of food. It is about creating family memories and representing the lives of two families coming together for a lifetime. It is easy to get lost in the details of planning and pleasing everyone, but don’t forget you should do what works for you as a couple, because in the end, it is your day

12/11/14 11:10 AM

. ALAINA STEVENS


appily ever after

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THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR I’m so far gone; what’s the point? Compulsive behaviors are shaped through forming patterns of emotional and mental habits. Our brains and body become attached to the thoughts, feelings and emotions associated with our actions. “I’ll COURTNEY LINSENMEYERalways be fat, so why try?”; “I’ve O’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR always been an addict and always will”; “I’ve been this way for as long as I can remember. Why change now?” The thought, behavior and emotion become associated with the brain and body as a pattern, later becoming a habit. Eventually, habits can become who, what, when and how we think about ourselves as we set sail on the directions of our life and chart a course each day. The brain and body have recall and can be retrained. Habits begin by shaping our behaviors, emotions and thinking process to develop patterns of behavior creating healthier habits. Breaking a cycle is a journey, but possible.

FINANCIAL ADVISOR Am I in a position to retire early? While many retirees have to stop working earlier than they’d planned due to health or employer issues, an early retirement continues to be a longstanding dream for many people. The upside of early retirement is easy to understand – more time to DAVID KARIMIAN, CRPC® pursue your interests, and to do so while you are still in good health. The downside risk centers on whether it will create a financial strain over time and the emotional impact of changing your routine. Keep in mind that given today’s life expectancies, anybody who retires prior to age 65 or 66 could easily spend two-to-three decades or more in retirement. Given this reality, here are five key questions you should answer before you decide to retire early: - Do you have a realistic plan to generate income for decades? - Do you have outstanding debts to pay? - Are you going to claim Social Security benefits early? - What is your plan for health care? - Are you emotionally prepared for a dramatic change in your life?

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

VETERINARIAN What are some helpful summer pet safety tips?

DR. RODNEY ROBARDS

Summer is right around the corner. Pet owners must be aware that extra care must be given to make sure that their furry friends are healthy and safe. The extreme heat in Oklahoma can be much worse for our pets. Those with dark coats, geriatric or obese pets, and those with shorter muzzles require extra caution.

• Provide a sufficient amount of water for your pet at all times! If your pet is outdoors, make sure the water does not get too hot in their bowl. • Limit your dog’s sun exposure by walking them in the early morning and evening when temperatures are lower. • Pet fur acts as a sunscreen in itself, so the shorter your pet’s hair, the more susceptible they are to sunburn. Please consider before grooming, and if you must shave your pet, try to do it early in the summer, giving the hair time to grow out. • If your pet has short hair, pink skin and/or white fur, they will be especially vulnerable to sun damage. • Pavement and asphalt can get especially hot and burn your pet’s paws, which is why it’s best to walk your dog when it’s cooler out, or keep them on grass and sidewalk.

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl., Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

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INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

David Karimian, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 David.x.Karimian@ampf.com

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT What is a white paper, and why is it important to my marketing strategy? You are a credible and reliable authority in your industry, and it’s important to position yourself as an expert. A white paper will help spread the word. A white paper JESSICA DYER is more than just a sales tool; it is a contribution to your industry. A well-executed white paper provides relevant and accurate information on a timely, industry-specific topic. It becomes a useful reference tool for your colleagues and customers, providing quick and factual information. It is important to remember that white papers are not based in opinion, they are always factual, with the sole intention of educating readers and helping your audience make decisions. They should be limited to one or two pages. Think of it as a lunch and learn on paper, providing your customers with bite-size information in an easily digestible format. A well executed white paper will not only become an effective sales tool, but will position your company as an authority in your industry, enhancing your overall marketing efforts.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539.777.6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR 7136 S Yale Suite 120 Tulsa, OK 74136

What are personal property insurance limitations? Too many people make a mistake thinking all of their personal property items they own will be appropriately covered under their homeowners’ insurance policy. JARED PETERSON

-

Here are some common limitations not typically understood:

Jewelry, watches, furs: Often limited to a maximum of $1,500-$2,500 for theft. Money: Often limited to $250-$500. Motorized vehicles (ATVs, Golf Carts, tractors, etc): Typically only covered if used to maintain the premises. Tools: Often limited to $2,000 if used for any business purposes. Watercraft: Often limited to $1,500 including motor and trailer. Firearms: Commonly limited to $2,500 for theft. Collectibles: Often limited to $1,500 for stamp, coin collections, etc.

Many of these items can receive increased limits of coverage by special endorsement and an increased insurance premium. For a higher premium, some items can be “scheduled,” which insures the items for an appraised amount and will provide “all peril” coverage including mysterious disappearance. If you would like to review your personal property or homeowners’ insurance coverage, contact a AAA Agent nearest you.

Jared Peterson, AAA Oklahoma 2121 E 15th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.748.1030 Jared.Peterson@aaaok.org

PHYSICAL THERAPY Athletes wear colorful tape on their shoulder, thigh or calf. Does it work? What you are describing is kinesiotape. It was developed in the ‘70s and was initially skin tone. Due to successful marketing, this tape was created in different colors and placed on highTIM MINNICK, PT level athletes to sell better. Thus, now you see this tape on young athletes and professionals. Unfortunately, I am personally unaware of any peer-reviewed research that proves kinesiotape improves athletic performance or prevents injury. It may help reduce edema following an injury event due to its professed ability to increase fluid flow in tissue underneath the tape. Additionally, it may provide a little proprioceptive feedback to an athlete during competition. Otherwise, much of the “benefit” is probably placebo in nature. More peer-reviewed research is needed related to this taping technique. Physical Therapists prefer to work on solving the underlying problems that lead to an athlete feeling a need for taping.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


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To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. ATTORNEY AT LAW I am receiving social security disability (SSD). If I get married, will it affect my benefits? If you are receiving SSD, then marriage will have no affect on your benefits. However, if you are receiving Supplement Security Income (SSI) through social security as a ESTHER M. SANDERS disabled individual, then household income will reduce the benefits that you receive, because SSI is needs-based, as opposed to payments through the monies that you paid in during your past work history. If you are receiving SSI, then your benefits will be reduced by household income, regardless of whether or not you are married.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST

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My grandfather has had Alzheimer’s disease for several years now, and his health is failing quickly. His physician recently suggested we bring in hospice care, but my grandmother does not want him to go to a nursing home. Can he get the care at his home?

Absolutely. The goal of hospice is to make the patient as comfortable as possible while helping provide some relief for the family members. We are able to provide hospice care wherever is most beneficial to the patient and his or her family members. In fact, nearly 80 percent of all hospice patients receive care in their home or a senior living facility. Our team of experts will work with your physician and your family to create a customized plan of care. You can call Grace Hospice at 918.744.7223, and we will be happy to provide you with more information.

What can be done to rid myself of stubborn excess fat and feel confident in my swim-suit this summer? The new, non-invasive procedure Coolsculpting® uses a patented cooling technology that targets and destroys fat cells. FDA-approved MALISSA SPACEK Coolsculpting® can be done in as quickly as one hour with no downtime and lasting results. Our patients begin to see a noticeable reduction of fat in as little as three weeks and continue to see improving, long-lasting results for up to three months following a treatment. This procedure is ideal for those looking to get rid of a little extra in their tummies, love handles, bra fat, arms and thighs. To schedule a complimentary consultation to learn more about Coolsculpting®, call today at 918.872.9999.

“Grace Hospice: Caring for patients and families in Northeastern Oklahoma for more than 15 years”

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free

DEVELOPMENTAL OPTOMETRIST Why do children need bifocals? Bifocal glasses use a special lens that corrects vision at two different distances – a prescription on top for distance and a different prescription on the bottom for near. When bifocals are mentioned, most people MEGAN KIRKPATRICK, OD think of these lenses being used for people over 40 who have lost their ability to focus up close due to age. However, children could also benefit from reading glasses. Many children can benefit from an addition of a bifocal in their glasses prescription. These are children who have not developed sufficient control over their focusing systems. Some children lack the ability to sustain sufficient focusing over an extended time period and others can’t make fast focusing shifts from one distance to another (such as copying notes from the board to their desk). There are also some children who have a tendency to over focus, and the additional stress causes eyestrain and headaches. Children could also benefit from no-line or progressive bifocals and multifocal contact lenses, if a need for bifocals are noted.

Megan Kirkpatrick, OD South Tulsa Vision Development Center 8988- D1 S Sheridan Tulsa, OK 74133 918.992.2343 www.tulsavisiondevelopment.com

Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT I want to look a little different from the other guys at my office that have style. What are ways to change it up without looking like I am trying too hard? If you read anything from me, you know that I’m always encouraging others to establish a personal style. It’s just a big AUTUMN POHL part of developing that individual character. Today, when it comes to clothing style for men, there are many ways to look unique. If you check out style blogs or even just catch a glimpse of the commentators from the game over the weekend, you will notice that it’s all in the small details. An idea would be something simple, like adding a pop of color to your pocket square or having a different design between your pocket square and your tie. How about trying out a new way to knot your tie? Try the Trinity knot or the Eldredge knot. Both very fresh looks can jazz up any suit. One of my favorite small details is matching the color of your shoe laces to your dress shirt. It’s a very soft detail that pulls a look together as if it was a fully finished look. Note that women do notice those details and appreciate the fact that you took the time to care. Don’t overthink your style. Do what comes natural and enjoy your individuality. Be inspired, but always be you.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

I haven't talked to my sister in 12 years. Recently, she has been on my mind. She was really cruel to me in the past, and I don’t know if I should even bother contacting her, yet I feel bad because she is my sibling. Siblings have a very unique relationship; it is the longest relationship we have with one person. Often the problems we have with our siblings in adulthood are resulting from issues that began in childhood. Siblings close in age can often be very competitive for parental favor and attention. Rivalry in youth often turns to strife in adulthood. Of course there are many factors that contribute to sibling relationships and our own sense of self, but few appreciate the sibling bond as an important part of adult life. If you are having thoughts of your sister, perhaps it is a good time to reach out and try to make contact. Keep in mind a few tips: Don’t start off in argument, but keep the focus on how things are going now; do not judge, stay current and do not re-visit the past; let go of any expectations. This could be a great starting point. AMY KESNER, PHD, LPC, LADC

Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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3/13/15 11:33 AM


Taste

EISCHEN’S IS KNOWN FOR ITS FRIED CHICKEN, WHICH BRINGS CROWDS FROM ALL OVER THE STATE TO THE TINY TOWN OF OKARCHE. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

FOOD, DRINK, AND OTHER PLEASURES

I

A Living Legend

Oklahoma’s oldest bar also sells the state’s most famed fried chicken.

t’s a chicken shack as well as the oldest bar in Oklahoma, but that only adds to the appeal of Eischen’s, a big operation running out of a small storefront in tiny Okarche, Oklahoma, about 40 miles northwest of Oklahoma City. The restaurant was opened as a saloon in 1896 – a full 10 years before Oklahoma even became a state – by Peter Eischen. Eischen’s Bar, as it’s known today, opened shortly after the end of Prohibition in 1933, with Peter’s son and grandson, Nick and Jack Eischen, as owners. It was as Eischen’s Bar that the joint became known as the best place in the state for fried chicken. A tragic fire closed the restaurant for about six months in 1993, but it was rebuilt and reopened to great celebration. Eight electric fryers line the kitchen of Ed “Chief” Eischen, chef and co-owner of the restaurant. These fryers cook about 24,000 pieces of chicken a week. JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

1492 NEW WORLD LATIN CUISINE Large floor-to-ceiling windows allow guests here to enjoy the views outside accompanied by natural light, which brightens up the space during the day. At night, the dimly lit restaurant serves sizzling, Latin-inspired cuisine that keeps patrons returning. The building that houses 1492 is an experience in and of itself: Sleek, sharp architectural lines, bright colors and interesting artwork sets a backdrop unlike any other. The tastes stand on their own, as well. While everything on this flavor-packed menu is worth a bite, the queso, which includes beans, spicy beef, sour cream, guacamole and pico de gallo; and the Cocktail Del Mar, a light and fresh seafood ceviche, are must-try appetizers. For special plates, the El Chicano, grilled poblano peppers stuffed with shrimp and

KNOWN FOR ITS FRIED CHICKEN, EISCHEN’S SERVES A LIMITED MENU THAT INCLUDES CHILI, BARBECUE SANDWICHES, NACHOS AND FRIED OKRA.

The scant menu – eight items total – offers sandwiches, chili, nachos and fried okra, but it’s the chicken that keeps hordes of Oklahomans pouring into the doors of Eischen’s. The chicken, light and crispy from the fryer but not at all greasy, is served piping hot. The breading and skin of the chicken are crunchy, but the meat inside is moist and tender. The chicken, which can only be ordered whole, costs $14 and is served with bread, pickles and raw onions. The chicken shack’s landmark status is evident in the large list of musicians, chefs, politicians and athletes that have visited Eischen’s. Visitors have included country superstars and Oklahoma natives Vince Gill, Garth Brooks and Toby Keith; Food Network and Diners, Drive-ins and Dives host Guy Fieri; internationally renowned chef Danny Bowien; governors, mayors and Oklahoma football royalty, including former OU coach Barry Switzer. Open from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. six days a week, Eischen’s is closed on Sundays. Eischen’s is cash-only, so remember to stop by an ATM before visiting. 102 S. Second St., Okarche. www.eischensbar.com JAMI MATTOX

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skirt steak; the Pineapple Espresso Pork, marinated, center-cut pork tenderloin served atop a perfectly grilled pineapple; and the Pabellon, Venezuelan shredded brisket marinated in red wine and served with yucca, rice and black beans, are unbelievably good. The menu also includes Tex-Mex basics, so if you’re craving enchiladas, fajitas or burritos, 1492 has got you covered. 1207 N. Walker Ave., Oklahoma City. www.1492okc.com – Brittany Anicetti

1492’S CEVICHE – TILAPIA, SHRIMP AND CRAB COOKED IN A CITRUS BLEND – IS TOPPED WITH FRESH AVOCADO. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

MAMA SINMI’S CHOP HOUSE

Mama Sinmi is the head chef at this West African-inspired restaurant. With a passion of sharing the stories and culture of West Africa, Mama Sinmi used her catering experience to open an eatery that would offer Oklahoma City the tastes true to her home country of Nigeria. Not only can patrons get these authentic meals in the restaurant, but Mama Sinmi also caters weddings, parties and potlucks. The healthy, organic, natural tastes that come out of her kitchen embody the kinds of food found in Nigeria. Using fresh ingredients and bold flavor combinations, the cuisine found here is pleasingly unique. For a snack, try the Meat Pie, a flaky, but-

tery shell filled with spiced ground beef, peas, carrots and potatoes. For an entrée, there’s no going wrong with the Jollof Rice, rice cooked in Mama Sinmi’s famous red sauce, or a Pepper Soup Entrée, which comes with a choice of goat meat or tilapia and is served with white rice, plantains and FuFu: a dough made from either boiled, roasted or dried and ground cassava, yam or oatmeal. The Efo Riro, with fresh cut spinach in a broth of pepper, tomato, onion, palm oil and fragrant spices, comes with choice of beef, chicken, goat or tilapia, and is always a tasty treat. 2312 N. Macarthur Blvd., Oklahoma City. www.mamasinmi. com. – B.A. MEAT PIE AND SUYA AT MAMA SINMI’S IS AN AUTHENTIC TASTE OF NIGERIA. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.


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Taste

GLUTEN-FREE SPRING ROLLS AND THAI CUCUMBER RELISH ARE A COUPLE OF FRESH TASTES AT JK’S THAI BUFFET. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

ON WHEELS

LONE WOLF BANH MI

When Lone Wolf opened its window to Tulsa residents and the city’s still-burgeoning food truck movement in 2012, banh mi was still something of a mystery to diners. The fresh and flavorful Vietnamese sandwich quickly caught on, however, and business has been brisk for Lone Wolf. So brisk, in fact, that the proprietors of the truck, Philip and Danielle Phillips, appeared on CNBC’s Restaurant Startup to seek investors in Lone Wolf’s yet-to-come brickand-mortar establishment. Lone Wolf has established a schedule that makes it easier for those craving Asian cuisine to find it. Truck meet-ups are where you may find Lone Wolf parked for lunch Tuesday through Friday, and at nights, The Fur Shop becomes the temporary home for Lone Wolf. Banh mi filled with Kung Pao pork, cilantro pesto chicken, soy Dijon portabella and other mouth-watering options remain the center around which Lone Wolf exists. Kimchi fries – French fries fried crispy and topped with a variety of options, including candied bacon, pulled pork or an over-easy egg – are also popular at the truck. Fried rice bowls in myriad flavor combinations are popular options for hungry customBANH MI IS STUFFED WITH MEAT AND ers. The spiced flavors of PICKLED VEGETABLES ON THE LONE WOLF FOOD TRUCK. this Vietnamese-inspired PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT. cuisine are tamped by fresh, tangy carrot and daikon slaw, cilantro, cucumbers and aioli. Follow Lone Wolf on Facebook or Twitter to find out the daily menu, specials and for more information on booking Lone Wolf for special events. www. lonewolftruck.com – Jami Mattox

SIP

INDIA PALACE

The large wooden doors that open into Tulsa’s oldest Indian restaurant hint at the regal cuisine that awaits. The smell of spice – coriander, cumin, turmeric and others mingling – is the first impression guests at this authentic Indian restaurant receive. Spice is a hallmark of dishes served at India Palace. Spices that most associate with sweet treats, like cinnamon ginger, are used to give meat and rice dishes a savory kick. Biryanis, curries and masalas sing with complex spice flavor. Chutneys made with fresh ingredients like cilantro and tamarind are served to each guest for adding flavor layers to menu items. The complexity of India Palace’s dishes are best ended with something sweet to drink. Two signature Indian drinks – chai and mango lassi – are delicious choices at the restaurant.

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Chai is black tea with milk and spices like cinnamon, star anise, ginger and clove. The milky texture of the tea and sweet note of spice is warming. India Palace serves chai in ceramic mugs and offers refills to those who would like one more cup. The lassi is a cooling yogurt drink that is both sweet and fruity. At India Palace, yogurt is combined with fresh mango and pureed until smooth. The drink is served in an ice cream soda glass and can be enjoyed at any point in the meal, though it is best thought of as dessert. The soothing yogurt is ideal after a spicy meal. 6963 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa. www.theindiapalacetulsa.com – J.M.

THE MANGO LASSI AT INDIA PALACE IS A SWEET TREAT TO ENJOY AFTER A SPICY MEAL.

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.


L O C A L F L AV O R W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

JK’s Thai Buffet

Thai favorites like Pad Thai, Massaman curry and Tom Yum Kai are served with gusto at JK’s Thai Buffet in Broken Arrow. The restaurant prides itself on offering patrons fresh, homemade, authentic Thai food prepared daily. Choose from the menu, or opt for the buffet, which offers a rotating selection of Thai dishes, along with rice, spring rolls, egg rolls, soups and salads. A hallmark of Thai cuisine and of the selections at JK’s, spice is incorporated into dishes like pepper garlic chicken, Tom Kha Kai and curry sauces. Visit JK’s for lunch or dinner, or carry out. Either way, the small eatery will satisfy cravings for authentic Thai. 1421 E. Kenosha, Broken Arrow. www. jksthaibuffet.com – Jami Mattox

EVELYN’S

Wanda J learned the art of cooking and creating “food for the soul” as a child from her mother, Evelyn. That passion grew into Wanda J’s Soul Food Kitchen in 1974 and the more recent Evelyn’s Soul Food Kitchen in 2005. Today, Evelyn’s, a family-oriented restaurant, allows Wanda to share her and her mother’s love for rich, flavorful, lip-smacking good soul food. A forkful of anything on this menu is a hot commodity: A full plate at Evelyn’s turns into a full belly in no time. Diners in the mood for something light but rich in taste and flavor can choose from the baked turkey, grilled chicken breast, beef patty melt or baked chicken. Those ready to take the plunge into fried food heaven can dig into the chicken fried chicken, fried pork chops, fried catfish, chicken fried steak and chopped sirloin. Burgers, BLTs and other sandwiches are available as well as vegetables with sass, which include candied yams, mashed potatoes, green beans, buttered corn, mac ‘n’ cheese and okra and tomatoes. And there’s no such thing as a soul food dish without a side of fries, onion rings, fried okra or a baked potato. 3014 N. 74th E. Ave., Tulsa. www.evelynsoulfood. com – Brittany Anicetti

FRIED CHICKEN, COLLARD GREENS, SWEET POTATOES, CORNBREAD AND MAC & CHEESE IS PERFECT SERVED WITH ICED TEA AT EVELYN’S. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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YO U R G R E E N C O U N T R Y

W E AT H E R T E A M

TA F T P R I C E

B R I T TA N Y R A I N E Y

BRETT ANTHONY

GEORGE FLICKINGER

C H I E F M E T E O R O LO G I ST

K E E P I N G YO U S A F E

CERTIFIED MOST ACCURATE FOR A DECADE


Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

CANADIAN BRASS, ONE OF THE FESTIVAL’S FEATURED ARTISTS, IS KNOWN FOR ITS UNIQUE STYLE THAT PAIRS SUITS WITH SNEAKERS. PHOTO COURTESY OK MOZART.

Benvenuto a Bartlesville

E

OK Mozart’s 31st year will take audiences on a unique tour of Italy.

very year talent of the highest caliber arrives in Bartlesville for a three-day festival that allows Oklahomans and visitors from across the country to experience music and culture with international significance. The OK Mozart International Festival first drew its curtains in 1983. Now in its 31st year, the festival’s line-up is expected to be better than ever as it celebrates the music of Italy. For an entire week, enjoy concerts performed at multiple venues throughout Bartlesville. Featured artists include Maestro Constantine Kitsopoulos, who has conducted orchestras in Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall and Royal Albert Hall; vocalists from Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni and Requiem casts; Louise Owen, the “Kitchen Fiddler,” a violinist who has studied the art since she was 3 years old and is now a member of the American Sinfonietta; OK Mozart Festival’s orchestra-in-residence, Amici New York Orchestra and more. Also hear from the Tulsa Youth Orchestra, the Bartlesville Choral Society conducted by Susan Mueller and Courtney Crouse and Matthew

Denman, two Oklahoma City University professors, who will intrigue with their sound that fuses the classical guitar with a mezzo soprano voice. Fill up on Italian culture at the L’Amore D’Italia Gala Ball, a black tie evening of dinner and dance with music by members of the Amici New York Orchestra. Throughout the week, 51 showcase events will provide guests with musical, historical and educational activities of all cultural flavors. Events include a West African drumming concert; performances by Travis Dunlap, Wade Daniels and Lenny Baker; architectural tours; Broadway favorites sung by classical baritone Dr. Jonathan Stewart and more. This year the OK Mozart International Festival, celebrating the 259th anniversary of Wolfgang Mozart’s birth, will run Saturday, June 6 through Saturday, June 13. It’s set to be an incredible week of music, entertainment, education and culture. For a full schedule, event descriptions and ticket information, visit www.okmozart.com. BRITTANY ANICETTI

JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY Huey Lewis and The News June 5 Brady

Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Patti LaBelle June 5 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Clint Black June 5 Riverwind Casino. www. riverwind.com

Greg Jacobs June 5 The Blue Door. www. bluedoorokc.com

AWOLNATION June 6 Diamond Ballroom.

www.diamondballroom.net

Weezer June 6 WinStar World Casino. www. winstarworldcasino.com Vince Gill & Tracy Lawrence June 6 The Oklahoma City Zoo Amphitheatre. www. thezooamphitheatre.com PHOTO COURTESY LYRIC THEATRE.

Tyler, The Creator June 7 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Brit Floyd: Space & Time World Tour June 7 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals June 9 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

E-40 June 10 The Vanguard Music Hall. www. thevanguardtulsa.com

Lynyrd Skynyrd June 11 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Zomboy June 11 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

Performance OKLAHOMA!

Curly, a good-looking cowboy, and Laurey, a sweet and charming farm girl, take the stage in Oklahoma City this month. Oklahoma!, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein’s first collaboration, based on the 1931 play Green Grow the Lilacs, took form in 1943 under the bright lights of Broadway. Set just outside Claremore in 1906, Oklahoma! quickly arrived on the musical map with its use of song and dance in its storyline and musical themes and motifs repeated throughout. See the birth of Curly and Laurey’s romance accompanied by “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’.” And because no love story is ever simple, “People Will Say We’re In Love” will guide Laurey’s attempt to convince Curly they are not. “The Farmer and the Cowman,” will direct the square dancing rivalry between local farmers and cowboys that end in fight, but love will prevail, and all will rejoice with “Oklahoma!” A musical with many characters and side stories, there’s much excitement wrapped into one, two-and-a-half hour performance. See Lyric Theatre’s presentation of Oklahoma! at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall June 23-27. For more information, visit www.okcciviccenter.com.

cainsballroom.com

Chris Brown June 12 Chesapeake Energy

Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

Dwight Yoakam June 12 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort. www.grandresortok.com

Jamey Johnson June 12 Riverwind Casino. www.riverwind.com

Patrice Pike June 12 The Blue Door. www.

bluedoorokc.com

Other Lives June 13 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Ben Folds June 14 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Tony Macalpine June 14 The Vanguard

Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

The Mowgli’s June 17 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

PERFORMANCES One-Man Lord of the Rings June 4-7 This

is the follow-up theatrical extravaganza to last year’s sensational, sold-out One-Man Star Wars starring Charles Ross. www.okcciviccenter.com

The Winter’s Tale June 4-20 Enjoy this

wistful play, part of Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park’s 2015 season, at Myriad Gardens. www. oklahomashakespeare.com

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof June 5-13 Set at the

Mississippi Delta plantation home of a wealthy cotton tycoon, this Pulitzer Prize-winning play remains one of Tennessee Williams’ best works. www.okcciviccenter.com

West Side Story June 5-7, 11-14 Don’t miss

one of the most memorable musicals and greatest love stories of all time at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, presented by Tulsa Project Theatre. www.tulsapac.com

Gimme Abbey June 12 Rock out to a concert

that pays tribute to two of the greatest bands in rock ‘n’ roll history: The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. You’ll be amazed by the two great tribute bands that take the stage: The Return and Satisfaction. www.tulsapac.com

Pagliacci Project June 12, 13 Aerial silks,

lyra, trapeze and the Spanish web will unravel the Pagliacci Project, which was adapted from Ruggero Leoncavallo’s opera Pagliacci. www.tulsapac.com

cainsballroom.com

Bruce Bruce June 13 The fan favorite

stand-up comedian who always keeps his audience rolling with laughter will be at Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com Alonzo King Lines Ballet June 14 See the beautiful and captivating movements of this celebrated San Francisco-based contemporary ballet company. www.tulsapac.com.

Trio Spiritoso: 18 To 21 June 18 The flute,

The Way Bent Revue June 18-20 This fun

The Steel Wheels June 1 Woody Guthrie

musical arrangement combines selections from more than 80 songs written for 50 Broadway shows. www.tulsapac.com

Robin Trower June 2 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com The Choir June 2 The Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

bokcenter.com

Dan Weber June 18 The Blue Door. www. bluedoorokc.com

SubsoniX June 18 Oklahoma City Farmers

Market. www.okcfarmersmarket.com

Tears For Fears June 16 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com Whitesnake June 17 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort. www.grandresortok.com

Tedeschi Trucks Band June 17 The

Oklahoma City Zoo Amphitheatre. www. thezooamphitheatre.com

Smashing Pumpkins June 19 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com Kevin Fowler June 19 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

2 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Move Live on Tour June 19 This standout

cainsballroom.com

Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular June

You, Me and Everyone We Know June

19 Grand Casino Hotel & Resort. www. grandresortok.com

Bill Engvall June 26, 27 He will be at Riverwind

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

Center. www.woodyguthriecenter.org

Luke Bryan June 18 BOK Center. www.

annual festival of original works that consists of short plays written by local playwrights, directed by local directors and features local actors. www.tulsapac.com

Oklahoma! June 23-27 Presented by Lyric Theatre, watch this classic love story unfold between Curly, a handsome cowboy, and Laurey, a winsome farm girl. www.okcciviccenter.com

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IN CONCERT Less Than Jake & Reel Big Fish June 1 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

show brings the Emmy Award-winning choreography and dance moves of Dancing with the Stars’ Derek Hough and the talents of actor and recording artist Julianne Hough to the WinStar World Casino stage. www.winstarworldcasino.com

melodrama continues with heroes, damsels in distress and over-the-top characters plus a musical revue featuring celebrity drop-in guests most Saturdays of the year at the Spotlight Theatre. www.spotlighttheatre.org

oboe and cello will bring music from the 18th through 21st centuries. www.tulsapac.com.

Heller Shorts: A Little Bit Longer Now June 18-20 This is Heller Theatre’s sixth

Less Than Jake

The Drunkard and The Olio Ongoing The

Casino on June 26 and WinStar World Casino on June 27. www.riverwind.com, www. winstarworldcasino.com

Tech N9ne’s Special Effects Tour June Brandi Carlile June 3 Cain’s Ballroom. www. 3 The Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Tyler, The Creator June 4, 7 At Diamond Ballroom June 4 and Cain’s Ballroom June 7. www.diamondballroom.net, www.cainsballroom. com

Patti LaBelle June 4 Hard Rock Hotel &

Bret Michaels June 19 7 Clans First

C o u n c i l C a s i n o & H o t e l . w w w. firstcouncilcasinohotel.com

Aranda June 20 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net My So-Called Band June 20 The Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Chase Bryant June 24 The Vanguard Music

Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Butch Walker June 4 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

Wynonna & The Big Noise June 25 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

SubsoniX June 4 Oklahoma City Farmers Market. www.okcfarmersmarket.com

Corey Smith June 25 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

cainsballroom.com

cainsballroom.com


In Concert bluedoorokc.com

Bone Thugs and Harmony June 25 Oklahoma City Farmers Market. www.okcfarmersmarket. com Turnpike Troubadours June 26 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com Hayes Carll June 26 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Chuck Cannon June 26 The Blue Door. www.

bluedoorokc.com

The Bright Light Social Hour June 27 ACM@UCO. www.acm.uco.edu

Susan Herndon June 27 The Blue Door.

www.bluedoorokc.com

Aerosmith June 27 Choctaw Casino Durant. www.choctawcasinos.com

Quiet Riot June 27 Choctaw Casino Pocola.

www.choctawcasinos.com

Turnpike Troubadours June 27 The

Oklahoma City Zoo Amphitheatre. www. thezooamphitheatre.com

John Calvin Abney with Chris Porter June 28 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

SPORTS Oklahoma City Energy www.energyfc.com v. Portland v. Vancouver v. Tulsa

Tulsa Roughnecks

June 5 June 9 June 13

www.tulsaroughnecksfc.com v. Sacramento v. L.A.

June 25 June 27 Tulsa Athletics www.tulsaathletics.com v. Ft. Worth v. Liverpool

June 20 June 27

PATTI LABELLE She stepped onstage as Patti Labelle in 1958 and has spent more than five decades sharing her powerful and mesmerizing talents that bring out the best in R&B, soul, pop and rock. Beginning her career as the lead singer of Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles, which would later change its name to LaBelle, she went on to a solo career in 1977. Her most well known hits include “On My Own,” “If Only You Knew” and “Lady Marmalade,” which was first recorded with LaBelle. More recently in her career, LaBelle secured a role in A Soldier’s Story and as a recurring character in the sitcom A Different World. Just this year, she made a guest appearance on the new Fox hit Empire. She has performed on Broadway stages and has written books that include her autobiography, Don’t Block the Blessings, and five mouth-watering cookbooks. With a voice that commands attention, the spotlight has always looked good on LaBelle, and to this day, she continues projecting her famed sound, high-hitting notes and soulful, low register. On June 4, she will perform on The Joint stage at Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Tulsa, and on June 5, she’ll be at WinStar World Casino in Thackerville. For more information, visit www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com or www.winstarworldcasino.com. five- and six-year-old reining horses. www. okstatefair.com Oklahoma Victory Dolls Roller Derby June 27 See the Victory Dolls at the Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com

Luke Bryan

FAMILY Chuggington Live! The Great Rescue Adventure June 5 Enjoy a live-action children’s musical with the whole family that brings trains on-stage at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com

Top Hat Family Magic Show June 14 Take the whole family to see master magician Steve Lancaster at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com Woolaroc KidsFest June 27, 28 Enjoy this

Oklahoma City Dodgers www.okcdodgers.com v. Fresno v. Sacramento v. Nashville v. Memphis v. Colorado

June 1 June 2-5 June 11-14 June 18-21 June 23-25 Tulsa Drillers www.tulsadrillers.com v. Midland June 2-4 v. Frisco June 5-7 v. NW Arkansas June 11-12 v. Springfield June 13-16 v. Arkansas June 17-20 Tulsa Shock www.wnba.com/shock v. Chicago v. Seattle v. San Antonio v. New York v. Seattle

June 6 June 9 June 16 June 26 June 28

Bricktown Throwdown June 5, 6 This

three-day team Crossfit competition will be held in Bricktown, Oklahoma City, by the canal and will include Pro, Rx, Scaled and Masters divisions. www.bricktownthrowdown.com

Oklahoma City Nationals Drag Boat Races June 5-7 Don’t miss one of the largest

drag boat races in the nation. www. okcmotorsports.com

Full Moon Run 5k June 6 Don’t miss this year’s Full Moon Run with a new course and dee jay. www.fullmoonrun5k.com Oklahoma City Roller Derby June 7 See the Oklahoma City Broads take on the South Central Roller Girls 5-8 p.m. www.okcrd.com

UCO Endeavor Games June 11-14 The University of Central Oklahoma presents its 16th annual UCO Endeavor Games for athletes with physical disabilities. www.uco.edu Saint Francis Tulsa Tough June 12-14 This huge bike festival brings competitive and recreation riders onto Tulsa’s streets for fun races through the city. www.tulsatough.com OKC Outlaws Roller Derby June 13 See the Outlaws at the Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com Xtreme Fight Night June 20 The fighters will enter the cage at 7 p.m. at Chactaw Casino in Pocola. www.choctawcasinos.com 2015 NRHA Derby June 20-27 Each summer, the NRHA Derby runs for one week in Oklahoma City and showcases the world’s best four-,

annual event with crafts, games, entertainment, food and re-enactors. www.woolaroc.org

Art Adventures Ongoing Children 3-5 experience art every Tuesday morning at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman, with special guests. Go online for schedules and other information. www.ou.edu/fjjma

FEATUREFLASH / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM. PHOTO COURTESY HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO TULSA.

Mama Sweet June 25 The Blue Door. www.

diversity of fiber art. www.livingarts.org

Nicole McMahan June 5-27 Enjoy her

artwork at TAC Gallery, a volunteer-run, nonprofit organization of artists and art supporters. www.tacgallery.org

Enter the Matrix: Indigenous Printmakers June 5-Jan. 2 This exhibit explores how

printmaking has become a matrix for cultural and artistic exchange, the critical sites of engagement and key figures. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Identity & Inspiration Thru June 29 Philbrook

Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s extensive collection of American Indian artwork and artifacts. www.philbrook. org

The Lollipop Guild June 20-July 30 This

international miniatures exhibition showcases more than 80 accomplished artists and artisans, well-known and emergent. www.lovettsgallery. com

Faberge: Jewelers to the Tsars June 20-Sept. 27 See the fine craftsmanship of Peter

Carl Faberge’s jewelry and adornments that once belonged to the Russian Imperial family. www. okcmoa.com

Intertwined, Stories of Splintered Pasts: Shan Goshorn & Sarah Sense Thru July 5 An exhibit featuring two American Indian artists’ contemporary weaving and basketry at the Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahhatulsa.org

Bookworks IV Thru July 5 This exhibit explores

the broad spectrum of the book as art. www. philbrook.org

Rendezvous Artists’ Retrospective and Art Sale Thru July 12 Contemporary

Western art will take center stage at this annual exhibition and art sale. Painter Andy Thomas and sculptor Walter Matia are the featured artists. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Warhol: The Athletes Thru July 12 This

exhibit is a series of 10 portraits of famous athletes commissioned by Andy Warhol’s friend and collector Richard Weisman. www.okcmoa. com

Storytime in the Garden Ongoing Enjoy this unique storytime every Thursday at 10 a.m. in June, July and August at Linnaeus Garden in Tulsa. www.tulsagardencenter.com

ART Van Gogh to Rothko: Masterworks from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Thru June 1 Enjoy masterpieces by some of the most prominent names in art history including Vincent van Gogh, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, Salvador Dali, Frida Kahlo, Andy Warhol and Mark Rothko. www.crystalbridges.org

Fragile Armor: Emily Chase June 5-July 10 These three life-size paper gown sulptures are together known as This Fragile Armor. www. livingarts.org Fiberworks June 5-10 Works from artists

across Oklahoma celebrate the creativity and

Tyler, the Creator Rush JUNE 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

Links for Little Ones Golf Tournament June

Community

PHOTO COURTESY RED EARTH FESTIVAL.

RED EARTH FESTIVAL

Conflict Cast in Bronze Thru July 12 This

exhibit centers on art that remembers the fallen and honors those who served in war. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Tulsa Underwater Dream Project Thru July 19 This exhibit features whimsical creative expressions by Oklahoma fiber artists. www. ahhatulsa.org

Born of Fire Thru July 20 This exhibit explores

some of the many incarnations of ceramic fabrication. www.crystalbridges.org

Changing Perspectives of Native Americans Thru Aug. 3 This artwork reflects shifting attitudes toward American Indians over the course of the 19th century. www. crystalbridges.org

California Impressionism: Selections from The Irvine Museum Thru Sept. 6 Explore the style of California Impressionism, a popular subject in California in the early 20th century. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

The Art of Ceremony Thru Sept. 6 On

display at Philbrook Downtown, this exhibit highlights contemporary carved figures that provide a window into Hopi ritual, belief and art. www.philbrook.org

Holly Wilson Thru Sept. 11 Wilson’s cast

bronze figures are unique and shed light on daily subtleties. www.oklahomacontemporary. org

The Figure Examined Thru Sept. 13 This

exhibit looks at the portrayal of the human figure through paintings, sculptures and words on paper by European and American artists of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Auguste Rodin, Pierre-Auguste Ronoir, Salvador Dali, Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock. www. philbrook.org

fishes in their natural surroundings while conveying the drama of sport fishing. www. crystalbridges.org

Nir Evron Ongoing On display at Philbrook Downtown, this exhibit explores the intersections of politics, religion, culture, identity and history of Israel. Neoclassicism to Romanticism: Works on Paper in 18th- and 19thCentury Europe Ongoing This student-cu-

rated exhibit focuses on works on paper beginning in the mid-1700s when new ideas emerged from the extensive political, intellectual, economic and social changes that were unfolding across the continent. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Focus on Favorites Ongoing This exhibit

highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

On Common Ground Ongoing Through the

mixing of these many works of art and cultural items depicting a great variety of people, one is reminded that all human beings have similar needs that bring us to a common ground. www. gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Orly Genger: Terra Ongoing This massive outdoor art installation is made of more than a million feet of lobster-fishing rope – woven, painted and stretched across Oklahoma’s City’s Campbell Park. www.oklahomacontemporary. org Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the Okla-

homa City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa.com

A World Unconquered: The Art of Oscar Brousse Jacobson Ongoing Ja-

10 masterpieces in this exhibit explore the diversity of still-life in the U.S. www. crystalbridges.org

cobson arrived at the University of Oklahoma in 1915 and greatly influenced the School of Art. His career includes more than 600 works of art with inspiration from the landscapes of Colorado, New Mexico and Oklahoma. www. ou.edu/fjjma

Fish Stories Thru Sept. 21 These 20 color

First Friday Gallery Walk Ongoing The

American Encounters: The Simple Pleasures of Still Life Thru Sept. 14 The

plates capture a number of distinctly American

100

galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

The Red Earth Native American Cultural Festival turns 29 and celebrates the American Indian June 5 through 7 at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City. A festival that was just named in the Top 10 for America’s Best Arts Festival by USA Today’s readers brings American Indian artists and dancers from across North America to Oklahoma City for a weekend of culture and heritage. During the juried art show and market, visitors can see and purchase artwork from top artists that include beadwork, basketry, jewelry, pottery, sculptures, paintings, graphics and attire. The Red Earth Fancy Dance Competition will feature some of the best in American Indian dance and the grand parade, as it does every year, will open the festival’s doors to the community, bringing American Indian spirit to the streets of downtown Oklahoma City: Bands, floats, honor guards, dignitaries and more make for a colorful and vibrant celebration. The parade will start at 10 a.m. on June 5 on a route that circles the Myriad Botanical Gardens. For more information, visit www.redearth.org.

all each month. www.thepaseo.com

First Friday Art Crawl Ongoing Stroll the

Proceeds benefit Camp Fire Green Country. www.tulsacampfire.org

Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at the Guthrie Green and other venues. www.thebradyartsdistrict. com.

Chip in to Rebuild June 8 Join Rebuilding

2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman.com

Top of the Town June 11 Benefiting Child

CHARITABLE EVENTS Brookside Rumble and Roll June 4 This

annual event brings hundreds of motorcycle riders and thousands of onlookers to Brookside each year. www.rumbleandroll.com

St. John Street Party June 6 More than

70 of Tulsa’s top restaurants and wine-tasting bistros will cater to the more than 2,000 guests that bring the St. John Medical Center campus to life. www.stjohnhealthsystem.com

Tour de Cure Tulsa June 6 Choose your route and go the distance on your own steam to raise money for diabetes research and community education. The event will begin at Hillcrest Hospital South. www.diabetes.org

Holland Hall Golf Tournament June 6 The annual golf game benefiting the school will take place at The Patriot Golf Club. www. hollandhall.org

Linnaeus Teaching Garden Ninth Anniversary Celebration June 6 Find

out how to make a thriving, healthy garden as the Tulsa Garden Center celebrates in Woodward Park. www.tulsagardencenter.com

Most Amazing Race June 6 Starting and ending at Guthrie Green, teams of two will be tasked with physical and mental challenges as they race throughout downtown Tulsa to benefit the Salvation Army of Tulsa. www.salarmytulsa. org Just Plane Fun June 6 Teams of 20 will compete in a tug-of-war with a 100,000-pound plane. Admission is free and open to the public.

Tulsa Together for its fifth annual golf tournament that benefits the organization’s work to help low-income people and families with home repairs. www.rebuildingtogethertulsa.org Care Resource Center, a program of Community Service Council, the seventh annual dining and social experience takes guests once more to the rooftops of Tulsa’s tallest buildings, where great food, views and company await. www. ccrctulsa.com.

Operation ART 2015 June 11 Local artists

collaborate with students to create works that will be auctioned off to benefit Operation Aware of Oklahoma and its mission to equip youth in the Tulsa area with education and skills to make positive life choices. www.operationaware.org

15 The 28th annual event takes place at the Golf Club of Oklahoma and will benefit The Little Light House School, which serves children with special needs. www.littlelighthouse.org

T21 Golf Tournament June 15 This event

benefiting the Down Syndrome Association of Tulsa will take place at Meadowbrook Country Club this year. www.dsat.org

Waltz on the Wild Side June 19 This event

will bring out your wild side with amazing food, drinks, music and dancing at the Tulsa Zoo’s 25th annual party that will benefit the Building Beyond Your Wildest Dreams capital campaign. www. waltzonthewildside.org

Run for Recognition June 20 Join MTM Recognition for the fourth annual Run for Recognition 5k and Fun Run benefiting Special Olympics Oklahoma. www.runforrecognition. com Henry P. Iba Citizen Athlete Awards June 22 The Rotary Club recognizes exceptional athletes exemplary of good citizenship and community leaders at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel and Convention Center. The scheduled 2015 keynote speaker is Seth Davis, Sports Illustrated senior writer and analyst for CBS Sports. www.ibaawards.com

Somewhere in Time Gala June 27 Join

“Havana Nights” at Cain’s Ballroom, where auctions and great entertainment benefit Retired Senior Volunteer Program and its volunteer services for seniors. www.rsvptulsa.org

COMMUNITY Tallgrass Music Festival June 5, 6 Enjoy great music and fun at Skiatook’s annual music festival. www.tallgrassmusicfestival.com

Red Earth Festival and Parade June 5-7 Enjoy the opening parade for the 29th annual Red Earth Festival on Friday, June 5 with more than 1,200 American Indian artists, dancers and singers to entertain downtown Oklahoma City crowds through the rest of the weekend. www.redearth.org Leake Car Auction June 5-7 Some beautiful and historic automobiles will drive into River Spirit Expo at Expo Square. www.exposquare. com Guided Kayaking Tour June 6 Float the

pristine Cossatot River on a guided kayak tour great for beginners. Kayaks, paddles, life jackets and shuttle transportation will be provided. www. arkansas.com

eMerge Dance Festival June 6 A site-

specific dance exhibit that promotes a revival of dance’s culture-bearing and connective function by reintegrating it into communal settings. www. livingarts.org

Route 66 Blowout June 6 The first weekend in June, Sapulpa comes alive with its annual car show and festival that celebrates the spirit of Route 66. www.route66blowout.com Jolly Runner Pirate 5k and Planking Contest June 6 This fun 5k includes a costume

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held at Broken Arrow’s Rose District Farmers Market. www.eventbrite.com

Rock The Boat June 6 Back for its third year,

Rock The Boat, a festival on the Bricktown Canal, features free Water Taxi rides, pop-up shops from local artists and retailers, live music, food trucks, kids’ activities and more. www. downtownokc.com

Tulsa Pride 2015 June 6, 7 Celebrate Tulsa Pride’s 33rd year with a festival and parade on Saturday, June 6, and with Pride in the Park on Sunday, June 7, at Centennial Park. www.okeq. org International Dog Show June 6, 7 See breeds of all sorts at this European-style dog show by the International All Breed Canine Association at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okstatefair.com

Buchanan’s Vintage Flea Market June 6, 7 Find great antiques and collectibles from across the United States at the Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com Metcalf Gun Show June 6, 7 Find a large

selection of vendors with great prices. www. okstatefair.com

OK Mozart International Festival June 6-13 This year’s annual music festival takes a trip to Italy through music, cuisine and culture. www.okmozart.com Wines of the West June 7 Stockyards City Main Street will host the fifth annual Wines of the West festival where 12 of Oklahoma’s finest wineries will offer free tastes. www.visitokc. com Urban Pioneer Awards June 9 This year,

the 11th annual Urban Pioneer Awards will honor Keith and Heather Paul of A Good Egg Dining Group. www.plazadistrict.org

deadCenter Film Festival June 1014 Enjoy an amazing weekend of film and parties in downtown Oklahoma City. www.deadcenterfilm. org

Art of Wine Festival June 11-13 Celebrate

Art

FABERGÉ: JEWELER TO Peter Carl FaTHE TSARS

bergé, a jeweler and eventual Master Goldsmith for House of Fabergé, was noticed by Tsar Alexander III, who recognized his talent and named him supplier to the court in 1885. The beautiful eggs that Fabergé is famous for crafting took form that same year when the Tsar asked the House of Fabergé for an egg to give his wife, Empress Maria. Fabergé’s eggs, 50 in total, were all made between 1885 and 1917. Adorned in jewels, gold, pearls and other embellishments, each egg was fashioned with a surprise. Fabergé’s other miniature creations included flower ornaments, animal sculptures, cigarette cases, photograph frames and desk clocks. The piece pictured here, Loving Cup, was created by Fedor Rückert, who served as a workmaster under Fabergé. Opening June 20 and running through Sept. 27, more than 200 of Fabergé’s rare treasures, including four imperial eggs, will be displayed at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. The exhibit draws from the Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Lectures, tours, gallery talks and other activities run throughout the exhibit’s stint in Oklahoma City. For more information, visit www.okcmoa.com.

the fruit of the vine with three evenings of food, friends and the world’s finest wines at Arkansas’s largest wine festival. www.waltonartscenter. org

Black Gold Days Festival June 18-

Brightmusic Chamber Ensemble Spring Festival June 11-16 This year’s 2015

Blue Whale Comedy Festival June 18-

season culminates with Brightmusic’s Spring Festival: America, the Beautiful, which will show the contribution of American composers to the modern repertoire. www.brightmusic.org

LIVE on the Plaza June 12 Enjoy featured artists, live music, special events, local shopping and more at Oklahoma City’s Plaza District each second Friday. www.plazadistrict.org Woodcarvers World Show & Sale June 12, 13 Enjoy carving and turning demos, beginners classes, competitions, video workshop and demonstrations with more than 50 skilled exhibitors. www.eowa.com

Stroud’s Historic Route 66 Wine & Food Festival June 13 From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,

21 Enjoy food and craft vendors, live entertainment, carnival rides and more at Glenpool’s 37th annual festival. www.glenpoolchamber.org 21 This year’s festival includes some big names: Michael Ian Black, Natasha Leggero and Nick Thune are just a few. www.bluewhalecomedyfestival. com

Kiamichi Owa-Chito Festival of the Forest June 19, 20 Enjoy music, contests,

beauty contests, races and more at this annual festival that connects Oklahoma with the beauty, culture and heritage of Kiamichi Country. www.brokenbowchamper.com

FreeOK 2015 June 20 Join in on the conversation promoting the ideas of education, civil equality, disaster relief aid and the separation of church and state at Tulsa’s Cox Business Center. www.coxcentertulsa.com

enjoy sips from wineries across Oklahoma as well as tastes from some great food vendors. www.stroudchamber.com

Okie Noodling Tournament June 20 There will be no hooks, no bait and no fear at the 16th annual noodling tournament at Wacker Park, Pauls Valley. www.okienoodling.com

Kicklahoma June 14 Buy, sell and trade

Kendall Whittier Art Festival June

Bricktown Blues and BBQ Festival June

20 Admiral Boulevard will come alive with local art, music and food. More than 20 Oklahoma artists will have their work for sale, plus open houses up and down the street.

sneakers, clothing and more at the Cox Business Center from noon to 5 p.m. www.coxcentertulsa. com

15, 16 This outdoor festival on the corner of Sheridan and Oklahoma Avenue in Oklahoma City will include music and BBQ and is free and open to all ages. www.brewerentertainment. com

OKC Pride Week June 15-21 Enjoy a week

of evening events that includes an outdoor concert, block party and arts festival that closes with the OKC Pride Parade on June 21. www. okcpride.org

Petit Jean 57th Annual Car Show and Swap Meet June 16-20 There’s something

for everyone at this show with cars, parts, antiques, and arts and crafts in the beautiful Petit Jean State Park. www.motaa.com

Jazz in June June 18-20 Bill Evans and his

band, Soulgrass, will headline this year’s free, three-day music festival in Norman. www. jazzinjune.org

102

Horton Records Sunday Concert June

FEDOR RÜCKERT (RUSSIAN, 1840–1917). LOVING CUP, 1899–1908. VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, RICHMOND. JEROME AND RITA GANS COLLECTION OF SILVER. PHOTO: TRAVIS FULLERTON. © VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

Morgan Horse Association of Oklahoma will host its 2015 summer classic in the Mustang Arena at Expo Square. www.exposquare.com

River Festival June 27 Oklahoma City’s Boathouse District hosts a Fourth of July-themed festival in June. www.boathousedistrict.org 2 Hip Chicks Roadshow June 27 This traveling show brings fashion, crafts, food, health, beauty and so much more to Expo Square. www. exposquare.com

OKCFest June 26, 27 This annual party/music

The OKC Land Run Antique Show June

on June 25 with a Concert in the Park at UCO and includes some other great events leading up to July 4 festivities. www.libertyfest.org

2015 Tulsa Summer Classic June 25-28 The

festival has a great lineup this year that includes Grace Potter, Better Than Ezra, Rascal Flatts, Hank Williams Jr., Clare Dunn, Corey Kent White and more. www.okcfest.com

Mount Magazine Butterfly Festival June 26, 27 Enjoy this family-friendly nature festival with seminars, hikes, garden tours, insect exhibits, a live arthropod zoo and special concert. Walk the trails in search of more than 25 different butterflies that often fly this time of year including zebra swallowtails, American ladies and the elusive Diana fritillary. www. mountmagazinestatepark.com

Oklahoma City Burlesque Festival June 26, 27 The third annual Oklahoma City Burlesque Festival will feature acts from around the globe. www.okcburlesquefest.com

Sandridge Energy Stars and Stripes

27, 28 Enjoy more than 50,000 square feet of merchandise from some of America’s finest dealers at the Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okstatefair.com

National Junior Limousin Show and All American Futurity June 27-July 3 Okla-

homa will be hosting this year’s event at Expo Square. www.exposquare.com

Concerts on the Green June 28 Enjoy this

Sunday afternoon concert part of the 2015 Guthrie Green Concert Series. www. woodyguthriecenter.com

Summer’s Fifth Night Ongoing Every Thursday evening through August, enjoy live music in Utica Square. www.uticasquare.com Heard on Hurd Ongoing Every third Saturday from March through October, enjoy local music, food and shops in downtown Edmond on

Tulsa Pride

Broadway between Main and Hurd. 405.341.6650

H&8th Ongoing On the last Friday of every

month March through October, enjoy the H&8th Night Market. www.h8thokc.com

Starlight Band Concert on the Green Ongoing This month, June 16, 23 and 30, take your blankets, lawn chairs, picnics and even pets to Guthrie Green for music and entertainment. www.guthriegreen. com

Movie in the Park Ongoing Enjoy a movie at Guthrie Green most Thursdays through October. www.guthriegreen.com International Gymnastics Hall of Fame Ongoing Celebrate the athletic and

artistic elements of the sport at Science Museum Oklahoma. www.sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Destination Space Ongoing This ex-

hibit reveals the amazing science that allows us to travel beyond the confines of earth. www.sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Walking Tour Ongoing Take a walking tour of historic downtown Tulsa. www. tulsahistory.org Gilcrease Films Ongoing See various films through the month. www.gilcrease. org

OKCMOA Films Ongoing Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com

Planetarium Shows Ongoing Don’t

21 Enjoy music by Pidgin, Dustin Pittsley and Greyhounds from 2:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Guthrie Green. www.guthriegreen.com

miss shows at Science Museum Oklahoma. www.sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Enhancing Service: Creating A Practical Customer Focus June 6 In this

To see more events happening

seminar, participants will enhance their awareness of the principles and techniques of establishing and maintaining good customer relations. www.okstate.edu

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey presents Legends June 25-28 This all-new

show brings the fun and fantasy of the circus to Oklahoma City’s Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

LibertyFest 2015 June 24-July 4 Selected as

one of the top 10 places to be in America on July Fourth by CNN and USA Today, Libertyfest starts

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR


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DEE NASH IS THE AUTHOR OF RED DIRT RAMBLINGS, A BLOG DEDICATED TO THE INS AND OUTS OF GARDENING. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

IN PERSON

A Cultivated Life

G

Gardening author Dee Nash seeks to spread her green passion.

ardening and writing have both long been a part of Dee Nash’s life. She studied journalism at the University of Oklahoma, and at the same time – at age 19 or 20 – began to develop her enthusiasm for gardening. Though she pursued both through most of her life, only recently has she combined them. Since bringing these passions together, Nash has become a fixture in the gardening writing world. Her blog, Red Dirt Ramblings, has won multiple awards, and she recently released her first book, aimed at giving no-nonsense gardening tips to the Millennial generation. Nash recalls first learning about gardening from her grandmother. She started tending 104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | JUNE 2015

plants of her own as a teenager, but only became really serious about it when she got her own living space in college. It helped that, in addition to her journalism classes, she took many courses in botany. Nash says that she became fascinated by plants, even down to the cellular level, because of the process of growing and the new life they represent. This passion continued through her adult life, even as she juggled careers writing for magazines and as a legal assistant. When she began Red Dirt Ramblings in 2007, though, she had little inkling that it would take off so dramatically. Motivated by a desire to write what she wanted on her own timetable, she began to blog about gardening. “I just started it for myself, and maybe my mother,” Nash says. Despite this humble beginning, and the often rough and tumble world of the blogosphere, she has gained increasing popular and critical attention, receiving recognitions such as a Gold Award from the Garden Writers Association, and being named a blog to follow in 2015 by Southern Living. Translating this momentum to the printed page, Nash has just had her first book published. The 20-30 Something Garden Guide aims to provide helpful advice for would be gardeners of the next generation. Nash finds a lot of hope in Millennials, who appear to be swarming in large numbers to the art of gardening. Organic gardening and a concern for local food sources contribute to this, but Nash also thinks that Millennials long for communal activities and a chance to unplug from constant electronic stimulation. Her book seeks to make gardening less intimidating for those just starting out. “[People] think they have to grow five acres ... just grow your favorite thing,” she says. In spite of her emphasis on simplicity in practice, Nash’s bigger picture of gardening is complex and nuanced. These days, she says, she grows plants mainly with an eye to what helps pollinators. She seeks to make her garden an ecosystem, a little patch of order in a chaotic world. Her success is especially notable given the difficult, diverse environment in Oklahoma. “If you can garden in Oklahoma and be successful at it, then you’re a real gardener,” Nash muses, and by that measure – and many more – Nash is a real gardener, indeed. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS


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Oklahoma magazine June 2015  

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