Page 1

OCTOBER 2015

Dr. Nazih Zuhdi A legacy of discovery and saving lives

BEST DOCTORS 309 Physicians, 59 Specialties

5 HEALTH ISSUES Affecting Oklahomans

RECORDING

STUDIOS RECORDING PROGRESS

FABULOUS KITCHENS AND BATHS PLUS THE YEAR’S HOTTEST TRENDS


#lunchdate #yummyfood #ilovefall #uticasquare

Capture, Share #uticasquare

uticasquare.com

Cool breezes and scents of fall are stirring up all new cravings. Usher in the season with toasty drinks, rich desserts, and savory entrées at Utica Square. It’s the ideal spot to catch up with friends or cozy up with that special someone. Create photo-worthy memories at any of our ten distinct restaurants. All found at Tulsa’s hometown treasure.


October 22 • 7 pm Tickets $50 Order your Event Center tickets at osagecasinos.com! Visit the Osage Box Office in Tulsa or call (918) 699-7667. Cash and all major credit cards accepted. Must be 18 to attend. No refunds or exchanges.

4 miles from Downtown Tulsa • End of Tisdale Parkway ©2015 Osage Casino. Management reserves all rights.

(877) 246-8777


Features October

64 5 Issues Affecting Oklahomans’ Health

2015 Oklahoma Magazine Vol. XIX, No. 10

Oklahoma has much to offer its residents, but poor health can prevent many from enjoying the state’s abundance. We spoke with specialists to uncover Oklahoma’s top five health concerns and found that increased education and access to health insurance and health care is essential to combating their grip.

71 2015 Best Doctors In America

Compiled by a team of researchers using a polling method audited and certified by Gallup, Best Doctors provides patients with a comprehensive list of respected and trusted specialists and physicians in a wide array of fields.

79 A Life Of Discovery

86

From a young age, celebrated inventor and surgeon Nazih Zuhdi had a curiosity for medicine, and never wanting to just fit the mold, his interest and ambition led him to Oklahoma, where he’d accomplish astounding strides in the field.

Now Trending

Beauty and functionality run throughout the three kitchens and one master bath. All rooms feature high-end finishes, the latest in design, and craftsmanship second to none. They also represent some of the finest work being done in the construction and design industry in Oklahoma.

OCTOBER 2015

October 2015

102 Recording Progress

Great music and Oklahoma go together. But it takes more than talented musicians to impact the industry. Recording studios and their teams are influential forces behind the state’s musical success, and they’re all about showcasing the many sounds that are Oklahoma bred.

Dr. Nazih Zuhdi A life of discovary and saving lives

BEST DOCTORS 309 Physicians, 59 Specialties

5 HEALTH ISSUES Affecting Oklahomans

RECORDING

STUDIOS RECORDING PROGRESS

FABULOUS KITCHENS AND BATHS PLUS THE YEAR’S HOTTEST TRENDS

2

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read ON THE COVER: LEGENDARY OKLAHOMAN DR. NAZIH ZUHDI DISCUSSES HIS MORE-THAN-SIXDECADE CAREER WITH CONTRIBUTING EDITOR TARA MALONE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS:

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.


HONORED TO BE RECOGNIZED AMONG AMERICA’S BEST. St. John Clinic brings together the primary care physicians, specialists and staff you’ve known and trusted for years under one banner. Backed by the resources of the St. John Health System, St. John Clinic embodies the best in comprehensive, coordinated care. Combined with online access to your medical records, payment options and lab results via St. John Online, we’re placing your health in your hands.

St. John physicians recognized as Best Doctors: David Akers, MD | Jon Cox, MD | Jonathan Friend, MD | James Hutton, MD Trudy Milner, DO | David Nierenberg, MD | Richard Smarinsky, MD Mark Waller, MD | William Watson, MD | Edwin Yeary II, MD

STJOHNCLINIC.ORG

P U L S E L I N E P H Y S I C I A N R E F E R R A L 918 - 744-0123


Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

13

13 The State

Children diagnosed with cancer, and their families, have to learn to navigate new, challenging and exhausting roads. OK Kids Korral in Oklahoma City was created to help make the journey more comfortable.

16 18 22 24 26 28

Happening People Culture Nature Sport The Insider

31 Life & Style 34 36

Guide Living Space

42 44 46 48 50 59 62

Design Style Accessorize Color Health News Destination Scene

Rob and Melissa Key, who both thrive off artistic and creative talents, put their passions into a beautiful new contemporary home that blends modern with southern charm.

PHOTO COURTESY SIMON HURST 2014.

Writing on-the-spot, topic-driven poems, Short Order Poems has found a platform at the monthly H & 8th Night Market, revitalizing Oklahoma City’s poetry scene.

36

109 Taste

With October welcoming the festivities of Oktoberfest, we couldn’t think of a better way to incorporate the fun into this issue than through the delicious German-style food Oklahoma offers. In Tulsa, Margaret’s German Restaurant offers scrumptious authentic bites with consistency.

111 Food Event

113 Entertainment

At 73 years old, Aretha Franklin continues energizing the spaces her powerful voice commands, and this month, the still radiant, beautiful and talented Queen of Soul will perform her hits and classics in Oklahoma.

114 Calendar of Events

120 In Person

4

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

109

32 113


MORE LOCATIONS. MORE CONVENIENT. For sudden illnesses, minor injuries and after-hours care that can’t wait, there’s a Warren Clinic Urgent Care near you.

URGENT CARE LOCATIONS TULSA

BROKEN ARROW

Warren Clinic – Springer Building 6160 South Yale Avenue

Warren Clinic – Elm Place 2950 South Elm Place, Suite 120 (101st Street & Elm Place)

HOURS:

Monday – Saturday: 9 AM to 9 PM Sunday: Noon to 8 PM Warren Clinic – Tulsa Hills 7858 South Olympia Avenue HOURS:

7 days per week: Noon to 8 PM

HOURS:

Monday – Friday: 9 AM to 9 PM Saturday – Sunday: 10 AM to 6 PM Warren Clinic – Kenosha 1801 East Kenosha Street (71st Street and OK- 51) HOURS:

Warren Clinic – South Memorial 10506 South Memorial Drive

7 days per week: Noon to 8 PM

HOURS:

7 days per week: Noon to 8 PM

For more information, please call 918-488-6688 or visit warrenclinic.com


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN

Arvest Private Banking supports

MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX

Oklahoma Physicians

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT BRITTANY ANICETTI CONTRIBUTING EDITORS JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER BEN ALBRECHT DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER JENNIFER LANDRUM ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE CARIE GONZALES CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM

Tulsa (918) 384-2764 Oklahoma City (405) 419-3798 arvest.com/privatebanking

EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM

Member FDIC 21356 Arvest.indd 1

8/18/15 2:13 PM

LOVE IN BLOOM

Let Oklahoma Magazine help you plan your special day!

Oklahoma Wedding Show Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 Expo Square Central Park Hall Limited booth space available. Act now to reserve your space.

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2015 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. TM Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

2013

Member

440 0 UNDER

For more information, call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com. Wedding.indd 1

6

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

9/13/15 1:36 PM

TM


The Science of Heat. The Beauty of Control.

Nonsurgical Vulvovaginal Rejuvenation ThermiVa treatments use radiofrequency energy to gently heat tissue to reclaim, restore, and revive feminine wellness, without discomfort or downtime. To learn more about the ThermiRF platform, visit www.thermi.com

Call to schedule a free consult, 918.392.7900 Tulsa Surgical Arts offers a full line of Cosmetic Surgical and skin care procedures to help you look and feel your best this fall. Angelo Cuzalina, MD

OKLAHOMA COSMETIC SURGERY CENTER

918.392.7900

|

tulsasurgicalarts.com


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

T

his month, we take a look at the pulse of Oklahoma. I recently read a study that indicated that Americans, on average, have visited more than 18 doctors in their lifetimes. This sounds like a staggering figure, but when I think about all the times I have wandered into a doctor’s office for everything from a sore throat to a pain in my back, it seems very feasible. There are primary care physicians, specialists, sub-specialists, and on and on. We see doctors for both physical and mental health. Some of us require specific care for bones, for lungs, for the heart or for the brain. The Centers for Disease Control report that the national health expenditures for 2013 were $2.9 trillion, a figure that accounted for 17.4 percent of the country’s Gross Domestic Product. Of that figure, roughly 20 percent was spent for physician and clinical services; the rest was paid for hospital care (32 percent), nursing home and continuing care facilities (five percent) and prescription drugs (nine percent). That’s more than $500 billion spent to either get us healthy or keep

A LIVING LEGEND: DR. NAZIH ZUHDI. READ ABOUT HOW HE BLAZED A TRAIL OF MEDICAL DISCOVERY IN OKLAHOMA ON P. 79. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

us there. With all the money we spend on health care, it’s no wonder we want to find the best available. On page 71, we present the 2015 Best Doctors of America list, a guide to the top peer-reviewed physicians in the state. It’s a great resource for those who are looking for a physician for new or continuing care. Use the information however you see fit. If you see your physician in the list, congratulate him or her by tweeting a picture of it to @OklahomaMag, and we’ll share your photo with our followers. Also in this issue: There’s nothing more satisfying to hear than a true success story, and, boy, do we have a success story for you. Dr. Nazih Zuhdi is an inventor, innovator and medical pioneer, and he’s spent most of his storied career in the Sooner State. Read about his discoveries and inventions and about the first heart transplant performed in Oklahoma, which was executed by Zuhdi and his staff at

Baptist Hospital, now a part of INTEGRIS Health (“A Life Of Discovery,” p. 79). We also look at five major health epidemics impacting Oklahomans and ways to mitigate or prevent them from getting worse (“5 Issues Affecting Oklahomans’ Health,” p. 64). These issues are momentous, but if we all do our part to make the healthiest decisions possible for ourselves and our families, we can begin to change the overall health of the state and its residents for the better. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

December 2015

Is your company a catch? Oklahoma Magazine is currently looking for great places to work in Oklahoma. If your company has what it takes, let us know. Visit www.okmag.com to nominate your company for inclusion in Oklahoma Magazine’s Great Companies To Work For. 2014

OKLAHOMA

Advertising opportunities available. Contact advertising@okmag.com • 918.744.6205 2015 great compaines.indd 1

8

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA 7/20/15 2:03 PM


JIMMY CHOO

OUR STORES AKRIS . ALEXANDER McQUEEN . ANNE FONTAINE . BALENCIAGA . BERETTA GALLERY . BILLY REID . BRUNELLO CUCINELLI CAROLINA HERRERA . CHANEL . CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN . COLE HAAN . DIANE VON FURSTENBERG . DIOR . ELLIS HILL EMILY SUMMERS STUDIO 54 . ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA . ESCADA . FIVE AND TEN . GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI . HADLEIGH’S HARRY WINSTON . HERMÈS . JAMES PERSE . JIMMY CHOO . KIEHL’S SINCE 1851 . LAFCO NEW YORK . LEGGIADRO LELA ROSE . LORO PIANA . MADISON . PEEPER’S . RAG & BONE . RALPH LAUREN . ROBERTA ROLLER RABBIT SAINT LAURENT . SCOOP NYC . ST. JOHN . ST. MICHAEL’S WOMAN’S EXCHANGE . STELLA McCARTNEY TOM FORD . TORY BURCH . TRINA TURK . VINCE . WILLIAM NOBLE RARE JEWELS

PARTIAL LISTING

COMPLIMENTARY VALET PARKING . GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE . HPVILLAGE.COM AT MOCKINGBIRD LANE AND PRESTON ROAD


OKMAG.COM

An Inspirational Voice

OKMAG.com includes an expanded story of how 18-year-old Tulsan Anastasia Richardson transferred her experience of being bullied into an anthem of hope for all those who have suffered from the words and actions of others. Read the condensed version on page 19.

S TAY CONNECTED

What’s HOT At

OK

OCTOBERFEAST

Enjoy more coverage of the state’s German-themed restaurants throughout the month. Read reviews, look at mouth-watering photos and learn about Oklahoma’s appreciation for the hearty cuisine.

TULSA CARES

We are a few months away from TulsaCARES’ annual Red Ribbon Gala, and this year is sure to be extra special, as the organization is cutting the ribbon on a brand new facility in Tulsa. We visit the new facility, tour the grounds and speak to a few key members of the organization about what changes the new facility will bring, and how it will not only benefit those in need, but TulsaCARES as an organization as well as it’s contributors. Also in this video interview, we learn what we can expect at the upcoming Red Ribbon Gala 2016 and meet the hosts Jay Krottinger and Ryan Tanner, who will tell us what they plan to bring when it’s their turn to host the premier charity event of the season.

THE PULSE OF TULSA

FOOD • HEALTH • ENTERTAINMENT Your guide to the most interesting people, places and food in Tulsa.

www.tulsamagazine.com Tulsa Mag House.indd 1

10

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

9/15/15 2:27 PM


TIME AFTER TIME

AFTER TIME AT THE TOP OF THE LIST

Our mission is simple: to bring Oklahomans the very best care, in every hospital, every specialty, every day. Striving to meet that goal often means others take notice. And when they do, it’s good news for all of us. When the Oklahoma Quality Award bestows all of INTEGRIS with its “Excellence” recognition, and INTEGRIS Baptist is Oklahoma’s only hospital to receive U.S. News and World Report’s best regional hospitals ranking, it means you can trust the INTEGRIS name wherever you go. And it’s no surprise to find many of our physicians named to Oklahoma Magazine’s Best Docs list again this year. They’ve earned the trust of their patients and the recognition they deserve. Please join us in congratulating them.

integrisok.com 405-951-2277


“I was listened to. I was coached. I got the second opinion that was right for me.”

Todd Hardy, Youth Baseball Coach and Lung Cancer Patient

“When I was diagnosed with lung cancer, I needed a treatment plan that fit into my active life. After I got my first opinion, I wanted to learn about other options— I wanted a second opinion. That’s exactly what I found at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® in Tulsa. My doctors took the time to get to know me and we developed a treatment plan that felt right. They were all about what I can do. And that’s exactly how I coach my kids.” Atlanta | Chicago | Philadelphia Phoenix | Tulsa

©2015 RisingTide

Getting a second opinion should be the first step in your cancer treatment. Find out more at cancercenter.com/Tulsa or call 888.568.1571.

No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results.


The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

A BRIGHT AND KIDFRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE WELCOMES VISITORS TO OK KIDS KORRAL. PHOTO COURTESY SIMON HURST 2014.

Home Away From Home

H

OK Kids Korral provides a haven of hope, love and rest for children and their families during treatment for childhood cancer.

aving a child diagnosed with cancer begins a journey unlike any other. It’s a road paved with fear and uncertainty within a maze of logistics. Often the specialized care a child needs is outside of a family’s home town, many miles and hours away. For families, traveling for medical treatment is felt emotionally, physically and financially; but helping to ease this burden is a special place known as OK Kids Korral, a project of the Toby Keith Foundation. Located in the heart of Oklahoma City and near several medical facilities, OK Kids Korral serves as a cost-free home away from home for pediatric cancer patients and their families.

With its inviting, lodge-style atmosphere, OK Kids Korral offers 12 overnight suites, each sleeping up to five people, and four daytime suites for daily visitors. For children with weakened immune systems, there is a neutropenia wing consisting of four guest rooms. These protective environment rooms are designed to limit air infiltration from other areas of the facility and the outside environment through a specialized positive pressure HVAC mechanical system with HEPA filtration. Indoor and outdoor play areas, a game room and a movie theater give children and families space to relax and spend time together. In addition, OK Kids Korral includes a gourmet kitchen, a family resource room, relaxation gardens and a reflection room.

Rick and Laura Roach know firsthand the struggle of battling childhood cancer. Their daughter, Reese, was diagnosed with an optic pathway brain tumor at 10 months old. Since her diagnosis, she has undergone three years of chemotherapy. Now, at age 4, Reese is having proton radiation therapy on a daily basis in Oklahoma City – three hours away from her home. “The Korral is a God-send,” says Laura Roach. “I feel my family is so blessed to have a place to come and rest. We feel safe and secure, and the staff is amazing. It has helped my family so much financially. The cost this day and age is so expensive, and having a nice place to come and rest our heads is a blessing.” OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

The Toby Keith Foundation was established by the country music star and native Oklahoman, along with his wife, Tricia, and a collective of like-minded friends. The foundation’s mission is to encourage the health and happiness of pediatric cancer patients and support OK Kids Korral. Keith and his wife witnessed the impact of childhood cancer when close friends lost their young daughter to the disease. “We are proud and fortunate to have Toby as our board president,” says Juliet NeesBright, executive director of OK Kids Korral. “He commits his time, talent and ideas to helping the foundation. We also have an advisory council who are invaluable in helping guide the day-to-day operations of the foundation and OK Kids Korral.” According to the American Cancer Society, more than 10,000 children in the United States under the age of 15 will be diagnosed with cancer in 2015. It’s estimated that approximately 1,250 children younger than 15 years old will lose their battle to cancer this year. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in children, behind accidents, and in the past few decades, childhood cancer rates have risen slightly. Since opening its doors in January 2014, OK Kids Korral has hosted hundreds of families. The staff, with the help of volunteers, facilitates a comfortable and encouraging atmosphere. Through the Chuckwagon Program, volunteers have the opportunity to provide a home-cooked meal for the families. “We always need volunteers,” says NeesBright. “The Chuckwagon Program is our effort to feed the families dinner at least five days a week. We can always use more groups or individuals to help purchase and cook those meals. Also, we love having a volunteer’s smiling face at the welcome desk.” For the families who stay at OK Kids Korral, it’s the simple things, like a meal and a quiet place to rest, that can make all the difference. On May 26, Dana Cullum’s 17-year-old daughter, Katie, was diagnosed with leukemia. Three days after receiving her diagnosis, Katie had her first chemotherapy treatment, and she is expected to need treatment for two-and-a-half years. Dana Cullum says her first impression of OK Kids Korral was awe-inspiring but also heartbreaking, because services like this are needed. She says that being so close to the hospital means she doesn’t have to commute hours each day, and she’s near the emergency room when her daughter is ill. 14

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

TOBY KEITH IS OK KIDS KORRAL’S BOARD PRESIDENT. PHOTO COURTESY SIMON HURST 2014.

“When we are here, it feels like home away from home,” says Cullum. “When my daughter is sick and can’t come downstairs to eat, I can take dinner to our room where she can feel comfortable. We have our own private suite, and the caring staff has helped us come to terms with this life-altering disease. Being here has allowed me to spend time taking care of my daughter and not having to worry about anything else but her. OK Kids Korral has made this new lifestyle a bit easier to handle, and without the Korral, we wouldn’t have had any place to go.” While every child’s story is unique, OK Kids Korral creates a network of support joining together families who intimately understand what it means to live a life with childhood cancer. “Before we opened our doors, I would talk about how we will save people time and money. I would go on to say that the Kor-

ral will be a respite for people struggling. I knew all of those things to be true,” says Nees-Bright. “But, at that time, I was not prepared for how we not only help people battling cancer, but those people become our friends, and we truly form a giant family who knows and feels the reality of a cancer diagnosis.” Nees-Bright shares that some days are joyful, while others are indescribably difficult. “We focus on the fact that the Korral gave our families a comfortable, hopeful place to call home,” she says. “One of our parents said that the Korral is special because some of our kids spend their last, happy days there. That comment has stuck with me and helps keep me smiling even when there are dark days.” REBECCA FAST


Patient-Centered Cancer Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility.

As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home.

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer 800 NE 10th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73104

centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-6822 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


BECAUSE SCIENCE

Peter J. Heinzelman, an associate professor in the Department of Chemical, Biological and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma, was the recent recipient of a $75,000 grant from the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology to further study and develop a new therapy that may address Alzheimer’s disease by destroying plaque that builds up on the brains of patients. The treatment, which utilizes biopharmaceutical proteases, if effective, would have lower costs with a more effective outcome compared to current therapies available.

If several hairs come out when you take down your ponytail, don’t freak out: According to the American Academy of Dermatology, it’s normal to shed between 50 and 100 hairs a day. Shedding more hair than this could mean that a person has telogen effluvium, or excessive hair shedding. Causes can include dramatic weight loss, giving birth, stressful events, high fever or a recent operation. If excessive shedding does not correct itself within six to nine months of these events, it’s best to see a doctor.

WHAT SHE

SHED

The State

HAPPENING

TIME FOR THE

CIRCULATOR

T

ulsa Transit recently launched its latest downtown circulator, The Loop, a bus that will run Fridays and Saturdays from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. A sleek, black exterior, sporting LED lights and a sound system within, The Loop, previously known as the downtown trolley, costs 25 cents to ride; if you show your receipt from a downtown business, the ride is free. For more information, visit www.tulsatransit.com.

16

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

GO FLY A KITE

When you think kite-flying in Oklahoma, the first place that comes to mind is Enid, right? The northwest Oklahoma city will welcome back the American Kitefliers Association’s national convention Sept. 28-Oct. 3. The convention is an annual gathering of kite enthusiasts, artists and competitors and is one of the largest kite gatherings in the world, according to Marcy Jarrett, director of Visit Enid. The city hosted the convention for the first time in 2012. American Kitefliers Association director Mel Hickman says the hospitality the group received in Enid was a primary factor for the convention’s return. During the convention, the association will have flying exhibits open to the public, including mass ascensions each day with more than 100 kites. Kite makers will vie for top prize in beauty and construction. For a complete itinerary, visit www.visitenid.org.

PILLOW TALK

Sleepless nights can have many causes: stress, illness, jet lag, poor mattress quality. It could also be a pillow. According to the Better Sleep Council, a nonprofit organization dedicated to education about sleep quality, a pillow should hold the head in the same relation to your shoulders and spine as if you were standing with correct, upright posture. That means a pillow should have adequate mass, density and support to do its job correctly. The type of pillow that’s best depends on how one sleeps: A medium-firm pillow is best for back sleepers, while side sleepers will do well with a firm pillow. The Better Sleep Council says that generally, pillows should be replaced each year. If you can fold your pillow in half, squeezing out all the air, and it doesn’t spring back to shape, it’s time to replace.

MUSEUM TO GO

Gilcrease Museum now offers a mobile version of its brick-and-mortar establishment. Gilcrease on Wheels debuted last fall at the Poteau Upper Elementary School in tiny Poteau, Okla. Then a pilot program, the mobile museum was so successful that it has been made a permanent part of Gilcrease’s educational outreach. Gilcrease on Wheels travels for presentations in third-grade classrooms across the state. An exhibit walk-through is available for fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, after-school programs and community events.


Discover the health plan that works hard for Oklahoma families. Good health insurance is about more than upfront costs. It’s about shielding you from surprises that can hurt your health and sink your savings. GlobalHealth works harder to safeguard your family and your wallet from colds to catastrophes with quality coverage, first-class service and breakthrough, money-saving ideas. Just ask our members. Nine out of ten are extremely happy with us. That makes us work even harder.

www.globalhealth.com /discover • 844-322-7222 MStWorksHardAd1 2016

MSBST16


The State

PEOPLE

A Life In Full Speed Artist Joe Andoe has lived in New York City more than half his life, but Oklahoma blood still runs deep in his veins.

J

JOE ANDOE’S ART IS INSPIRED BY HIS EARLY YEARS IN TULSA. PHOTO COURTESY JOE ANDOE.

18

oe Andoe no longer lives in Tulsa, but a little piece of Tulsa resides in everything he paints. Take one of his more recent exhibits, Super Highway, for example: Andoe used images from Google Street View as a direct inspiration for characteristically stark landscape paintings of places he remembered from his past, growing up in the 1960s and ‘70s in an east Tulsa neighborhood that never seemed far from undeveloped fields full of horses. This particular approach to the Internet – using it “like a periscope to look at these old places that haven’t changed much,” he says, save perhaps for the broadband cables that convey the images themselves – is merely the latest iteration of an artistic process that seems to be perpetually gazing back into a specific time and an even more specific geographical location. “Tulsa is still my home, even though I have lived in New York for 32 years,” he says. But the path from the lonesome roads of east Tulsa to the fashionable art galleries of the Lower East Side was never an easy one, nor was it always paved with the most sober of intentions. Andoe’s 2007 memoir, Jubilee City, details a life of drug- and alcohol-related experiences, relationships with beautiful but emotionally unstable women and a tendency toward selfdestruction which, more than once, came close to costing him his career, but which he has since succeeded in conquering. Born in 1955, Andoe began drawing extensively early on – a habit shared by most kids, but with Andoe, it gradually took the shape of something greater, persisting as childhood gave way to the teens against a backdrop of sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll. Andoe’s book recalls a pre-digital era when young adults seemed to live more in the present moment, determined to find whatever forms of physical pleasure life had to offer them. He writes of driving to the outskirts of town with an older friend

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

to get drunk on cheap wine at age 14, concluding, “At last I had mastered the low art of coming unmoored.” A later experience, hitchhiking from Tulsa to the Mexican border near the end of his high school days, feels like something out of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. “I remember that I was lucid and in the moment, and how flat and warm I-35 was against my back, and how big, wide, and deep the south Texas sky was and how I had never seen so many stars, and how I had never been so free,” he writes. Meanwhile, Andoe’s family and friends and classmates continued to respond favorably to his drawings – all the way up to his time at Tulsa Junior College, where he initially majored in agricultural business with the intent of opening a feed store. Faring poorly in those classes, but wanting to stay in school because he had a new girlfriend there, Andoe changed his major to art. A significant moment occurred when his art teacher hung up students’ still lifes in the classroom, and Andoe did not see his among them. He knew something was going on, he says. “I asked why he didn’t hang my still life up, and he said it stood out too much,” Andoe recalls.


KEY to the CURE Get the shirt. Shop the weekend. Show your support.

Join Saks Fifth Avenue in the fight against cancer. Get the shirt, designed by Jason Wu, available exclusively at Saks this October. Then shop Thursday to Sunday, October 15 to 18, when Saks will donate 2% of sales to local and national cancer charities.* Special thanks to Julianne Moore, the 2015 Ambassador for the Entertainment Industry Foundation, Stand Up To Cancer and Saks Fifth Avenue’s Key To The Cure

*THURSDAY TO SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15 TO 18, 2% OF PARTICIPATING VENDOR NET SALES AND PARTICIPATING VENDOR FLAT DONATIONS FROM SAKS FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK AND BEVERLY HILLS, AND SAKS.COM UP TO A TOTAL OF $500,000 WILL BE DONATED TO OUR NATIONAL BENEFICIARY, THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY FOUNDATION (EIF) AND ITS PROGRAM STAND UP TO CANCER (SU2C). ADDITIONALLY, FROM OCTOBER 1 TO OCTOBER 31, 100% OF THE KEY TO THE CURE T-SHIRT SALES FROM THESE LOCATIONS AND SAKSOFF5TH.COM WILL BE DONATED TO EIF/SU2C. FOR ALL OTHER SAKS FIFTH AVENUE LOCATIONS, AN ALLOCATED AMOUNT BASED ON STORE’S WEIGHTED AVERAGE OF TOTAL SALES COLLECTED FROM 2% OF PARTICIPATING VENDOR NET SALES AND PARTICIPATING VENDOR FLAT DONATIONS FROM THURSDAY TO SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15 TO 18, ALONG WITH 100% OF THE KEY TO THE CURE T-SHIRT SALES WILL BE DONATED TO EACH STORE’S DESIGNATED CHARITY PARTICIPATING IN THE KEY TO THE CURE CAMPAIGN.


The State

From there it was on to the University of Oklahoma’s art school. In Norman he met the woman with whom he would share a troubled marriage and relocate to New York City, where further misadventures lay in store, including tragicomically abortive attempts to establish a home in nearby Jersey City. The thought of being ashamed of his origins never occurred to him, he says; in fact, his roots played to his advantage. There are even points in his literary self-portrait where he refers to himself in the third person as a “cowboy.” “My story was just so much more interesting than some kid whose parents drove him down the Merritt Parkway and set him up in a loft in Tribeca,” he says. “I was blown away to meet guys who had never held a shovel or even knew how to drive.” His reception was, at least for a time, less favorable in his own state. Back in Tulsa, years after he had accumulated a body of work and made a name for himself, the Philbrook Museum of Art refused a gift of one of his paintings. He attributes this to a lack of willingness to accept artists from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. “I guess it would have seemed weird to me, too, once upon a time to see a guy from east Tulsa calling himself an artist,” he says. But he thinks that Oklahoma is changing for the better as far as those attitudes are concerned. His work eventually appeared at Philbrook as part of a traveling show comprised of still lifes from New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. So goes the upward trajectory of Andoe’s life story – and if the cinematic potential of that story has yet to be realized, it is not necessarily for lack of effort. A condensed version of the book nearly saw life as a movie – not so much A Memoir at Full Speed as A Memoir on Crack, Andoe says – but, after various fits and starts, the project failed to reach fruition.

Fellow Tulsa native Larry Clark was slated to direct, he says. “He got me to write the screenplay so we didn’t lose control of the story,” he says. “Just like a couple of Okies, we got the same lawyer, a Hollywood lawyer that we were sharing, so we were on the same team, you know? But it just didn’t happen.” Andoe is a man of the 20th century who made it, against improbable odds, to the 21st with body intact and mind expanded. He is also an artist who gained international recognition through sheer force of creative will – a testament to the idea that, even in a crowded field like professional painting, success may be achieved on merit alone, and not just as a result of knowing the right people or being born into the right milieu. Viewed from a certain angle, his life assumes Horatio Algeresque dimensions. “Nobody really gave anything to me,” he says. “I never expected it. Nobody ever gave me a thing besides my folks.” Now approaching age 60, he is in a position to look back as one of the lucky ones. A question naturally arises as to what advice he might dispense to young, aspiring artists. “Don’t do it,” he says, tongue at least partly in cheek, and knowing full well that people will ultimately do what they want, that any valid art inside of a person will find its way to expression. What makes him happy now, he says, are the simpler things – seeing his children, talking to his friends, working. “I know what it’s like to own things. I know what it’s like to spend money. I know what it’s like to buy cars by impulse. And that’s all overrated,” he says. “Maybe that’s a piece of advice in itself,” I suggest. “I guess so,” he replies, toward the end of a conversation in which no attempt had been made to hide his Oklahoma accent. ERIC MILLER

AN INSPIRATIONAL VOICE

Singer-songwriter Anastasia Richardson, an 18-yearold Tulsa native, inspires through her anti-bullying lyrics, among other uplifting records. “Do you feel big and strong when you make me feel small?/ Does it give you joy to see me when my back’s against the wall?/Your tongue cuts like a razor with every word you say/ Just know before you judge me, that God makes no mistakes. I am beautiful.” These opening lyrics of 18-year-old, Tulsa native Anastasia Richardson’s “I Am Beautiful” is her call to end bullying and a message of hope for all those who’ve felt the devastating effect of its grip and aren’t sure where to turn. A singer-songwriter, Richardson hopes her music will encourage others to learn to use their voice instead of hiding it inside. During her freshman year at a Tulsa high school, she suffered the crippling control

20

of bullies. With the help of school officials, the problem was resolved, but that wasn’t enough for Richardson. Her dreams were bigger. And, it was remembering back to a Justin Bieber concert the year before that drove her momentum. “[He said to the crowd], ‘If you didn’t believe in me, I wouldn’t be performing in front of you guys,’” Richardson recalls. “That really engaged me.” In 2013, after experiences and reflections scribbled in her journal became lyrics that she shared through YouTube videos, Nashville producer Curt Ryle stumbled upon her talent. He would become an influential force behind Richardson’s success, and while collaborating on “I Am Beautiful” with Ryle, Richardson began molding her

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

talent into other powerful compilations. Richardson’s first album, I Am Beautiful was self-released in September 2014; by sharing her story online, she gained more than 40,000 Twitter followers by the time the album debuted. Currently working on another album set to release next year, Richardson is focusing her immediate efforts on October: anti-bullying month. She hopes television and radio stations will join her on a campaign to combat bullying by playing “I Am Beautiful” each day throughout October. She is tackling that goal one email at a time. – Brittany Anicetti

SEE FULL STORY ON OKMAG.COM

PHOTO BY STEPHEN JONES.

SHOUT OUT


The State CULTURE

The Ghost Wears Green

A gruesome accident nearly 60 years ago may have left the ghost of a young woman to roam among the buildings of her small town.

A

chilling ghost story always starts with a mysterious, gruesome murder. This is certainly the case of Avard’s Woman in Green. Mildred Anne Reynolds, formerly Anne

22

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

Newlin, was a new wife, married to Dee Reynolds, the basketball coach at Avard High School, in Woods County. The morning of March 13, 1956, she was following her usual routine of driving into Alva for her classes at Northwest Oklahoma

State University while wearing a green dress. But on this day, she left class early, driving back to the couple’s farmhouse located just north of Avard, about 15 miles away. Hours later, Anne Reynolds’ car was found less than two miles from her house, smoldering from a fire. Her body was charred beyond recognition. The fire had been so intense that her right leg from the knee down had been burned off. One of her shoes, spattered in blood, was located 250 feet from the car, and her coat was 10 feet from the vehicle. There was an extra set of car tracks near the scene. Her death certificate, No. 005081, has both homicide and accidental death listed as causes of death. It does state that there “was a lots of blood stains” at the crime scene. But investigators in 1956 noted the woman had previously suffered from dizzy spells, and there was the possibility the brake drum overheated, ignited the fuel tank and set off an explosion. Woods County Sheriff Rudy Briggs Jr. still has three pieces of evidence from the crime scene: a gas tank from the car, a limb from where the car supposedly hit a tree, and Reynolds’ rosary beads. Briggs says it is a cold case that his office is still treating as a homicide. Lifelong Avard resident Nan Wheatley, now in her 60s, will tell visitors that somebody local did it. She also will tell visitors she met Reynolds 46 years later. Wheatley operated a café called Vina Rae’s Grill in the former Avard High School gymnasium when she says the headless figure of a woman came through the walls and then vanished. That was on Memorial Day 2002. Wheatley claims to have heard unexplained noises and seen wisps of an image


“A café employee attempted to serve a

passing by the view of students when the building was the high school gym where Dee Reynolds coached. Earlier in 2002, a café employee attempted to serve a woman in a green dress at the counter; the employee looked away to grab a pad to take the woman’s order, but when she turned back, the woman was gone. Wheatley claims she would hear sounds resembling someone walking with a peg leg in another part of the old gym, only to find no one there. She only read later that Reynolds’ leg had been burned off. The reported sightings led paranormal groups from both Tulsa and Enid to record what they saw in the gym on Halloween night 2003. Glowing orbs and a faint image at the end of the hallway in a photo was the extent of the two groups’ findings. Wheatley says the two investigating groups told her there was more than one

WOMAN IN A GREEN DRESS

at the counter; the employee looked away to grab a pad to take the woman’s order, but when she turned back, the woman was GONE.”

ghost in the old gym. One is a male ghost named Isaac, who Wheatley claims tried to push her down a flight of stairs. She says the paranormal groups chased him off to a nearby vacant building. Most of the businesses in Avard have closed up. The grain cooperative closed some time ago, and with no one left to serve,

HAUNTED HISTORY

Fifteen years ago, the individuals who maintained the Fort Reno property needed to come up with a way to raise enough money to restore the timeworn buildings while sharing the fort’s history with the public. “Fort Reno was a military camp in 1874 and was established as a military post in February of 1876,” says director Karen Nix. “Fort Reno and the Darlington Agency, which served the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians across the Canadian River, together preserved the peace and directed the orderly transition of this part of the Indian Territory from reservation to individual farms and ranches. Troops from Fort Reno supervised the first great Land Run of 1889 that opened the Unassigned Lands for settlement.” With that history spanning more than a century, Fort Reno has had its fair share of suicides and unsolved murders, and those unsettled souls have piqued the interest of the living. So, in 2000, the ghost tours began, bringing in guests on the third Saturday of each month from March through October to witness the unusual occurrences.

Wheatley closed her café five years ago. Today, 26 people live in Avard among the vacant buildings of the town. The gym where Dee Reynolds coached after the mysterious death of his wife is locked up and rarely entered – the building’s contents left alone to the creaks and moaning caused by the wind. MIKE COPPOCK

For the last four years, those tours have been led by Grandma’s Paranormal Society. The group of volunteers has spent many hours investigating the site, comparing their findings to the fort’s documented history. Paranormal investigator and tour guide Ruth Ann Crawford says the group has developed a relationship with some of the spirits and can count on them to make their presence known during the live investigations held on each tour. One such encounter occurred in the chapel. “The chapel windows are at least 15 feet off the ground. In others words, so high that there’s no way a person could be standing there in front of those windows,” explains Crawford. “The person on the tour took a picture, and, very clearly, there was a human face and upper chest looking in that window. Not only was it so clear that you could see all the details, we believe – compared to the pictures that we have seen there at the fort – that it was Ben Clark. Ben Clark was a big part of the fort’s history, and he committed suicide here at the fort.” The investigators strive to be as accurate as possible as they intertwine history and mystery to entertain and intrigue the guests – even the non-believers. – Beth Weese

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

23


The State N AT U R E

The Science Of Studying Sasquatch

I

Oklahoma bigfoot researchers are taking the legendary creature from lore to lab.

t’s shortly before midnight on a foggy fall evening in 1988. My mother is driving us through the backcountry roads of Newalla. I am dozing in the back seat, when suddenly I lurch forward as my mother slams on her brakes, screaming wildly. Being a supportive daughter, I start in with my own bloodcurdling shrieks. Then, as abruptly as she began, my mother goes silent and calmly resumes driving. When I can open my mouth without my heart jumping out, I demand to know what’s going on. “Oh nothing, baby,” my mom says, serenity personified. “It was just a bigfoot that ran across the road.” Like many Oklahomans, I have grown up with tales of the creature. In southeastern Oklahoma, he is known as the Boggy Bottom Monster. Others call him bigfoot, sasquatch, hairy man, even the North American wood ape. Recently, the North American Wood

24

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

Ape Conservancy, a nonprofit organization of scientists, naturalists and investigators, published a comprehensive 230-page report on their findings from a long-term research study conducted regarding mysterious primate activity in Oklahoma’s Ouachita Mountains. While definitive results from photograph and lab analysis failed, the research group documented thousands of incidents, including rock hurling, knocking on wood and various unusual vocalizations, of which the group obtained several audio clips. So how exactly does one “research” bigfoot? And why is Oklahoma such a hotbed of sasquatch activity and folklore? We asked D.W. Lee, executive director of the Mid-America Bigfoot Research Center (MABRC). Although ostensibly a regional organization, it has attracted more than 500 members from three continents, seven nations and 42 states. Each year at the beginning of October, the center hosts the Oklahoma Bigfoot Symposium in Stilwell,

where it presents the results of research and other expeditions in the quest to investigate the creature’s existence. “I have been unfortunate enough to have 25 sightings of the bigfoot, out of being in the woods nearly 4,000 times during my time as a researcher,” Lee says. “I say ‘unfortunate’ because once you see these animals, you become obsessed with seeing them again.” Lee attributes the high rate of bigfoot sightings in the state to a couple of different factors. “Oklahoma has a larger concentration of lakes, watersheds and forests than many other states,” Lee says. “With more and more people moving outward into those areas, more encounters with bigfoot is inevitable as humans encroach on [the creature’s] habitat.” A self-described armchair researcher and lifelong bookworm, MABRC researcher Glen McDonald first became intrigued when,


ASK US ABOUT ATTACHED TEETH IN A DAY!

as a teenager, he saw an unidentifiable creature stand up from a creek bed. “I couldn’t see it clearly since I’d left my glasses at home,” McDonald says. “Whatever it was really scared the guys I was with.” McDonald was hooked. When asked why Oklahoma is indeed “Bigfootville,” McDonald agrees with Lee. “I think this may be because Oklahoma has a lot of great habitat if bigfoot actually exists,” he says. “Oklahoma has a lot more water available year round in reservoirs and farm ponds than it did 100 [years] ago, for instance.” He also believes that an upsurge in deer populations might make the Oklahoma forests and mountains attractive real estate for the creature. Through their years of research with the MABRC, Lee and McDonald have made surprising discoveries about the cryptid during their numerous expeditions into some of the most remote areas of the state. And while McDonald admits that an expedition can be a great reason to go camping, both he and Lee emphasize that there is a lot more involved BEFORE AFTER than just setting up tents and hunting for footprints. “An expedition is not just an impromptu affair,” Lee says. “It’s planned out and detailed down to the last minute.” Each potential research expedition, Lee explains, begins with scouting a location. When deciding on a potential area, teams search for such telltale signs as wooden structures and footprints and talk to locals about sightings. “An expedition brings multiple researchers together, with their reChris Ward, DDS sources and with a common goal in mind,” Lee says. “It usually takes 918-274-4466 • owassodentalimplants.com about two months prior to plan, coordinate and gather the resources together. Maps and aerial photos are studied, moon phases, sunset and sunrise [times] are collected. Sighting reports for the general area are 21004 Chris Ward DDS.indd 1 6/10/15 reviewed. Several meetings are held by all the attendees online.” Once an area is suspected as a likely spot for an expedition, the team conducts further research, setting up listening devices and recorders and thermal cameras. If the area shows great potential, a full expedition may be planned. Researchers arrive and set up trail and thermal cameras, audio recorders, parabolic devices and sometimes even militarygrade motion sensors, Lee says. Daytime activities include searching for tracks or other physical evidence. In the evening and nighttime hours, team members set up listening posts in the area and take four-wheelers into the woods. Even a short expedition of a few days can lead to hundreds of hours of video and audio that, along with any physical specimens collected, must be analyzed by members at the center. “I’m still a skeptical agnostic on the existence of bigfoot,” McDonald says. “I’ve met a lot of folks who’ve had sightings. I don’t think everyone who has had a sighting can just be cynically dismissed as a nutcase. A creature similar to bigfoot was part of American Indian culture long before Columbus supposedly discovered our continent. I got involved in bigfoot research after I got acquainted with Ph.Ds, former police officers and a wide variety of other folks who are researching the bigfoot enigma. I Your business faces many potential wrong turns as it cruises along toward future know a lot of folks who absolutely believe that bigfoot exists.” financial success. An expert employee benefits insurance broker can help you For those interested in conducting their own research expeditions, Lee steer clear of any bumps in the road, ensuring a smooth, uninterrupted and secure ride for you and your employees. has some words of wisdom. Strategic Employee Benefit Services “Bigfoot tends to stay close to water and food sources, and if you can specializes in providing a wide seleclocate good sources of this, you can find bigfoot activity,” he says. “Bigfoot tion of health insurance and voluntary is a flesh-and-blood animal, that is, a primate. No DNA study has since benefits products as well as human proven their existence, contrary to some folks who claim it has. They also resources solutions and healthcare Shelley Hughes, CPA do not cloak, disappear into portals into other dimensions or ride in UFOs.” reform compliance. We have charted Certified Healthcare Reform Specialist your challenges and know how to For those interested in learning more, the MABRC has a comprehensive PPACA Certified Professional avoid and overcome them. Contact us database of bigfoot research and information at www.mid-americabigfoot. (918)497-1173 or (405)767-9415 today to keep your business moving com. Shelley.hughes@nm.com

IMPLANT, SEDATION, and COSMETIC DENTISTRY

Guidance that won’t leave you lost

3:20 PM

Planning your business’ future can feel perilous without a knowledgeable guide leading you in the right direction.

TARA MALONE

forward—leave the navigation to us.

21365 Northwest Mutual.indd 1

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

25 8/19/15

5:05 PM


The State

SP ORT

Young Talent Kristian Doolittle shoots for success during his senior year at Edmond Memorial.

W

KRISTIAN DOOLITTLE IS THE TOP-RANKED HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL PLAYER IN THE STATE AND SUITS UP FOR EDMOND MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

26

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

hen he was just a toddler, Kristian Doolittle leapt as high as he could to pitch a full-size basketball toward a full-size goal, only for it to plop back down. Undeterred, he tries again and again, doing his best to keep up with his older brother, Kameron. Doolittle is now known as one of the top-ranked high school basketball players in Oklahoma. It is apparent that the now-17-year-old, six-foot, seven-inch Edmond Memorial senior feels great about his accomplishments, yet he is very humble in speaking about it. There are a lot of good players in Oklahoma, he says, so to be top ranked is pretty cool and feels like an accomplishment. Basketball isn’t the only extracurricular activity in which Doolittle has exceptional abilities. He began his athletic career playing football, because his brother Kameron played. In fact, he says he always wanted to try every sport his brother played. He tried baseball as well, but he remembers getting bored in the outfield, so he would watch other games going on behind him. In those earlier years, it was already apparent Doolittle was very athletic, as he attended many camps, played on several teams and won multiple awards while doing so. Because of his height and talent, he would often be placed on older teams. When he talks about his involvement in those camps and teams, Doolittle speaks highly of coaches who have taught him much from such an early age. He recognizes the coaches from his early years as having great influence on his path. He recalls playing on one little league basketball team in particular; nearly every single boy from that team has gone on to experience great success and recognition among high school basketball players in the state. His involvement in most other activities and hobbies eventually took a backseat to basketball. Doolittle admits he’s not too sad about having put piano aside. He did, however, play

football through his freshman year. He played quarterback and was named MVP that year. Unfortunately, his football career came to a halt when he broke his ankle playing summer basketball the summer before his sophomore year. Although he excelled in football, “I didn’t like getting hit that much. That was the only downside,” he says. But by that point, the University of Oklahoma had discovered Doolittle’s basketball talent. He has committed to play for OU in 2016. When he was a freshman, Doolittle was already playing on the varsity basketball team at Memorial. Recruiters from OU came to watch another teammate, Jordan Woodard, and discovered Doolittle, as well. “I always tell Kristian that you’ve got to play your best because you never know who’s watching,” says Denise, Doolittle’s mother. Since being recruited by OU, he has become familiar with the basketball program there. He’s met the coaching staff and players, gone to games and has gotten comfortable with the idea of Norman being his future home. That’s why this past year, Doolittle, an Oklahoma State University fan, had no qualms about fully committing to OU. “They’ve always been talking to me since my freshman year,” he says. “It just feels like a second home, really. ” Despite that, he finds humor in the fact that his brother, Kameron Doolittle, grew up rooting for OU but now plays wide receiver for OSU. He ultimately wants to make it to the NBA. Although he doesn’t have a lot of time to watch NBA games, he is inspired by LeBron James’s work ethic and Kevin Durant because “he’s just good,” he says. Of course, there is still his senior year to focus on, and he has goals for his team and for himself. Edmond Memorial was ranked number three this past year in 6A basketball. This season, Doolittle hopes the team will win the state championship. As for himself, he knows he must stay healthy so that he can continue to improve. With that, it’s obvious not much has changed since he was a toddler. He may not be trying to keep up with his brother these days, but Doolittle still strives to be better each and every time he plays. JULIA CLAPPER


The State

VOCALIST CINDY CAIN WILL LEND HER TALENTS TO THIS YEAR’S UNCORKING THE CURE, WHICH RAISES MONEY FOR THE NATIONAL MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY. PHOTO COURTESY CINDY CAIN.

THE INSIDER

Swingin’ for a Good Cause

Renowned Tulsa vocalist Cindy Cain lends her talents and voice to a cause close to her heart.

I

n her years as a leading light on the Tulsa music scene, vocalist and songwriter Cindy Cain has never called attention to the fact that she suffers from multiple sclerosis. It’s not that she’s gone out of her way to cover it up. It’s just that she hasn’t made it a part of her public persona. For that reason, most of the people who’ve seen her shows and bought her CDs have likely been unaware that MS has been a major factor in the choices she makes in her life and career. That fact goes a long way toward explaining why you haven’t seen her doing any club appearances for the past couple of years – especially since her favorite place to perform in Tulsa went out of business. “Fatigue is probably the biggest and most invisible issue I deal with,” she says. “And due to that, I made a decision after Ciao closed [on Oct. 15, 2012] to just do special shows, like Janet [Rutland] and I did this year at SummerStage. I’ll do shows at the Jazz Hall of Fame again, too, but I’m now at a point where it’s just too difficult to haul my P.A. all over town. Most musicians know that you get tired of hauling your crap around; for me, it’s become so difficult that I don’t want to do it anymore.” As she indicates, this does not mean that the days of catching Cindy Cain in concert are over. It just means that she’s going to be picking her appearances more judiciously, and they’re going to be a bigger deal. That brings us to her sole booking this month, as the headlining act for this year’s Uncorking the Cure event, set for Tulsa’s Cain’s Ballroom on Oct. 15. Begun in 2002 by Oklahoma members of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Uncorking the Cure raises

28

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

funds that help improve the quality of life for Oklahomans afflicted with MS as well as assisting with research into the disease. Named this year’s MS Ambassador, Cain is also serving on the steering committee for the event. “This wasn’t really something I set out to do,” explains Cain. “Donna Leming, who’s a huge music fan as well as a good friend of mine, started having a group of our friends do the MS walks in Tulsa. Maybe you could say I was the inspiration, but she was the motivating force. She’s been doing the MS Walk for about seven years, and every year, she’s the one who’s continued to rally the troops. Because of getting involved with the walking team, I became more aware of the things the National MS Society was doing within Tulsa. Then, last year, I finally bought a ticket and went to Uncorking the Cure, the big fundraising event. The lady who sold me my house has MS, and she’s involved with the Society, and along with a number of other folks she said, ‘Oh, you should sing for us sometime.’ So it really just coalesced into this.” Because the venue is Cain’s Ballroom (named after former owner Madison “Daddy” Cain, to whom Cindy Cain is not related), the longtime home of western-swing king Bob Wills and his brother Johnnie Lee Wills, the board members suggested to Cain that she put together a band and program that fit the venue. It wasn’t much of a stretch for her to put a western-swing angle on the evening. Although she’s best known in town as a jazz and blues singer, Cain is the kind of artist who doesn’t consider any musical genre off-limits. “The very first gig I ever had was when I was in the Peace Corps,


ROBERT

TALBOTT in Yaounde, the capital of Cameroon, and I sang at a restaurant across from the U.S. Embassy, owned by a French-Canadian woman,” she recalls. “I sang with a house band that included a couple of members of the national orchestra. We did ‘The Lion Sleeps Tonight,’ ‘Your Cheatin’ Heart,’ ‘Walkin’ after Midnight’ and Roberta Flack’s ‘The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face.’ It was just a little bit of everything. “Later on, when I moved to D.C., I knew I wanted to sing, so I went to an open-mic night at Whitey’s on Washington Boulevard, watched all the bands, picked out the best one – which was a country band – and went up and said, ‘You need a female singer.’ We did songs like ‘Mama Tried,’ with me backing up the male vocalist, and probably some Highway 101 stuff, because they were very big at the time. We rehearsed for a year, did one wedding, and then the band fell apart.” Despite that, she says, her months of rehearsing with that group helped add another influence to her singing and songwriting, which she kept after returning to northeast Oklahoma in the early part of this decade. She’d actually been exposed to country much earlier, as a young girl growing up in Pryor. “When you listen to my original music, you can hear that it doesn’t come out of any one place,” she explains. “But it’s certainly Oklahoma-influenced, and partially country-influenced.” Western-swing music contains those same influences, along with others familiar to Cain: classic pop, big band, blues and jazz. And all but one of the members of the band she’s assembled especially for this event, the Red Hot Pokers, can boast of having impressive credentials in the genre. (The only one who doesn’t, Scott McQuade, is an internationally known jazz pianist whose skill and versatility 21395 Travers.indd make him a perfect fit.) The group includes fiddler Shelby Eicher, trumpeter Mike Bennett and trombonist Steve Ham, all current members of the high-profile Tulsa Playboys; bassist Dean DeMerritt, who toured and recorded with the veteran western-swing group Asleep at the Wheel; and drummer Wade Robertson, whose extensive credits include work with western-swing king Hank Thompson. It wouldn’t be a Cindy Cain show, though, if she didn’t bend a few genres. “We’ll probably do [the Bob Wills classic] ‘Take Me Back to Tulsa,’” she says. “But we’ll also do some Patsy Cline, Wanda Jackson and Hank Williams. We might even do a Hank Williams III song. There’ll be swing and waltzes and, you know, other things. To me, it’s like jazz, swing, western swing – how do you parse those away from one another?” Before Cain and the Red Hot Pokers take the stage, Cain’s friend and fellow vocalist Janet Rutland will open with what Cain calls “a cocktail set,” backed by McQuade, DeMerritt and Robertson. Lambrusco’z to Go caters the event, with wine from Calistoga Cellars as well as a silent and live auction. Cain plans to give all attendees two of her CDs, 2006’s In My Impala and 2009’s Live at Ciao: Rhythm and Romance. The primary reason she’s throwing in the bonus discs, she says, “is that my window of opportunity for selling CDs has further diminished by the scaling back of my gig schedule. I don’t realistically envision being able to sell that many down the road, so what better community to give them to than those who support raising funds for an MS cure and for MS patients and their caregivers?” Individual tickets are available for $125, with table reservations available as well. Those attending must be at least 21 years of age. For more information on this year’s Uncorking the Cure, visit www. nationalmssociety.org.

Buy OK Local

Fine apparel

www.traversmahanapparel.com

South Lewis at 81st • The Plaza • 918-296-4100

1

9/9/15 3:47 PM

JOHN WOOLEY 21362 Skin Renewal.indd 1

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29 9/17/15

1:44 PM


yea Cele r w bra ith ting Tul m sa y 28 th Eye Cli nic

Thank you to my loyal patients and great staff. Dr. Blane Snodgrass, O.D. Tulsa Eye Clinic 7171 S. Yale • Tulsa, OK 74136 918.492.2702 • doctorsnodgrass.com

13517 Dr. Blane Snodgrass.indd 1

8/18/15 21351 3:04 PM BOK Center.indd 1

8/18/15 2:05 PM

Our Services MRI

Osteoporosis Clinic Pain Management

Pediatric Orthopaedic Care

Orthopaedic Excellence, Compassionate Care. Our diversified physicians and expert staff will work to customize advanced treatments that meet your individual bone and joint needs. With premier industry skills and cutting edge technology, we have the finest team to restore your mobility so you can get back to doing what you love. Visit Any of Our Locations:

Midtown Tulsa

South Tulsa

1809 E. 13th St., Floors 1, 2, 3 Tulsa, OK 74104

8803 S.101st E. Ave., Suite 100 Tulsa, OK 74133

Physical Therapy Radiology

Worker’s Compensation

Our Treatments Foot & Ankle

Hand & Wrist Knee & Hip

Shoulder & Elbow

Spine: Neck and Back Sports Medicine

Trauma & Fractures

P (918) 582-6800, option #3 • F (918) 582-6060 • www.toctulsa.com 21353 Orthopaedic Center.indd 1

30

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

8/18/15 2:09 PM


Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

CHAD REYNOLDS (CENTER) WRITES MADE-TO-ORDER POEMS AT A RECENT H & 8TH EVENT. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Poems Made To Order Two poets bring custom poetry to customers hungry for something unique.

W

hat’s on the menu today? Love and mercy? The promise of tomorrow? A sonnet with a side of iambic pentameter? Tennyson sauce or Whitman dressing? Not quite, but almost. It’s not Burger King, and you can’t always have it your way. And every poem cooked up by Short Order Poems is served well-done. Short Order Poems sits at the corner of Hudson and Eighth Street during Oklahoma City’s popular H & 8th Night Markets. In the middle of the chaos created by 30,000 people, music, food, alcohol and stars, two poets – Chad Reynolds, 39, and Timothy Bradford, 45 – along with three or four guest poets, are creating food for the soul. “It’s not like they’re bankers that think it’s fun to sit down and write poems. They’re poets. That’s what they are. This isn’t them trying to have a shtick. This is them looking for a great way to express, at the core, who they are. That’s why it works. It’s honest. It’s not about what sells. It’s them doing what they

love. What they love is writing,” says H & 8th Market Night organizer Brian Bergman. Waiters take orders – topics – and briskly deliver them to the waiting cooks. Patrons won’t hear the sizzling of a grill, but they will hear the clicking and clacking of the keys of a manual typewriter, perhaps a Hermes 3000 or an old Smith Corona. Nor will customers hear a bell signaling that their order is up, but if one of the poets is rolling, they’ll hear the ding of a manual typewriter that’s reached the end of a line. Both native Oklahomans, Reynolds and Bradford are serious poets. Reynolds, an insurance broker by day, is the author of Buenos Aires, a collection of travel poems. He’s also published six chapbooks, completed two full-length manuscripts and been published in more than 30 journals and literary reviews, including Washington Square and Cutbank. His time with Short Order has given him more than 200 poems that he plans to revisit, more than enough for his third manuscript. Bradford is the author of Nomads with Samsonite, a poetry collection published in

2011. His work has also appeared in several journals and literary reviews, including 42opus and Diagram. Bradford has served as the assistant editor of the Oklahoma State University literary magazine, Cimarron Review. With a Ph.D. in creative writing, he now teaches literature and composition as a visiting assistant professor at the university. The poetic pair developed Short Order to feed Oklahoma City’s starving poetry community. It was an on-the-spot recipe hashed out in early 2014 at midtown Oklahoma City’s Elemental Coffee Roasters with its owner, Brian Bergman, also well-known as the organizer of H & 8th Night Market. He listened as the two tossed ideas back and forth for bringing poetry readings to Oklahoma City. “It’s a constant struggle wherever you are, no matter how much money or pull you have, to get people to come out and listen to people reading poetry. We decided not to create that,” says Bradford. “We decided Oklahoma City’s not ready for that. Even if it was, that wasn’t what we wanted to do because OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

31


Life & Style

REYNOLDS IS THE AUTHOR OF BUENOS AIRES, A CHAPBOOK OF TRAVEL POETRY.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

it would just be the same thing we’ve seen everywhere else.” As an aside, Reynolds mentioned something a friend of his, poet Kathleen Rooney, experimented with in Chicago. Rooney created Poems While You Wait, a public setting where writers craft poetry on the spot using manual typewriters and topics randomly taken from the crowd. “As Chad described Poems While You Wait, Brian’s listening, and you could just see that he was getting excited. He said, ‘That – that’s the idea.’ This was what pushed us to do it. Brian said, ‘If you guys can put this together, I’ll give you a table right there on the corner of H & 8th. He was willing to feature us at the heart of this festival. At that point, we couldn’t back down unless we were really wimps. What’s the worst that could happen? We go, we suck, nobody buys anything and we shut it down,” says Bradford. Bergman, who also owns a branding company, Whiteboard Labs, is known around town as an idea guy. The enthusiasm he displayed masked a bit of hesitancy. “I knew they were charging for the poems,” he says. “I wasn’t sure how people would react to it. This could be a runaway hit. Or it could be a slow slog up a trail. You never know. The first time they did it, they had a waiting list. They had to stop taking orders early in the evening because they had more than they could do. That’s spectacular. It definitely surprised me.” The popularity they garnered quickly forced them to put basic economics into action. When demand exceeds supply, the price goes up. Every meal served by Short Order now costs $10. “It started out at five bucks, and the demand was too high. We couldn’t meet it. A couple of times last year, we had to leave and fill orders at home, which was not fun. The last thing you want to do after spending five hours writing poems is to go home and write 10 more. So this was a very simple example of supply and demand. This was economics playing itself out in a field that is so non-commercial. It’s great. It’s lowered demand a little bit and allowed us to rightsize ourselves,” says Reynolds. Short Order Poems appears regularly at the H & 8th Market Night on the last Friday of every month, March through October. Now in its second year, Short Order’s popularity isn’t waning. The duo has performed at other events and venues and will appear in Tulsa in December, time and location to be announced. PAUL FAIRCHILD

32

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015


Be...A Champion Be...A Cascian

Chase Antonacci Class of 2015

At the State Science Fair, Chase Antonacci won “Best Project” in the entire High School Division, First Place in Biochemical/Medical and Health, the Scholarship Award, the US Surgeon General’s Health Science Award, and he was chosen the Oklahoma Delegate to the International Science and Engineering Fair. Chase conducted research over the summer through The University of Tulsa TURC program and is currently focusing on Pre-Med at Washington University in St. Louis.

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, November 1, 2015, 1:00 - 3:00 pm Register for an Entrance Exam or Shadow Day at casciahall.com/admissions. Oct 2015 SCI_OK Mag (Kybella).pdf 1 8/21/15 21364 Cascia Hall.indd 1

5:15 PM

2520 S. Yorktown Ave. Tulsa, OK 918-746-2600

$300

OFF Kybella

PACKAGE OF TWO

chin up!

8/19/15 4:50 PM

Kybella™ is FDA-approved to reduce fat under the chin and reduce the appearance of a "double chin." Hold your head high with confidence with non-surgical Kybella!

UNRETOUCHED KYBELLA PHOTOS

Are you bothered by excess fat beneath your chin?

www.casciahall.com admissions@casciahall.com

After 5 Treatment Sessions

MODEL

Before

Schedule Your Free Consultation:

918.948.6375

6565 South Yale, Suite 110 | Tulsa, Oklahoma 74136 | www.skincareinstitute.net Special promotions valid until 10.31.15, and may not be combined. Must mention this ad to receive specials. Individual results vary. Other restrictions may apply. 21374 Skin Care Institute.indd 1

8/24/15 9:04 AM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

33


Life & Style

GUIDE

Pin-worthy Pumpkin Projects

Paint small, store-bought pumpkins with metallic silver or gold spray paint to create small touches of fall that can incorporate easily into existing décor.

This fall vegetable is not just for pies anymore. Try a savory take on pumpkin by incorporating it into a pasta sauce. Heat together 1/2 cup pumpkin puree, one ounce of cream cheese, ¼ cup of half and half, a bit of fresh minced garlic, salt and pepper in a medium saucepan on low until cheese is melted and everything easily mixes together. Add two cups of cooked pasta shells, six slices of crumbled bacon and a sprinkling of sliced scallions and Parmesan cheese and serve. Don’t forget about the seeds! Toss two cups of rinsed-and-dried pumpkin seeds with a couple of teaspoons of vegetable oil and a tablespoon of salt. Roast on a baking sheet in a 375-degree oven until crisped and browned, about 15 minutes. Give them a stir every five minutes. For an extra kick, try adding in one tablespoon of Old Bay seasoning, barbecue seasoning or jalapeno powder with salt. Recipe courtesy Chowhound.

What’s your favorite trick-or-treating candy? Vote at www.okmag.com or on Twitter using #oklahomacandy.

SMELL MY FEET 34

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

$2

BILLION Is spent annually on Halloween candy.

$77.52 Amount the average American spent on Halloween in 2014.

CREEPY CELEBRATIONS

SPOOKY STATS

Haunt The Zoo – Oct. 26-31 Oklahoma City Zoo. www. okczoo.com HallowZOOween – Oct. 27-31 Tulsa Zoo. www.tulsazoo.org Haunted Tulsa Deco Trolley Tour – Oct. 30 Downtown Tulsa. www.tulsawine.com BooHaHa in Brookside – Oct. 31 Brookside. www.brooksidetheplacetobe.com Oklahoma City Halloween Parade & Costume Party – Oct. 31 Automobile Alley. www.okchalloweenparade.com Seventh Annual Spider Ball – Oct. 31 IDL Ballroom. www.idlballroom.com

20 %

23

Of those who celebrated Halloween in 2014 made their own costumes.

Million Americans dressed their pets in costumes for Halloween in 2014.


Yes, at Monte Cassino we’re known as “the saints,” but it’s not simply a moniker students instantly acquire after enrolling, it’s an honor and a tradition students have earned for 90 years. From the first day of Monte Cassino classes in 1926 to today, being a Saint is tantamount to what is important in being successful: hard work, respect for others, a passion to overachieve, a strong moral compass, and the ability to make good day-to-day decisions. So for all reasons people have been choosing Monte Cassino for 90 years (nationally recognized academics, access to team-building athletics, community representation), our unique, creative Catholic social skills programs are what sets us apart then and now from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will set your son and/or daughter apart as well. Want your child to have a better opportunity to succeed in life?

Be a Saint.

918.742.3364 | MonteCassino.org Oklahoma Magazine 1/2 Page Vert. 3.73x10.063 4c - Monte Cassino 21358 Monte Cassino.indd 1

8/18/15 21400 2:15 PM Jack Arnold.indd 1

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

35 9/3/15

2:23 PM


Life & Style L I V I N G S PA C E

Resident Artists An artistic couple brings their strongest work to a home that reflects a Southern sensibility with modern touches.

T

Photography by Nathan Harmon

ulsa artists Rob and Melissa Key were drawn to Tulsa for different reasons, but both found appreciation for their media in the city. Melissa is a native of New Orleans, where she enjoyed a thriving career as a contemporary artist and freelance photographer. Katrina’s devastating aftermath prompted Melissa to move to Tulsa. Rob, a native of Oilton, Okla., worked on the East Coast in the aviation industry, where he mastered his welding skills. The tumultuous devastation of Sept. 11 prompted his move to West Palm Beach, Fla., for five years, designing and producing metal art for multi-million-dollar homes. “I moved to Tulsa in 2005 because I thought Tulsa needed a good iron shop. I barely had a business card,” Rob says, laughing. “My business grew by word of mouth.” Today, his metal art company employs 15 people. Rob and Melissa met through an online dating site and forged a friendship. They married a decade ago and now share their home with their 8-year-old son, Finn.

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

THE NEUTRAL PALETTE OF THIS HOME IS THE PERFECT BACKDROP FOR HOMEOWNER MELISSA KEY’S ABSTRACT ART.


IS M MEL

OT O SHOOT.

F RO

VISIT OKMAG. COM TO SEE

EXCLUSIVE OTOS SA PH PH KEY’

S OW N

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

37


Life & Style

BELOW: WHITE WALLS AND DRAPERIES ARE CONTRASTED WITH BLACK WROUGHT IRON WORK FORGED BY ROB KEY. RIGHT: METAL BAR STOOLS CRAFTED BY ROB KEY ARE COVERED IN ICELANDIC SHEEP SKIN, A FOCAL POINT OF THE KITCHEN.

38

So what happens when two highly creative and artistic people merge their multiple talents to build a contemporary home? “I’m a right-brain abstract artist, and he’s artsy, too. We are always talking about art and ideas,” Melissa says. “My ideas come from everywhere,” Rob laughs. “Once an idea is born, it becomes a reality, almost overnight.” Melissa wanted a home that echoed her love for New Orleans. Rob wanted a showcase for his exquisite metal art, including doorways and staircases, patio swings and sculptures. The result is a 4,400-square-foot, two-story, dramatic home that has architectural whispers of old New Orleans mansions. Melissa loves white, so white walls and floor-to-ceiling white draperies are contrasted with sleek, black wrought-iron railings and a center staircase, designed and built by Rob. White walls provide an ideal backdrop for Melissa’s larger-than-life abstract paintings, many with gold leaf traces.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015


OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

39


Life & Style

THE OUTDOOR AREA OF THE HOME IS A PERFECT SPOT FOR ENTERTAINING AND IS VISIBLE FROM NEARLY EVERY ROOM.

“The seasons change my color palette,” she says. “I like different colors, and my art is a reflection of how my surroundings inspire me. Light and sunshine make me happy, so we are always opening doors to the outside.” Twelve-foot ceilings and 10-foot interior panel doors, hand-crafted from cypress wood harvested from New Orleans swamps, provide a dramatic feel to the home. “Originally, pocket doors in New Orleans mansions were left ‘naked,’ so the wood

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

grain was evident,” Rob explains. Oak wood flooring is arranged in a chevron pattern, which is mimicked in the fireplace interior. For the Keys, the kitchen is the heart of the home. An enormous island of Italian Carrera marble is the centerpiece. “I love to cook. It’s where everyone gathers,” Melissa notes. “The countertop is similar to those in New Orleans homes. The ladies there always made their pralines on a

marble slab.” Metal bar stools, crafted by Rob, line two sides of the island. Covered in white Icelandic sheep skin, they add texture to the setting. The sumptuous patio beckons from every room. The pure white of the outdoor area with its pool and white Carrera border, white brick fireplace, covered pavilion and open seating area, reflects the couple’s talent for superb design. M.J. VAN DEVENTER


Since 1964 Specializing in frameless heavy glass shower doors, mirrors, framed shower doors, glass tops and insulated glass units.

Don Tracy Glass Co. 1335 S. HARVARD ● TULSA, OK 74112 OFFICE: (918) 744-1815

3549 South Harvard, Tulsa 918-742-9027

www.dontracyglass.com

20589 Don Tracy Glass.indd 1

4/17/15 Tonis 12:29 1.indd PM 1

9/9/15 1:02 PM

918-518-5678 • BRIANDWIGGS.COM 20670 Brian Wiggs.indd 1

9/2/15 12:29 PM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

41


Life & Style

OKLAHOMA NATIVE LAUREN MAKK (FAR RIGHT) WILL CO-HOST FABLIFE WITH (FROM LEFT) LEAH ASHLEY, CHRISSY TEIGEN, TYRA BANKS AND JOE ZEE.

PHOTO COURTESY DISNEY ABC HOME ENTERTAINMENT AND TELEVISION DISTRIBUTION.

DESIGN

The Design Diva

Interior design reality television star and Oklahoma native Lauren Makk provides advice and tips while cohosting a new daytime TV show alongside some of pop culture’s biggest names.

I

nterior designer Lauren Makk has taken a seat as co-host alongside former supermodel Tyra Banks on a new daytime TV show called FABLife. Makk’s role as the Home Lifestylist on the show means she will share her signature approach to design. Her hallmark of affordable luxury focuses on a budget-friendly innovation to home design. “A lot of people think interior design is for the rich,” says Makk. “Design can be easy and approachable.” Makk’s views stem from her upbringing in Oklahoma. Her roots in the Sooner State inspire her designs not just in appearance, but particularly in their accessibility. “I have lived in middle America,” says Makk. “I know what real people live like. It’s about working with what you’ve got and making it look amazing. Growing up in Oklahoma, there weren’t a lot of high-end design stores around, so I developed an uncanny ability to mix retail with resale.” Makk spent years perfecting her signature style, considering herself an interior designer since birth. Makk’s mother is a home builder, and as a child she spent plenty of time on construction sites. Utilizing her experiences there

42

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

and her art studies at the Classen School of Advanced Studies, Makk became adept at combining form and function. Her willingness to explore different options inspired into her career path, too. While attending Oklahoma State University, she took advantage of a national exchange program to attend college in California. She decided to stay in California to finish her degree, and then went to work designing model homes. Seeking an opportunity with a bit more excitement, Makk saw an ad on Craigslist that was seeking designers for a show resembling TLC’s popular Trading Spaces. Despite the risks, Makk took the leap and decided to audition. “I killed that first audition,” recalls Makk. “I knew something magical had just happened.” After making it through several more auditions, she was offered a job, with one amazing surprise. “It wasn’t a Trading Spaces-like show,” reveals Makk. “It was Trading Spaces.” She went on to also star on A&E’s Drill Team, a show that tackles home renovation on an extreme deadline. Now on FABLife, Makk combines practical design tips and expertise with her personal journey navigating the single life and her weight

loss experience. “We want every body type to [be] represented,” says Makk. “And, I don’t mean everybody, I mean every body.” FABLife aims to offer a wealth of practical advice through its lineup of experts: Tyra Banks, Chrissy Teigen, Joe Zee, Leah Ashley and, of course, Makk. Banks is FABLife’s authority on all things beauty and business. Culinary connoisseur and supermodel Teigen is the show’s resident foodie. Zee brings his signature styling advice and insight on the latest trends and looks. YouTube sensation Ashley shares her DIY love of upcycling, flea markets and vintage stores. “After just filming just a few shows, I have learned so much,” says Makk. “We all seek out ideas that are real, that real people can use.” FABLife also offers viewers the opportunity to interact with the show as well as the experts via Instragram, Twitter and Facebook. While Makk isn’t busy filming, she loves to come home to Oklahoma any chance she can get to see family and have some of her favorite Oklahoma specialties like a Johnnie’s charbroiled burger. “I miss Oklahoma so much,” says Makk. After all, Oklahoma will always be home. LINDSAY CUOMO


Double Wedding Ring Quilt, 1940. Pieced cotton plain weave top, cotton plain weave back and binding; quilted. Gift of the Pilgrim / Roy Collection, 2014.1945. Photograph © 2015 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

.

18635 Jim Norton.indd 1

7/16/15 21384 10:26 AM OKC MoA.indd 1

8/27/15 9:42 AM

Highly walkable mid-town location Minutes to shopping, Philbrook, parks, & hospital

Very exclusive, only six residences

located at 28th and Peoria

Highest quality materials & systems Designer fixtures & accessories

Controlled access gated community

Contact Us 2200 S. Utica Place, Suite 100 • Tulsa, Oklahoma 918.582.2220 • www.cowenresidential.com

21393 Cowen Construction.indd 1

9/1/15 11:09 AM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

43


Life & Style

VINCE FRINGED BLANKET CARDIGAN, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

VINCE LEATHER CAPE COAT, $1,295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JOIE CAPE, $598, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

GENERATION LOVE FRINGED PONCHO, $249, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SCIALLE SCARFS TWEED PONCHO, $240, ABERSONS.

GLAMOURPUSS FUR CAPE, $825, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STYLE

Shrouded In Warmth

SONIA RYKIEL

This season’s must-have outerwear includes capes, ponchos, blanket cardigans and wraps that keep the wearer warm and fashionable. Texture, color-blocking, plaid and tweed are a few trends expressed through these odes to coziness.

THEORY PLAID PONCHO, $495, ABERSONS.

SONIA RYKIEL

ALICE + OLIVIA PINSTRIPE CAPE, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

BAILEY 44 PLAID PONCHO, $328, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

44

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

ALICE + OLIVIA FOX FUR-TRIMMED SWEATER, $660, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

JOIE MULTICOLOR PONCHO, $428, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

JOIE ZIP-FRONT PONCHO, $448, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


For more than half a century, GableGotwals has led the way in representing companies involved in the energy and oil and gas sectors. Our clients cover the gambit of downstream, midstream, and upstream companies, who range from family owned businesses to Fortune 100 companies. Whether it’s “bet the company” litigation, acquisitions, joint venture arrangements, financing, or Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) regulations, our attorneys have experience in every aspect of the energy industry. Our knowledge means less time educating us about your operation, more time solving your problem, and more confidence that we understand the implications to your company. GableGotwals…Solving Problems and Managing Opportunities.

We Are Energy Law

TULSA

·

OKLAHOMA CITY

·

www.gablelaw.com

21370 GableGotwals.indd 1

8/20/15 3:51 PM

The A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Foundation has donated $8 million to help fund the construction of a new academic building at Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences. In honor of the historic gift, the largest ever given to OSU Center for Health Sciences, the facility will be named the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Medical Academic Building. The Tandy Foundation’s

TRANSFORMING MEDICAL EDUCATION IN OKLAHOMA

generous investment in our students will provide state-of-the-art training for the next generation of Oklahoma physicians and transform medical education in our state.

®

Tulsa, Oklahoma

21368 OSU CHS.indd 1

918-582-1972

www.healthsciences.okstate.edu

8/20/15 10:58 AM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


Life & Style

LIC ETAL , RS M EAKERS L KO N HAE IP-ON S VENUE. IC M A L S H L T E IF TASS , SAKS F $350

ACCESSORIZE

Bling Foot Forward

This fall’s fashion are largely inspired by the ‘70s, complete with fringe, leather, ponchos and vests. But another aspect of ‘70s fashion was the disco culture: jumpsuits, drapery, metallic materials and a lot of bling. This aspect of the fashion can be seen far and wide on the feet. Blinged-out shoes are a great way to add sparkle to even the most basic outfit. A pair of dark jeans and a simple tee have never looked so sophisticated than when they are paired with a pink pair of Manolo Blahnik glitter heels.

JIMMY CHOO STILETTO HEELS, $895, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

OO 895, Y CH ,$ JIMM D FLATS E. HE ENU IS L A L E H V EMB KS FIFT SA

JIMMY CHOO CRYSTAL EMBELLISHED SANDALS, $1,595, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MANOLO BLAHNIK ANKLE BRACELET HEELS, $885, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO METALLIC SANDALS, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LIC ETAL 95, OO M $6 Y CH DALS, . JIMM N SAN VENUE A -O SLIP S FIFTH SAK

MANOLO BLAHNIK LINK SANDALS, $925, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MANOLO BLAHNIK METALLIC SNAKESKIN SANDALS, $875, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

46

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

MANOLO BLAHNIK METALLIC PRINTED CUTOUT PUMPS, $745, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MANOLO BLAHNIK GLITTER PUMPS, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MIU MIU HEEL-STUDDED ANKLE BOOTS, $1,100, BALLIETS.

MIU MIU GLITTER-AND-STUD FLATS, $795, BALLIETS.


Crossing the Milk River oil on canvas, 30.5" x 42" (detail) Autry National Center, Los Angeles

Painted Journeys: the art of John Mix stanley october 4, 2015 – January 3, 2016

Exhibition organized by the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Cody, Wyoming.

Title sponsor of the Gilcrease Museum exhibition season is the Sherman E. Smith Family Foundation. TU is an EEO/AA Institution.

gilcrease.utulsa.edu 21375 Gilcrease.indd 1

8/25/15 9:19 AM

Chris & Larry Houston American Pipe Bending

Great Results, Happy Patients! (Thank you, OKC!)

Straight pipe never had a chance. American Pipe Bending is a real Tulsa success story. After decades of bending pipe and shipping it worldwide, Larry and Chris are quick to joke about not liking straight pipe. What they do like is a strong relationship with their local bank. With an ambitious growth plan, they need a bank that can deliver.

405.751.LOVE

Member, Int. Society of Hair Restoration Surgery Certified, American Board of Plastic Surgery Fellow, American College of Surgeons Member, American Society of Plastic Surgeons American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery

mabreybank.com • 888.272.8866 • Formerly Citizens Security Bank 21361 Mabrey.indd 1

CareCredit & Prosper Healthcare Lending welcome

Member FDIC

8/19/15 12:01 PM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM 21366 Dr Love.indd 1

47 8/20/15

9:12 AM


Life & Style

ALEXIS BITTAR THREE-STRAND NECKLACE, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. VINCE SUEDE LEGGINGS, $945, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MILLY CHAIN PURSE, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

VINCE GRAY BLAZER, $495, ABERSONS.

MASUNAGA OPTICAL GLASSES, $360, HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR.

SONIA RYKIEL

AQUATALIA KNEE-HIGH BOOTS, $650, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

COLOR

Gray Days

ALEXIS BITTAR LABRADORITE AND CRYSTAL BRACELET, $145, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STUART WEITZMAN GRAY PUMPS, $398, ABERSONS.

Fall’s favorite neutral is anything but drab. Pair gray clothing with accessories that offer a pop of color, or add it to other neutrals for a sophisticated look.

R TA BIT EAR- AKS IS EX ENT 75, S . L A RP , $1 UE SE GS VEN RIN TH A FIF

LOEFFLER RANDALL FRINGE CLUTCH, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. ALICE + OLIVIA BOATNECK MINI DRESS, $298, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

BAJRA SCARF, $435, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ADRIENNE LANDAU KNIT RABBIT FUR COAT, $695, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LANVIN SWEATER, $1,570, ABERSONS.

SONIA RYKIEL

KAREN KANE TOP, $188, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

48

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

THEORY PRINT DRESS, $315, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


L A N O I T INTERNA

,,2015– 1 1 r e b o t c O ,,2016 7 1 y r a u n a J

op #dallasgoesp


Life & Style

DR. RACHEL DAVISJACKSON IS A NEONATAL SPECIALIST AND SERVES AS THE MEDICAL DIRECTOR FOR THE HENRY ZARROW NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT AT THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS.

PHOTO COURESTY SAINT FRANCIS HEALTH SYSTEM.

HEALTH NEWS

Big Care For Small Patients

The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis provides hope and help to area families.

D

riving past 61st Street and Yale Avenue in Tulsa, one can’t help but notice a giant panda waving. The friendly bear sits atop The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis and serves as a symbol of the most comprehensive pediatric medical care available in eastern Oklahoma. Through The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, children in critical need have greater access to life-saving treatments and care – and families have a chance for healing and hope. “Since opening The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis in February of 2008, a team of individuals at Saint Francis Health System have worked to recruit pediatric subspecialists to the Tulsa community,” says Dr. Shannon Filosa, executive director of women’s and children’s services for Saint Francis Health System. “Many specialties that were not available in Tulsa have been added with the addition of these new doctors. The ad-

50

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

dition of these specialties for children has improved the health of children in Tulsa and eastern Oklahoma because families now have access to the latest treatments and therapies from pediatric fellowship trained physicians.” The Children’s Hospital offers services in more than 25 different pediatric specialties and includes the region’s only Level IV Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), pediatric hematology/oncology clinic and pediatric cardiac surgery program. In 2014, as part of its regional impact, Saint Francis neonatologists, pediatric intensivists and pediatric specialists provided educational outreach to more than 15 regional hospitals and hundreds of pediatric and family medicine providers through a monthly tele-health education series as well as onsite clinically focused presentations and specialty consults. The 30,000-square-foot Henry Zarrow NICU is recognized as a Level IV NICU by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“A Level IV NICU is the highest level in the country and provides comprehensive care for neonatal patients,” says Filosa. “A specific neonatal team attends high-risk deliveries and focuses on the baby’s condition to improve outcomes for infants born prematurely, difficult births, birth defects or any condition that places the infant at risk.” The Henry Zarrow NICU cares for nearly 850 newborns and their families each year and provides life-saving procedures, such as therapeutic hypothermia and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for infants suffering with heart and lung failure. The NICU also includes a specially trained neonatology transport team that travels to more than 20 smaller referral hospitals throughout eastern Oklahoma, Missouri and Arkansas. Nearly 35 percent of infants admitted to the Henry Zarrow NICU are born at other hospitals. For families who live in Tulsa and surrounding areas, having state-of-the-art neonatal care


“I did it all by myself” moments are a common occurrence at Camp CB. Photo: Nathan Bilow

SAVE 20% on lodging when you book by OCTOBER 15, 2015 Restrictions apply.

1.855.318.8715

skicb.com/deals

The last great Colorado ski town

TM


REBECCA FAST

52

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

QUICK FACTS

Life & Style

close to home can be a great comfort. “Because of the expertise available at this facility, parents and their babies don’t have to leave the city or state for most of the neonatal problems we encounter. Their support system is near home, and that’s what families need when they have an infant in the NICU,” says Dr. Rachel Davis-Jackson, a neonatal specialist with Warren Clinic and the medical director for the Henry Zarrow NICU at The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis. Davis-Jackson shares that she personally understands what it means to have a sick baby in the NICU, having had a child born premature, at 26 weeks. She considers it a privilege to help others along their journey. “I thank God for the opportunity to do what I do. I believe, for me, this is a calling,” she says. “I try my best to comfort our parents while always being totally honest about care and prognosis. The news is not always good, but I attempt to deliver it in the most compassionate and caring manner I can. One of the greatest rewards to this job is sending a previously critically ill infant home with their family.” She adds that after a child is released from the hospital, the rewards continue. “Parents bring their growing children back to see us and send pictures,” she says. “It is an amazing feeling to watch these little ones grow, knowing the problems they started off with.” Davis-Jackson and the staff at The Children’s Hospital are committed to providing the most advanced care in a compassionate and child-friendly environment, and their work was recently recognized. In 2014, The Children’s Hospital received a Four-star Award for its inpatient care from the Professional Research Consultants, ranking the hospital among the top 25 percent nationally. Filosa attributes the achievement of a high level of inpatient care to the hospital’s comprehensive services and a dedicated staff that works in partnership with parents to promote family-centered care, quality and optimal outcomes for children. According to Filosa, the unique features of the childbirth program that make it successful include the Henry Zarrow NICU and other key care services like the OB Hospitalist Program, which allows Saint Francis to have a board certified obstetrician in the hospital at all times.

about

The Children’s

Hospital

1995 95+ 162 at Saint Francis

Year the hospital was established

Beds in the building

Pediatricians and

subspecialists on staff

SUZANNE AND BILL WARREN, BECKY DIXON AND PATRICK KEEGAN, PAINTED PONY BALL 2014.

PAINTED PONY BALL

As the premier fundraiser for The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, Painted Pony Ball raises funds to support pediatric care, programming and facilities for sick children, whether or not they are able to pay. On Oct. 17, patrons will gather at the Cox

Business Center for a spectacular evening that includes cocktails and appetizers at 6:30 p.m., dinner and auction beginning at 7:30 p.m. and entertainment by the Grammy Award-winning group The Band Perry, energizing the event at 9 p.m. www.saintfrancis.com


YOUR TRIP BEGINS HERE

Whitaker Point near Boxley

Arkansas has mountains — and we’re glad to share them with you. Getting to them is a lot easier than you might think. And along the way, you can sample some local craft brews, take in a world-class art museum, or stay in a quaint mountain cabin. Come see us. ORDER YOUR FREE VACATION PLANNING KIT AT ARKANSAS.COM OR CALL 1-800-NATURAL.

#VisitArkansas


GIVE YOUR KIDS

SOMETHING TO DO BESIDES “LIKE” AND “FOLLOW.”

Swimming, hiking, kayaking, playing, just being kids … there’s plenty to do in Arkansas’s state parks. Make plans to connect them with nature and a world of outdoor adventures today.

ArkansasStateParks.com My park, your park, our parks Pinnacle Mountain State Park

#ARStateParks

EVERY ROOM HAS A VIEW FROM ARKANSAS'S HIGH POINT.

Stay in the mountain lodge or a cabin and enjoy the sweeping views. Dine on classic Southern cuisine. Hike, join the guided nature programs, or just relax. Breathtaking scenery and first-class accommodations await you at Mount Magazine State Park.

1-877-665-6343 • MountMagazineStatePark.com ountMagazineStatePark.com

One of Arkansas’s five state park lodges.


presents the world premiere of

rld Wo iere! m Pre

April 25 - Oct. 18, 2015 CLINTONPRESIDENTIALCENTER.ORG/DINOSAURS

Northwest Arkansas

BELLA VISTA | BENTONVILLE | EUREKA SPRINGS FAYETTEVILLE | HOLIDAY ISLAND | HUNTSVILLE ROGERS | SILOAM SPRINGS | SPRINGDALE

HOG

VACAT ION AMONG AMERICA’S MOST OVERLOOKED OVERLOOKS.

Country Visit NorthwestArkansas.org to learn more

This ad is paid for with a combination of state funds and private regional association funds

only be Boston Mountains can The blazing beauty of the the year. It’s red, yellow and orange of experienced a few weeks plan your fall getaway in Fayetteville To . see can eye the ille.com as far as a, visit experiencefayettev and the surrounding are


South

ARKANSAS’ Naturally Charming

Visitor’s Guide

Camden’s CIVIL WAR Place in the

A R K A N S A S

WATER WOODS Exploring lakes, rivers, trails and terrain.

ARKANSAS RIVER

2015 ARKANSAS TOUR GUIDE

Flowing Through History

Juicy Details from the

VALUABLE COUPONS INSIDE Arkansas Department of Parks & Tourism 1 Capitol Mall • Little Rock, AR 72201 Arkansas.com

• Destination Highlights • Area Maps • Attractions • Hotels and Motels • Bed and Breakfasts • Resorts and Cabins • Arts and Entertainment • Historic Sites • Lakes and Rivers • Spas • Scenic Drives • State and National Parks

Bradley County Pink Tomato Festival

The Bounty of LAKE FISHING Digging for TREASURES Fall Foliage HIKES Paddle boarding on Beaver Lake New EPIC trails and more...

Ultimate Guide to the

OUTDOORS

Complete Guide to Arkansas South’s Attractions

ARKANSAS MOTORCYCLING GUIDE Arkansas is home to some of the best motorcycling in the country. Hundreds of thousands of bikers from all over the nation descend on The Natural State for rides and rallies throughout the year. At each event and around every turn, there’s a place where they can pick up a copy of the Arkansas Motorcycling Guide.

1-800-872-1259 Arkansas.com/motorcycling

ARKANSAS TOUR GUIDE

Within the pages of the Arkansas Tour Guide, you’ll find travel ideas and helpful tips for planning your next vacation in Arkansas. Explore “Unique Arkansas Experiences,” “Edible Arkansas” and “What’s New” in the most comprehensive tourism publication produced in The Natural State.

Arkansas.com 1-800-NATURAL

ARKANSAS’ SOUTH

A place of natural charm with great festivals, state parks, historic sites, shopping, dining and lodging, Arkansas’ South is also renowned as an outdoor paradise for world-famous hunting and fishing in scenic woodlands and on pristine waters. Order your free Visitor’s Guide or view it online.*

ARKANSAS WATER & WOODS

Arkansas is a place that beckons you outside. Arkansas Water and Woods offers an inside look at outdoor activities in The Natural State. These are quintessential Arkansas experiences, the things you must do and the places you must see.

1-866-566-5727 Arkansas.com

ArkansasSouth.com

BWIO

• Attractions • Arkansas Wine Country • Lakes • Scenic Mountains • Driving Tours • Arkansas River • Motorcycling • Festivals & Events • State & National Parks

A FIRST-CLASS TIME … EVERY TIME

No worries, no stress, complete relaxation … Gaston’s White River Resort is the place to achieve that. We’ve got everything you need for a family vacation, romantic getaway or group gathering, year-round. First-class accommodations and amenitites add up to a first-class time … every time.

870-431-5202 gastons@gastons.com Gastons.com

VAN BUREN Experience fall in the Ozarks and the Boston Mountains from a vintage excursion train. Take a stroll through the Main Street Historic District to shop the unique specialty shops and antiques, enjoy live music and great food. The Historic Drennen-Scott House, home of Revolutionary War descendant John Drennen and his family, is truly a treasure worth exploring. Fall Festival – October 9-11. For a free Visitor’s Guide, call or visit our website.

1-800-332-5889 vanburen.org

WESTERN ARKANSAS’ MOUNTAIN FRONTIER

Beautiful scenery will surround you in a place steeped in history and hospitality. Visit Fort Smith’s scenic riverfront and historic sites. Delight in fall splendor on a train ride through the Boston Mountains. Discover wine tastings and vineyard tours while touring the Arkansas Wine Trail. Attend bluegrass festivals in Mansfield and Waldron, the Fall Arts and Crafts Fair in Van Buren or the Old-Fashioned Square Gathering in Ozark.*

To order FREE BROCHURES and begin planning your vacation today visit FreeArkansasInfo.com

1-800-332-5889 visitwestarkansas.com

* Ads paid for with a combination of state funds and private regional association funds.

ARKANSAS.COM


Bentonville

BENTONVILLE

Bentonville is home to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art housing the world’s largest collection of American art. The Scott Family Amazeum, the newest attraction, is a hands-on museum with a climbable tree canopy and chocolate laboratory. The city’s culinary scene boasts James Beard-nominated chefs. To request a travel guide, call 800-410-2535 or visit our website.

visitbentonville.com Horseshoe Canyon Ranch, Jasper

BWIO

EUREKA SPRINGS’ only full-service resort is also one of the best values in town. Visit our website www.InnoftheOzarks.com to preview all the amenities we have to offer, such as great dining, scenic views and entertainment on-site.

Bentonville

FORT SMITH

CONWAY is home to three

colleges, a thriving business community, scenic lakes and parks, and a number of cultural and recreational opportunities. A creative blend of modern and quaint, Conway has the energy of a big city while it maintains its small-town quality of life that is second to none.

501-327-7788 ConwayArk.com

1-800-814-9575 www.InnoftheOzarks.com

Visit one of True West magazine’s “Top 10 True Western Towns,” and relive America’s frontier-past in the city where “True Grit” happened. Tour Miss Laura’s, a former bordello housing the Visitors Center, learn about “Hanging Judge” Isaac C. Parker at the National Historic Site, enjoy a train excursion through the Ozarks, and much more. Experience Fort Smith, Arkansas … the original gateway to The Wild West!

1-800-637-1477 www.ExperienceFortSmith.com

SEND FOR FREE ARKANSAS TRAVEL INFORMATION! For the fastest, most convenient way to order, visit FreeArkansasInfo.com or use the coupon.

 I wish to receive all 11 brochures. Or check as many brochures as you wish:

 Arkansas Motorcycle Guide  Arkansas Tour Guide  Arkansas South  Arkansas Water & Woods  Bentonville A & P  Best Western Inn of the Ozarks

 Conway  Fort Smith  Gaston’s White River Resort  Van Buren  Western Arkansas’ Mountain Frontier

Please print clearly

Name: Address: City: Email:

State:

ZIP:

Your email address is used only for the Free Arkansas Info service and is not saved, used or shared by FreeArkansasInfo.com for any other purpose unless explicitly stated otherwise.

Mail coupon today to: Free Brochures P.O. Box 8003 Little Rock, AR 72203 3030

15 F/W


War Eagle Mill

Doe’s Eat Place, Fort Smith

21396 Arkansas 1/4.indd 1

9/10/15 10:32 AM

Eureka Springs

ARKANSAS.COM

APT 27923 3RD 1/3.indd PAGE Oklahoma Magazine.indd 1 21396 Arkansas 1

to our Customers for voting us The Best of the Best.

1512 E 15TH STREET \\ TULSA, OK \\ 918.794.0071 \\ FIFTEENTHANDHOME.COM

Fifteenth and home.indd 1 9/1/15 21409 6:40 AM PM 9/2/15 9:14

9/14/15 10:15 AM

KENT HOFFMAN

Visit US At

CONSTRUCTION 821 W WILSHIRE OKLAHOMA CITY

405.607.4141 19347 Kent Hofman.indd 1

58

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

okmag.com

9/17/15 11:38 AM 1/16 web.indd 1

11/9/14 12:56 PM


Life & Style THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART’S NEW BUILDING IN NEW YORK CITY IS MADE UP OF NINE FLOORS, FEATURING 50,000 SQUARE FEET OF INDOOR GALLERIES AND 13,000 SQUARE FEET OF OUTDOOR EXHIBITION SPACE.

D E S T I N AT I O N

PHOTO BY NIC LEHOUX, COURTESY WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART.

Bigger And Beer

The Whitney Museum of American Art in New York continues its vital contribution to art relevant to the United States, and as its collection grows, so does its need for space.

G

ertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, an American sculptor born in 1875, understood the struggle American artists of her time had exhibiting and selling their works in the U.S. In 1907, she began purchasing and showing American works of art that were not accepted by the mainstream. Seven years later, the Whitney Studio in Greenwich Village became the canvas and platform of emerging and unrecognized artists. In 1929, in an attempt to share her collection – one Whitney knew was of

high value to American art – she offered an endowment to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, comprised of more than 500 pieces she’d amassed up to that point. With the Metropolitan’s refusal, The Whitney Museum of American Art took form in 1930. In the past seven decades, the museum’s collection has grown alongside its prominence, a confirmation of its purpose, and has thus continued to outgrow the spaces its art fills, having to move locations four times. The newest of which, its most ambitious building, resides at 99 Gansevoort St. in New York City’s Meatpacking Dis-

trict. In May its doors opened, welcoming guests into its sprawling space donned with pieces by Jeff Koons, Jasper Johns, Edward Ruscha, Chuck Close, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol and more. Today, The Whitney Museum of Art’s permanent collection includes more than 21,000 works by more than 3,000 artists in the U.S. during the 20th and 21st centuries, and the museum continues to showcase exceptional exhibitions within its galleries, an opportunity that its new location has made infinitely more possible. OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

59


Life & Style

VISIT ONLINE

PHOTO COURTESY FRIENDS OF THE HIGH LINE.

www.whitney.org

MARY HEILMANN’S SUNSET WAS A SITE-SPECIFIC INSTALLATION THAT INAUGURATED WHITNEY’S LARGEST OUTDOOR GALLERY, WHICH WAS ON DISPLAY THROUGH SEPT 27.

THE BUILDING

Nine stories, more than 50,000 square feet of indoor galleries and 13,000 square feet of outdoor exhibition space make up Whitney Museum of American Art’s statuesque new building that sits on the edge of the Hudson River in the Meatpacking District of New York City. Stretching upward with sharp lines, angles and protruding cubes, the

THE NEIGHBORHOOD

Discover the neighborhood that has welcomed Whitney and its significance with open arms. Home to myriad restaurants with flavorful cuisine, shopping, nightlife and attractions, the Meatpacking District, a patch of New York City from Gansevoort to West 15th Street and Hudson to 11th Avenue, has a lot to offer.

building was designed by architect Renzo Piano, who says his creation took both Whitney’s needs and its remarkable new site into account. The build’s most brilliant features include a dramatically cantilevered entrance along Gansevoort Street, walls of windows, state-of-the-art classrooms and a 170-seat theater.

The High Line: This unique public park offers an elevated experience. Running from Gansevoort Street to West 34th Street, The High Line offers visitors gardens, art, walkways and more on the transformed historic freight rail line above the streets of Manhattan’s West Side. www.thehighline.org

Chelsea Market: The world-famous indoor food market, with more than 35 vendors, offers soups, nuts, wine, coffee, cheese and more. www.chelseamarket.com

RUNNING PEOPLE AT 2,616,216 BY JONATHAN BOROFSKY WAS PART OF ONE OF THE MUSEUM’S INAUGURAL EXHIBITIONS, AMERICA IS HARD TO SEE, WHICH WAS ON DISPLAY THROUGH SEPT 27. PHOTO BY NIC LEHOUX, COURTESY WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART.

UPCOMING

The museum’s signature exhibition, the Whitney Biennial is an invitational show of pieces produced within the previous two years. Allowing the museum to continually focus on recent progress in American art, including new artists and works, the exhibition, the only of its kind in the country, has impacted the museum since its creation in 1932 by Whitney her

60

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

self. The next Biennial exhibit will be in spring 2017. Upcoming exhibitions will welcome artists Archibald Motley, Jared Madere, Rachel Rose, Frank Stella, Laura Poitras, Sophia Al-Maria, Stuart Davis, Carmen Herrera, David Wojnarowicz and more to Whitney throughout the next year. BRITTANY ANICETTI

Ground Zero Museum Workshop: This museum allows visitors to experience Ground Zero through the images and artifacts that capture the courageousness, heartache, hope and sorrow of the recovery period following Sept. 11, 2001. www.groundzeromuseumworkshop.org


WOOD-STONE, INC. KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN STUDIO

DREAM. DESIGN. INDULGE.

"Celebrating our 21st year” Thank you Tulsa!

www.nathanharmon.com

T: 918.269.6284

21240 Nathan Harmon.indd 1

Russ Pippin, CKD Certified Kitchen Designer

1303 East 15th Street • Tulsa, Ok 74120 918.584.3710 woodstone@tulsacoxmail.com • www.wood-stone.com

8/18/15 13609 5:13 PM Wood-Stone Design.indd 1

5/27/15 2:57 PM

We Are Your Complete Source For

CUSTOM

AUDIO VIDEO We are headquarters for the best selection of cutting-edge technology for that ultimate home theater experience—indoor and outdoors —plus business environments. We invite you to consult with our skilled professionals when considering a home theater, home automation and business communication. We proudly offer the best products and expert installation, backed by our 30 years of experience serving northeastern Oklahoma.

7030 South Lewis Avenue (Northwest Corner of 71st & Lewis)

918-495-0586 www.VideoRevolution.com

Barco • Definitive Technology • Digital Projection • Integra • JVC • Klipsch • Lutron • Panasonic • Pioneer Elite RTI • Samsung • Seura • Sharp • Sonace • Sonos • Sony • Toshiba • Universal Remote Control • Yamaha

16328 Video Revolution.indd 1

5/29/15 3:50 PM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

61


Life & Style

Scene MIKE DILLARD, DARCI DILLARD, TERESA LEDLOW AND JASON LEDLOW, FESTIVAL OF HOPE, HEARTLINE.

MARY BLANKENSHIP POINTER, CHUCK THOMPSON AND KAREN RIEGER, CRIMSON COCKTAILS, CATHOLIC CHARITIES OKC.

CHERRAH GILES, CONNIE CRONLEY, BUEL ANGLEN AND CARA COWAN WATTS, MEKKO SCREENING, IRON GATE.

EL, E HUMMN IT AND JO VIA KIM LOB EW, SUTTON A WILD BRCH CENTER. RESEAR

GOV. BILL ANOATUBBY, RUSS FLORENCE, JAYME COX, DON BETZ AND REP. GEORGE YOUNG, OKLAHOMA CITY AWARDS DINNER, OKLAHOMA CENTER FOR COMMUNITY AND JUSTICE.

TERI AULPH, LEAH BOWLES, JODI WOODBRIDGE TROOK AND DEE ANN WICKS, 2016 GO RED FOR WOMEN CAMPAIGN KICKOFF.

DAVE AND SUSIE HENSCHEL, CHRISTEN AND MIKE MILES, JILL DONOVAN AND ERIC MARSHALL, SAN MIGUEL: DANCING WITH THE TULSA STARS, NOV. 7 AT COX BUSINESS CENTER.

62

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

MATT MOFFETT, MICHELLE MARTIN AND KEVIN MISEROCCHI, CHARLES ADDAMS FAMILY & FRIENDS, TULSA GIRLS ART SCHOOL.

BAILEY SIEGFRIED, NATHAN PRITCHETT, MAYOR DEWEY BARTLETT, MEREDITH SIEGFRIED AND TERRELL SIEGFRIED, FLIGHT NIGHT 2015 PATRON PARTY.


Servicing the Greater Tulsa Area for more than 30 years. Our knowledgeable and unmatched customer service sets us apart from others. 10545 S. Memorial • Tulsa,OK • 918.369.7800 M-F 7:30am - 5pm • Sat 9am - 2pm www.homehardwareusa.com


Issues 5Affecting Oklahomans’ Health By Lindsay Cuomo

64

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015


Five deadly diseases,

conditions and illnesses impact Oklahoma’s population.

BUT THERE IS HOPE. Oklahoma Magazine talks to some of

the state’s top

physicians about how the population can lessen the effect of these ailments.

Since its earliest days, Oklahomans have faced many crises to the population’s health and wellbeing. It has been Oklahomans’ willingness to face and find solutions to those challenges that has made the state who we are today. OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

65


1

Heart Disease & Stroke

The heart and circulatory system are vital to sustaining life, and this makes heart disease and stroke obvious contenders as one of Oklahoma’s top health concerns. According to the 2014 Oklahoma State of the State’s Health report, heart disease was the leading cause of death in Oklahoma, accounting for one in four deaths, which is 30 percent more deaths due to heart disease than the national average. “Oklahoma has the third highest rate of death due to heart disease in the nation,” says Dr. Beau Hawkins, a cardiologist at OU Physicians. “Also, Oklahoma has the fourth highest rate of death due to stroke.” Additionally, heart attacks and strokes can lead to long-term disability. Strokes are the leading cause of serious disability in the U.S. These staggering numbers confirm that heart disease and stroke easily capture a place at the top of our list of health concerns in Oklahoma. This concern is not new, adds Dr. Jeffrey M. Sparling, an interventional cardiologist with INTEGRIS Heart Hospital at INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center and president of the board of directors of the Central Oklahoma Affiliate of the American Heart Association. “Unfortunately, these rates have stayed relatively static for a number of years despite media attention and increasing public awareness,” says Sparling. Many factors put Oklahomans at an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. “High blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, obesity, high cholesterol and physical inactivity greatly increase risk,” he says. Sparling adds family history and undiagnosed heart rhythm irregularities to that list. But, what can Oklahoma do to impact the trend and reduce the number of deaths? According to Hawkins, the answer is education, better access to medical care and recreational spaces. “A lot of Oklahomans remain uninformed [about the risks]. Publicgeared education about the hazards and risk factors for cardiovascular disease must be improved,” says Hawkins. “A significant proportion of Oklahomans do not have health insurance, and lack of health insurance is directly linked to healthcare access and lack of preventative cardiovascular care.” Sparling would like to see a statewide emphasis on legislation aimed to improve public health matters and more on the local and individual levels as well such as the banning of smoking in public spaces. However, important change begins with you, too, says Sparling. “A healthy heart is one that allows its owner to work and play without restriction and live a long, healthy, happy and productive life,” explains Sparling. “Regular exercise, maintenance of a healthy weight and regular visits with your health care provider focusing on control of cholesterol and blood pressure are all part of a hearthealthy lifestyle and can drastically reduce the rate of heart attack and stroke.”

66

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

2

Obesity

The number on the scale impacts more than just physical appearance. Many Oklahomans struggle in this area, as more than 30 percent of Oklahomans fall into the obese category. Physicians use body mass index (BMI) to calculate a person’s healthy weight range, comparing weight in relation to height. “(The body mass index) is an imperfect method, as it does not take into account the actual body fat percentage of an individual,” says John Friedl, the physical activity and nutrition manager at the Center for the Advancement of Wellness with the Oklahoma State Department of Health. BMI is the best method currently available, says Friedl, but defining the risks of carrying too much weight on the body is a murky and complex subject. “For example, a person with a ‘healthy’ weight who consumes a lot of fat and sodium and is not active could potentially be less


healthy than an individual moderately overweight that consumes a healthy diet and meets physical activity recommendations,” explains Friedl. “An individual could be classified as overweight but perform healthy behaviors and be considered ‘fit,’ as well as have healthy markers.” He adds that typically, increased weight accompanied by unhealthy behaviors can spell an increase for chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease. A high risk for heart attack, stroke and certain types of cancer are known to be impacted by obesity. Obesity also impacts quality of life. “There are also financial concerns,” adds Friedl. “Obese individuals typically spend more annually on health expenses than their normal-weight counterparts.” Small changes matter. A balanced diet full of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, low-fat dairy and plenty of water combined with physical activity have a significant impact on health.

3

Diabetes

Diabetes is closely related to the obesity issue and is the seventh leading cause of death in Oklahoma. According to the 2014 State of the State Health Reports, in 2010, Oklahoma had the fourth highest death rate in the nation due to diabetes. “The diabetes epidemic has not slowed in Oklahoma,” says Dr. James Lane, director of Adult Clinical Programs with the Harold Hamm Diabetes Center. “Oklahoma has a higher rate of diabetes than most states, and we also have an increased risk of young people with type 2 diabetes.” Quite often, people with diabetes have no idea they are afflicted with the disease. In 2014, the American Diabetes Association estimated that more than 8 million people were living undiagnosed. “Diabetes is a silent killer,” says Dr. Trudy Milner, family medicine physician and assistant medical director at St. John Health System. “You don’t often feel bad until serious complications are happening.” Diabetes is the body’s inability to break down sugars that enter the body. The result-

“From a health standpoint, we prefer good health and healthy behaviors over the ‘societal beauty’ that is perhaps not eating right and exercising the way they should,” says Friedl. The good news is that Oklahoma’s population has exhibited a positive trend in this complex area in the past few years. “Prior to 2011, Oklahoma was projected to have the highest rate of obesity in the coming years due to the aggressive rate of increase,” says Friedl. However, that projected increase has not occured. According to Friedl, fewer Oklahomans are transitioning into the obese category each year. Oklahoma is making progress, but more work needs to be done. Initiatives like the Oklahoma Health Improvement Plan, Healthy Oklahoma 2020, seek to ensure that the healthy choice is the easiest choice for all Oklahomans.

ing glucose buildup can lead to a variety of dangerous complications. “If your sugar stays out of control, it affects your heart, kidneys and can cause tingling, pain and numbness in legs and feet,” explains Milner. “Infections do not heal quickly because the sugars feed the bacteria and can result in extended hospital stays and even amputation. It also affects your whole blood system, which can cause stroke, affect your vision and can result in blindness.” “You have to respect diabetes, or it will ruin your health,” adds Lane. Up to 95 percent of people diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which is typically impacted by two factors: lifestyle and genetics. Though risk factors like family history, ethnicity and age also play a role in developing diabetes, there are steps one can take to prevent the disease or to lessen its complications. “Keep your weight under control, and use those sugars in a positive way instead of letting them just sit in the body,” advises Milner. “Exercise regularly, for 30 minutes three times a week, or even 15 minutes a day. And,

see your physician.” Cost plays a role in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diabetes. Lane and Milner both agree that more needs to be done to ensure Oklahomans have access to health care. “There is a lack of physicians in rural Oklahoma,” says Milner. “We really need more physicians to provide health care to all Oklahomans.” “Another of our challenges is getting medicines our patients can afford,” says Milner. In response, Oklahoma is working to make improvements. Doctors in direct patient care are taking an integrated approach to help and support patients in making difficult lifestyle changes, and in the community, universities have organized targeted initiatives to funnel and train new doctors to reach high need areas. OSU’s Center for Health Sciences’ Center for Rural Health serves as the clearinghouse for rural health information and offers support to doctors, hospitals and clinics who serve our state’s rural residents, and OU’s Community Health Alliance aims to reach the uninsured and underinsured of Oklahoma City. OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

67


4

Cancer Related To Lifestyle Choices

In Oklahoma, cancer-related deaths are common. “Oklahoma is ranked 12th-highest in the nation for cancerrelated deaths,” says Dr. Supriya Koya, hematologist and medical oncologist with Utica Park Clinic, part of Hillcrest Healthcare System. “Many people think of cancer risk as a game of chance,” says Dr. Deepu Madduri, the medical director of stem cell and cellular therapies with Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Southwestern Regional Medical Center. While cancer may seem like an unlucky lottery, there are certain risk factors that individuals have control over. “In some instances, a cancer diagnosis is the result of random factors or causes, but we are increasingly aware of so-called lifestyle choices, such as smoking, drinking, sedentary lifestyle and having multiple sexual partners, which can be linked to certain forms of cancer,” explains Madduri. “Smoking alone is linked to 80 to 90 percent of lung cancer deaths worldwide but can also lead to a multitude of other cancers.” An estimated 3,220 new cases of lung cancer have been diagnosed in Oklahoma so far this year, according to the American Cancer Society. The positive side to this understanding is that by altering these lifestyles choices and adopting healthier habits, certain types of cancers are preventable. According to the World Health Organization, at least one-third of cancers are preventable, says Koya. “Fifty percent of colorectal cancers can be prevented by decreasing alcohol and red or processed meat consumption,” outlines Koya. “Thirtythree percent of breast cancers are preventable by reducing weight, decreasing alcohol consumption and breast feeding, if possible. Fifty-nine percent of endometrial cancers can be prevented by regular physical activity and healthy body weight, especially in the post-menopausal years,” continues Koya. “Cervical cancer can be prevented by following safe sex practices, [getting] regular Pap smear screening and HPV vaccine.” The first step to reduce the number of cancer-related deaths is to increase awareness of early diagnosis, potential risk factors and prevention. “With the awareness among people of the preventable causes of cancers, many are adopting a healthy lifestyle with simple behavioral changes,” says Koya. “However, the gains are not equally distributed,” counters Madduri. “We have seen larger reductions in lifestyle-related cancers in east and west coast communities and relatively less change in the Midwest and South.” Oklahoma has employed several initiatives to promote healthy choices. The Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust is a state agency tasked with the goal of reducing and preventing tobacco use as well as obesity, funding a variety of support and wellness programs. “Laws were amended in 2013 to make state-owned property smokefree, which significantly decreases second hand smoking,” says Koya. “The Oklahoma State Health Department is working with other organizations to spread awareness of the importance of maintaining healthy body weight and is also trying to make more fruits and vegetables accessible to people.” There are several programs offered by a variety of organizations working to make cancer screenings and treatment available. “For example, The Take Charge Program provides no-cost breast and cervical cancer screening throughout Oklahoma for the eligible females,” says Koya. “Similarly, The Oklahoma Colorectal Cancer Screening Program provides no-cost colonoscopies throughout Oklahoma for eligible males and females.” One very simple but powerful change Madduri recommends is to establish a relationship with a primary care physician. That important relationship can help guide you to age-appropriate cancer screenings.

68

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

5 Mental Illness

Heart disease and stroke, obesity, diabetes and cancer are dangerous threats to Oklahomans’ physical health, but so is mental illness; recognizing the scope and impact of this health issue is vital. According to the Behavior Health Barometer, published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration, nearly 600,000 adults and 200,000 children in Oklahoma live with some sort of mental illness, each year. These staggering numbers are only topped by the percentage of those Oklahomans who go without treatment. Only a small percentage of people dealing with mental illness seek and receive treatment, says Dr. R. Murali Krishna, psychiatrist and president and chief operating officer of INTEGRIS Mental Health and INTEGRIS James L. Hall Center for Mind, Body and Spirit. “Oklahoma has a high prevalence of mental illness and low access to treatment,” explains Krishna. “We invest only $53 per capita [on mental health issues] when the national average is over $100. Mental illness is often a silent disease, and most people suffer alone.” Lack of funding and lack of understanding go hand-in-hand. “Many people still assume mental illness is an illness of choice and sign of weakness or sin,” says Krishna. “They think they can just shake it off. … Science, however, says it is a disease of the most important organ of the body. We need to combat it like any other disease, and until that happens [the numbers] will continue to get worse. … The brain and the mind are the central core of our health, but we essentially have a headless health care.” Mental illness affects more than just the mind. The whole body suffers, as well. “Mental illness is one of the leading causes of disability,” says Krishna. “It lowers productivity and attentiveness, leading to more frequent accidents. Depression lowers immunity and increases heart attack risk 400 percent. Anxiety increases chance of stroke.” The positive side to this very serious issue is most mental illness is treatable, and very effective treatments are available. “Most people can be treated, and with proper follow-up, they can become very productive,” says Krishna. There are ways to combat risk for mental illness, says Krishna. Just as one would care for the rest of his or her body, the mind needs TLC, too. “The mind has a hardwired healing system, but many don’t know how to activate it,” says Krishna. “Stress plays a big role in our life, and our emotions cause physical changes in our body. … If you find a way to calm your mind through whatever method you choose, you can heal the effects of life and its stresses. The benefits are profound. Your learning, memory and resiliency improve as well as your judgment and impulsive parts of brain. “Mental illness is a brain disorder, and we need the core of society to accept that,” he adds.


YOU TAKE IT UPON YOURSELF TO KEEP THEM STRONG. WE MAKE IT EASIER BY SIMPLIFYING HEALTHCARE.

We’ve made it our mission to simplify the twists and turns of healthcare. Let us walk you through it, and get you back to what really matters – living a healthy life. We’re right here in Oklahoma, so we understand what you need and where you come from. Welcome to a refreshingly simple approach to healthcare.

Visit ccok.com to find your solution.

YOUR HEALTHCARE SOLUTION


What good is the

“right� treatment if the diagnosis is wrong? Based on the medical cases reviewed by our physicians, 1 out of 3 diagnoses in the U.S. require correction or refinement. And 75% of the reviewed treatment plans need modification. In fact, medical errors are a leading cause of injury and even death in our country. Best Doctors is out to change that. We help ensure the right diagnosis and treatment by providing patients with access to world-class medical experts for second opinions, treatment guidance and more. Our services are offered nationwide as an employee benefit by companies like The Home Depot and many other Fortune 500 companies. Find out if your company offers Best Doctors and keep your health care on the right track.

www.bestdoctors.com


BEST DOCTORS, THE BEST DOCTORS IN AMERICA, and the Star-in-Cross Logo are trademarks of Best Doctors, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries, and are used under license.

Best Doctors, Inc. is transforming and improving health care by bringing together the best medical minds in the world to help identify the right diagnosis and treatment. The company’s innovative, peer-to-peer consultation service offers a new way for physicians to collaborate with other physicians to ensure patients receive the best care. Headquartered in Boston, MA, the global company seamlessly integrates its services with employers’ other health-related benefits, to serve more than 30 million members in every major region of the world. More than a traditional second opinion, Best Doctors Anesthesiology

delivers a comprehensive evaluation of a patient’s medical condition – providing value to both patients and treating physicians. By utilizing Best Doctors, members have access to the brightest minds in medicine to ensure the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Best Doctors’ team of researchers conducts a biennial poll using the methodology that mimics the informal peer-to-peer process doctors themselves use to identify the right specialists for their patients. Using a polling method and balloting software, that Gallup® has audited and certified, they gather the insight and experi-

ence of tens of thousands of leading specialists all over the country, while confirming their credentials and specific areas of expertise. The result is the Best Doctors in America® List, which includes the nation’s most respected specialists and outstanding primary care physicians in the nation. These are the doctors that other doctors recognize as the best in their fields. They cannot pay a fee and are not paid to be listed and cannot nominate or vote for themselves. It is a list which is truly unbiased and respected by the medical profession and patients alike as the source of top quality medical information.

JAMES S. (JIM) DAY Tulsa Spine and Specialty Hospital Olympia Anesthesia 6901 S. Olympia Ave., Tulsa, 74132 918-388-5723

RICHARD W. SMARINSKY St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.744.2333

JOHN L. ALDRIDGE Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S. Canton Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.494.0612

JONATHAN D. FRIEND St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.744.2333

MARK WALLER St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.744.2333

SCOTT E. AMES Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S. Canton Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.494.0612

THOMAS D. GILLOCK Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S. Canton Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.494.0612

WILLIAM P. BAILEY Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S. Canton Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.494.0612

DENNIS W. MORRIS Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S. Canton Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.494.0612

WILLIAM WATSON II St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.744.2333

DAVID L. AKERS St. John Medical Center Department of Anesthesia 1923 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.744.2333

Gallup® has audited and certified Best Doctors, Inc.’s database of physicians, and its companion The Best Doctors in America® List, as using the highest industry standards survey methodology and processes. These lists are excerpted from The Best Doctors in America® 2015-2016 database, which includes over 40,000 U.S. doctors in more than 40 medical specialties and 400 subspecialties. The Best Doctors in Americaâ database is compiled and maintained by Best Doctors, Inc. For more information, visit www.bestdoctors.com or contact Best Doctors by telephone at 800-675-1199 or by e-mail at research@bestdoctors. com. Please note that lists of doctors are not available on the Best Doctors Web site. Best Doctors, Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list, but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person or other party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. Copyright 2015, Best Doctors, Inc. Used under license, all rights reserved. This list, or any parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without written permission from Best Doctors, Inc. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without the permission of Best Doctors, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.

KENT WOOLARD Associated Anesthesiologists 6839 S. Canton Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.494.0612

Cardiovascular Disease

KAREN BECKMAN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Cardiovascular Institute and Pulmonary Medicine OU Physicians Building, Suite 2E 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001

HAROLD M. BURKHART University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Second Floor, 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5789 ROBERT MEL (MEL) CLARK INTEGRIS Cardiovascular Physicians, Building B, Suite 400, 3433 NW 56th St., Oklahoma City, 73112 405.947.3341 R. DOUGLAS ENSLEY Warren Clinic Cardiology of Tulsa 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite A100, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.8500

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

71


RALPH LAZZARA University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Cardiovascular Institute and Pulmonary Medicine OU Physicians Building, Suite 2E 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001 SUNNY SEN PO University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Cardiovascular Institute and Pulmonary Medicine OU Physicians Building, Suite 2E 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001 DWIGHT W. REYNOLDS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Cardiovascular Institute and Pulmonary Medicine OU Physicians Building, Suite 2E 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001 MICHAEL SPAIN Warren Clinic Cardiology of Tulsa 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite A100, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.8500

Colon and Rectal Surgery

CRAIG S. JOHNSON Surgical Associates 2448 E. 81st St., Suite 1100, Tulsa, 74137 918.505.3400

Critical Care Medicine

MATTHEW BRITT Pulmonary Specialists 3400 Northwest Expressway, Suite 105, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.947.3335

Dermatology

LYNN A. ANDERSON Midtown Dermatology Herman Kaiser Medical Building 1725 E. 19 St., Suite 702, Tulsa, 74104 918.728.3100 DAVID K. DUNCAN 2413 Palmer Circle, Norman, 73069 405.321.3868 MICHAEL D. JOHN Edmond Dermatology Clinic 620 W. 15th St., Edmond, 73013 405.359.0551 MARK D. LEHMAN Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E. 21st St., Tulsa, 74114 918.749.2261 SCOTT WILLIAM MEYERS The Dermatology Surgery Center 1440 Terrace Dr., Tulsa, 74104 918.293.9966 DONALD R. SEIDEL Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E. 21st St., Tulsa, 74114 918.749.2261 THOMAS STASKO OU Physicians Dermatology 619 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6110 JAMES B. STEWART JR. 3705 W. Memorial Road, Suite 101, Oklahoma City, 73134 405.751.0020 THOMAS D. URICE 2413 Palmer Circle, Norman, 73069 405.321.5322 EDWARD H. YOB Tulsa Cancer Institute Skin Cancer Center Hillcrest South Medical Plaza 8803 S. 101st E. Ave., Suite 335, Tulsa, 74113 918.307.0215

Family Medicine

JAMES R. BARRETT University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4311

72

RYAN M. BIGGERS OU Physicians Mid-Del Family Medicine 1212 S. Douglas Blvd., Midwest City, 73130 405.736.6811 JAMES LEE BRAND University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4311 CURTIS COGGINS OMNI Medical Group 402 W. Morrow Road, Sand Springs, 74063 918.245.1328 STEVEN A. CRAWFORD University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., First Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3537 JEFFREY B. CRUZAN INTEGRIS Family Care Memorial West 5915 W. Memorial Road, Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 73142 405.773.6415 TRUDY MILNER St. John Clinic 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 100, Tulsa, 74104 918.748.7890 CHEYN D. ONARECKER St. Anthony Family Medicine Center 608 NW Ninth St., Suite 1100, Oklahoma City, 73102 405.231.3000 TOMAS P. OWENS JR. Great Plains Family Medicine Center 3500 NW 56th St., Suite 100, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.951.2855 KALYANAKRISHNA RAMAKRISHNAN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., First Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3537 A. VAIL STEPHENS Long Term Care Specialists 4334 Northwest Expressway, Suite 175, Oklahoma City, 73116 405.557.1200 PETER A. WINN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4311 JOHN ZUBIALDE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., First Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3537

Family Medicine/ Hospice and Palliative Medicine

ROBERT SALINAS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., First Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3537

Gastroenterology

PAUL N. MATON Digestive Disease Specialists 3366 Northwest Expressway, Suite 400, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.702.1300 DON P. MURRAY Digestive Disease Specialists 3366 Northwest Expressway, Suite 400, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.702.1300

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

WILLIAM M. TIERNEY University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Section of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4E, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3445 JOE C. ZUERKER Mercy Clinic Gastroenterology 4200 W. Memorial Road, Suite 901, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.749.4247

Geriatric Medicine ROBIN K. GONZALEZ St. Anthony Physicians North 6201 N. Santa Fe Ave., Suite 2010, Oklahoma City, 73118 405.272.5555

INSUNG KIM Warren Clinic Department of Geriatric Medicine 6160 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.497.3650 LAURENCE Z. RUBENSTEIN OU Physicians Senior Health Center O’Donoghue Research Building 1122 NE 13th St., Suite 1500, Oklahoma City, 73117 405.271.3050 ROBERT SALINAS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., First Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3537 BRYAN STRUCK OU Physicians Senior Health Center O’Donoghue Research Building 1122 NE 13th St., Suite 1500, Oklahoma City, 73117 405.271.3050 PETER A. WINN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Clinic 900 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4311

Geriatric Medicine/ Hospice and Palliative Medicine

BRYAN STRUCK OU Physicians Senior Health Center O’Donoghue Research Building 1122 NE 13th St., Suite 1500, Oklahoma City, 73117 405.271.3050

Hand Surgery

THOMAS C. HOWARD III McBride Orthopedic Hospital Clinic 1110 N. Lee Ave., Oklahoma City, 73103 405.230.9270

Infectious Disease

MICHAEL STUART BRONZE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Section of Infectious Diseases 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4E, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3445 JOHN RUDMAN HARKESS Mercy Clinic Infectious Disease – North Meridian Building D 13313 N. Meridian Ave., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.529.5759 JAMES HUTTON St. John Medical Center Department of Infectious Disease 1923 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.744.3424 JAMES LEROY KIRK JR. Mercy Clinic Infectious Disease – North Meridian Building D 13313 N. Meridian Ave., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.529.5759 WILLIAM J. LEWIS Inter I.D. Kelly Building 6565 S. Yale Ave., Suite 812, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.9486

VADAKEPAT RAMGOPAL INTEGRIS Family Care Baptist Department of Internal Medicine 3330 NW 56th St., Suite 220, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.713.7422

JOHN E. HUBNER Hubner Health Internal Medicine Specialists 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 1100, Tulsa, 74104 918.742.5533

MARK D. ROWLAND Inter I.D. Kelly Building 6565 S. Yale Ave., Suite 812, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.9486

MARTINA JELLEY Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Internal Medicine Schusterman Center Clinic 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4173

MICHELLE R. SALVAGGIO University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Infectious Disease Institute Presbyterian Professional Building 711 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Suite 430, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6434 LEONARD N. SLATER Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases 921 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.456.2511

Internal Medicine

JAMES K. BAILEY Warren Clinic Department of Internal Medicine William Medical Building 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1150, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.9425 MARY ANN BAUMAN INTEGRIS Family Care Central Department of Internal Medicine, Building C, Suite 500 3400 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4787 DUSTAN P. BUCKLEY Mercy Clinic – Internal Medicine Building C 13313 N. Meridian Ave., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.254.9690 THOMAS C. CONIGLIONE Oklahoma Sports Science & Orthopedics 6205 N. Santa Fe Ave., Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 73118 405.419.5440 JON P. COX St. John Clinic 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 402, Tulsa, 74104 918.748.7877 MICHAEL K. CRAWFORD 13321 N. Meridian Ave., Suite 210, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.748.4343 S.A. DEAN DROOBY 5728 NW 132nd St., Oklahoma City, 73142 405.603.7610 EARL SANDERS ELLIOTT INTEGRIS Family Care Central Department of Internal Medicine, Building C, Suite 500 3400 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4805 JANIS FINER Saint Francis Hospital Division of Hospital Medicine 6161 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.502.1900 STEPHEN J. GAWEY St. John Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine 1819 E. 19th St., Suite 302, Tulsa 74104 918.742.0552 ERIN KATHLEEN GLASGOW INTEGRIS Family Care Central Department of Internal Medicine, Building C, Suite 500 3400 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4433 ROBERT B. HAUGER Warren Clinic Department of Internal Medicine 6600 S. Yale Ave., Suite 600, Tulsa, 74136 918.491.5990 T. KARL HOSKISON Oklahoma University Physicians Hospitalist Program Department of Internal Medicine 4502 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.660.3467

BRIAN P. LEVY 124 N. Bryant, Suite C4, Edmond, 73034 405.330.7606 DAVID M. NIERENBERG St. John Medical Center Department of Internal Medicine 1725 E. 19th St., Suite 501, Tulsa 74104 918-745-6990 JOE LYNDLE REESE Warren Clinic Department of Internal Medicine William Medical Building 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1150, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.9425 RONALD BARRY SAIZOW Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Internal Medicine Schusterman Center Clinic 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4400 KERSEY WINFREE Saints Medical Group Metro 120 N. Robinson St., Oklahoma City, 73102 405.232.3111 WILLIAM H. YARBOROUGH Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Internal Medicine Schusterman Center Clinic 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4176

Internal Medicine/ Hospital Medicine

MICHAEL S. GEBETSBERGER Utica Park Clinic Department of Internal Medicine 9001 S. 101st E. Ave., Suite 230, Tulsa, 74133 918.392.5470

Medical Genetics

KLAAS WIERENGA The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Genetics OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4211

Medical Oncology and Hematology

PHILIP C. COMP University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center Blood and Bone Marrow Cancers Clinic 800 NE 10th St., Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8299 KATHY K. DAGG Mercy Oncology of Norman 701 E. Robinson St., Suite 100, Norman, 73071 405.321.4644 BRIAN VINCENT GEISTER INTEGRIS Cancer Institute of Oklahoma 5911 W. Memorial Road, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 73142 405.552.0490 ALAN M. KELLER Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.505.3200 JOSEPH P. LYNCH Warren Clinic Department of Medical Oncology 11212 E. 48th St., Tulsa, 74146 918.556.3000 JOHNNY MCMINN INTEGRIS Cancer Institute of Oklahoma 5911 W. Memorial Road, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 73142 405.552.0490


SURGERY, INC.

Would like to congratulate Stephen D. Bruns MD, Justin T. Atherton MD, Rocky M. Morgan MD, and Timothy W. Hepner MD, for being selected again as Best Doctors for 2015. We would also like to thank you for placing your trust in us for your healthcare needs for over 80 years.

Surgery, Inc. was established in 1932 by Dr. David Garrett. Dr. Garrett was later joined by Dr. Harold White, Dr. Robert Shepard, Dr. Al Shirkey and Dr. Bill Loughridge. These surgeons formed the foundation of medical excellence still exhibited today by the surgeons of Surgery, Inc. Today, Surgery, Inc. has grown to encompass eight surgeons with a variety of specialties and two locations. The staff and physicians strive to create a friendly and caring environment that reflects their quality of care. It is our goal to serve as the area’s leading surgical practice and to help patients by improving their physical well being through excellent surgical care.

Specializing in: Advanced Laparoscopy Breast Colonoscopy and EGD Endocrine Surgery: Adrenal Glands, Thyroid and Parathyroid

Gastrointestinal Surgery Hepatobiliary Surgery, including Gallbladder Hernia Melanoma and Other Skin Disorders Surgical Endoscopy, PEG Vascular Access for Dialysis

SURGERY, INC. surgeryinc.com Providing Quality and Compassionate Care for Over 80 Years

918.301.2505 1725 E. 19th St. • Suite 800 • Tulsa, OK 74104 12455 E. 100th Street N.• Suite 150 • Owasso, OK 74055


MARK R. OLSEN Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.505.3200 CRAIG LEE REITZ Mercy Oncology Physicians 4205 McAuley Blvd., Suite 375, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.751.4343 GEORGE B. SELBY University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center Blood and Bone Marrow Cancers Clinic 800 NE 10th St., Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8299 CHARLES MARTIN STRNAD Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.505.3200

RUPA K. DESILVA The Women’s Health Group SouthCreek Medical Plaza 9001 S. 101st E. Ave., Suite 350, Tulsa, 74133 918.293.6200

DONALD K. RAHHAL Mercy Health Center Center for Women’s Health 4140 W. Memorial Road, Suite 500, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.755.7430

BRENT A. BESON 4221 S. Western Ave., Suite 5000, Oklahoma City, 73109 405.644.5160

ROYICE EVERETT Women’s Healthcare Associates 3617 NW 58th St., Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.942.5593

ELI N. RESHEF INTEGRIS Bennett Fertility Institute ObGyn Specialists 3433 NW 56th St., Building B, Suite 210, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4701

J. MIKE BANOWETZ Mercy Clinic Neurology 4120 W. Memorial Road, Suite 218, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.302.2661

KERSI BHARUCHA University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5B, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3635 JOHN ERNEST CATTANEO Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Neurology 591 E. 36th St. N., Tulsa, 74106 918.634.7817

ALY MOHAMED ELSEBAI ALY Oklahoma Nephrology 3366 Northwest Expressway, Suite 730, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.951.4944

DAVID LEE GORDON University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5B, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3635

ROBERT M. GOLD Nephrology Specialists of Oklahoma 6465 S. Yale Ave., Suite 507, Tulsa, 74136 918.481.2760

JOSHUA KERSHEN 4221 S. Western Ave., Suite 5000, Oklahoma City, 73109 405.644.5160

PRANAY KATHURIA Oklahoma University Physicians Division of Nephrology and Hypertension Schusterman Center Clinic 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4888

JEANNE ANN F. KING University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5B, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3635

Nephrology

THOMAS C. KENKEL Nephrology Specialists of Oklahoma 1124 S. St. Louis Ave., Suite 201, Tulsa, 74120 918.592.0296 SATISH KUMAR University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Division of Rheumatology Immunology and Allergy OU Physicians Building, Suite 4E 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8478

GERMAINE L. ODENHEIMER Oklahoma City VA Medical Center CANDO Alzheimer’s Clinic 921 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.456.3365 ELLIOTT D. ROSS Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Neurology Service 921 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.456.3365

LAURA ANN ISAACS RANKIN Kidney Specialists of Central Oklahoma 3366 Northwest Expressway, Building D, Suite 550, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.942.5442

PEGGY J. WISDOM University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Neurology Clinic 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5B, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3635

CHRIS M. SHOLER 4334 Northwest Expressway, Suite 201, Oklahoma City, 73116 405.842.8298

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Neurological Surgery NAINA GROSS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery, The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 4000, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4912 DAVE G. MALONE St. John Medical Center Department of Neurological Surgery Bernsen Medical Plaza 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 706, Tulsa, 74104 918.794.5542 CRAIG RABB University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery, The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 4000, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4912 MICHAEL E. SUGHRUE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery, The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 4000, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4912

Neurology

74

RAY CLAUDE BABB JR. Hillcrest South Medical Plaza 8803 S. 101st E. Ave., Suite 230, Tulsa, 74133 918.481.1200 JUDITH BLACKWELL The Women’s Health Group SouthCreek Medical Plaza 9001 S. 101st E. Ave., Suite 350, Tulsa, 74133 918.293.6200 SUSAN L. CHAMBERS Oklahoma City Gynecology and Obstetrics 11200 N. Portland Ave., Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.936.1000 YEW CHEONG CHOO Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.505.3200 GRANT COX Tulsa ObGyn Associates Williams Medical Plaza 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 800, Tulsa, 74104 918.747.9641 LATASHA B. CRAIG OU Physicians Reproductive Medicine 840 Research Parkway, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1616 PATRICIA A. DAILY Warren Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 6465 S. Yale Ave., Suite 815, Tulsa, 74136 918.492.1001

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

LYNN EDWARD FRAME Utica Women’s Specialists 1725 E. 19th St., Suite 401, Tulsa, 74104 918.749.1413 PAUL GEHRING Tulsa ObGyn Associates Williams Medical Plaza 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 800, Tulsa, 74104 918.747.9641 MICHAEL ALAN GOLD Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.505.3200 KARL R. HANSEN OU Physicians Reproductive Medicine 840 Research Parkway, Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1616 MARSHA KAY HOWERTONENGLES 6465 S. Yale Ave., Suite 310, Tulsa, 74136 918.236.3000 DEBORAH LORRAINE HUFF Oklahoma City Gynecology and Obstetrics 11200 N. Portland Ave., Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.936.1000 J. STEPHEN JONES Warren Clinic Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine 6565 S. Yale Ave., Suite 601, Tulsa, 74136 918.502.4636 DAVID A. KALLENBERGER INTEGRIS Bennett Fertility Institute ObGyn Specialists 3433 NW 56th St., Building B, Suite 210, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4701 LORA J. LARSON Saint Francis Hospital Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 6161 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.494.2200 AMANDA LEVINE Stonebridge Obstetrics and Gynecology 3815 S. Boulevard, Edmond, 73013 405.341.9996 LAURA L. MACKIE Oklahoma City Gynecology and Obstetrics 11200 N. Portland Ave., Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.936.1000 ROBERT S. MANNEL University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center 800 NE 10th St., Suite 6043, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6822 TERESSA JOAN MCHENRY Warren Clinic Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology 2605 W. Main St., Jenks, 74037 918.298.2336 DONALD SCOTT MCMEEKIN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology 800 NE 10th St., Suite 2100, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8707 MIKIO A. NIHIRA University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Women’s Pelvic and Bladder Health OU Physicians Building, Suite 5D 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.9493

MICHAEL R. SEIKEL INTEGRIS Bennett Fertility Institute ObGyn Specialists 3433 NW 56th St., Building B, Suite 210, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4701 K. ANTHONY SHANBOUR Mercy Women’s Center Mercy Plaza Building 4140 W. Memorial Road, Suite 215, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.242.4030 JOHN STANLEY Mercy Health Center Perinatal Center of Oklahoma 4140 W. Memorial Road, Suite 321, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.748.4726 GARY F. STREBEL 4200 W. Memorial Road, Suite 201, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.749.4200 DARON GENE STREET Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E. 51st St. S.,Tulsa, 74146 918.505.3200 JOAN L. WALKER University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center Division of Gynecologic Oncology 800 NE 10th St., Suite 2100, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8707 ROBERT A. WILD OU Physicians Section of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility OU Physicians Building, Suite 3C 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.9494

Ophthalmology

CHARLES P. BOGIE III 3435 NW 56th St., Suite 1010, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4747 CYNTHIA A. BRADFORD Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of General Ophthalmology and Cataract Surgery 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1090 REAGAN H. BRADFORD JR. Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1092 ADAM G. DE LA GARZA 14000 N. Portland Ave., Suite 101, Oklahoma City, 73134 405.521.0041 BRADLEY K. FARRIS Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1091 STEPHEN R. FRANSEN Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1092 LAYNE E. GOETZINGER Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of General Ophthalmology and Cataract Surgery 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1090

DARIN HAIVALA Retinal Associates Of Oklahoma 12318 Saint Andrews Dr., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.752.0717 RALPH B. HESTER III Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Comprehensive Ophthalmology and Cataract Surgery 3500 NW 56th St., Suite 101, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.271.9500 PETER LLOYD HILDEBRAND Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Parke Pavilion, Suite 333 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1096 DAVID W. JACKSON Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of General Ophthalmology and Cataract Surgery 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1090 MAHMOUD A. KHAIMI Dean McGee Eye Institute Glaucoma Service 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1093 RONALD M. KINGSLEY Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1092 THERESA LARSON Dean McGee Eye Institute Cornea and External Diseases Pavilion A, First Floor 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1095 ROBERT E. LEONARD II Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1092 ANNIE MOREAU Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Parke Pavilion, Suite 333 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1096 REBECCA K. MORGAN Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Low Vision Rehabilitation 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1793 SUMIT K. NANDA Oklahoma Retinal Consultants 3366 Northwest Expressway, Building D, Suite 750, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.948.2020 ANIL D. PATEL Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1091 STEVEN R. SARKISIAN JR. Dean McGee Eye Institute Glaucoma Service 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1093 VINAY A. SHAH Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Retina and Vitreous 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1092 RAYMOND MICHAEL SIATKOWSKI Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1094


21372 OU Medicine.indd 1

21363 Dean McGee.indd 1

8/21/15 21373 9:40 AM Tulsa Bone & Joint.indd 1

8/24/15 8:34 AM

8/19/15 4:18 PM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

75


RHEA L. SIATKOWSKI Dean McGee Eye Institute Cornea and External Diseases Pavilion A, First Floor 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1095 SCOTT C. SIGLER Eye Associates 2020 E. 15th St., Suite B, Edmond, 73013 405.348.9993 GREGORY L. SKUTA Dean McGee Eye Institute Glaucoma Service 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1093 ROLAND A. WALTERS 3301 NW 63rd St., Oklahoma City, 73116 405.949.6177 MARK J. WEISS The Eye Institute 1717 S. Utica Ave., Suite 107, Tulsa, 74104 918.742.2428 THOMAS C. WOLF 3431 S. Boulevard St., Suite 105, Edmond, 73013 405.562.2036

Orthopaedic Surgery THOMAS C. HOWARD III McBride Orthopedic Hospital Clinic 1110 N. Lee Ave., Oklahoma City, 73103 405.230.9270

JAMES CALVIN JOHNSON Oklahoma Sports Science & Orthopedics 6205 N. Santa Fe Ave., Suite 200, Oklahoma City, 73118 405.419.5412 GHAZI M. RAYAN INTEGRIS Hand and Microsurgery Center 3366 Northwest Expressway, Building D, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4888 BROCK SCHNEBEL McBride Orthopedic Hospital Clinic 1110 N. Lee Ave., Oklahoma City, 73103 405.230.9270 DAVID CARLTON TEAGUE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center OU Physicians Orthopaedic Surgery Clinic 825 NE 10th St., Suite 1300, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2663 JOHN F. TOMPKINS II Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Department of Orthopedic Surgery 921 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.456.3379

Otolaryngology

STEPHEN M. BROWNLEE Eastern Oklahoma Ear Nose and Throat 5020 E. 68th St., Tulsa, 74136 918.492.3636 KEITH F. CLARK Oklahoma City Ear Nose and Throat Clinic Saints Medical Plaza 535 NW Ninth St., Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 73102 405.272.6027 JOHN R. HOUCK JR. OU Physicians Department of Otorhinolaryngology OU Physicians Building, Suite 4C 825 NE 10th S., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1368 GREG A. KREMPL University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center Department of Otolaryngology 800 NE 10th St., Fourth Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7559 MICHAEL MCGEE Otologic Medical Clinic Hough Ear Institute 3400 NW 56th St., Oklahoma City, 73112 405.946.5563

IVAN WAYNE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center W Facial Aesthetics 13904 Quail Brook Dr., Oklahoma City, 73134 405.271.5950 DAVID W. WHITE Eastern Oklahoma Ear Nose and Throat 5020 E. 68th St., Tulsa, 74136 918.492.3636

Pathology

BARBARA L. BANE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Division of Anatomic Pathology Presbyterian Tower 700 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5653 A. NEIL CROWSON Pathology Laboratory Associates 4142 S. Mingo Road, Tulsa, 74146 918.744.2553 JAN V. PITHA Oklahoma City VA Medical Center Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Service 921 NE 13th St., Room 4F128, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.456.5340 STANLEY S. SHRAGO INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center Department of Pathology 3300 Northwest Expressway, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.949.6842 JAMES W. TAIRA Oklahoma Dermatopathology 1211 N. Shartel Ave., Suite 202, Oklahoma City, 73103 405.685.3700

Pediatric Allergy and Immunology MARTHA M. TARPAY Mercy Health Center Allergy Asthma and Clinical Research Center Mercy Tower, Suite 206 4200 W. Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.752.0393

Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology RUPA K. DESILVA The Women’s Health Group SouthCreek Medical Plaza 9001 S. 101st E. Ave., Suite 350, Tulsa, 74133 918.293.6200

Pediatric Cardiology

EDWARD D. OVERHOLT The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Oklahoma Children’s Heart Center OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 2F 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5530 KENT E. WARD The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Oklahoma Children’s Heart Center OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 2F 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5530

Pediatric Critical Care

MORRIS R. GESSOUROUN The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Critical Care Medicine 1200 Everett Dr., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5211

JESUS EDILBERTO MEDINA OU Physicians Department of Otolaryngology OU Physicians Building, Suite 4C 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7559

76

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

Pediatric Developmental and Behavioral Problems

DONALD R. HAMILTON OU Child Study Center 1100 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73117 405.271.5700 LAURA MCGUINN OU Child Study Center 1100 NE 13th St.,Oklahoma City, 73117 405.271.5700 MARK LEE WOLRAICH OU Child Study Center 1100 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73117 405.271.5700

Pediatric Endocrinology

PIERS R. BLACKETT The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Diabetes and Endocrinology OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 4D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6764 STEVEN D. CHERNAUSEK The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Diabetes and Endocrinology OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 4500 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3303 KENNETH C. COPELAND The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Diabetes and Endocrinology OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 4D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2006 DAVID H. JELLEY Oklahoma University Physicians Division of Pediatric Endocrinology Schusterman Center Clinic 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4400

Pediatric Gastroenterology

JOHN E. GRUNOW The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Gastroenterology Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 9E 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6549 JUDITH ANN O’CONNOR The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Gastroenterology Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 9E 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6549 MARILYN I. STEELE The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Gastroenterology Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 9E 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6549

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

RENE Y. MCNALL-KNAPP The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Jimmy Everest Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders in Children OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 10A 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4412 WILLIAM H. MEYER The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Jimmy Everest Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders in Children OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 10A 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4412

Pediatric Infectious Disease

SUSANA CHAVEZ-BUENO The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4211 TERRENCE L. STULL The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4211 ROBERT C. WELLIVER The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Infectious Diseases OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405-271-5703

Pediatric Medical Genetics

JOHN J. MULVIHILL The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Genetics OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4211 KLAAS WIERENGA The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Genetics OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4211

Pediatric Nephrology

MARTIN ALLAN TURMAN The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Pediatric Nephrology OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 5D 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4409

Pediatric Neurological Surgery NAINA GROSS University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery, The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center, Suite 4000 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4912 TIMOTHY B. MAPSTONE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery, The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center, Suite 4000 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4912 AMANDA L. YAUN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Neurosurgery, The Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center, Suite 4000, 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4912

Pediatric Ophthalmology

JAMES M. RICHARD Children’s Eye Care 11013 Hefner Pointe Dr., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.751.2020 MARK H. SCOTT Children’s Eye Care 11013 Hefner Pointe Dr., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.751.2020

RAYMOND MICHAEL SIATKOWSKI Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1094 TAMMY L. YANOVITCH Dean McGee Eye Institute Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1094

Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

JOSEPH DAVEY The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Orthopaedic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 3A 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2669 WILLIAM A. HERNDON The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Orthopaedic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 3A 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2669 WILLIAM R. PUFFINBARGER The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Orthopaedic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 3A 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2669 J. ANDY SULLIVAN The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Orthopaedic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 3A 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2669

Pediatric Otolaryngology

G. PAUL DIGOY Pediatric ENT of Oklahoma 10914 Hefner Pointe Dr., Suite 200 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.608.8833

Pediatric Specialist/Abused Children SARAH PASSMORE Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Pediatrics Schusterman Center Clinic 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4400

Pediatric Specialist/ Child and Adolescent Psychiatry BETTY PFEFFERBAUM University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Williams Pavilion, Room 3217 920 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4219

Pediatric Specialist/ Child and Adolescent Psychiatry GREGORY E. SHADID Norman ADD Center 730 Asp Ave., Suite 210, Norman, 73069 405.310.4477


Pediatric Specialist/ Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine KIMBERLY ERNST The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine North Pavilion, Seventh Floor 1200 Everett Dr., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5215

MARILYN BARNARD ESCOBEDO The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine North Pavilion, Seventh Floor 1200 Everett Dr., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5215 VENUGOPAL (VENU) GOTTIPATI The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine North Pavilion, Seventh Floor 1200 Everett Dr., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5215 MARY ANNE WIGHT MCCAFFREE The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine North Pavilion, Seventh Floor 1200 Everett Dr., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5215 KRISHNAMURTHY C. SEKAR The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine North Pavilion, Seventh Floor 1200 Everett Dr., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5215 ANNE G. WLODAVER The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine North Pavilion, Seventh Floor 1200 Everett Dr., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5215 JEANIE B. TRYGGESTAD The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Section of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine North Pavilion, Seventh Floor 1200 Everett Dr., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5215

Pediatric Surgery

ROBERT WARREN LETTON JR. The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Physicians General and Plastic Surgery Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 2E 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4357 PHILIP CAMERON MANTOR The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Physicians General and Plastic Surgery Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 2E 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4357

Pediatric Transplant Hepatology

JUDITH ANN O’CONNOR The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Gastroenterology Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 9E 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6549

Pediatric Urology

DOMINIC FRIMBERGER The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Physicians Pediatric Urology Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 7100 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3800 BRADLEY P. KROPP The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Physicians Pediatric Urology Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 7100 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3800 BLAKE W. PALMER The Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Physicians Pediatric Urology Clinic OU Children’s Physicians Building, Suite 7100 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3800

Pediatrics/ General

PATRICK J. DALEY 1589 E. 19th St., Tulsa, 74120 918.743.8941 DONALD R. HAMILTON OU Child Study Center 1100 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73117 405.271.5700 ANNE M. HARRINGTON Warren Clinic Department of Pediatrics 2950 S. Elm Pl., Suite 430, Broken Arrow, 74012 918.449.4061 FRANZ MONCADA Warren Professional Building 6465 S. Yale Ave, Suite 408, Tulsa, 74136 918.481.4880 DOUGLAS W. STEWART Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Pediatrics Schusterman Center Clinic 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4400 S. SANDRA WAN Pediatric and Adolescent Care Williams Medical Plaza 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 300, Tulsa, 74104 918.747.7544 J. PERRY WARD Warren Clinic Department of Pediatrics 2950 S. Elm Pl., Suite 430 Broken Arrow, 74012 918.449.4061

Plastic Surgery

EUGENE B. GARBER JR. 1784 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.745.2117 NORMAN S. LEVINE 1211 N. Shartel Ave., Suite 905, Oklahoma City, 73103 405.236.0300 ARCHIBALD S. MILLER III Tulsa Plastic Surgery William Medical Building 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 315, Tulsa, 74136 918.492.2282 BRENT A. RUBIS 10119-A E. 80th St. S., Tulsa, 74133 918.254.6793 PAUL SILVERSTEIN Oklahoma Plastic Surgeons 3705 NW 63rd St., Suite 204, Oklahoma City, 73116 405.842.9732 IVAN WAYNE University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center W Facial Aesthetics 13904 Quail Brook Dr., Oklahoma City, 73134 405.271.5950

Psychiatry

GERARD CLANCY University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine Department of Psychiatry 4502 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.660.3300 MICHELLE HUBNER Psychiatric Associates of Tulsa 4612 S. Harvard Ave., Suite A, Tulsa, 74135 918.747.5565 BRYAN K. TOUCHET Oklahoma University Physicians Department of Psychiatry Schusterman Center Clinic 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4400

Pulmonary Medicine MATTHEW BRITT Pulmonary Specialists 3400 Northwest Expressway, Suite 105, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.947.3335 DAVID C. LEVIN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Health and Lung Center OU Physicians Building, Suite 500 825 NE 105th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001 JONATHAN R. L. SCHWARTZ Oklahoma Pulmonary Physicians 4200 S. Douglas Ave., Suite 313, Oklahoma City, 73109 405.636.1111

Radiation Oncology

CARL R. BOGARDUS JR. University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology 800 NE 10th St., Suite L100, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5641 CLINTON AMOS MEDBERY III Southwest Radiation Oncology 325 NW 15th St., Oklahoma City, 73103 405.210.7471

Radiology

MICHAEL A. LAWLESS Oklahoma Life Access Mary K. Chapman Plaza 1819 E. 19th St., Suite 410, Tulsa, 74104 918.744.2442 STEPHEN PAUL LEE Radiology Associates 3330 NW 56th St., Suite 206, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4232 TIMOTHY A. LIND St. John Medical Center Tulsa Radiology Associates 1923 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.744.2171 W. JORDAN TAYLOR Tulsa Vascular Specialists Department of Interventional Radiology 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1302, Tulsa, 74136 918.749.8346 TIMOTHY L. TYTLE Mercy Health Center Division of Interventional Radiology 4300 W. Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.936.5440 THOMAS WALLACE WHITE St. John Medical Center Tulsa Radiology Associates 1923 S. Utica Ave., Tulsa, 74104 918.744.2171

Rheumatology

ELIZA CHAKRAVARTY Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation Arthritis and Clinical Immunology Program, 825 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6042

LAWRENCE A. JACOBS Rheumatology Associates 5555 E. 71st St., Suite 7100 Tulsa, 74136 918.491.9007

FRANK N. FORE Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 602, Tulsa, 74104 918.712.3366

IRA N. TARGOFF University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Division of Rheumatology Immunology and Allergy OU Physicians Building, Suite 4E 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8478

ROBERT C. GARRETT Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 602, Tulsa, 74104 918.712.3366

Sleep Medicine

JONATHAN R. L. SCHWARTZ Oklahoma Pulmonary Physicians 4200 S. Douglas Ave., Suite 313, Oklahoma City, 73109 405.636.1111

Surgery

JUSTIN T. ATHERTON 1725 E. 19th St., Suite 800, Tulsa, 74104 918.301.2505 BRIAN ROBERT BOGGS Mercy Clinic Breast Surgery 4200 W. Memorial Road, Suite 708, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.749.7023 STEPHEN BRUNS 1725 E. 19th St., Suite 800, Tulsa, 74104 918.301.2505 JOHN R. FRAME Breast Health Specialists of Oklahoma City Plex Tower #60, Suite 1500 2448 E. 81st St., Tulsa, 74137 918.392.7950 TIMOTHY HEPNER 1725 E. 19th St., Suite 800, Tulsa, 74104 918.301.2505 ALAN B. HOLLINGSWORTH Mercy Women’s Center 4300 McAuley Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.936.5455 STEVEN B. KATSIS Surgical Associates 2448 E. 81st St., Suite 1100, Tulsa, 74137 918.505.3400 MARK R. MEESE Surgical Associates 2448 E. 81st St., Suite 1100, Tulsa, 74137 918.505.3400 ROCKY MAX MORGAN 1725 E. 19th St., Suite 800, Tulsa, 74104 918.301.2505 RUSSELL G. POSTIER OU Physicians General Surgery Clinic OU Physicians Building, Suite 4G 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1400 W. CHRISTOPHER SUTTERFIELD Surgical Associates 2448 E. 81st St., Suite 1100, Tulsa, 74137 918.505.3400

Urology

JAMES S. ARCHER Urology Centers of Oklahoma 1211 N. Shartel Ave., Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 73103 405.235.8008 ROBERT R. BRUCE Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma 10901 E. 48th St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.749.8765 MICHAEL S. COOKSON University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Urology Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center 800 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4088 DANIEL J. CULKIN University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Urology Clinic OU Physicians Building, Suite 5F 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8156 MARC MILSTEN Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma 10901 E. 48th St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.749.8765 PUNEET SINDHWANI University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Department of Urology 825 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6452

Vascular Surgery

JOHN BLEBEA OU Physicians Division of Vascular Surgery Bernsen Medical Plaza 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 600, Tulsa, 74104 918.634.7500 MARK R. MEESE Surgical Associates 2448 E. 81st St., Suite 1100, Tulsa, 74137 918.505.3400 EDWIN C. YEARY II St. John Physicians Trauma Surgery 1919 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 606, Tulsa, 74104 918.748.7676

BEVERLY JEAN TALBERT University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Peggy and Charles Stephenson Cancer Center Breast Cancers Clinic 800 NE 10th St., Second Floor, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7226 BRANDON D. VARNELL Surgical Associates 2448 E. 81st St., Suite 1100, Tulsa, 74137 918.505.3400

Surgical Oncology

ALAN B. HOLLINGSWORTH Mercy Women’s Center 4300 McAuley Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.936.5455

Thoracic Surgery

HAROLD M. BURKHART University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Section of Cardiothoracic Surgery OU Children’s Physicians Building, Second Floor, 1200 Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5789

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

77


Congratulations, Dr. Lynn Frame, for your listing in Best Doctors in America 2015-2016

Lynn E. Frame, MD

Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

Specializing in obstetrics, gynecology, Her Option office ablation, robotic surgery, wellness exams, menopause, hormone therapy and pelvic support issues.

kinslow, keith & todd, inc. architecture| interiors |engineering

DESIGNING FOR THE BEST PATIENT EXPERIENCE

Utica Women’s Specialists

Your needs. Realized. — Kinslow, Keith & Todd, Inc.

1725 E. 19th Street, Suite 401 • Tulsa, OK 918-749-1413

21394 Utica Womens Specialist.indd 1

2200 S. Utica Place, Suite 200 | Tulsa, OK 74114 | 918.744.4270 | www.kktarchitects.com

9/4/15 21412 12:00 PM Kinslow Keith & Todd.indd 1

For over 40 years we‘ve provided comprehensive Ear, Nose and Throat care to Oklahomans. We know that you have choices in health care and we thank you for placing your trust in us!

· · · ·

Anthony Loehr, MD · David Hall, MD Robert Nelson, MD · Atul Vaidya, MD Stephen Brownlee, MD · Christopher Siemens, MD William Sawyer, MD · Evan Moore, MD · David White, MD

918.492.3636

The stamp of excellence!

Locally Owned and Operated for over 42 years Our team is your team! Let Saffa help the entire family from your youngest to oldest family members…even your family pets! • Retail Prescriptions • Compounding Prescriptions • Durable Medical Equipment Daily Living aides • Compression stocking lymphedema sleeves • Part D plan comparisons

78

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

18956 Eastern OK ENT.indd 1

• Price matching available on most local prescription pricing • We accept most insurance providers don’t settle for mail order! • New Unique gift section featuring many locally made items

Compounding is the long-established practice that enables physicians and veterinarians to work with your pharmacist to customize medications specific for individual needs.

eoent.com

68th & Yale • 91st & Mingo

9/14/15 2:36 PM

8002 S Sheridan Rd Tulsa, OK 74133 918.492.4242 | M-F 9-6 Sat 9-1 www.saffarx.com

FREE DELIVERY IN THE TULSA METRO AREA 9/9/15 21413 12:21 PM Saffa.indd 1

9/15/15 12:43 PM


A Life Of

DISCOVERY Renowned inventor and surgeon Nazih Zuhdi brought the world to Oklahoma, and the state gave to him a beautiful life. By Tara Malone

DR. NAZIH ZUHDI, LEFT, SLIPS ON GLOVES BEFORE A HEART TRANSPLANT IN THE ‘80S.

PHOTO COURTESY INTEGRIS.

’m sitting in the Oklahoma City home of one of the world’s most famous medical scientists. Very few characteristics distinguish it from any other home in the Nichols Hills area – in fact, it is one of the most modest. But above Dr. Nazih Zuhdi’s head is a framed, lovingly preserved bouquet of flowers his wife held when the streets in front of the Oklahoma History Center were named for Zuhdi and his spouse. Pavarotti trills throughout the entire house. “I love Luciano,” Zuhdi tells me, gesturing me to sit on the couch. “All day, I must have him.” Threatening to overshadow both the singer and Zuhdi himself is Bob, 10 pounds of Pomeranian fluff twirling and barking along with the opera. “He is smart,” Zuhdi tells me, winking roguishly. “He is stealing the show.” OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

79


From his dining room – currently swimming in papers and artifacts being curated by the author of Zuhdi’s latest biography – he brings forth a hefty, burgundy tome. The cover reads World Who’s Who in Science from Antiquity to Present. Within its pages reside every Nobel Prize recipient, Galileo, Tesla, Einstein and Nazih Zuhdi. “They chose me to be in it,” he says proudly of the 1968 reference. “The only Oklahoman. They list a lot of things, mainly the big three … the last two were done in Oklahoma. Not in New York, Washington or Minnesota. Right here.” He thumps the volume for emphasis. Those three things – developing an assisted circulation machine to support patients during open heart surgery; inventing the total intentional hemodilution technique, and inventing an artificial bypass heart – are a portion of what has earned Zuhdi the prestige and notoriety he commands today. “This is important because people forget history. This cannot be forgotten,” he says. Now 90 years old and as dynamic a personality as ever, Zuhdi is in no danger of being lost to memory, neither during his lifetime nor in the future. His inventions have saved the lives of millions across the globe, and his surgical techniques are now standard practice in every cardiac and transplant operating room in the world. When travelers arrive at the Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City, his name greets them on the banner for the Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute at INTEGRIS Baptist Hospital, the first comprehensive organ transplant center in the nation. Like many of the travelers disembarking before his banner in the airport terminal, Zuhdi’s journey to Oklahoma began thousands of miles away. Born in 1925 in Beirut, Lebanon, he evinced an early fascination with medicine. His father, an ophthalmologist who had trained at the University of Vienna, would often allow Zuhdi to accompany him and observe his surgeries. Zuhdi was eager to begin his medical education as soon as possible. “When I finished my high school, I went right away to the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. That was in about 1842.” Zuhdi chuckles. “Nineteen-forty-two, excuse me.” Already set on a career in medicine, Zuhdi was captivated by two other subjects that would further shape his life. “The first year was an experience to me because I spent it learning about the founding fathers of the United States,” Zuhdi says. “Washington, Adams, Jefferson, all the way to Lincoln. I also studied the three Abrahamic religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam. They are very similar. And so I became totally educated in those matters. They changed my life, actually.” n 1952 Zuhdi boarded a flight to the United States to begin his internship at New York’s Columbia University Hospital. But once he arrived, he flatly refused (in a harbinger of the determined single-mindedness he would display during the length of his career) to complete his residency. “I refused to do it because during my first year, I heard Clarence Dennis talk,” Zuhdi says simply. Dennis, then at the University of Minnesota, had performed the first open-heart surgery in the world with his own heart-lung machine. Although the surgery was not initially successful, Zuhdi was so intrigued by Dennis and his work that nothing would do but for him to join Dennis’s lab. “Really, I wanted somehow to be different than the regular students who went through with all their learnings, then get their boards of surgery or gynecology or whatever,” Zuhdi says. “And they become either professors or private physicians. That is not what appealed to me.” Zuhdi, eschewing a residency at Columbia, wrote to Dennis for a place in his lab, which by then had moved to the State University of New York-Downstate Medical Center. Dennis, impressed by the

80

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015


DR. NAZIH ZUHDI, NOW 90 YEARS OLD, IS A LEGENDARY INVENTOR, INNOVATOR AND SURGEON. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

81


young doctor’s vigor in applying for the lab, immediately offered Zuhdi a place. It was there that Zuhdi began his work on perfecting assisted circulation via the heart-lung machine. “There was no open heart surgery, period,” Zuhdi explains. “You are born with a defect, you die off, that is it. The heart needs a pump outside the body, and the lungs need an oxygenator. It was not easy because to duplicate the heart is not easy. To duplicate the lungs is not easy. It’s hard work. The persistence is what counts.” uhdi’s dream was to build a successful heartlung machine to pump sufficient oxygen to keep the organs alive during an open-heart procedure. While Zuhdi was ostensibly training in Dennis’s laboratories, the experienced cardiologist and scientist recognized a momentous mind when he saw it. He later wrote of Zuhdi: “During his training at Brooklyn, Zuhdi was a very bright star among the 50-odd residents in training there, always ready with suggestions and the drive to carry them through, which he did regularly in the year he worked with me in the research laboratory during our work on developing a pump-oxygenator, as a result of which, we were able to salvage the first long-term survivor of massive myocardial infarction and shock by temporary circulatory support with that same pump-oxygenator.” Dennis’s matter-of-fact tone belies the revolutionary medical milestone he and Zuhdi had achieved. On Nov. 1, 1954, the duo made history with their new assisted circulation machine. “We used it on a patient who was in total heart failure,” Zuhdi recalls. “We used it for the first time in the world to help that patient who was in a coma. And basically it worked. It was the first successful case in the world of a heart-lung machine being used as an assisted circulation to a failing heart. … All of a sudden, at 27 years old, I became the most known worker in heart-lung machines in the world. They used to come visit Dennis in the lab, and he would always wave them over to me. ‘Tell them how you did it!’ And that was Dennis, you know.”

‘You Need Oklahoma’

Zuhdi’s assisted circulation machine had been a success and brought him instant worldwide fame, but his mind was not content to rest. “With Dennis, we were basically working on how to duplicate the human body.” He chuckles and rolls his eyes, amused. “To duplicate God’s creation!” Meanwhile, at the University of Minnesota, a surgeon-scientist name C. Walter Lillehei – so-called The King of Hearts – was taking

82

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

assisted circulation one step farther by using cross-circulation, or a compatible human being as a heart-lung machine. At Dennis’s urging, Zuhdi joined Lillehai in Minnesota in 1956. “He was very smart,” Zuhdi says, wagging his finger. “At the time, many thought it was very stupid. To them he was a kook. But he was smart.” As Zuhdi worked with Lillehai to perfect assisted circulation, word of Zuhdi’s accomplishments were reaching the ears of an enterprising Oklahoma surgeon: Dr. John Schilling, the new chairman of the University of Oklahoma Department of Surgery. Schilling was determined to establish a preeminent heart surgery research section at the OU College of Medicine, and he wanted Zuhdi there to build it. Oklahoma seemed an unlikely home for one of the world’s foremost cardiac scientists. As Zuhdi says, “It had nothing of science at the time.” But Dennis and Lillehei encouraged the move, telling Zuhdi he could become “The King of the Prairies.” Dennis told him, “Go. You don’t need me anymore. You need Oklahoma.” Zuhdi never looked back and never left the state he has called home for most of his life. In 1957, he joined the OU College of Medicine in Oklahoma City. He was delighted at Schilling’s willingness to build him a lab. In that lab, Zuhdi built his latest version of the heart-lung machine. Schilling could not have been more thrilled with his recruit. “He was so elated,” Zuhdi remembers. “He was like a child. Nobody had heart-lung machines except two or three universities. And they were lousy.” But Zuhdi’s stay in the OU DeZUHDI PERFORMS OPEN HEART SURGERY. partment of Surgery was too brief PHOTO COURTESY INTEGRIS. for Schilling and the university’s administrators. He was told by the department that as a member of a state university, his work was to be overseen by a committee of three members, and that was a dealbreaker. “I never ask others what I want to do,” Zuhdi says emphatically. “This my life. This is true. My rules.”

Beacon Of Hope

For Zuhdi, the choice was a no-brainer. He would not tolerate committee oversight of his research. Although he credits Shilling with bringing him to Oklahoma, and the two remained lifelong friends, Zuhdi severed all ties to OU. Luckily, while Oklahoma was an unrealized state for scientific and medical innovation, visionaries abounded in Oklahoma City at the time. One such luminary was John Kirkpatrick. When Kirkpatrick discovered that Zuhdi intended to leave the state, he offered to build the scientist a lab anywhere he wanted – as long as he stayed in Oklahoma. “So we rode around in his car, and I chose the worst-looking hospital in Oklahoma City,” Zuhdi says with a laugh. “Mercy on 13th Street. I said ‘Here.’ Because really, a hospital, I don’t need. I just


needed a lab.” And thus was born the Mercy Hospital Heart and Research InstituteExperimental Laboratory. It was in this new lab that Zuhdi turned his mind again to perfecting the heart-lung machine and the survival for patients of cardiac surgery. The problem, he determined, was the blood itself. The amount needed to replace lost blood during open-heart surgery, and to keep circulation flowing to the oxygen-starved heart and lungs, was staggering. In addition, blood could barely flow through constricted arteries. Open-heart surgery was still a deadly business for many patients, despite the astronomical advances that had been made in the previous several years. Zuhdi now had a new goal to tackle. What, he wondered, would happen if sugar water were used? Zuhdi holds up his hand, his forefinger curled into a tiny circle against his thumb. “This is why they died,” he says, indicating the small opening in his fist to mimic the constricted artery. “Then, we add the sugar water, and PEW!” He widens the circle of his finger and thumb as far as it can go. “It blew up! PEW! The way the brain comes upon it …” he shakes his head in wonder. The priming of the heart-lung machine with a calculated volume of non-hemic primer is now known as total intentional hemodilution, and Zuhdi’s technique is used to perform cardiac surgery and transplants on millions of patients each year. The first, however, was a child from Broken Bow named Terry Gene Nix. At a year old, Terry Gene had been diagnosed with pulmonary valvular stenosis, in which the valve that controlled blood flow to his tiny heart and lungs was narrowed, taxing his under-oxygenated organs. As he grew older and his condition deteriorated, little Terry Gene didn’t have much time. He was 7 years old in 1960 and about to become the first human recipient of total intentional hemodilution in the world. To the delight of his family, doctors and the medical community around the world, Terry Gene only needed a fraction of the replacement blood needed to keep oxygen circulating during his surgery – some 1.5 pints, as opposed to gallons. The day after his three-hour procedure, he was smiling for the cameras of the world. Although Terry Gene died three years later from an unrelated ailment, he served as a beacon of hope for patients and surgeons across the globe. Because of him, millions of patients each year undergo open-heart surgery and transplants using total intentional hemodilution. Terry Gene’s grave marker reads: Terry Gene Nix The Gateway to All Total Intentional Hemodilution By Whom Millions Have Come To Life February 25, 1960 Remembrance by Nazih Zuhdi, M.D.

of medical science: the Zuhdi-Ritchie artificial bypass heart. A version of the plastic heart is now preserved at the Oklahoma History Center. But its journey began, appropriately, with a dog named Mercy. As the first recipient of the artificial heart, Mercy the Dog gained instant fame across the world in 1963. Mercy Hospital and Zuhdi’s lab were once again inundated with reporters and scientists from across the globe who had come to see the remarkable canine. “Oklahoma City became so famous! It was amazing,” Zuhdi says. “Because Mercy made history in the world, you know.” The dog was cared for by Sister Mary Alvera in the basement lab of Mercy Hospital – the same nun who would introduce Zuhdi to Annette, the woman who would become his wife. “She became a special RN,” Zuhdi says, grinning. “Dr. Zuhdi’s RN.” Sister Mary Alvera, who had sent firstyear nursing student Annette to Zuhdi’s lab, told him, “Let’s face it, Nazih. She got you.” The couple married in Paris in 1970, and Annette’s name can be seen on the circle drive in front of the Oklahoma History Center. Zuhdi shows me a picture by photographer Yousef Khanfar. From a carpet of mist and forest, one tree rises strong. Behind it, a river trickles inexorably down the mountaintop. “She is the waterfall of my life,” Zuhdi says simply. “Without her, there is no greenery.” While news of Zuhdi’s ministrations bore fruit at Mercy Hospital and spread across the world, not all was smooth sailing in the halls of the hospital. Physicians were in an uproar at Zuhdi’s unorthodox surgical methods, making the atmosphere tense for Zuhdi and his team. Meanwhile, the proverbial “City on a Hill,” a term given to Oklahoma Baptist Hospital, was under construction in northwest Oklahoma City. “I decided to try Baptist,” Zuhdi says. He roars with laughter, “Well, they wouldn’t let me in!” Baptist Hospital had scarcely been built, and while eager to take Zuhdi on, there was no facility there capable of housing the doctor’s larger-than-life operations. Zuhdi remembers performing some of the first open-heart surgeries at the fledgling medical facility, where he had no lab or office. Instead, when it was operating time, Zuhdi would throw his heart-lung machine into the back of a pickup truck and pull up to the back of the hospital. Piece by piece, he would haul the machine up the stairs, where he would re-assemble it for surgery. After a successful operation, the machine would once more be disassembled and lugged back to the pickup truck. “They had no lab, they had nothing,” Zuhdi remembers. “It was just beginning. If there is something wrong happening, they would call me.” In 1963, Zuhdi and colleagues Allen Greer and John Carey left Mercy for their new home on the hill. And as with every institution Zuhdi graced, tumult – along with momentous discoveries – ensued. Baptist – now known as INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center – became Zuhdi’s longest home, and the one to bear his name.

“I never ask others what I want to do. ... This my life. My rules.”

Love And Mercy

Hemodilution would forever remain Zuhdi’s most transformative contribution to medical science, but it was far from his last. For when Kirkpatrick had decided to build Zuhdi a lab, he also went a step further: he sent him a partner. Kirkpatrick recruited U.S. Navy commander and engineer Clark Ritchie to join Zuhdi to build the lab. Ritchie stayed with Zuhdi for seven years at Mercy Hospital. The two lived within a couple of blocks of each other in Nichols Hills, and together, Ritchie and Zuhdi would create the next innovation that would forever change the face

Oklahoma’s First Transplant

In the early 1980s, hundreds of physicians signed a petition to remove Zuhdi from Baptist, claiming he was destroying their organization with his work. OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

83


“It’s so unthinkable, so bad, it’s so radical,” Zuhdi mimics the protesting physicians. He recounts seeing the petition shredded by Kenneth Bonds, then Chairman of the Board at Baptist. “‘Trashcan, Nazih!’ PEW! The higher ups supported us, period,” he says. Protests to Zuhdi’s plan to establish the Oklahoma Heart Center at Baptist were viewed dangerous by cardiologists who feared the creation of a comprehensive heart center would adversely affect their practices and impact them financially. Zuhdi became incensed, defeated, then determined once more. He bore the Oklahoma Heart Center kicking and screaming into existence but was plagued by politics and obstacles the entire way. Zuhdi finally decided that if he could not make other cardiac surgeons realize the benefit of the newly conceived Oklahoma Heart Center, and reconcile the political squabbling that accompanied its creation, he’d simply do something else at Baptist. He would, in essence, create his own medical kingdom, in which he and his research – and not his fellow physicians – called the shots. He issued his resignation to the Oklahoma Heart Center (now the Baptist Heart Hospital – it eventually came to prominence without him), marched to his secretary Sue Lowe, and told her he was starting a transplant center at Baptist called the Oklahoma Transplantation Institute. Lowe simply replied, “Okay.” Everyone knew by now that Nazih Zuhdi would do whatever he wanted. He confirms this when, of the 1985 creation of the transplant institute that now bears his name, he shrugs and says flatly, “I wanted it. “Very few places did transplants in the nation,” Zuhdi recalls. “Only 12 or so. The research done was immense. We recruited from all over the world to the transplant center.” The institute was the nation’s first and only comprehensive transplant center, serving as an epicenter of research and surgical transplantation of all solid organs. It was at the center that Zuhdi performed the first human heart transplant in Oklahoma, on Nancy Rogers in 1985, skyrocketing Baptist Hospital to national fame. Rogers had been a previous patient of Zuhdi’s. In the early 1970s, when she suffered from Stage IV Hodgkin’s lymphoma, he had removed her spleen and sections of her diaphragm due to tumors. The first patient to be treated with chemotherapy in Oklahoma, her cancer entered remission, but her heart was left irreversibly damaged from the treatment. By 1984, Rogers had developed cardiomyopathy with symptoms of congestive heart failure. Rogers had beat cancer, but she could now

84

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

scarcely walk a few steps. On March 3, 1985, she put herself in Zuhdi’s hands once more. Four hours later, she had a new heart, flown through storms from Dalton, Ga., and had made history. Myriad “firsts” followed under Zuhdi’s vision at Baptist: Oklahoma’s first piggy-back heart transplant (the sixth in the nation), in which the patient’s heart is connected to the donor heart; the state’s first heart-lung transplant in 1987, and its first single-lung transplant – one of only a handful in the world at the time – in 1990; and the

ZUHDI, CENTER, VISITS NANCY ROGERS, THE FIRST HEART TRANSPLANT PATIENT IN OKLAHOMA, ALONG WITH ROGERS’ DAUGHTER, LEFT. PHOTO COURTESY INTEGRIS.

first double-lung transplant in Oklahoma in 1994; the list went on as Baptist’s fame grew. The transplant center, renamed the INTEGRIS Nazih Zudih Transplant Institute upon Zuhdi’s retirement in 1999, remains one of the most successful and cutting-edge transplant centers in the United States today, and Zuhdi could not be prouder that it is the first thing travelers see upon arrival in Oklahoma City. “I’ve been here in Oklahoma since 1957,” Zuhdi says. “I chose here because they needed me, and I have had the most beautiful life ever here. It is really remarkable. It’s been a beautiful life. It was planned by God for me to be here. I could never have done what I did in any state in the U.S.A., which is the most advanced country in the world in medicine, anywhere but here.” When asked what he most likes about the life he has built in Oklahoma, he surprisingly recites a story about being pulled over by the police. “I was driving my red car,” he says. “My red car is famous. It’s a 1989 Mercedes. VROOM!” He steers the imaginary wheel with his hands, stomps the invisible gas pedal and beams at me. “A cop from The Village came behind and he stops me. He comes beside and he tells me, ‘Dr. Zuhdi?’ “‘Yeeesssss?’ I say. “‘My mother told me to show you this.’ “He begins to undo his shirt! And there is his scar. ‘You did my open-heart surgery when I was 2 years old. And I thank you.’”


Shop Goodwill & SAVE !

Karen Weidner, R.N. and Kristen Rice, M.D.

For Fall Fashions, Accessories & Holiday Décor

Advanced skin treatments and cosmetic dermatology.

 

918-712-3223

1325 E 35th Street Suite B

21389 Utica Square Skin Care.indd 1

9/1/15 11:17 AM

Shop Often—Selection Changes Daily In All Stores Hours: M—S 9 am—6:30 pm ● Sunday Noon—6:00 pm Tulsa Locations: 3110 Southwest Blvd., 102 S. Garnett Rd., 19021 E. 51st St. Broken Arrow: 2210 W. Washington Glenpool: 502 West 125th Place Owasso: 8525 N. 117th East Ave. Claremore - Bartlesville - Carthage - Joplin - McAlester

www.goodwilltulsa.org

21369 Goodwill.indd 1

Mommy Maids

8/20/15 11:32 AM

• Residential or Commercial • Call for FREE Estimates

Gift Certificates Available!

$75 for 2 hours of Basic Cleaning Just mention this ad. Offer expires 10/31/15

918.938.8222 www.mommy-maids.com 18405 Mommy Maids 1-8H.indd 1

Visit US At

“It’s hard to compete with a Mom’s touch.” 9/14/15 10:23 AM

Come celebrate fifteen years of dreaming, planning and building. A.R. AND MARYLOUISE TANDY FLORAL TERRACES

Grand Opening

For details, visit tulsabotanic.org or call 918.289.0330 3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive

O C TO B E R 3 & 4

okmag.com 2539_TulsaBotanic_OklahomaMagazine.indd 21359 Tulsa Botanic Garden.indd 1 1 1/16 web.indd 1

11/9/14 12:56 PM

8/14/15 2:17 8/18/15 9:47 PM AM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

85


THE LACANCHE RANGE WAS MANUFACTURED IN FRANCE AND IS IDENTICAL TO ONE THAT WAS IN THE OWNER’S PREVIOUS HOME. THE COUNTER-TO-CEILING CABINETS FLANKING THE STOVE ARE THE ONLY UPPER CABINETRY IN THE ROOM, DESIGNED BY KITCHEN IDEAS.

PHOTO BY MELISSA LUKENBAUGH.

TREND ALERTTOUCH OF GOLD

ACCORDING TO HOUZZ.COM, A HOME DESIGN WEBSITE AND APP, SMALL TOUCHES OF METALLIC COLORS IN THE KITCHEN IS A HOT TREND IN DESIGN FOR 2015.

86

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015


NOW TRENDING

KITCHENS AND BATHS ARE TWO ROOMS THAT MAKE UP A HOME, BUT THEY ARE THE TWO THAT CAN PROVE THE COSTLIEST. WITH NEW CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING PROJECTS DEMANDING THAT THESE ROOMS FEATURE HIGH-END FINISHES, DESIGNER TOUCHES AND STATE-OF-THE-ART TECHNOLOGY WHILE ALSO OFFERING TIMELESS STYLE, DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS ARE THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX AND CUSTOMIZING THESE ROOMS TO SUIT EXACTLY WHAT THE HOMEOWNERS DESIRE. By Jami Mattox

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

87


THE GALLEY SINK ALLOWS THE HOMEOWNER TO SLICE, DICE, CHOP AND PREPARE FOODS IN ONE WORKSTATION. THE SINK IS LOCATED BELOW A LARGE KITCHEN WINDOW, WHICH AFFORDS THE HOMEOWNER BEAUTIFUL VIEWS WHILE SHE’S WORKING IN THE KITCHEN.

OPEN AND CLEAN

T

Photography by Melissa Lukenbaugh he owner of a new construction home in midtown Tulsa turned to Kitchen Ideas and the firm’s manager, Michael Thorp, to help design the general layout and functionality of the kitchen. A designer herself, the owner desired a kitchen that was both beautiful as well as functional. She does a fair amount of entertaining, so it was important to Thorp to create a space that accommodated large crowds and offered plenty of room for food storage. The kitchen’s Galley Sink makes for efficient food preparation and is close to the range. Multiple Thermador refrigerator and freezer units provide ample room for food storage. The units are lined in metal, so they retain cold and are more efficient, and shelves can be raised and lowered with a motorized mechanism. The homeowner desired an open and clean feel, so upper cabinetry was kept to a minimum. A steam oven and icemaker are built into the kitchen’s large island. The finished kitchen mixes functionality with designer touches and allows the homeowner to display decorative elements that she has collected from her travels around the world.

88

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

THE HOMEOWNER REQUESTED THAT THE KITCHEN DESIGN OFFER WAYS TO HIDE SMALLER COUNTERTOP APPLIANCES. TO ACCOMMODATE THIS, THORP INSTALLED CABINETS AND POP-UP SHELVES BENEATH THE COUNTER AND ISLAND TO HOUSE THESE APPLIANCES, SUCH AS AN ESPRESSO MACHINE AND A STAND MIXER.

THORP INSTALLED THE GALLEY LOCKER IN THE DINING AREA, A PIECE THAT IS CUSTOM MANUFACTURED FOR KITCHEN IDEAS. HE SAYS THE JUXTAPOSITION OF THE CLEAN, CONTEMPORARY STYLE OF THE HUTCH CONTRASTED WITH THE CLASSIC STYLING OF THE ROOM IS ONE OF HIS FAVORITE ASPECTS OF THIS PROJECT.


THE KITCHEN’S UPPER CABINETS FACED IN GLASS HAVE RECESSED LIGHTING, WHICH DISPLAYS THE HOMEOWNER’S CHINA COLLECTION. MATCHING PENDANT LIGHTS THAT HANG OVER THE ISLAND PROVIDE THAT EXTRA “AH HA!”, SAYS WELCH. CAESARSTONE QUARTZ COUNTERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE OPEN, AIRY FEEL OF THE ROOM.

LIGHT AND PRETTY

D

Photography by Josh Welch esigner Jennifer Welch worked with architect Sam Gresham and builder Rex Massey to transform her client’s Nichols Hills kitchen into a room that was beautiful and fit the needs of the busy family. For the remodel, the kitchen was taken back to its studs. The homeowner wanted the kitchen to be light and “pretty,” according to Welch. The homeowner’s daughter is an avid cook, so it was also important that the kitchen be functional. With a few photos for inspiration, Welch began sketching cabinetry ideas and placement of appliances. Welch is adamant that her kitchen designs feature a backsplash that goes all the way to the ceiling. Young Brothers Inc. installed the mosaic marble backsplash that serves as a focal point behind the range. A Miele ventilation hood breaks up the pattern. Caesarstone quartz counters top the lower cabinetry and island. A vegetable sink complements the main sink and provides more room for food prep. Custom made barstools are comfortable and sturdy. A large wine refrigerator was also a must in this kitchen remodel. Matching pendant lights over the island complete this stylish kitchen.

90

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

THE BACKSPLASH, A CUSTOM MARBLE MOSAIC, RUNS FROM THE COUNTER TO THE CEILING AND IS BROKEN UP BY THE MIELE VENTILATION HOOD. THE LARGE ISLAND PROVIDES FOOD PREP SPACE ALONG WITH COMFY SEATING.


The Best Appliances Inside & Out!

for Your Home

Metro Appliances & More offers high quality products with the selection to meet every need and budget as well as the buying power to offer the lowest possible price. Our factory-trained experts are here to help!

And if you’re looking to upgrade your backyard retreat, Metro Outdoor Living has everything you need. Our experts can help you plan your outdoor kitchen and patio.

5313 S. Mingo Rd., Tulsa

6235 S. Mingo Rd., Tulsa

MetroAppliancesAndMore.com

MetroOutdoorLiving.com

918-622-7692

918-893-2960


92

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015


WELCH HAD THE HOMEOWNER’S BREAKFAST TABLE REFINISHED BY MANZO’S CUSTOM REFINISHING. A BAMBOO-STYLE CHANDELIER WAS PAINTED WITH WHITE LACQUER AND HUNG ABOVE THE TABLE. WELCH INSTALLED A BENCH WITH COMFY PILLOWS ALONGSIDE THE BREAKFAST TABLE FOR EXTRA SEATING.

TREND ALERTCONTRASTING VIEWS

ACCORDING TO DESIGN QUARTERLY, CONTRAST IN COLOR AND TEXTURE IS ALL THE RAGE FOR 2015. THE DARK PENDANT LIGHTS AND WHITE QUARTZ COUNTERTOPS ARE A PLEASING JUXTAPOSITION IN THIS OKLAHOMA CITY KITCHEN.

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

93


THIS MASTER BATH IS A PEACEFUL RETREAT FOR THE ENID HOMEOWNERS. TOUCHES INCLUDE A DEEP, FREESTANDING BATHTUB AND A READING AREA WALLED WITH WINDOWS.

TREND ALERTFREESTANDING TUBS

STATEMENT-MAKING BASINS CONTINUE TO GROW IN POPULARITY, ACCORDING TO HOUZZ.COM. SOME TUBS, SUCH AS THIS DESIGN BY BAINULTRA, CAN STAND ALONE AS A SCULPTURAL ELEMENT IN THE ROOM.

CUSTOM DREAM

T

Photography by Fred Welch his traditional home located in Enid, a new construction project by Tim Hughes Custom Homes, was built with the notion that everything in the home should be bigger and better. That included the installation of his-and-her vanities and closets and a gym and sauna located next to the closets in the master bath. A reading room, walled in windows, is located in the room behind the bathtub. Faucets, ďŹ xtures and door and cabinet hardware throughout the room were provided by Designer Hardware by Faye. The centerpiece of this impressive master bath is a glass-and-marble shower. The shower is comprised of marble and quartzite, which creates the two distinct colors. Merlin Nightingale, president of Enid Tile & Marble, says that the walls of the shower are full slabs, each weighing at least 1,000 pounds. Working with full slabs created unique challenges in terms of plumbing and installation of the shower hardware, he adds. Ross See of Oklahoma City-based Sees Design worked closely with Hughes and Nightingale on the design of the luxurious bathroom.

94

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

CUSTOM HIS-ANDHER VANITIES PROVIDE PRIVATE SPACE AND STORAGE.


SHOWCASE

Kitchens And Baths, Inc. 8122-B SOUTH LEWIS THE PLAZA

www.austin-bean.com T 918.794.7020 • 409B E. 8th St. Tulsa, OK 74120 20673 Austin Bean.indd 1

SHOWROOM HOURS: M-F 9-5 SAT 10-4

918.299.4232

KitchenAndBathShowcase.com

antique terra-cotta & reclaimed stone floors

3/11/15 18121 10:36 AM Showcase Kitchens & Baths.indd 1

9/1/15 10:39 AM

2309 East 69th Street Tulsa, OK 74136 • 918.492.5434 tilestonedistributors.com 21402 Tilestone.indd 1

9/9/15 2:33 PM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

95


THE FREESTANDING SHOWER IS COMPRISED OF MARBLE AND QUARTZITE SLABS, ALONG WITH GLASS, AND IS EQUIPPED WITH AMBIENT LIGHTING AND SHOWER HEADS AND NOZZLES.

96

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015


General conTracTors inc. 1424 south Harvard Tulsa, oklahoma 918-749-7904 www.barronandmcclary.com

10824 Barron & McClary.indd 1

Architecture & Interior Design 918-592-1225

duvallarchitects.com

2/4/14 21387 3:08 PM Duvall.indd 1

8/28/15 3:48 PM

Bringing Function & Style to the most important part of your home.

Kitchen Ideas Metro Appliances Design Center 5313 S. Mingo Road, Tulsa 21379 Kitchen Ideas.indd 1

photo: focus-b.com

Transform your dreams inTo realiTy

Kitchen Ideas LLC www.kitchendesign.com 918.494.0621

Kitchen Ideas & The Galley Collection Showroom 6910 S. Lewis Ave, Tulsa 8/25/15 2:57 PM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

97


AN ENTERTAINER’S DREAM

W

Photography by Brian McMurtry, Studio B Photography hen it came time to remodel the kitchen in this midtown Tulsa home, the homeowner’s instructions to Duvall Architecture and Interiors owners John and Sherri Duvall were that the room should be modernized to accommodate a large family and for entertaining. The homeowner also desired a clean-line design that still fit in with the style of the rest of the large, historical Tudor home. Must-haves included an oversized island at which the family could gather, along with a beverage station that is separated from the cooking zone. Sherri Duvall worked with general contractors Jordan & Sons to remodel the large, spacious room – part of a larger renovation – that looks traditional but has modern updates. The custom cabinets were created by

98

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

Sullivan’s Custom Cabinetry and stained a custom gray color that was created especially for this project. The existing fireplace, behind the island, was refaced with limestone. A large, glass-front Sub-Zero refrigerator offers a variety of drink options, and the adjacent wet bar is equipped with ample storage for glassware, as well as a television for watching the big game from the comfort of the kitchen. The large island is topped with Calcutta marble – also used on the backsplashes in the room – and has a divided sink. A trio of Robert Abbey pendant lights hanging above the island are sphere-shaped Lucite and brass and give the illusion of movement. They were a find by the homeowner. The new, eat-in chef’s table was purchased from Restoration Hardware and complemented with Cassina chairs from SR Hughes. This kitchen opens up to a great room and is adjacent to the patio and outdoor kitchen, but it serves as the warm and inviting hub of this home.


Tim Hughes Custom Homes, llc. You put a lot of time and care into building your life. That’s why we want to help you build a home that reflects that life. Whether you’re looking for a place for your family to grow ... or want to create a space that expresses exactly who you are, we can help you make your dream home come true.

CURRENTLY BUILDING IN: NICHOLS HILLS GAILLARDIA ROSE CREEK OAK TREE GLEN EAGLES OFFICE PARK STONEMILL MANOR EL PASEO (ENID)

TIM HUGHES CUSTOM HOMES, LLC. 912 NW 139TH STREET PARKWAY EDMOND, OK 73013 CELL: 405.627.2216 PHONE: 405.775.0070 EMAIL: THCHLLC@AOL.COM WEB: TIMHUGHESCUSTOMHOMES.COM

Kitchen and Bath design and Remodeling By tulsa’s Finest The Farm Shopping Center 6502 East 51st Street 918.949.9017 www.chdkitchenandbath.com

Fall Into Savings

21414 Tim Hughes.indd 1

9/16/15 20593 2:06 PM Carriage House Design.indd 1

SINCE 1961

Heating . Cooling . Electrical . Plumbing

918-252-5667 www.aircoservice.com

OK Mech #598 • Plumbing #94510 • Electrical #71875

21405 Airco.indd 1

7/15/15 9:33 AM

Fall Special

$59.00

After Oklahoma Natural Gas Rebate Furnace tune up & safety check Each additional unit $44.50 May not combine with other offers

9/14/15 2:23 PM

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

99


PREVIOUS: A LARGE SUB-ZERO REFRIGERATOR IS SEPARATED INTO TWO SECTIONS: ONE FOR A LARGE SELECTION OF DRINKS, AND THE OTHER TO SERVE AS THE FAMILY’S EVERYDAY FOOD STORAGE SPACE. ABOVE: THE EAT-IN CHEF’S TABLE PROVIDES A CASUAL SPACE FOR THIS LARGE FAMILY TO EAT AT TOGETHER. THE MODERN CHAIRS WERE PURCHASED FROM TULSA’S SR HUGHES. LEFT: THE LARGE ISLAND WAS CRAFTED BY SULLIVAN’S CUSTOM CABINETRY AND STAINED WITH A CUSTOM COLOR CREATED SPECIALLY FOR THIS PROJECT.

TREND ALERT STATION AGENTS

THIS KITCHEN REMODEL FEATURES A BEVERAGE STATION, AN AREA THAT THE FAMILY CAN GATHER THAT KEEPS THEM OUT OF THE WAY OF THE COOK’S TRIANGLE. STATIONS ARE INCREASING IN POPULARITY, AS THEY ARE AN AVENUE FOR HOME COOKS AND THOSE WHO LOVE TO ENTERTAIN TO MAINTAIN ORDER IN THE KITCHEN, THE MOST POPULAR ROOM IN THE HOUSE.

100

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015


BUILDING HUSBANDS A WAY OUT OF THE DOGHOUSE S ICNEC 1E9 14994 9 SIN

Whether it ’s a NEW kitchen countertop, bathroom shower, or a complete kitchen or bathroom REMODEL, Hoffman Kitchen & Bath can take it from concept to completion. It all begins with a FREE In-Home Consultation. FREE INNHOME CONSULTATION

PLAN & DESIGN

BUILD OR REMODEL

ENJOY

hoffmankb.com

Thank you for making us Oklahoma’s Best of the Best. Edmond Showroom

Norman Showroom

2800 South Kelly Avenue

1204 North Interstate Drive

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm; Sat 9am-4pm

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm; Sat 9am-4pm

(888) 590-9072 (Appointments Welcome)

(888) 590-9072 (Appointments Welcome)


RECORDING

PROGRESS

Oklahoma’s recording studios provide a solid foundation for the state’s music scene. By Asher Gelzer-Govatos

In Muscle Shoals, a recent documentary about the tiny Alabama town that houses two of the most important recording studios in the world, the filmmakers speculate that sound, like wine, has terroir – local flavor imparted by the land. As strange as that may sound, living in Oklahoma makes the idea feel more likely; after all, one of the Sooner state’s signature musical styles, red dirt, literally takes its name from the soil. A major foundation of Oklahoma’s growing music culture that goes easily unnoticed are the recording studios that musical acts use to give permanence to their creations. Yet in recent years, these studios have grown in number and prominence, gaining a national reputation for quality. In all styles, from country to rap, Oklahoma recording studios help ensure that local music stays local, not just in its creation but in its production.

Different Strokes

A quick tour of the state’s recording studios reveals a large diversity of focus and method. Most belong to a single owner who also runs much of the operation, but some find their place within a larger context. Some studios focus on singer-songwriters, some on full bands, and others on everything in between. Many record the big, established names of the Oklahoma music scene, but some focus on developing new talent. What ties these very different studios together is their unflagging commitment to making Oklahoma music great. When most people hear the words “Oklahoma music,” the image they likely conjure involves guitars and fiddles and country twang. Wes Sharon, owner and operator of 115 Recording in Norman, specializes in just this sort of music. 115 has served as the recording location of a number of albums for regional country and Americana acts. The studio pushes beyond the typical boundaries of folk and country music, however, and also records singer-songwriters and bands with more of a rock edge. Recently, 115 worked on a number exciting projects, including with rising stars of the folk world John Fullbright and The Turnpike Troubadours. Fullbright’s 2013 album From the Ground Up, which was nominated for Americana album of the year by both the Grammys and the Americana Music Association, was fully produced, mixed and recorded at 115. The same goes for The Turnpike Troubadours’ album Goodbye Normal Street, which was Lone Star Music’s bestselling record of 2013. If country is Oklahoma’s tried and true musical genre, the title of exciting new kid on the block goes to hip-hop, which has seen something of a Renaissance in recent years. Tulsa, especially, houses a vibrant hip-hop scene, with local acts performing socially conscious, infectious songs at a number of hot venues in town. The newcomers at MuGen Music are seeking to propel this culture to undiscovered heights. A management 102

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

company as well as a recording studio, MuGen works with local artists from beginning to end to bring about new hip-hop albums. Other studios focus less on genre and more on shared artistic vision. Breathing Rhythm Studio in Norman records work from bands of all stripes. Instead of narrowing in on a particular sound, the studio instead searches for artists ready to open themselves up to the spontaneity of the recording process. As owner/operator Steve Boaz puts it, he looks for acts that possess “a drive to capture a moment that is imperfect, uncorrected and real.” This openness has led to a number of opportunities for Breathing Rhythm. Fayetteville, Ark.-based band Smokey and the Mirror has made the trek to Norman to record at the studio, which has also produced work by Kyle Reid and the Low Swinging Chariots that has garnered critical buzz. Upcoming work includes an album with the band Young Readers. Studio Two, in the heart of downtown Tulsa, boasts a long history of quality recording in Oklahoma. Since the mid-‘90s, owner Lane Lollar has recorded hundreds of projects for local musicians, including big acts like Steve Liddell. He has also, thanks to reputation and location, recorded work by national artists like David Archuleta, Chamillionaire and even the touring cast of the musical Grease. Because of Studio Two’s proximity to performance venues like the BOK Center, Lollar often records these artists as they pass through Tulsa. While most studios focus on capturing high-quality recordings for as many acts as possible, the studio of the Academy of Contemporary Music at the University of Central Oklahoma has different priorities. The studio simultaneously acts as a testing ground for the school’s music performance students and a laboratory for those pursuing a degree in music production. Though the studio occasionally records acts from the wider community, most of its energy gets focused toward producing the next generation of Oklahoman musicians and studio engineers.

In The Booth

So how exactly does a record get made? How does an act move from the initial lightning strike of inspiration to an album worth sharing with fans? As it turns out, there’s no one way an album gets recorded. Depending on genre, temperament and the desired sound, the process can take a number of different shapes. Every studio starts in the same place, however – finding acts worth recording. Though they get paid regardless of a band’s quality, the studios have an interest in working with acts that will reflect well upon them. Like so many areas of the entertainment industry, talent discovery at a local level is driven largely by connections. Often, musicians the studio operators have worked with will bring new talent to their attention. This ensures


a level of quality, reliability and seriousness. Some studios even screen potential acts thoroughly. MuGen Music, for example, makes all potential clients undergo a rigorous interview process and a sample recording session before agreeing to a contract. Studio Two also proceeds with caution, given how many people approach them without understanding the full scope – or cost – of a recording session. Once a studio agrees to record and produce an album, the work has just begun. With actual recording time at a premium, lots of work goes into the front end of making songs work. Boaz says he spends a long time in preproduction simply discussing each song with a band. Preproduction can also vary depending on the type of act. With a full band that plays together regularly, the songs often come with arrangements in place beforehand, thus cutting down on the preproduction process. With singer-songwriters, however, the work can be more rigorous. Often these acts will come to the studio with only a simple melody line worked out and lyrics laid on top. It is the job of the studio operator to take this rough product and shape it into something more polished. A common way to do this is to record a demo, a stripped down version of a song that will later be transformed into something more fleshed out. Some studios prefer to skip this step and work from a more developed starting place. Sharon says that, rather than demos, he likes to work from templates. He will have a singer play along on the instrument of his or her choice (usually guitar or piano), then pair that with a beat from a drum machine. From that template, he will go on to create lush orchestrations that fill out the song. The recording process itself also varies widely depending on the needs of the group. Established bands come fully equipped and ready to record, with little need for added players. Many groups, though, require the backing of studio musicians. Here again, connections play a key part in the process. Sharon often recycles players on multiple projects – for instance, using members of The Turnpike Troubadours on many albums by other groups. A musician himself, Sharon will even occasionally fill in, playing bass or other instruments from the booth. It’s also possible, thanks to technology, to record albums in separate chunks, with each instrument doing its own thing, coming together in the mix. Many studios, though, prefer the more organic feeling that arises from having all the musicians in the same room, at the same time; this togetherness lends what Boaz calls “a certain vibe” to the proceedings. Lollar likes to record “on floor,” with the entire band’s musicians playing together in a way that feels most natural to them. However the players are arranged, it can take a surpris-

BREATHING RHYTHM STUDIO OWNER STEVE BOAZ WORKS WITH ARTISTS WHO SPAN SEVERAL GENRES, IN SEARCH OF CREATING MOMENTS THAT ARE “IMPERFECT, UNCORRECTED AND REAL,” HE SAYS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

103


ingly long amount of time to record a three- to five-minute song. Though Sharon has seen entire jazz albums recorded in a day, he tends to allot one to three days per song. Another variable in the recording process is the role – and sometimes lack thereof – technology plays. Though everyone uses computers these days, especially in the mixing process, the part the machines play during recording can vary widely. Many studios that specialize in country or folk music use computers sparingly, preferring the old fashioned ways of recording. Sharon uses computers when necessary, but keeps his studio well stocked with all the classic equipment, which he feels gives him more control over the recording. Likewise, Boaz, though well versed in digital recording, loves the feel of albums recorded onto analog tape. Given all the new technology, the way we experience music has radically changed over the past 10 years, from the recording process down to the listening experience. Not all this impact

has been positive. Though the lowering of cost afforded by home recording has allowed for a democratization of the process, it has also had an adverse effect on recording quality. As Lollar points out, this degradation has continued, in part, because new formats like MP3s sacrifice quality and balance for reduced file size, and listening devices like earbuds inherently lower sound quality. Because people get trained to listen in this way, their understanding of the full possible range of sound has diminished, which in turn lets producers get away with lower standards. Technology is not going away, so the trick becomes teaching recording engineers to use it wisely. At ACM, students learn both the classic techniques involved in recording and the cutting edge process enabled by computer programs. ACM features training in both Avid and Ableton, two of the most common software programs for recording music. It employs one of the only Ableton certified engineers in the country, which allows them to teach their students the proper techniques for getting the most out of the technology. In addition, ACM requires that all students at the school take basic classes covering the recording process – not just those training to be sound engineers, but also those specializing in music performance and music business. This means that, in theory, people in all areas of the music business get trained to be sensitive to the nuances of recording. Concerns over technology play a lesser role in hip-hop recording, where nearly everything is done via computer. Given the radically 115 RECORDINGS OWNER WES SHARON, HIMSELF A MUSICIAN, HAS WORKED ON GRAMMY NOMINATED ALBUMS FOR OKLAHOMABASED ARTISTS. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

different nature of hip-hop, this reliance on digital technology makes sense. Very rarely do hip-hop songs – especially those recorded on a local level – contain actual instruments played by musicians. Instead, the tracks consist of a rapper laying lyrics on top of a beat constructed out of computer-generated rhythms and preexisting songs. Producers gain an extra level of importance in this process, since they take responsibility for bringing everything together on the musical end. Since many hip-hop songs contain snippets of other music, a legal obstacle also arises: the need to clear copyright. Though smaller operations sometimes sample without legal permission, professional outfits like MuGen must pay for the rights to various songs used in the recording process. Once the music gets recorded, studios get to work on mixing and finishing the sound. If the song must be assembled from various recordings, the mixing process can become quite complex, with overdubs being used to bring everything together. Regardless of how the song gets assembled, post-production involves evening out and polishing the sound. Techniques such as reverberation (adding extra resonance) and compression (evening out the volume balance of the various instruments) smooth out the rough patches and create sonic harmony. The hope is that, with the right skill, a producer can elicit what Boaz calls “that goosebumpy feeling” from any recording, no matter how rough the initial sound.

Side Projects

Even with the Oklahoma music scene blossoming as it is, and with national acts more and more considering Oklahoma recording studios as viable options, it can be tough to foot the large expense of all that recording equipment through album cutting alone. Many Oklahoma studios engage in the common practice of lending out their services to companies looking to record things other than music. The alternate uses for recording studios come in a variety of flavors, though much of it involves working for television. 115 Recordings collaborates frequently with Fox Sports and ESPN on sporting events; Studio Two has recorded for the Golf Channel, ESPN and A&E; and Breathing Rhythm has worked in the past with the HGTV channel. Voiceover for video games can also provide a revenue stream, as witnessed by 115’s large body of work with 2k Sports on its WWE line of games. Sometimes these extracurricular activities arise not from financial need but from individual passion. As a young studio, MuGen Music has yet to record any spots for television or video games, but it parlayed its passion for culture into a different sort of project: sponsoring a podcast. Paquette notes that this podcast airs uncensored on SoundCloud and reflects the studio’s bold approach. Covering music, film,


art and anything else that strikes their fancy, the podcast tackles “hot topics with a no holds barred attitude,” Paquette says.

Oklahoma Proud

RYAN PAQUETTE (RIGHT), OWNER OF MUGEN MUSIC, HOPES TO PROMOTE THE STATE’S THRIVING HIP-HOP SCENE ON A NATIONAL LEVEL. PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

Whatever side projects these studios pursue, the focus always swivels back to music in the end, and with good reason, since more and more, Oklahoma offers a treasure trove of undiscovered talent waiting to be shared with the world. Oklahoma recording studios play a vital role in bringing this music to the public ear, and not only through the actual process of recording. In fact, these studios act as some of the primary champions of new and exciting musicians. MuGen Music, for example, works to break down barriers to the world of hip-hop and bring new audiences in contact with its vital message. Paquette and company hope to chip away at the still pervasive stereotype of rap as a violent style of music, instead showing it as a force for positive social change. MuGen also aims to make a mark on the national hip-hop scene by proving that Oklahoma acts can hold their own against the best in the business. The Oklahoma hip-hop scene has long been saturated with talent, according to Paquette, but what has been missing is a professional structure in place to bring that music to the public. By combining recording with management and promotion, MuGen seeks to unleash a new wave of Oklahoma hip-hop on the world. Boaz notes that he discovers most of his new talent through a network of friends and connections in the existing music business. As more Oklahoma acts gain exposure, Breathing Rhythm and other studios can expect their businesses to keep booming. This prospect excites Boaz, who finds opportunity for growth in the ever-expanding pool of talent. “The music scene in Oklahoma keeps me constantly on my toes and challenges me to be better all the time,” he says. “There’s something really special about the musicians and how we grow them here.” For Sharon, part of Oklahoma’s uniqueness consists in the nature of the recording studios themselves. According to him, an even higher number of studios than usual in Oklahoma are run by owner/operators such as himself. Though many studio operators receive official training at places like ACM, a large percentage, like Sharon, have taught themselves through years of hands-on experience. This leads to an individualized workflow that opens up chances for experimentation not found in more corporate settings. In some ways, the boom in Oklahoma’s live music scene has not transferred over to the recording studios. Lollar notes that, as opportunities have increased for musicians to

play full time for a living, there has been a corresponding jump in musicians without a home band. Instead of acts practicing and playing exclusively as a single band, it is common in Oklahoma for a musician to float from live performance to live performance as needed. This lets musicians grab multiple gigs a week and make more money, but it also means that bands have less time to cohere, which can effect their willingness to record albums. Still, as the music business evolves in Oklahoma, there are plenty of reasons to hope that it will benefit everyone involved, including recording studios. Despite only being a few years old, ACM has already graduated several sound engineers who have set up independent studios in Oklahoma. Of course, the owner/operator model also means that the people running Oklahoma’s studios have a financial investment that hits close to home. Their livelihood depends on producing distinct work, and this means that personality is an asset. It also means that recording studios want not just individual success, but the increased flourishing of Oklahoma music as a whole. This leads to a certain collegiality among the studios. Sharon, one of the old hands of the business by now, has decades of shared experience alongside other studios in the area, like Bell Labs Recording. Collaboration, more than competition, insures a high standard of quality for Oklahoma’s studios. Then, of course, there’s the tricky matter of terroir. Is there just something special about

Oklahoma that permeates its music scene, from the garages where bands rehearse to the studios where they record? Sharon, for one, seems to think so. In particular, he pinpoints a long tradition of Midwest uniqueness and local pride, an unwillingness to be defined by trends in New York or Los Angeles. “Our filter is different. You’re not going to get that kind of filter on the East Coast or the West Coast,” he says. Since the 1980s, Sharon contends, there has been a do-it-yourself aesthetic to many local acts that eschew influence even from nearby states like Texas. As an example, Sharon points to Oklahoma’s most famous home-grown band. “The Flaming Lips could come from no place else, other than Oklahoma,” he says. In many ways, Oklahoma music still struggles to emerge from the shadow of its towering acts, from The Flaming Lips back through Leon Russell to Bob Wills and Woody Guthrie. Having such monumental musicians as a part of Oklahoma history is inspiring, but it also creates a weight of expectation when so few groups achieve the same success. More and more, whether in the world of Americana or hip-hop or anything in between, Oklahoma musical acts seem intent on creating a thriving local culture of performance and recording. As the musicians themselves engage in this endeavor, Oklahoma’s recording studios are right alongside them, helping to press the record of the state’s musical ingenuity onto the public’s memory. OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

105


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS ROOFER

FINANCIAL ADVISOR What are traps that investors should avoid?

What is Commercial Roof Maintenance? Commercial roof maintenance can mean a wide variety of things. The number one thing is to be proactive rather than reactive. Often times, owners will react to a leak or roof problem once it's too late, when a RICKY HANKS simple yearly inspection can make a huge difference. During inspection all rooftop penetrations, seams and curbing will be thoroughly checked and problems addressed as needed. Other issues that can arise are prolonged standing water, also known as “pooling," or backed-up drainage systems. Updating sealants and replacing weathered flashings can be offered as solutions. A full maintenance package, such as a complete roof restoration, can also gain additional years before considering a roof replacement. All commercial roofs are different and have different needs. This is why it is important to have a professional inspect and maintain the roof in order to prolong the life of the roof.

Ricky Hanks T-Town Roofing 5770 E Skelly Drive Tulsa, OK 74135 ricky@t-townroofing.com 918.445.4400

INSURANCE AGENT What is usage-based auto insurance? Insurance companies are always looking for innovative ways to help their customers save money on auto insurance, especially for safe drivers. Usage-based insurance, or UBI, looks at driving behaviors RUSS IDEN related to when, where and how someone operates their vehicle. These behaviors are monitored with a device installed under the dash of a car or by an application connected to a smartphone. Some people may see this as “big brother,” but it’s becoming more accepted, especially if people can save money. With this device installed, additional features may be offered beyond just saving money on auto insurance. Some companies may also offer driver feedback around braking, acceleration, cornering and fuel efficiency. This information will not only help you operate your vehicle more safely, it might help to prolong the life of your vehicle and reduce breakdowns. If you have questions about usage-based insurance, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.392.4214 800.222.2582, x4214 russ.iden@aaaok.org 106

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

Investing in the stock market has its ups and downs, and it’s not just because the stock market is unpredictable. It’s easy for individual investors to get tripped up by the psychology of investing. Investors need to be aware of these four common behaviors and plan accordingly: DAVID KARIMIAN, CRPC®

• Eternal optimism. When money is involved, it’s tough to keep feelings in check. It’s completely normal – even expected – to

believe your stock will go up in value even if it’s heading in the other direction. • Herd instincts. Individual investors tend to follow the crowd, buying popular stocks (perhaps influenced by a mention in the news or a friend’s recommendation) and selling when they see others cutting loose. • Fear of failure. No one likes to lose, so investors often delay the sale of a losing stock and instead sell winners (thinking they’re smart to turn a profit). • Super ego. If you think you can beat the market, think again. Timing the market is a strategy that doesn’t work well over time.

The bottom line? Forget about outsmarting the market and resist the urge to do it all yourself. Instead, seek advice when it’s time to invest. Focus on making investment decisions that are aligned with your longterm goals and are backed by experience, research and insight.

David Karimian, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT There has been a lot of buzz about public relations, but I don’t know where to start or even if it is worth it. You have probably heard the saying, “Image is everything,” and it’s true. It is important to know that PR isn’t just about being in the news; it JESSICA DYER is about how you and your business are perceived by your target audience. When developing a PR strategy, take into account your current marketing and advertising efforts and goals. It is important to ensure that it is consistent with and supported by your business vision and practices. A solid PR campaign should be a well-rounded mix of media, community, internal and customer relations. When done well this can give your current marketing efforts or advertising campaign a power punch. It’s not uncommon for our clients to see ROI of 50% to 70%. An expertly crafted PR strategy will mean an increase in your bottom line, something that is definitely worth it.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539-777-6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST I have a double chin that I hate. Is there anything out there to get rid of it without having surgery? The dreaded double chin affects so many of us; thankfully, Allergan has just released a new product. Kybella is a prescription medicine used in MALISSA SPACEK adults to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe fat below the chin (submental fat), also called “double chin.” It is the only injectable FDA-approved for the treatment of the double chin. Kybella works by attacking and destroying fat cells under the chin. Once destroyed, those cells cannot store or accumulate fat. This revolutionary new product can rid you of your bothersome submental fat over the course of 2-6 treatment sessions with no downtime in between sessions. To find out more about Kybella and to schedule your complimentary consultation please call 918.872.9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY I have noticed athletes on television and people at the gym using tape on their shoulders. What is this for? Occupational and Physical Therapists have used a variety of taping techniques for many years in order to perform musculoskeletal correcTIM MINNICK, PT tion. At this time, and what is often seen on athletes, is elastic tape. I use elastic tape on my clients that would benefit from musculoskeletal corrections, such as an impingement syndrome in the shoulder and tendonitis in the elbow or wrist. The elastic tape is also beneficial for reducing swelling, accelerating blood flow and optimizing more normal movement patterns. I have seen great results with use of the elastic tapes when applied properly and the client is trained/instructed on strengthening and stretching exercises to perform regularly.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

NOVEMBER 2015

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. ATTORNEY AT LAW Who has the right of way in a funeral procession? The vehicles in the funeral procession have the right of way unless there is an intersection that is controlled by traffic signals or a police officer. The Oklahoma Statutes at 47 Sec. 11-315 require the vehicles ESTHER M. SANDERS in the procession to be conspicuously designated. If such, then no other vehicles shall be driven between the vehicles. It is a misdemeanor for a driver to violate the above law. Penalties may include fines, imprisonment or both.

HOSPICE CARE It is coming up on a year since I lost my father, but sometimes it feels like yesterday. Is that normal? Absolutely. There is no timetable for grief, and that is even truer when you have lost a parent. You are facing a year of many “firsts” without your AVA HANCOCK Dad, and that is difficult. You can often feel as if you are reliving the loss each time. This is why at Grace Hospice, we offer grief and bereavement support to families who have lost a loved one for 13 months after the person passes. We also offer support groups for people dealing with grief, and I encourage you to contact us about them. You will meet people who can truly empathize with you and that can help you cope with grief. To find out more, please call us at 918.744.7223.

“Grace Hospice: Caring for patients and families in Northeastern Oklahoma for more than 15 years”

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free

DEVELOPMENTAL OPTOMETRIST What is a “lazy eye?” A lazy eye, known as amblyopia, causes unilateral vision loss. Amblyopia affects over 10 million individuals in the U.S. alone, making it the most common form of unilateral vision loss. This disease impacts 2-4 percent of the world’s population. A MEGAN KIRKPATRICK, OD lazy eye develops when the brain is not processing a clear image from one of the eyes. Due to the brain being unable to align the clear and blurry images, it becomes easier for the brain to ignore the image from the “blurry” eye, therefore causing a lazy eye. Research shows us that amblyopia impacts a person more than just eyesight alone. Individuals with amblyopia have poor depth perception, dysfunction in eye tracking skills affecting reading fluency, visual perception and deficiencies in hand-eye coordination. The treatment of amblyopia with the proper glasses/ contact lens prescription, patching and vision-training activities is highly successful at any age. After treatment, patients are able to successfully gain improved eyesight, along with peripheral vision, depth perception and higher order visual perception skills they did not have before.

Megan Kirkpatrick, OD South Tulsa Vision Development Center 8988- D1 S Sheridan Tulsa, OK 74133 918.992.2343 www.tulsavisiondevelopment.com

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT I keep hearing about this J.Hilburn Men's Clothier company, and I want to find out more about it. What is it? Have you ever said to your wife or friend, "Man, I hate shopping," "I can't find anything I like," "It's way too expensive," or "It just doesn't fit AUTUMN POHL correctly?" Then of course, after buying it because you need it, you more than likely will need to get it tailored, which only makes your purchase that much more expensive. To be honest, guys have the raw end of the deal when it comes to clothing. In comes J.Hilburn, a company that is revolutionizing the way that men shop. We are a customized Italian clothing line that offers so much more than the exceptional product. The clients who seek us are searching for a better experience all together, and that's just what we give them. We make it convenient by coming to you at a time that works best for your schedule. We design the wardrobe from many details, from fabrics, stitching, collars, pockets, etc. The fit is made just for your body based on the personal measurements we take. Finally, once ordered and delivered, we bring the product to you and ensure the fit and satisfaction.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

Food. Need we say more?

Promote your restaurant in this issue, 918.744.6205 advertising@okmag.com.

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

107

OKLAHOMA


Petal Pushers Art & flowers come together in the finest of all floral service.

Celebrating our

52nd Year

Reserve an evening of “World Class” Caesar Salad with Steak, Lobster, Chicken or Fish. Friday & Saturday night featuring Mark Bryan.

3109 South Yale • 918.743.1800 celebritytulsa.com

12542 Celebrity Restaurant.indd 1

1660 E. 71st, Suite H, Tulsa, OK 74136

918.494.0999

Oklahoma Magazine is available by 4/4/13 subscription for only $18 for 12 issues.

6/23/15 12950 4:57 PM Petal Pushers.indd 1

3:07 PM

M AY gus t 201 5

2015

155 PHYSICIANS IN 57 SPECIALTIES

20

NE E T O SLIC JUSORE M

E love RFOIRDTHNEDOklahoma

OPEN 6 a.m. - 2 p.m. DAILY

1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd. • Claremore, OK 74017 918-341-7333 • www.hammetthouse.com 10780 Hammett House Restaurant.indd 1

108

21381 Hideaway.indd 1

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

3310 E. 32nd, Tulsa, Oklahoma Across from Walmart Neighborhood Market

PhillsDiner.indd 1 7/10/14 11798 9:36 AM

8/26/15 20545 9:36 AM Tropical Lanna.indd 1

Cov

er.i

ndd

7

FT

A

O

R NE

+SO d

5.ind

r051

GCR SON

June cover.indd 3

BRA

boys cow age ma’s herit laho rich Ok a have

15

Tulsa OnTwo Wheels

20

perf

T

the

kl in O

US

Find

pies ect

AU G

Reasons to

a

ahom

918-742-4563

JUNE 2015

Au

15

20

June 2015

May

TOP DOCTORS

80 THINGS TO SEE AND DO

eat Gr N’S AREGIONAL

OM D A WO R L W DESTINATIONS

TRAVEL g

angin s chation ale ers e fem conv the

Fiv

/15

4/14

2:52

PM

+SUMMER WEDDING GUIDE 5/14/15 2:56 PM

2

Cove

7/2

2/1

5

3:1

1 PM

SUBSCRIBE AT

okmag.com/print-subscription

5/2/14 12:41 Subscription_1-16v.indd PM 1

8/16/15 1:37 PM

5/18/15 11:56 AM


Taste

FOOD, DRINK AND OTHER PLEASURES

THE OKTOBERFEST DELIGHT: TWO SAUSAGES SERVED WITH POTATO SALAD AND A CRISPY POTATO PANCAKE. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

Holy Schnitzel

Margaret’s German Restaurant was created from a love of cooking, realized.

M

argaret Rzepczynski’s mother died when Rzepczynski was only 4 years old, and her father lovingly raised her and taught her how to cook a wide variety of dishes. She was young and flighty in those days and paid little attention. “I preferred disco,” she recalls. “In Warsaw, those were the days of disco.” But the giddy Warsaw nights of the ‘70s were soon replaced with political repression and martial law. In 1982, Rzepczynski and her husband, a tall and handsome athlete who once tried out for Poland’s Olympic team, fled Poland and ended up in an Austria refugee camp. And there they were stuck, until a Catholic priest, who somehow heard of their plight, arranged for them to come to Tulsa. They had never heard of Tulsa, they spoke fewer than 10 words of English between

them, but they came. Rzepczynski had never loved cooking, but she realized that it was the only job where language proficiency was irrelevant. She found her way to the Westin Hotel, where the kitchen was the domain of a master chef named Jacques Lissonnet. “I don’t speak English good, but I work very hard,” she told him. “Tomorrow 8 a.m.” he replied. For five years she worked with, and learned from, Lissonnet. “We bonded because neither of us spoke English,” Rzepczynski recalls. Now at about this time, a man named Pierre VerHulst and his wife, Gerti, opened a German restaurant named Pierre’s Deli. The couple divorced and sold the restaurant to another family, the Arsalas. They, too, split up and offered the restaurant to Rzepczynski. “People told me it was bad luck, divorces

come in threes,” she says, “but it’s almost 40 years later, and Andrew and I are still happily married.” The food served at Margaret’s is very filling, and so good it requires a major effort of will to stop eating. Soft, puffy pretzels appear at the table, followed by crisp, hot potato pancakes with applesauce. Then comes soup, or a bowl of kapusniak, and then heavy platters appear piled high with schnitzel or sauerbraten, a marinated beef delicacy that takes many days to make. There’s also kassler rippchen, smoked pork with a rich, hammy flavor; and leberkaese, similar to bologna sausage. Along with the entrees come delicious side dishes. Crisp, tangy red cabbage; a rich, hot potato salad that is one of Pierre’s original recipes; earthy, mellow sauerkraut and those difficult to make but delicious Austrian gnocchi called spaetzle. And if somehow you’ve saved room OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

109


Taste

for dessert, there are rich chocolate cakes available, but few manage to get that far. “One of the secrets of our success,” says Rzepczynski, “is consistency. If you order something, you know it will be made the same as always. I’ve been to restaurants where they’ve had five chefs in five months, and you never know what you’re going to get. But here we’ve had the same chef for 13 years, and many of the waitresses have been here longer than five. Of course, in the beginning, I was the chef and the waitress and the cleaner-up, but I was living my life in the same small room and couldn’t continue that.” With a tradition like this, regulars are inevitable. “I know about half my customers. I see a pregnant woman with her husband, and then years later the same couple with a child, and then years after that a full-grown man comes in and says, ‘My parents used to take me here as a child.’” Asked about gemutlichkeit, the German ideal of a place so welcoming that when you enter you feel as if you’ve come home and found your family, Rzepczynski cries, “Yes! That’s it exactly!”

MARGARET RZEPCZYNSKI OUTSIDE HER EPONYMOUS RESTAURANT.

A VARIETY OF SAUSAGES AT FASSLER HALL. PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

FASSLER HALL

BRIAN SCHWARTZ

BRATWURST AND SCHNITZEL PLATE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

With locations in Tulsa and Oklahoma City, Fassler Hall is spreading its love and craftsmanship for German-inspired flavors across Oklahoma, and people can taste it in each bite. Perfecting its menu selections, including its Bratwurst, Cheddarwurst, Schnitzel Sandwich, Pretzels and Potato Pancakes, Fassler Hall also indulges with its German and European draft and bottled beer that complement its authentic cuisine: eight drafts and more than 15 bottles. For those not in the mood for German goodness, Fassler Hall presents other appealing specialties, including a Chicago Dog, Chili Cheese Dog, Falafel Dog and Kraut Burger, among others. On Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., enjoy brunch at Fassler Hall with a selection of breakfast tacos, biscuits and waffles. Monday through Friday, Happy Hour boasts mini brats and hotdogs wrapped in bacon and smothered with chili for $6. 304 S. Elgin Ave., Tulsa and 421 NW 10th St., Oklahoma City. www.fasslerhall. com – Brittany Anicetti

INGRID’S KITCHEN

With the European atmosphere and décor, it’s hard not to feel like a local when entering Ingrid’s Kitchen. With its wide deli selection, extensive list of German cuisine and incredible desserts, Ingrid’s is perfect for trying to get in touch with your German side this October. Along with its traditional deli menu, Ingrid’s specialty German deli menu includes a Schinkenwurst, a German bologna and ham sandwich, and Gelbworst, a veal loaf sandwich. All of Ingrid’s German sandwiches are served on specialty breads with German mustard and mayonnaise and cheese. Ingrid’s also has a wide variety of German specialties, such as bratwurst and schnitzel. The restaurant also has a seemingly endless menu of homemade desserts, which is sure to make anyone’s day better. From standards like brownies to German treats like strudels, Ingrid’s Kitchen has all the necessary components to satisfy a sweet tooth. 3701 N. Youngs Blvd., Oklahoma City. www.ingridskitchen.com – Janelle Archer 110

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

THE BRATZA IS BACK

Hideaway Pizza’s Oktoberfest-inspired pie returns, featuring a garlic glaze with Bavarian mustard, mozzarella, sauerkraut, bratwurst, red onion, cheddar and jalapenos. www.hideawaypizza.com – B.A.


HUNGRY FESTIVALGOERS LINE UP AT THE FOOD TENTS AVAILABLE AT OKTOBERFEST. PHOTO COURTESY LINDE OKTOBERFEST.

FOOD EVENT

Prost To Oktoberfest

S

Underneath gleaming white tents, festivalgoers celebrate with German food, music, dance and beer-filled steins.

ometime in early October, a long line of trucks and a small army of burly workers will slowly drive out of a big warehouse in Kansas and over the Oklahoma state line. The end destination: Tulsa’s River West Festival Park. Using the special magic known only to circus crews and carnival roustabouts, the crews will unload several hundred tons of tangled fabric, rope and poles bigger than a ship’s mast, and slowly, the shimmering white tents of Linde Oktoberfest will rise for its 37th year. The largest is 200 feet long and 100 wide, 20,000 square feet total. Meanwhile, in the same park, another workmen’s battalion will put the finishing touches on yearlong renovations, featuring upgrades of the electric and plumbing infrastructure that make the festival run smoothly, as well as decorative touches like the large maypole erected at the park’s entrance. In Germany, maypoles bedecked with ribbons are very much a part of Oktoberfest. The organizers try their best to make Tulsa’s Oktoberfest as authentic as possible. The festival’s production designer visited Munich’s Oktoberfest a few weeks ago in order to garner last-minute decoration tips. Oktoberfest has always been about fun. It began in 1810 when public festivals were held in Munich to celebrate the marriage of King Ludwig I (grandfather of the king who built the castle featured in the Disney logo). The people had so much fun that the party

was held again the next year and soon became an annual event. It continues because festivalgoers have so much fun. The same goes for the Tulsa tradition. What started as a small event in 1979, hosted by the German-American Club, has morphed into a huge party. How huge? There’s never been an accurate count, but it’s estimated that at least 60,000 festivalgoers attend each year and eat more than 20,000 bratwurst. “But we make sure there’s a lot of variety, not just bratwurst,” says Tonja Carrigg, an official at River Parks Authority who has been involved with festival preparation for more years than she can count. “We want as much German food as possible,” she says. And so there is schnitzel and strudel and pretzels. One can find potato pancakes, Ludger’s cheesecake and even a Euroburger; that’s the name for sausages served on a hamburger bun. “And we’re always looking for something new,” says Carrigg. “What do you think of red cabbage?” Festivalgoers early in the day have a choice of food with no lines, can wander from tent to tent unimpeded by crowds and might see some of the many games and contests held in the early afternoon. There’s a beer barrel race, a dachshund dog race and a stein hoist. There are children’s pageants and polka lessons. There are also at least 50 varieties of beer that are as fresh as if they were

brewed next door. Some are specially made in Germany for Tulsa’s Oktoberfest. “We order it direct from Germany,” Carrigg explains. “It is brewed fresh just for us, and it goes straight to us.” Some of the best beer flows in the smaller tents, each of which has a stage, where a mix of German-themed acts and local Tulsa bands perform. People pack the benches next to long picnic tables to listen. As the sun sets, more crowds and more smiles fill the park. Around 8:30 p.m., swarms wander to the big tent, the Lufthansa Bier Garten. Walking through the night past the lit-up wheels of the amusement park, past all the food and crafts vendors, the enormous tent glows softly. Through the opening in the tent, the space, wall-to-wall with people, is energized with laughter, singing and shouting and dancing on tables. “Dancing on tables,” Carrigg says with a fleeting smile, “that’s original to Tulsa. We have very strong picnic tables, and we get 100 new ones every year to make sure they stay strong.” And when asked what separates Tulsa’s festival from Germany’s, all she can think of is those lively feet against the tabletops. “But aside from that, we hope you can’t [tell the difference],” she says. “Our goal is to make it as much like Munich as possible. With this year’s new decorations, it’s going to be beautiful, and you won’t feel like you’re in Tulsa anymore.” BRIAN SCHWARTZ OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

111


3:00

WEEKDAYS ON

4:00


Entertainment

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Old Soul, New Audience At 73 years old, Aretha Franklin hasn’t slowed down, and her youthful energy will electrify Choctaw Casino, Durant.

PHOTO COURTESY CHOCTAW CASINOS.

B

lack-and-white photographs remember the elegant, radiant and genuine soul of Aretha Franklin upon her arrival in the music industry in the late ‘50s and her rise to stardom, with her full voice projecting her through the decades. Born in 1942, the year of Bing Crosby’s “White Christmas,” Earl Hines’ “Stormy Monday Blues” and the opening of Capitol Records, Franklin’s younger days were spent singing gospel at her father’s church, and her musical curiosity would allow her to learn the piano by ear alone. Franklin’s natural talent continuing to shine between every inflection, run and rasp, her voice, both powerful and delicate, notes she effortlessly directs into place, dances through the spaces she commands. Her emotion and attitude is felt and reciprocated through her energy and poise, and it didn’t take long for the world to take notice. Arriving in the international spotlight in 1967 under Atlantic Records, Franklin found

No.1 status on the R&B Chart with “I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You)” and her version of Otis Redding’s “Respect.” Other Top 10 singles that year included “Baby I Love You” and “(You Make Me Feel Like A) Natural Woman.” Franklin’s stunning sound continued into the following year with her top-selling albums Lady Soul and Aretha Now, including hits “Chains of Fools,” “Ain’t No Way,” “Think” and “I Say A Little Prayer.” The proof of her success became further tangible in 1967 when Franklin accepted her first two Grammys, for Best Rhythm and Blues Recording and Best Female R&B Vocal Performance for “Respect.” Winning Grammy Awards among other honors would last throughout her career. Franklin’s success had grown to match her voice, and the next five decades continued to praise her brilliant soul. Highlights of the last two decades include Franklin becoming the first woman to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of

Fame, in 1987; her performance of “Nessun Dorma” at the 1998 Grammy Awards; performing at Super Bowl XL in her hometown of Detroit in 2006; performing “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” at President Barack Obama’s 2009 inaugural ceremony; forming her own label, Aretha’s Records; and her 2014 cover of Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep,” which solidified her as the first woman to have 100 songs on Billboard’s Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. Today, at 73 years old, her soul has the grit that comes with a lifetime of hard work and experience. The energy she exudes when she’s in her element, performing on stage, continues to be potent and mesmerizing. On Saturday, Oct. 17, Franklin will arrive onstage at Oklahoma’s Choctaw Casino, Durant. Performing The Hits and the Great Diva Classics, the Queen of Soul will light up the Choctaw Grand Theater. Tickets start at $45. For tickets or more information, visit www. choctawcasinos.com. BRITTANY ANICETTI OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

113


PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

PHOTO COURTESY DCF CONCERTS.

Entertainment

Calendar

IN CONCERT

Counting Crows In September 2014, Counting Crows released its seventh studio album, Somewhere Under Wonderland, and, after returning from a world tour that started last summer, playing songs from the album before it had even been released, the group began another domestic circuit in July. On Sunday, Oct. 11, that tour will come to a close as the band makes Oklahoma City’s Zoo Amphitheatre its last hurrah. Counting Crows’ first all-original studio album since 2008, Somewhere Under Wonderland, the group’s sixth Top 10 album, showcases frontman Adam Duritz’s rasp and grit, with an aged appreciation. And with that lapse in creative mastery between the two albums arrived a new lyrical direction. Set lists from previous stops on the group’s tour have included “Palisades Park,” “Scarecrow” and “God of Ocean Tides” off its latest album, as well as past favorites, including “Round Here,” “A Long December,” “Come Down,” “Omaha,” “Colorblind,” “Start Again” and “Mr. Jones.” For more information, visit www.zooamp.com.

PERFORMANCES Texas Tenors Oct. 1 The 2015-16 Performing Arts Series at Oklahoma City Community College kicks off with the harmonizing trio. www.occc.edu/pas Dracula Oct. 1-3 Dracula, Jonathan Harker, Lucy, Van Helsing, Dr. Seward, Mina and Renfield arrive on a Tulsa stage. www.tulsapac.com Spitfire Grill Oct. 1-4 Mitchell Hall Theatre at the University of Central Oklahoma. www.uco.edu Sue Monk Kidd: The Writing of Life Oct. 2 Part of the 2015-16 Tulsa Town Hall speakers series, Sue Monk Kidd, author of The Secret Life of Bees, will give a luncheon presentation. www.tulsapac. com Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra With Wynton Marsalis Oct. 2 Wynton Marsalis has led his 15-musician orchestra throughout the world and now arrives in Tulsa. www.tulsapac.com The BFG (Big Friendly Giant) Oct. 2 A young, orphan “human bean” discovers not all giants are bad. www.tulsapac.com Belshazzar’s Feast Oct. 2 Attendees can enjoy a feast of food trucks prior to experiencing the performance of William Walton’s composition that tells the story of the Fall of Babylon, at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.canterburyokc.com Quartetto Di Cremona Oct. 4 The Mediterranean style of these four skilled Italian string players mesmerize. www.

114

tulsapac.com Chicago Tap Oct. 5 Chicago Tap Theatre, a collision of footwork, live music and storytelling, arrives at UCO’s Mitchell Hall Theatre. www.uco.edu Ragtime Piano: Jeff Barnhart and Brian Holland Oct. 6 Two accomplished pianists perform ragtime tunes. www. tulsapac.com Tax Dermia Oct. 6, 7 Mexico City performance artists entertain at Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts.org Brown Bag It: Wika & Mayfield Oct.

Giselle

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

7 Bring your lunch, and enjoy a special presentation by Norman Wika and Farren Mayfield on trombone and piano. www. tulsapac.com Bernice Bobs Her Hair Oct. 7-25 Witness Bernice’s attempt to fit in, in the big city in this musical. www.lyrictheatreokc.com Burn This Oct. 8-10 After her friend and roommate dies, Anna, a dancer and choreographer, must deal with the fallout. www.tulsapac.com The Hour Glass Project Oct. 8-18 Kendall Hall, The University of Tulsa. www.utulsa.

edu/arts-at-tu/ Time For Three Oct. 10 This string trio will entertain with its mix of bluegrass, jazz and folk. www.tulsapac.com UCO Chamber Orchestra Concert Oct. 9 Mitchell Hall Theatre at the University of Central Oklahoma. www.uco.edu Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus Live! Oct. 13-15 This one-man show will have couples laughing all night. www.tulsapac.com Tom Segura Oct. 16 See the comedian who’s brought laughs to Conan, Happy Endings, The Late Late Show, Comedy Central, Mash Up and more. www.acm. uco.edu You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown Oct. 16-25 Sooner Theatre. www.soonertheatre. org Tall Tales, Magic and Majesty Oct. 17 Violinist August Hadelich will perform with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic. www.okcphilharmonic.org Silence! The Musical Oct. 22-Nov. 7 Audiences over the age of 18 will enjoy this funny satire featuring Buffalo Bill and Dr. Hannibal Lector. www.okcciviccenter. com Taming of the Shrew Oct. 23-25 Tulsa Ballet will bring Shakespeare’s witty story to life. www.tulsaballet.org Giselle Oct. 23-25 Oklahoma City Ballet performs the tale of a young peasant girl with a desire for dance. www.okcciviccenter. com Waiting for Godot Oct. 23-31 American Theatre Company opens its season with Beckett’s first play. www.tulsapac.com Downtown Edmond Old Fashioned Fall

Festival Oct. 24 The afternoon fun will take place at Festival Marketplace. www. downtownedmondok.com Janeane Garofalo Oct. 25 See the actress, comedian and activist at the ACM@UCO Performance Lab. www.acm. uco.edu New Musical Workshop with Kyle Dugan Oct. 25-Nov. 1 Lorton Performance Center, The University of Tulsa. www. utulsa.edu/arts-at-tu/ Doc Severinsen and the Oklahoma City Jazz Orchestra Oct. 26 A The Tonight Show favorite will perform at OCCC with the Oklahoma City Jazz Orchestra. www. occc.edu/pas TU Symphony Orchestra Oct. 26 Lorton Performance Center, The University of Tulsa. www.utulsa.edu/arts-at-tu/ Jazz Youth Concert Oct. 28 The eighth annual concert will take place at the Lorton Performance Center at The University of Tulsa. www.utulsa.edu/arts-at-tu/ TU Jazz Concert Oct. 29 Lorton Performance Center, The University of Tulsa. www.utulsa.edu/arts-at-tu/ echoBoom Oct. 29 See the Oklahoma premiere of the school-shooting drama, at UCO’s Mitchell Hall Theatre. www.uco. edu Chris Hardwick Oct. 30 The stand-up comedian, podcaster and television personality will be at WinStar stage. www. winstarworldcasino.com Bad Jews Oct. 30-Nov.8 An important family heirloom becomes the source of tension between three cousins in this Heller Theatre Company presentation. www.tulsapac.com Halloween Symphony Spooktacular Oct. 31 Part of the Tulsa Symphony Pop Series, enjoy a special performance dedicatedtoHalloween.www.tulsasymphony. org Terry Fator Oct. 9 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa. com

IN CONCERT Drew Holcomb and The Neighbors Oct. 1 ACM@UCO. www.acm.uco.edu In Distress Fest Oct. 2, 3 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com Glass Animals Oct. 2 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Neal McCoy Oct. 2 Riverwind Casino. www.riverwind.com The Vine Brothers Oct. 2 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com The Electric Rag Band Oct. 3 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com Loretta Lynn Oct. 3 Choctaw Casino, Durant. www.choctawcasinos.com Celtic Thunder Oct. 3 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Meg Myers Oct. 4 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Father John Misty Oct. 5 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Hozier Oct. 6 The Zoo Amphitheatre. www.thezooamphitheatre.com Royal Blood Oct. 6 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Ariana Grande Oct. 7 BOK Center. www. bokcenter.com Run The Jewels Oct. 7 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Albert Hammond Jr. Oct. 7 Opolis Bar & Micro Venue. www.opolis.org Cherub Oct. 8 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Def Leppard, Foreigner & Tesla Oct. 9 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com Modest Mouse Oct. 9 Cain’s Ballroom.


SPORTS OKC Thunder www.nba.com/thunder

v. Dallas

Oct. 13

Tulsa Oilers www.tulsaoilers.com

v. Wichita Oct. 16 Oct. 18 v. Allen Oct. 30 v. Missouri OU Football www.soonersports.com v. Texas Tech Oct. 24 OSU Football www.okstate.com v. Kansas State Oct. 3 v. Kansas Oct. 24

SPORTS

COURTESY OKC THUNDER.

Oklahoma City Thunder For the Oklahoma City Thunder, this October blends preseason warm-ups with the tip-off to regular season play. With six preseason games leading up to the team’s Oct. 28 first regular season game at home against the San Antonio Spurs, fans are anxious to see the 2015-16 starters and their chemistry. With Kevin Durant’s health expected to return Oklahoma’s champion to the court, it’s a strong guarantee that Durant, Russell Westbrook and Serge Ibaka will lead the lineup. According to ESPN, shooting guard Dion Waiters, who started 23 games last season, and center Enes Kanter, who started 74 games last season, will join them at the start of the clock. Oklahoma fans can root on their team Friday, Oct. 9 against Fenerbahce Ulker at Chesapeake Energy Arena, on Tuesday, Oct. 13 against the Dallas Mavericks at Tulsa’s BOK Center and when they take on the Denver Nuggets Sunday, Oct. 18 back in Oklahoma City. A few numbers for Oklahoma fans to know for the regular season: There will be 10 Sunday home games, three Saturday home games, seven November home games, and the team’s longest home stand, four games, will take place Dec. 25 through Dec. 31. For more information, visit www.nba. com/thunder.

PHOTO BY LAYNE MURDOCH/GETTY IMAGES/ NBAE,

www.cainsballroom.com Jose Gonzalez Oct. 9 ACM@UCO. www. acm.uco.edu Pepe Aguilar Oct. 9 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Kacey Musgraves Oct. 10 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino. com Twenty One Pilots Oct. 11 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net Counting Crows Oct. 11 The Zoo Amphitheatre. www.thezooamphitheatre. com John Calvin Abney and Levi Parham Oct. 11 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc. com Kacey Musgraves Oct. 11 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Michael Fracasso Oct. 13 Woody Guthrie Center. www.woodyguthriecenter.org All Time Low & Sleeping With Sirens Oct. 15 The Brady Theater. www.bradytheater. com The Band Perry Oct. 16 Choctaw Casino, Durant. www.choctawcasinos.com Casey Donahew Band Oct. 16 Choctaw Casino, Pocola. www.choctawcasinos. com Gurf Morlix Oct. 16 The Blue Door. www. bluedoorokc.com OK Electric Music Festival Oct. 16, 17 Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts. org Aretha Franklin Oct. 17 Choctaw Casino, Durant. www.choctawcasinos.com Heart Oct. 17 Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com RachelDaviswithDominicJohnDavis Oct. 17 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc. com The Bar Brawl 3 Oct. 17 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com Jackson Browne Oct. 18 The Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com The Sword Oct. 18 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Chris Knight Oct. 19 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com The Polyphonic Spree Oct. 19 ACM@ UCO. www.acm.uco.edu Celtic Woman Oct. 20 Mabee Center. www.mabeecenter.com Flux Pavilion Oct. 21 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com WallThe Moon Oct. 22 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net Maddie & Tae Oct. 22 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com One Eyed Doll Oct. 22 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com Lionel Richie Oct. 23 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com Blitzen Trapper Oct. 23 Opolis Bar & Micro Venue. www.opolis.org Josh Abbott Band Oct. 23 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Jackson Browne Oct. 24 WinStar World Casino. www.winstarworldcasino.com David Ramirez Oct. 24 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com Chris Tomlin Oct. 25 BOK Center. www. bokcenter.com Ben Rector Oct. 25 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com CHVRCHES Oct. 26 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Mac Miller Oct. 27 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Ghostland Observatory Oct. 30 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

District invites children of all ages to make costumes, paint pumpkins, create jewelry out of candy and more with the help of local artists. www.thepaseo.com Haunt the Zoo for Halloween Oct. 26-31 Enjoy this one-of-a-kind trick-or-treat experience with the whole family. www. okczoo.com HallowZOOeen Oct. 27-31 Celebrate Halloween at the Tulsa Zoo with Goblin Stops, carnival-stye games, themed activities, a haunted train ride and more. www.tulsazoo.org Art Adventures Ongoing Children 3-5 experience art every Tuesday morning at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman, with special guests. Go online for schedules and other information. www. ou.edu/fjjma

ART Norbert Herber Art Exhibit Oct. 1-29 Alexandre Hogue Gallery, The University of Tulsa. www.utulsa.edu/ arts-at-tu/

Janeane Garofalo TU Football www.tulsahurricane.com

v. Houston Oct. 3 v. Louisiana-Monroe Oct. 10 Oct. 23 v. Memphis Oklahoma Regatta Festival Oct. 1-4 Enjoy four days of rowing, kayaking and lots more. www.boathousedistrict.org SandRidge Youth League Championships Oct. 23 Athletes from six schools will race 500-meter sprints on the Oklahoma River. www.boathousedistrict.org

FAMILY The Tortoise and the Hare Thru Oct. 9 See what happens when the tortoise steps up to the challenge against the hare. www.oklahomachildrenstheatre.org Frozen Oct. 1-4 Disney on Ice presents

a popular production at the Tulsa State Fair. www.tulsastatefair.com Day Out With Thomas Oct. 2-4 Take a ride with a 15-ton replica of Thomas the Tank Engine. www.oklahomarailwaymuseum. org Pumpkinville Oct. 9-31 Oklahoma City Botanical Gardens welcomes families and friends to its Children’s Garden. www. myriadgardens.org Haunt The Harn Oct. 22 Celebrate Halloween early with Harn Homestead’s family-friendly, trick-or-treat event. www. harnhomestead.com Alvin and the Chipmunks Live! Oct. 23 See your favorite chipmunks and Chipettes on stage with a world-class production. www.coxconventioncenter. com Magic Lantern Oct. 25 The Paseo

Orly Genger: Terra Thru Oct. 2 This outdoor art installation made of more than a million feet of lobster-fishing rope creates a unique experience. www. oklahomacontemporary.org MomentumTulsa Oct. 2-23 See creations by Oklahoman artists ages 30 and younger. Mediums include film, performance, new media, installation, music and more. www. livingarts.org The Paper Trail Oct. 2-31 Teresa J. Wilber’s work will be on display at TAC Gallery. www.tacgallery.org The Jerome M. Westheimer, Sr. & Wanda Otey Westheimer Distinguished Visiting Artist Chair: James Surls Oct. 2-Jan. 3 Explore Surls’ investigation of the natural world through his sculptures made from wood, steel and bronze. www.ou.edu/fjjma Joe Johnson Photography Exhibit Oct. 2-Nov. 29 Johnson’s art has found its way into Art in America, New York Times, Boston Globe and more, and now, it will be on display at the Zarrow Center for Art & E d u c a t i o n . w w w. u t u l s a .e d u / arts-at-tu/

King Biscuit Blues Festival

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

115


Entertainment

FAMSCREENPRINT COLLECTION OF THE JORDAN SCHNITZER MARILYN MONROE (MARILYN), (11.3.1), ANDY WARHOL, 1967. PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART. ILY FOUNDATION ©ARS, NEW YORK, NY. PHOTO COURTESY

ART

Contemporary Wildlife Art Retrospective Exhibit and Sale Oct. 3 See the works of seven premier wildlife artists at Woolaroc Museum. www.woolaroc.org Painted Journeys: The Art of John Mix Stanley Oct. 4-Jan. 3 Explore John Mix Stanley’s artwork depicting the American West. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu Jamie Wyeth Thru Oct. 5 Discover Wyeth’s distinctive approach to realism over the course of six decades. www. crystalbridges.org Cherokee Art Market Oct. 10, 11 Attend one of the largest American Indian art shows in Oklahoma that feature 150 artists representing 50 tribes from around

the U.S. www.cherokeeartmarket.com Alfred Maurer: Art on the Edge Oct. 11-Jan. 4 Known for his French Fauvism and American Modernism, more than 70 of Alfred H. Maurer’s most accomplished works will be on display. www.crystalbridges. org On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb Thru Oct.11 Tulsa and Oklahoma have a rich history and tradition of jazz music, which is celebrated in this exhibit. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu Modern Times Thru Oct. 15 Explore an exhibit that celebrates speed. www. philbrook.org Nir Evron Projected Claims Thru Oct.

Art in the Square

116

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

Life in Color On Sunday, Oct. 18, Andy Warhol’s colorful Pop art will fill Philbrook Museum of Art for an exhibition that celebrates the artist’s brilliance. Warhol was an important visionary of Pop art, a movement of the 1950s and ‘60s that represented media and popular culture within artists’ works. Pop art allowed everyday culture to find a place within fine art, and emerging as a staple in the New York scene, Warhol’s works flourished alongside his reputation. An artist, celebrity, entrepreneur and author, Warhol’s artistic mediums included drawings, painting, printmaking, photography, silk screening and more. With works on display and collected worldwide, his contribution to art is immeasurable. The Philbrook exhibit, Life In Color, shines a light on Warhol’s prints that include portraits of Marilyn Monroe, among other celebrities, the electric chair, camouflage patterning, flowers, sunsets and more. Empowering guests to explore the works of other contemporary artists of Warhol’s time, Philbrook has included prints by Richard Diebenkorn, Chuck Close, Edward Ruscha and Keith Haring within the exhibit. For more information, visit www. philbrook.org.

18 Internationally-acclaimed artist Nir Evron will showcase his latest films and photography that are based on romanticized views of the Holy Land. www.philbrook. org Remembering Chris LeDoux Thru Oct. 18 This exhibit features the rodeo and country star’s (1948-2005) memorabilia andsculptures.www.nationalcowboymuseum. org In Living Color Oct. 18-Jan. 17 See the colorful works of Andy Warhol alongside those of Richard Diebenkorn, Chuck Close, Edward Ruscha and Keith Haring. www.philbrook.org An Ode to Hands: Selections from the Permanent Collection Thru Oct. 24 This exhibit explores the theme of hands in art and life through a variety of media. http://museum.okstate.edu Print Beyond Pop: American Lithography After 1960 Thru Oct. 24 This exhibition explores a critical moment for American lithography. www.museum.okstate.edu Off The Wall Oct. 24-May 15 Discover Thomas “Breeze” Marcus’ larger-than-life murals and paintings. www.philbrook.org End of the Trail: A Centennial Celebration Thru Oct. 25 Celebrate the unique history of the seminal sculpture on the 100th anniversary of its creation. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org The Wyeths Thru Nov. 8 Uncover the Wyeths’ artistry of American realism with an installation celebrating the 15 Wyeth paintings in Philbrook’s permanent collection. www.philbrook.org TAC@AHHA Thru Nov. 22 The annual Tulsa Artist Coalition’s members show returns to AHHA. www.ahhatulsa.org Immortales: The Hall of Emperors of the Capitoline Museums, Rome Thru Dec. 6 A selection of 20 busts from the collection of the world’s oldest museum, the Capitoline in Rome, comes to the U.S. for the first time. www.ou.edu/fjjma Bert Seabourn: American Expressionist Thru Jan. 9 The Oklahoman’s artwork

donated to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum over the past three years by Pam Parrish. w w w. nationalcowboymuseum.org Enter the Matrix: Indigenous Printmakers Ongoing This exhibit explores how printmaking has become a matrix for cultural and artistic exchange, the critical sites of engagement and key figures. www.ou.edu/fjjma Neoclassicism to Romanticism: Works on Paper in Eighteenth- and NineteenthCentury Europe Ongoing This studentcurated exhibit focuses on works on paper beginning in the mid-1700s when new ideas emerged from political, intellectual, economic and social changes. www. ou.edu/fjjma Focus on Favorites Ongoing The exhibit highlights the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu On Common Ground Ongoing Through the mixing of these many works of art and cultural items depicting a great variety of people, one is reminded that all human beings have similar needs that bring us to a common ground. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa. com First Friday Gallery Walk Ongoing The galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo. com First Friday Art Crawl Ongoing Stroll the Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at the Guthrie Green and other venues. www. thebradyartsdistrict.com 2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman.com

Run The Jewels

will be on display at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. www.oklahomahof.com The Secret Life of the City Thru Feb. 11 For this exhibit, eight artists have each created a piece of art the size of a small billboard. www.downtownokc.com Posed & Composed: Portraits of Women from the Permanent Collection Ongoing Explore 12 portraits by 11 American artists from just before World War I through the early 1980s. www.okcmoa.com Wakati:TimeShapesAfricanArt Ongoing Explore the question, “How does time shape African art?” http://museum.okstate. edu Interludes Ongoing Uncover more than 20 paintings, drawings and prints by Oklahoma printmaker Doel Reed. www. philbrook.org Navajo Weavings from the Pam Parrish Collection Ongoing Thisexhibitshowcases 25 of the more than 60 major weavings

CHARITABLE EVENTS ARTonTAP Oct. 2 Enjoy more than 80 varieties of beer, food from local restaurants and live music on the Roof Terrace beer garden at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com Oklahoma City Cattle Baron’s Ball Oct. 2 Join the American Cancer Society at Oklahoma City’s McGranahan Barn for an evening of delicious food, live country music, auction and more. http://gala. acsevents.org Excelencia Awards Gala Oct. 2 The 16th annual gala will bring rich art, culture and tastes to the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel. www.tulsahispanicchamber.chambermaster. com Casta Diva Ball Oct. 3 Dress up in your best Moulin Rouge attire to benefit Tulsa Opera and the culture it brings to Tulsa. www.tulsaopera.com


MARKETPLACE

Get Picture-Perfect SmileS

WITHOUT BRACES!

P while you Slee

Start aS younG aS 5 yearS old!

Voted Tulsa's The Best of the

Best

North of Woodland Hills 6837 S. Memorial Dr. North of Utica Square 2139 E. 21st St.

no metal • no BracketS • no tiGhteninG half the coSt • no relaPSe Call For Details

918.254.1611

www.visionsunique.com

817-571-2100

JOHN ROGERS, DDS Tulsa • 918.933.4889 | Broken Arrow • 918.451.9066 refreshdentistrytulsa.com

21404 Refresh.indd 1

Z

ZOLLER

FREE CONSULTATION

9/14/15 12:41 21397PM Visions.indd 1

DESIGNS 300 OFF

$

Plus!

Trunk Show

& ANTIQUES, INC.

Regularly $3200. Must mention this ad when scheduling appointment. New Ortho patients only. Restrictions may apply.

Two Days Only October 29 & 30

W

FINANCING AVAILABLE • INSURANCE ACCEPTED s Blvd Mid Citie Precinct Line Rd

G

wy

eH

vin

e rap

Brown Trail

H

Mid-Cities

458 MiD Cities BlvD. Hurst, tX 76054

All Treats, No Tricks!

www.RadiantSmilesMidCities.com

183

1 3 4 3 E 1 5 T H S T, T U L S A • 9 1 8 - 5 8 3 - 1 9 6 6 21386 Zoller.indd 1

1611 S. Utica Ave. (918) 749-2405

12435 UPS.indd 1

9/2/15 10:26 AM

10051 S. Yale, Suite 105 | 918.299.6565 | DonnasFashions.com

9/1/15 11:26 21378AM Donna's.indd 1

9/1/15 8:50 AM

3701-A S. Harvard (918) 747-0662

8/30/12 10:42 21376AM Salt Yoga.indd 1

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM 117 AM 8/25/15 10:23


118

COMMUNITY

Tulsa Town Hall Speaker Series In its 81st season, Tulsa Town Hall is celebrating an inspiring list of 2015-16 speakers for its monthly Friday afternoon lecture series held at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. “Tulsa is fortunate to have this opportunity to hear and meet these renowned speakers,” says Kathy Collins, Tulsa Town Hall executive director. The series opens on Oct, 2 with Sue Monk Kidd, author of The Secret Life of Bees, a novel that had a spot on the New York Times bestseller list for more than two years and was translated into 23 languages; her most recent work is titled The Invention of Wings. On Nov. 6, the renowned political consultant James Carville will arrive in front of the audience, lending his knowledge and experience in both life and politics. Oklahoma’s own President David L. Boren of the University of Oklahoma will lead a discussion on Jan. 15. Those with an ear and exaltation for the orchestra will be delighted to see Conductor Benjamin Zander of The Boston Philharmonic Orchestra on March 11. Zander’s teaching goes beyond keys and melodies, pulling on the strings of life. And last but not least, Doris Kearns Goodwin, a presidential historian, author of six New York Times bestselling books and a Pulitzer Prize winner for No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, will present her topic, “Leadership Lessons from the White House,” on April 22. Season subscriptions are available for $75 per person. Each speaker will be a guest at a luncheon following the lecture, and subscribers can participate for $25 per event. Lectures go from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. For more information, visit www.tulsatownhall.com.

PHOTOS COURTESY TULSA TOWN HALL.

Entertainment

St. John ZooRun Oct. 3 Run for health, the challenge and to benefit the zoo programming at this family-friendly run event for all fitness levels and ages. www. tulsazoo.org TulsaHallofFameInductionCeremony Oct. 5 The societyhonors leaders of philanthropy and community during its annual celebration. www.tulsahistory.org Raven Classic Golf Tournament Oct. 5 Tee off at Page Belcher Golf Course for Riverfield Day School’s fundraiser for Riverfield athletics. www.riverfield.org Foundation Cup Oct. 6 Foundation for Tulsa Schools will hold its golf tournament at The Patriot Golf Club. www. foundationfortulsaschools.org Global Vision Awards Dinner Oct. 7 Benefiting Tulsa Global Alliance, the 20th annual event includes fine dining and an awards presentation honoring individuals with unique contributions to vision for the community. www.tulsaglobalalliance.org Fun Ball Oct. 8 Benefiting Ronald McDonald House Tulsa, the 2015 event will feature The Swon Brothers. www. rmhtulsa.org Cooking for the Cause Oct. 8 Ten premier restaurants and chefs will offer cooking demonstrations and wine pairings at Metro Appliances & More. www. irongatetulsa.org TulsaAreaUnitedWayWomen’sLeadership Council Fall Reception Oct. 8 The event at Hyatt Regency will focus on the collective impact women can make on improving education in Oklahoma. www.tauw.org/ WLCFallReception Green Leaf Gala Oct. 9 Show your support at the annual event benefiting Up With Trees. www.coxcentertulsa.com JDRF OneWalk Oct. 10 Join others at Guthrie Green to walk three miles while raising money and awareness to battle type one diabetes. www.tulsa.jdrf.org Orchids in October Oct. 15 Enjoy the annual award luncheon that recognizes a unique individual who has a significant impact on Myriad Gardens. w w w. oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com Uncorking the Cure for MS Oct. 15 The 14th annual event at Cain’s Ballroom will include catering from Lambrusco’z to Go, Triumph Wines produced by Calistoga Cellars and great silent and live auction items. www.nationalmssociety.org OKC Signature Chefs Auction Oct. 15 The annual event benefiting March of Dimes will bring some of Oklahoma City’s best chefs to the Oklahoma City Golf and Country Club. www.marchofdimes. org/oklahoma Tulsa Bone Bash Oct. 16 This year, the Arthritis Foundation’s Bone Bash will bring patrons to The Mayo Hotel. www. arthritis.org Race for the Cure Oct. 17 Oklahoma CityBotanical Gardens. www.myriadgardens. org Mvskoke Hall of Fame Oct. 17 A night of recognition benefits the Creek Nation Foundation Inc. and the Muscogee Nation Festival. w w w.creektourism.com/ mvskoke-hall-of-fame/ Light the Night Walk Oct. 17 Benefitting The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, which works to find cures and ensure the best treatments for all blood cancer patients, the event will take place at The University of Tulsa. www.lightthenight. org Peace, Love & Goodwill Festival Oct. 18 Oklahoma City Botanical Gardens. www.myriadgardens.org Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes Oct. 18 Join the American Diabetes Association at Wiley Post Park in Oklahoma City and celebrate putting a stop to diabetes. www. diabetes.org Nimrod Awards Dinner Oct. 19 Karen Russell, author of Swamplandia, along with other guests, will recognize this year’s award winners. www.utulsa.edu/nimrod Habitat “Fore” Humanity Golf Classic Oct. 19 The 17th annual tournament will tee off at The Patriot Golf Club in Owasso. www.tulsahabitat.org

Tulsa Run

A Tribute to Excellence Oct. 21 Join others at the Arthritis Foundation’s annual dinner and awards evening. www.arthritis. org OklahomaCityCharityScotchTasting Oct. 22 The seventh annual event benefiting Rainbow Fleet Child Care Resource and Referral will feature six flights of premium single malt scotch and a cigar bar at a private home. 405.706.7484 Winterset Launch Party Oct. 23 The launch party kicks-off the Osteopathic Founders Foundation’s annual gala in February. www.wintersettulsa.com Laps for Little Ones Oct. 24 Join The Little Light House for its 37th annual fun run and alumni carnival at Cascia Hall. www.littlelighthouse.org Mita’s Foundation Charity Banquet Oct. 24 The fifth annual event includes Peruvian food and live music. www.mitasfoundaiton. org Buddy Walk Oct. 25 The Down Syndrome Association of Tulsa will host its 2015 event at Oral Roberts University. www. dsat.org Badges ‘n Barb-B-Que Oct. 29 The annual event returns to Christiansen Aviation Jones Airport for a barbeque cook-off contest between area law

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

enforcement and fire departments. www. okcpn.org Care Card Shopping Oct. 30-Nov. 8 Buy a Care Card and save up to 20 percent at more than 200 local stores and restaurants while benefiting Family & Children’s Services. www.fcsok.org Corks & Kegs Oct. 30 The fifth annual, Halloween-themed event benefiting Sooner-Tulsa Chapter of Cystic Fibrosis Foundation will pair beers and wines from around the world with Tulsa’s finest bites. www.cff.org

COMMUNITY Oklahoma’s International Bluegrass Festival Oct. 1-3 Bands from across the world will entertain at this year’s festival in Guthrie. www.oibf.com Tulsa State Fair Oct. 1-11 Enjoy everything the fair has to offer at Tulsa’s Expo Square. www.tulsastatefair.com Fall Traders Encampment Oct. 2, 3 With entrance to Woolaroc, the public can see authentic 1840s trader camps for two days. www.woolaroc.org Frack Fest Oct. 2-4 Don’t miss Oklahoma’s premier underground multimedia festival. www.frackfest.org

Halloween Festival Oct. 2-31 Take the whole family to the Castle of Muskogee for an all encompassing Halloween ex p e r i e n ce. w w w.o kc a s t l e.co m / halloween The 13th Ward Oct. 2-31 Visit Tulsa and Broken Arrow’s largest haunted attraction that packs fear, chaos, uncontrollable patients and illusions into 30,000 square feet of terror. www.the13thward.com United Way of Central Oklahoma Day of Caring Oct. 2-3 This community-wide volunteer event connects volunteers with partner agencies to work on variosu projects throughout the community. www. unitedwayokc.org Art In The Square Oct. 3 More than 90 local artists will showcase their works in Utica Square. www.uticasquare.com Oklahoma City Bully Dog Show Oct. 3 The third annual event takes place at the Cox Convention Center. w w w. coxconventioncenter.com National Indian Taco Championship Oct. 3 Taste the creations of the contestants vying for best Indian taco, and enjoy vendors, music, Indian dance, cowgirls, barrel racing and more. www. pawhuskachamber.com Rugged Maniac Oct. 3 The 25 obstacles across the three-mile course that is Rugged Manic arrive at Oklahoma City’s Wake Zone Cable Park. www.ruggedmaniac. com/events/okc Stockyard Stampede Oct. 3 Enjoy a day full of western activities that will keep the whole family entertained. http:// stockyardscity.publishpath.com/ Guthrie Escape Oct. 3, 4 Don’t miss the 2015 fine art, wine and music festival in Historic Guthrie. www.guthrieescape.com Motley’s Farm Pumpkin Festival Oct. 3-Nov. 1 Just a short drive from all parts of central Arkansas, pick your own pumpkins right off of the vine, ride tractor-drawn wagons into the fields and around the farm, visit the farm zoo and watch live pig races! www.motleyspumpkinpatch.com Art in the Park Oct. 4 Enjoy an afternoon of live music at Guthrie Green with fun art activities for kids. www.utulsa.edu/ art-at-tu/

Tulsa Roots Rocks The Green Oct. 4 Don’t miss the last event in the series. www.guthriegreen.com 38th Annual Turkey Track Harvestime Bluegrass Festival Oct. 7-10 Turkey Track Bluegrass Festival is a four-day event with approximately 16 bluegrass and bluegrass-gospel bands. www. turkeytrackbluegrass.com 30thAnnualKingBiscuitBluesFestival Oct. 7-10 Spanning five city blocks, the festival includes six stages and more than 80 acts. www.kingbiscuitfestival.com Executive Management Briefings Oct. 8 William J. Warren, president of Warren Theatres, will give a luncheon presentation at Cox Business Center as part of OSU Spears School of Business’ Executive Management Briefings. www.cepd.okstate. edu Oklahoma Oil & Gas Expo Oct. 8 Connect with more than 3,600 participants, exhibitors and sponsors from the oil and natural gas industry. www.okoilexpo.com 6 Degrees of Bacon Oct. 8 Downtown Oklahoma City turns into a bacon lover’s dream with music, beer and the honoree, bacon. www.downtownokc.com Red Dirt International Film Festival Oct. 8-10 In its third year, Stillwater’s RDFF continues educating, promoting and entertaining during its three-day festival. www.reddirtfilmfestival.org Animation Festival Oct. 9 Featuring short film animations in stop-motion, Claymation, 2D animation, 3D animation or cut-outs, enjoy creations five minutes or less. www.livingarts.org Watonga Cheese & Wine Festival Oct. 9-10 Celebrate 39 years with tastings, tours, contests, souvenirs, music, food and more. www.watongacheesefestival. com Brush Creek Bazaar Oct. 9-10 This outdoor festival includes more than 80 craft vendors accompanied by live music of many genres. www.brushcreekbazaar. org Art on Main Oct. 10 Enjoy a day of Oklahoma’s best art, wine and music in downtown Jenks. www.jenkschamber. com


MARKETPLACE

747.2566

iidentitysalon.com

21399 iidentity.indd 1 Downtown Stillwater Car & Bike Show Oct. 9, 10 The ninth annual show welcomes all to downtown Stillwater with food trucks, vendors, live music, giveaways and, of course, cars and bikes. www.downtownstw. com Wiederkehr Village Weinfest Oct. 9, 10 Enjoy free wine-tasting tours, rides through the vineyards, arts and crafts displays, Trauben Stube and Beer Garden, international a la carte cuisine and so much more. www.wiederkehrwines. com Edmond Historic Ghost Tours Oct. 9, 10, 24, 24 The Edmond Historic Preservation Trust will be hosting downtown ghost tours throughout the month. 405-285-9700 Chillin’ & Grillin’ Oct. 10 Spend the day enjoying the best of barbecue, at River City Park in Sand Springs. www. sandspringschamber.com OKC Gun Show Oct. 10, 11 Oklahoma Expo Hall 2, Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com Repticon Oct. 10, 11 See thousands of reptiles and other exotic animals. www.repticon.com/oklahomacity.html Grand National & World Champion Morgan Horse Show Oct. 10-17 Jim Norick Arena, Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com Adult Haunt The River Cruise Oct. 11-31 On Saturdays, cruise the river on a Halloween-themed boat that includes haunted tunes, light snacks and a cash bar. www.okrivercruises. com Oklahoma Changing World Prize Oct. 11 This year, the prize goes to Mary and Sharon Bishop-Baldwin, two relentless advocates for same-sex marriage. www.woodyguthriecenter. org MotorcycleSwapMeet Oct. 11 Centennial Building, Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com Tulsa Business Forums Oct. 13 Francis Shammo, executive vice president and chief financial officer of Verizon, will give a luncheon presentation. www. cepd.okstate.edu Friends of Finance Oct. 13 Joseph Gorder, president and CEO of Valero Energy Corporation joins the speakers series. http://business.utulsa.edu/ Dod Alter Building Talk Oct. 13 Steve Liggett will discuss the history of Day of the Dead and the essential parts of Alters. www.livingarts.org OKC Oilfield Expo Oct. 14, 15 Join

Hozier

industry professionals focused on deal-making and trade. www.coxconventioncenter.com Taste of Western Oct. 15 Oklahoma City celebrates its restaurants and art with beautiful murals and exceptional food and wine tastings. www.tasteofwestern.sqaurespace.com Shop Hop on Auto Alley Oct. 15 Enjoy open house events a local shops, extended shopping hours, live music, and more along Automobile Alley. www. downtownokc.com National Association for Campus Activities Central Regional Conference Oct. 15-17 This year’s conference takes place at Tulsa’s Cox Business Center. www.coxcentertulsa.com Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo Oct. 15-17 Stephens County Fair & Expo Center. www.visitduncan.org AnnualFallRVShow&BargainExpo Oct. 15-18 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okstatefair.com First Draft Oct. 16 The 11th annual beer tasting event returns to ONEOK Field. www.firstdrafttulsa.com Route 66 Flywheelers Gas Engine & Tractor Show Oct. 16-18 The 25th annual show arrives in Catoosa. www. route66flywheelers.org Garden Tour for Connoisseurs Oct. 17 Tour the gardens, outdoor living areas and landscapes of homes in Oklahoma City and Edmond. www. ok-hort.org/garden-tour Life in Color Oct. 17 The Big Bang World Tour heads across the country

2020 Utica Square www.hicksbrunson.com 918.743.6478

The Ultimate Luxury Eyewear Experience

9/3/15 21360 2:13 PM Hicks Brunson.indd 1

with its Paint Factory in tow. www. coxconventioncenter.com Dialectic Grio: Spoken Word Event Oct. 17 Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts. org Nimrod Conference for Readers and Writers Oct. 17 This all-day writing conference includes workshops, readings and discussions. www.utulsa. edu/nimrod OKC Household Hazardous Waste Collection Oct. 17 Bring your OKC water bill to Oklahoma State Fair Park and drop off any hazardous waste. www.okstatefair.com Bark in the Park Oct. 17 Fuqua Park, Duncan. www.visitduncan.org Buchanan’s Vintage Flea Market Oct. 17, 18 Find antiques and collectibles from dealers throughout the U.S. www. okstatefair.com Metcalf Gun Shows Oct. 17, 18 Modern Living Building, Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com Musselman’s Apple Sauce Family Skating Tribute Oct. 18 Recording artist Kristian Bush will perform live for this family-themed show. w w w. coxconventioncenter.com Woody Guthrie Center Concerts on the Green Oct 18 Hear from John Flynn and Kelly Kristofferson, Rachael Davis, Kim and Reggie Harris and Josh White Jr. www.guthriegreen.com Our Wurst is the Best Bratfest Oct. 22 Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Duncan. www.visitduncan.org

8/19/15 9:56 AM

Linde Oktoberfest Oct. 22-25 In its 37th year, the fun returns to River West Festival Park. www.tulsaoktoberfest. org WizardWorld Oct.23-28 Jointhousands at the Cox Business Center for the TulsaComicConWizardWorldConvention. www.wizardworld.com/tulsa An Affair of the Heart Oct. 23-25 Find arts, crafts, gourmet food, custom furniture, seasonal items, clothing and more at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. okstatefair.com U.S. National Arabian and Half-Arabian Championship Horse Show Oct. 23-31 Expo Square. www.exposquare. com Boo Review Oct. 24 Mainstreet Duncan. www.visitduncan.org Family Fall Festival Oct. 24 Simmons Center, Duncan. www.visitduncan.org USTRC CINCH National Finals Oct. 24-Nov. 1 Enjoy nine, high intensity days of competition. www.ustrc.com Excellence in Construction Awards Banquet Oct. 29 The banquet will be held at Tulsa’s Cox Business Center. www.coxcentertulsa.com Schmooza Palooza Party Oct. 29 Network with OKC business professionals. www.okstatefair.com Haunted Tulsa Deco Trolley Tour Oct. 30 Girouard Vines’ wines will welcome all aboard this one-of-a-kind haunted trolley tour. www.tulsawine.com Tulsa Run Oct. 31 Choose from a 2K, 5K or 15K run through downtown Tulsa. www.tulsasports.org/tulsarun BooHaHainBrookside Oct.31 Celebrate Halloween with the 25th annual event. www.brooksidetheplacetobe.com OKCHalloweenParade Oct.31 Celebrate with a parade and costume party on Automobile Alley. www.okchalloweenparade.com Grand American Arms Show Oct. 31-Nov. 1 Cox Pavilion, Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com An Artistry in Wood Oct. 31-Nov. 1 Enjoy a woodcarving and sculpting show and sale. www.okstatefair.com Buchanan’s Vintage Flea Market Oct. 31-Nov. 1 Find antiques and collectibles from dealers throughout the U.S. www. okstatefair.com Oklahoma Mineral & Gem Show Oct. 31-Nov. 1 Modern Living Building, Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair. com Reding Farm Corn Maze Thru Nov. 1 Weave your way through helmets,

mascots, and more for the Oklahoma football-themed maze. www.redsiloproudctions.com The Hex House Thru Nov. 1 See if you can make it all the way through this haunted attraction. www.tulsahexhouse. com Pumpkin Festival at Shepherd’s Cross Thru Nov. 7 The festival includes a pumpkin patch, hay maze, scarecrow making, hayrides, farm animal petting barn and so much more. www.shepherdscross. com The Sanctuary Thru Nov. 8 Every weekend, The Sanctuary comes to life with the ghosts of Dr. Ryan Hammond’s experiments. www.thesanctuaryokc. com Premiere on Film Row Ongoing Enjoy film Row’s monthly block party on the Third Friday of each month through October. www.filmrowpremiere.com Heard on Hurd Ongoing Every third Saturday from March through October, enjoy local music, food and shops in downtown Edmond. 405.341.6650 H&8th Ongoing On the last Friday of every month March through October, enjoy the H&8th Night Market with gourmet food trucks and live music. www.h8thokc.com Movie in the Park Ongoing Enjoy a movie at Guthrie Green most Thursdays through October. www.guthriegreen. com Walking Tour Ongoing Take a walking tour of historic downtown Tulsa. www. tulsahistory.org Gilcrease Films Ongoing See various films through the month. www.gilcrease. org OKCMOA Films Ongoing Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.org To see more events happening around

Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR

OCTOBER 2015 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

119


TULSAN W.B. WARD LENDS HIS VOICE TO AUDIOBOOKS AS WELL AS A RADIO FEATURE.

PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

IN PERSON

L

Voicing The Vision

W.B. Ward’s experience in show business carries over to a newfound career as the voice for audiobooks.

isten up, and listen very carefully. W.B. Ward, a 57-year-old Tulsa native and show biz veteran is in high demand as an audiobook reader after only a year and a half in the business. The reason, he says, is that recording an audiobook isn’t just a reading gig; it’s show business. “I got into a debate with a fellow audiobook producer some time back,” he recalls. “I declared this to be show business. He said, ‘No, it’s something else.’ It’s show business. It’s not just reading. You’re acting. It is an acting gig, and it’s no different from producing a TV show, a motion picture or a radio drama. It is entertainment and you have to know how to perform.” Ward ended up in the audiobook world after a pair of strokes two years ago forced him to reinvent himself. They left him with the inability to stand for long periods of time. He sought out a way to make a living that would work with his new limitations. A spectator in his home recording studio, would, he says, laugh when they see him in action. Though listeners only hear his voice in the finished product, he physically acts the parts as he reads, gesturing constantly to nail the portrayal of this or that character. “I had to keep adjusting the windscreen on my microphone because I kept slapping it. Most of the time when I do a retake, it’s because I’ve been gesticulating so much I’ve actually moved my microphone a few times while recording. If I have another stroke and end up losing my arms, I doubt that I’d be able to do anymore audiobooks,” he says. Ward reads a variety of material. He just put the finishing touches on a recording of a biography of Plato and Aristotle. His favorite genre, though, is the classics. “My favorites that I’ve done so far was Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol and an anthology of Edgar Allen Poe short stories. I’m getting ready to do H.G. Wells’s War of the Worlds here in the next few months. You just can’t beat writing like that. I love reading those because they’re just so well-written. And because they’re so well-written, they’re very easy to perform,” he says. Also among his favorites are the novels of Oklahoman Joe 120

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2015

Harwell, author of Welcome to Utica, which is set entirely in Tulsa. Harwell had been on the hunt for an audiobook publisher when he met Ward in 2012. They hit it off, and a chance meeting turned into a partnership when the two discovered ACX, a division of Amazon that facilitates self-published audiobooks. They work together through ACX on a revenue share basis. Harwell provides the material, and Ward provides the voice talent. “He has a great voice,” says Harwell. “His delivery is just completely awesome. All of my books are set in Arkansas and Oklahoma. He’s lived and worked here for a long time, and he understands how people from this area talk, the dialect. I write with a little bit of colloquial language. He understands that completely and delivers it without a hitch.” To hone his craft, Ward often listens to classic radio shows like Father Knows Best and Gunsmoke. He pays close attention to how characters are developed and used in the stories, picking up tricks along the way that he uses in his own readings. Ward insists that his entry into the audiobook market, though galvanized by accident, was a natural progression of his entertainment career. In previous lives, he’s performed stand-up comedy, magic, mentalism and worked in circuses and sideshows. He’s done his fair share of radio broadcasting, too, and returned to it after his strokes. He produces a radio show, Ward’s Daily Almanac, a syndicated drop-in feature, a sort of “this-day-in-history” that covers trivial and overlooked, but also compelling, historical events. The show airs around the country and is followed by Tulsans on Blacklightradio. com. It airs seven days a week, seven times a day. Ward just wrapped his 25th audiobook. He’s grateful for the reception he’s received and plans on continuing. He will, he says, never lose sight of what makes a good audiobook. “Creative expression is key in an audiobook,” he says. “If recorded well, it doesn’t require you to see a picture. If done correctly, the listener can see the entire image in their mind without any assistance from a screen and with no visual references whatsoever. If you’re unable to do that, then it wasn’t recorded well.” PAUL FAIRCHILD


T H E 2016

ES

LUXURY WITHOUT INTERMISSION STARTING AT $39,274

LEXUSOFTULSA.COM | 918.665.3987

October Oklahoma Magazine  

A Life Of Discovery  From a young age, celebrated inventor and surgeon Nazih Zuhdi had a curiosity for medicine, and never wanting to just...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you