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OCTOBER 2014

TOP MEDICAL ISSUE

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SPECIALTIES

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DOCTORS

PHYSICIANS

WHAT IS

YOUR BODY

TELLING YOU? SHAKIN’ OKLAHOMA Is there going to be a big one?

Inside Oklahoma’s luxurious

KITCHENS & BATHS


#pumpkinlatte #leavesturning #lunchdate #ilovefall

Capture, Share #uticasquare

uticasquare.com

Cool breezes and scents of fall are stirring up all new cravings. Usher in the season with toasty drinks, rich desserts, and savory entrées at Utica Square. It’s the ideal spot to catch up with friends or cozy up with that special someone. Create photo-worthy memories at any of our ten distinct restaurants. All found at Tulsa’s hometown treasure.


V O L . X V I I I , N O . 10

FEATURES

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Say What?

October 2 014 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

Our bodies constantly send us signals about our health. Hopefully, the majority of the signals are positive. Feeling alert, sleeping well and a healthy appetite are all signals indicative of good health. But what about fevers, unexplained weight loss and frequent headaches? We speak to physicians across the state about what our bodies may say to us, and how we should interpret it.

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Top Doctors 2014

Each year, Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. compiles its list of top doctors practicing in the state. Divided among specialties, this list is an easy-to-use guide of some of the top physicians in the state as reviewed by their peers.

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Worth The Investment

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Tectonic Shakes

No one can deny that Oklahoma has seen an exponential growth in earthquake activity over the past few years. Oklahoma Magazine contributing editor Tara Malone takes a look into the trend to find answers and helpful information for those who may find themselves at the epicenter.

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SPECIALTIES

150

DOCTORS

PHYSICIANS

WHAT IS

YOUR BODY

TELLING YOU? SHAKIN’ OKLAHOMA

October COVER.indd 15

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OKMAG.COM

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MEDICAL ISSUE

Is there going to be a big one?

New & Improved!

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

OCTOBER 2014

October 2014

TOP

Kitchens and baths are two rooms that can present the costliest renovations, yet they are the rooms often targeted when homeowners are looking to spruce up their quarters. We take a look inside some of Oklahoma’s top-of-the-line kitchen and bath renovations and look at how homeowners put their special touches on these rooms.

Inside Oklahoma’s luxurious

KITCHENS & BATHS

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries. ON THE COVER: THE 2014 TOP DOCTORS LIST IS BACK WITH A COMPREHENSIVE ROSTER OF OKLAHOMA PHYSICIANS ADMIRED BY THEIR PEERS.

9/19/14 3:59 PM

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!


HONORED TO BE NAMED

ONE OF OKLAHOMA’S BEST HOSPITALS

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT NAMES ST. JOHN AMONG TOP HOSPITALS IN OKLAHOMA St. John Medical Center has once again been ranked among the best hospitals in Oklahoma, receiving high marks in urology care by U.S. News and World Report, and being named the top performer in northeastern Oklahoma. Thank you for trusting us with the care of you and your family. It is an honor to serve you.

P U L S E L I N E P H Y S I C I A N R E F E R R A L 918 - 744-0123 ST. JOHN MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN SAPULPA | ST. JOHN OWASSO | ST. JOHN BROKEN ARROW JANE PHILLIPS MEDICAL CENTER | ST. JOHN VILLAS | ST. JOHN URGENT CARE | ST. JOHN CLINIC STJOHNHEALTHSYSTEM.COM


Contents

DEPARTMENTS The State

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32

Paranormal activity is all around us, if you believe in that kind of thing. In this month’s State, we look at some of Oklahoma’s purported haunted locations. From abandoned Catholic missions to high-end hotels, the legends and lore about these places are enough to spook even the biggest skeptic.

18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32

People 5 Qs Culture Icon The Insider Oklahoma Business Scene Living Space

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When Patrick Gordon moved back to Tulsa, he went to work renovating a Maple Ridge house that would work as both home and work space for this renowned artist. The result is a delightfully eclectic mixture of styles and spaces, of art and tchotchkes.

40 42 44 46 53

Style Color Trend Your Health Destination

Taste

99

Kevin George and former Top Chef contender Joshua Valentine put their heads together to create the exquisite atmosphere and menu at The George Prime Steakhouse, the pinnacle of refined dining atop Oklahoma City’s Founders Tower. Oklahoma Magazine contributing editor Tara Malone takes a look at why The George and its menu are turning heads.

102 What We’re Eating 104 Food Event 105 How To

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Entertainment

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The beginning of every NBA season is filled with energy and excitement, and for the Oklahoma City Thunder, it begins this year on the Choctaw High School basketball court. The Blue and White Scrimmage and preseason matches lead into the season opener against Portland later this month at Chesapeake Energy Arena.

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Calendar of Events

In Person

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Hello, tomorrow. Being the hospital of the future requires more than brick and mortar, glass and steel. It takes vision. With the Trauma Emergency Center and patient tower, the largest expansion in our 54-year history, Saint Francis Health System takes another giant step toward tomorrow’s healthcare. The eight-story structure includes the area’s largest emergency room, 150 additional beds in the new patient tower, a new main lobby and Chapel. This innovative facility allows Saint Francis to continue its mission of extending the presence and healing ministry of Christ and provides everything necessary to care for the residents of eastern Oklahoma for generations to come.

saintfrancis.com Saint Francis Hospital | 918-494-2200

SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS WARREN CLINIC HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL SOUTH LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL SAINT FRANCIS BROKEN ARROW


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX ASSOCIATE EDITOR KAREN SHADE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS TARA MALONE, CHRIS SUTTON, JOHN WOOLEY GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER NATE PUCKETT DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SAMANTHA E. GRAMMER CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204

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Copyright © 2014 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman TM Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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Dr. Cuzalina


COMING FEBRUARY 2015

Image Matters

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Oklahoma Magazine takes a look at beauty and image. Reserve your space at 918.744.6205

advertising@okmag.com

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9/16/14

The U.S. is a country that strives for health. Despite the obesity epidemic, people are living longer. Trends show that consumers continue to seek out and buy organic food. Gym visits are on the rise. With this increased focus on health consciousness comes a greater demand for physicians. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 82 percent of adults and 93 percent of children in the U.S. had contact with a health care professional in 2012. One billion physician office visits were made that year, 55 percent to primary care physicians. The most common reason for a visit was a cough; the most common diagnosis at these visits was essential hypertension. Anyone who has experienced a health scare can attest to the neces12:31 PM sity of excellent physicians and specialists. They can provide care, guidance and, sometimes most important, compassion in a time of crisis. Oklahomans are lucky to have some of the most renowned medical centers in the country that are on the cutting edge of treatment, from diabetes to ovarian cancer. We also have biomedical research facilities that are making breakthroughs that will one day, hopefully, lead to a cure or eradication of a disease. These positive impacts in health care in Oklahoma are made possible by the excellent physicians, nurses and medical professionals in the state. Some of these physicians – 150, to be exact – are recognized in Top Doctors, an annual list compiled by Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. of the top physicians in Oklahoma as reviewed by their peers. It’s a list that includes physicians representing 48 specialties, from adolescent medicine to vascular surgery. Please use it as a consideration when choosing a physician. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

THIS MONTH, WE LOOK AT HEALTH WITH OUR ANNUAL TOP DOCTORS AND HOW TO READ THE SIGNALS YOUR BODY IS SENDING TO YOU.

©2014 San Antonio Convention & Visitors Bureau.

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What’s Hot At

Let us Know... Oklahoma Magazine is looking for the state’s best places to work, and we need your help.

Nominate your company for Great Companies To Work For 2014.

To receive the nomination form, email editor@okmag.com.

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8/16/14 10:03 AM

Watch our web exclusive videos for expanded coverage. PAT R I C K G O R D O N H O M E T O U R In our web-exclusive video, Julie Chin tours the Tulsa home and studio of world-renowned painter Patrick Gordon. Get a behind-the-scenes look as Gordon shares his creative process, and receive an insightful look into what makes him one of Tulsa’s most celebrated contemporary artists.

TOP DOCTORS DIRECTORY Find complete, searchable listings of all of Oklahoma Magazine’s Top Doctors in our online database. With our easy-to-navigate directory, quickly locate the best physician for a range of health-related topics. Getting yourself on the path to a healthy life has never been this easy.

C E L E B R AT E H A L L O W E E N W I T H O K M A G . C O M Get an inside look at Tulsa’s premier home-haunt and see a beautiful home transformed into an elaborate house of the dead. View online photo galleries of the hottest Halloween extravaganzas in Oklahoma, and vote on your favorite costumes seen around town. Also this month, download custom Oklahoma-themed jack-o’-lantern stencils to show your candle-lit Okie pride.

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Precision cancer treatment is

changing the way we fight lung cancer What started out as pain in her chest, turned into a long battle with lung cancer. Ursula decided to go to Cancer Treatment Centers of America® to explore treatment options.

Ursula Hull, Lung Cancer Patient, and Dr. Daniel Nader

With advanced genomic tumor assessment, Ursula’s physicians were able to offer her a specific, targeted therapy based on her genetic make-up. This is precision medicine on a truly personalized level—and it’s helping us provide the individual care our patients deserve. “When I saw how they could use my genetic markers to pinpoint my treatment options, I was just amazed. I am very, very pleased I came to Cancer Treatment Centers of America.”

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No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results.

©2014 Rising Tide


THE SACRED HEART MISSION IN KONAWA IS SAID TO BE ONE OF OKLAHOMA’S HAUNTED SITES. BELOW: SACRED HEART MISSION WAS HOME TO A SCHOOL FOR AMERICAN INDIAN STUDENTS THAT BURNED DOWN IN 1901.

The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

FILE PHOTOS.

Sooner Specters These Oklahoma haunts are famous for things that go bump in the night.

Stone Lion Inn

GUTHRIE Built in the same year that Oklahoma joined the union as the 46th state, the Stone Lion Inn once was the most luxurious home in Guthrie, the new state’s capitol. But tragedy afflicted the Houghton family, the original residents of the stately mansion. According to legend, the Houghtons’ daughter, Augusta, died after falling ill and receiving an accidental overdose of opiate-laced medicine. Later, the home was purchased by others and turned into a funeral parlor. Now, a popular bed and breakfast, the past of the Stone Lion Inn refuses to stay dead. Guests have complained of noisy little ones and the sound of wooden balls rolling across the floors when no children were staying at the inn. Other guests have claimed to see a dapper, pipe-smoking gentleman haunting the halls, believed to be Augusta’s father, F.E. Houghton.

An investigation by the Syfy network television show Ghost Hunters recorded electronic voice phenomena and eerie shadows within the walls of the notorious mansion.

Sacred Heart Mission

KONAWA Very little remains of the original Sacred Heart Mission, founded in 1877 by Father Isidore Robot, a French Benedictine monk. Robot built a church, a monastery, a school for American Indian children, a technical institute and more, making Sacred Heart the wellspring of Catholicism in Oklahoma. But a terrible fire during the winter of 1901 erupted in the boys’ school dining hall, destroying much of the establishment. Although many structures were rebuilt,

Sacred Heart was so far off the railway that the monks eventually relocated to Shawnee, where they founded St. Gregory’s University. The mission in Konawa finally closed for good in 1955. Today, all that is left of the 19th-century part of the settlement is the bakery and a small log cabin – and, some say, the spirits of the dead. Witnesses claim to see blue orbs of light dancing around the cemetery grounds at night. Others have heard the desperate whinnying and stampeding of horses believed to have died while trying to escape the great fire. Creeping mists and mysterious cold spots occur out of nowhere. Perhaps most chilling of all, many eyewitnesses have seen a woman walking the grounds at night, a panther prowling by her side.

OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

15


The State

Skirvin Hilton Hotel

OKLAHOMA CITY It is difficult to separate fact from fiction when it comes to the legendary history of the Skirvin Hilton Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City, but one thing is certain: Plenty of guests believe the place is haunted. Storytellers often repeat the legend of a woman named Effie, a hotel maid and lover of the hotel’s founder, W.B. Skirvin. According to local lore, Effie became pregnant with Skirvin’s child and was hidden away on the 10th floor of the hotel to have her baby. After the pregnancy, however, she remained locked in her room until, in despair, she jumped from the window to her death, baby in arms. While there is no historical record of Effie having existed, the Skirvin, which opened in 1911, is home to plenty of grim, true history. Local reporters recently discovered that another patron did, indeed, commit suicide by defenestration at the Skirvin. In addition, the first manager of the former Prohibition speakeasy-turned-luxury-hotel died under circumstances disputed to be either murder or suicide. Male guests have reported being subjected to the affectionate advances of a female

Chicago Bulls were disturbed by mysteriously slamming doors in their rooms.

Brady Theater

TULSA The “Old Lady on Brady” has a storied – and some say haunted – history. Once the largest theater west of the Mississippi River, the venue has hosted the likes of everyone from the Marx Brothers and Katharine Hepburn to Buddy Holly and Tom Waits. According to locals, however, there is one famous performer who refuses to leave. In the fall of 1920, world-renowned Italian tenor Enrico Caruso arrived in Tulsa for what would be one of his final performances. Eager to experience what the area had to offer, Caruso was touring a nearby oil field when all the cars in his entourage mysteriously broke down. Caruso was forced to walk back to the Brady in the wet, wintry weather. Not long after his performance, Caruso perished of a virulent lung condition that his manager blamed on his cold Oklahoma walk. Now, it is said, that Caruso haunts the Brady Theater in vengeance for his death, tampering with equipment, moving objects and generally causing a spectral nuisance. According to legend, Caruso keeps company with another spirit: The ghost of a stagehand who hanged himself in the catwalk, but still IF A GHOST HAUNTS THE never misses a performance. SKIRVIN HILTON HOTEL, Stories of the building’s use as a deITS MUST BE AN OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER FAN. tention center for black citizens during FILE PHOTO. the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921, in which hundreds of held people are alleged to have died, have fueled claims of a haunting.

Tri-State Spook Light, “Spooksville Triangle”

entity. Others report occasionally finding a surprise companion in their showers. Whoever the ghost is at the Skirvin, it appears to be an Oklahoma City Thunder fan. In 2010, members of the New York Knicks blamed ghosts at the hotel for their loss to the Thunder, while team members of the

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA Since the 19th century, dozens of citizens and visitors have witnessed an unusual phenomenon in the night sky over the area between Miami, Okla.; Columbus, Kan.; and Joplin, Mo. Known by several names, depending on one’s state of residence, the TriState Spook Light is a mysterious orb that weaves its way across the darkened countryside. The light has been the subject of several academic studies, none of which have arrived at a definitive explanation for the eerie glow. Practical witnesses attribute the orb to swamp gas, minerals in the soil or the refracting light of passing vehicles. Others, however, maintain the orb is spectral in nature, perhaps the spirit of a Civil War soldier wandering with a lantern, searching forever for his missing head. TARA MALONE

OK THEN

DINING WITH MYSTERY

When dining at the Haunted House Restaurant, nestled in the rural outskirts of northeast Oklahoma City, bring along an appetite for mystery. The story began on June 1, 1963, with the unsolved murder of car-dealer Martin Carriker, who at age 74 was shot in the head while in the house. Authorities charged Carriker’s stepdaughter, Margaret Pearson, along with two handymen from the estate, with the murders. Shortly after Pearson’s arrest, Carriker’s ex-wife, Clara, died in the house of natural causes. Although Pearson was eventually acquitted of her stepfather’s murder (which remains unsolved to this day), her personal tragedies did not end. With the estate up for auction and nowhere to turn, Pearson was found dead in the home of an apparent drug overdose shortly before Valentine’s Day the following year. Restaurant owner Marian Thibault has overseen (previously with her husband, now passed) the “haunted” restaurant in the old Carriker place for 50 years. While she scoffs at the idea that the restaurant is inhabited by spirits, the estate’s gruesome history keeps curious diners returning to this unusual destination. – TM


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The State

OKLAHOMA-BORN POET QURAYSH ALI LANSANA SAYS THE VAST OKLAHOMA SKY INSPIRED HIM TO IMAGINE BIG. PHOTO BY GAY PASLEY, COURTESY OF QURAYSH ALI LANSANA.

PEOPLE

Poetic Republic

Oklahoma native Quraysh Ali Lansana translates a complex world into verse.

B

efore Quraysh Ali Lansana taught at Julliard, created an urban literacy workshop in Chicago or wrote eloquent poetry, he was a little boy in Enid, Okla., with a wild imagination. The youngest of six children, Lansana was exposed to the power of music and poetry at an early age through his older siblings and his upbringing in church. He also recalls being very aware of race and its implications even as a child. Lansana was raised in the politically tumultuous 1960s. He saw his parents battle discrimination and his older sisters and brother integrate their school systems. “Racial matters have certainly had an impact on who I am and how I think, morally,” says Lansana. As he matriculated through high school and later at the University of Oklahoma, he kept these experiences and lessons of cultural sensitivity close to him. Writing became the perfect medium for his expression. Lansana marveled at the writings of many of the black poets and

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

novelists from the first half of the 20th century and grew more eager to produce politically evocative prose and poetry himself. In the late ‘80s, Lansana left the Sooner State for the Windy City, where he still lives today. Since moving to Chicago, Lansana has earned a Master of Fine Arts degree, written five poetry books, edited eight anthologies and taught in the drama division of The Juilliard School. He also created a number of writing and literacy workshops for inner city youth. Lansana credits the progressive and racially diverse environment of Chicago for much of his success. He says he wishes that his home state was more responsive to social justice issues like those unfolding in Ferguson, Mo. “A lot of folks [in Oklahoma] decide not to engage because they don’t feel that their voices will be heard or because they just don’t want to get involved,” says Lansana. He still has an enormous amount of love for Oklahoma. Lansana will celebrate the release of his new book of poetry, The Walmart Republic, by hosting a launch party and reading at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater. The event will be at 6 p.m. on Oct.10 in the Great Hall of the Tom and Brenda McDaniel University Center. Lansana continues to process the world through his writing. While the last 25 years in Chicago have been instrumental in the continued growth of his imagination, he knows that its roots go deeper. “I believe the big Oklahoma sky had a lot to do with it,” he says. “There’s a lot of room to dream and imagine.” NATHAN PORTER


The State

5 QS

Overtures For Tulsa Greg Weber joins the budding Tulsa Opera as managing director.

Greg Weber brings nearly three decades of art management experience to Tulsa Opera this month. As the newly appointed managing director for the organization, Weber hopes to continue the growth that Tulsa Opera has experienced in recent years. Weber joins the organization after a three-year stint as the director of production at the San Francisco Opera. Having worked with Houston Grand Opera, San Francisco Opera and other companies, what about Tulsa Opera caught your attention? Opera is a like a small town – everyone knows everybody and what each person is doing. I heard new board leadership in Tulsa had taken bold steps to grow the company, and any type of growth in the arts can be challenging and risky. My work has always focused on growth, and the competitor in me loves a challenge. After meeting members of the board, I felt such passion and conviction from them for the city and the art form that I was convinced I had to be a part of the blooming of Tulsa Opera.

NEW TULSA OPERA MANAGING DIRECTOR GREG WEBER SEEKS TO MAKE AN IMPACT ON THE ARTS AND CITY.

What are your greatest concerns, not only for the organization, but for opera and the performing arts? There has always been conversation surrounding support and funding the arts. As we have watched opera companies fail over the past five to seven years, that fear about financial sustenance has loomed 20

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

Do you have ideas for expanding the audience for Tulsa Opera? First and foremost, I want Tulsans to know that opera is touchable. I’m an example of that. I grew up on a small farm in the Midwest, the 11th of 12 children. At the age of 21, I saw my first opera, The Marriage of Figaro, and I was hooked. I didn’t understand the story, couldn’t quite follow it, but loved how the music elucidated it all for me. The best way to expand an audience is to be in the community and encourage people to give us a try.

PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

As an educator (Weber is a former University of MissouriKansas City assistant professor), do you see a learning component to viewing opera? I see a learning component in every part of our lives – not just opera and music. Many of the most successful and brilliant among us are people who have studied music at some point in their lives. Some of the earliest human artifacts found have been musical instruments. Why? Music doesn’t keep our heads dry, it doesn’t feed our bodies, it doesn’t defend us against dangers. Music, I believe, has given us our greatest achievement – the ability to think creatively and abstractly. Without music we are less likely to discover innovative ways to keep dry, feed ourselves, grow as a generation.

menacingly over each company. The arts have always relied on devoted benefactors to keep them alive, and that model hasn’t really changed. Mozart had Emperor Joseph II, and Verdi had Antonio Barezzi … We will have financial challenges, but I have already seen buds of strength sprouting throughout the company, and I am inspired by the devotion I see in the company’s benefactors. Seeing this positive financial front, my concern focuses on arts education and attention spans.

How do you hope to most impact Tulsa Opera in the coming seasons? First and foremost, I intend to impact Tulsa and Oklahoma! This is a fantastic city and a magnificent state. As a newcomer, I will not only remind Tulsans of this, but the entire opera industry of what a fabulous place it is I now call home. My efforts will focus as much on growing Tulsa and Oklahoma as they will on growing Tulsa Opera. All three need each other to offer an outstanding place for our children. As an arts leader, I am a pragmatic dreamer – I always have my head in the stars, but my eye on the path to reach them. This means I bring a strong commitment to artistic growth and fiscal responsibility. This type of stability has always been one of my playing cards, and it will become a staple at the opera. I will not allow opera to be marginal or irrelevant. I will defend it. I will fight for it. For 400 years it has inspired lovers, dreamers and even cartoonists. Through opera we see humanity’s greatest and most grotesque characters – many times we see ourselves, our weaknesses and our strengths. Opera is as important to our humanity as kindness is to our soul. As an arts leader, my greatest impact is to feed humanity’s soul. KAREN SHADE


&

QA Dr. Paula Root

Medical Director at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma

Why did you decide to become a doctor?

I decided to become a doctor because I enjoy science and building relationships with people. It was my love of science that drove me to medical school, where I was able to work with and take care of patients.

What moments do you find inspiring in your field?

What do you think our members would be surprised to know?

I think our members would be surprised to know that we do have clinicians here on staff, nurses and physicians, who really care about our members and are here to make sure that they get the health care they need.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?

As a medical director, I am able to reach out and work with our providers and make sure that our members are getting the care that they need.

The great people, I love working with all of my associates at Blue Cross. I also enjoy the feeling that I am still able to reach out and make sure our members get the care that they need.

What do you like about working for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma?

What would you say to an inspiring nurse or doctor or someone who is just entering the field?

I have been here for 16 years now, and I feel like taking care of our members has always been our number one priority, which speaks to our purpose statement, “To do everything in our power to stand with our members in sickness and in health.�

My son is getting ready to apply for medical school, so this hits close to home for me. I told him that this is a really exciting time to be entering into medicine because things are changing so quickly in technology and the health care environment. I also tell him that he should always remember that he is in this for his patients.

A Division of Health Care Service Corporation, a Mutual Legal Reserve Company, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association

601426.0414


The State

S M A R T M OV E

RAISING LEPIDOPTERA

UNDISCOVERED TALENT IS IN GOOD SUPPLY AT RODEO OPRY. PHOTO BY JACK CORMAN.

CULTURE

The People’s Opry A small theater showcases and fosters big talent in Stockyards City.

G

ranville “Grant” Leftwich’s passion for music helped him turn his backyard jam sessions with friends and family into a legacy for all to enjoy at the Rodeo Opry. At 7:30 p.m. every Saturday, hundreds gather in Oklahoma City’s Stockyards City to witness Oklahoma’s official country music show. “If you are wondering what to expect when you come to a Saturday show, be prepared to hear one of the best house bands you have ever heard, backing different artists each week, and being entertained by a fun, family-friendly emcee while enjoying one of the opry’s famous root beer floats and snacks from the concession stand,” says executive director Cindy Scarberry. “It’s always a fun night of quality music and family entertainment.” Previously known as the Oklahoma Opry, the name was changed when the show moved out of Knob Hill Theater in the Capitol Hill District. “The Rodeo Opry is currently housed in what was known as the Rodeo Theater in the Stockyards of Oklahoma City,” says opry performer Owen Pickard. The opry stage is a haven for undiscovered talent in Oklahoma. Grammy Award-winner Bryan White and Red Dirt music star Cody Canada both began their careers performing there. “Grant (Leftwich) had always put everything he had back into the show and wanted to help promote, showcase and connect young entertainers with industry professionals while providing quality entertainment and education,” says Scarberry. Pickard was just 14 when he began performing at Rodeo Opry. “I have the opry to thank for my start in the entertainment business, and for that, I am eternally grateful,” says Pickard. “For me, it’s home.” To continue this tradition, the nonprofit Opry Heritage Foundation of Oklahoma opened a music school in 2009. At the school, children from low-income households receive music lessons for 50 cents. “So, while the Rodeo Opry is providing family-friendly shows every Saturday night, rest assured that your $15 ticket is going to great use,” says Scarberry. “For the Rodeo Opry, it’s more than just showcasing the talented artists and musicians on our stage,” echoes Pickard. “This show is the foundation of the organization, and the school is the platform for the future of our community. Thirty-seven years later, we’re just getting started.” For more about Rodeo Opry, visit www.rodeoopry.com. BETH WEESE

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

A nonprofit organization is providing job training and supplies to Thlopthlocco Tribal Town members interested in learning the trade of butterfly farming. Natives Raising Natives and its partner, the Euchee Butterfly Farm, are located in Leonard, Okla., and raise butterflies used in zoos and exhibits as well as at butterfly releases and special events. Funded by a $500,000 U.S. Department of Agriculture grant, Natives Raising Natives’ mission is to promote financial independence. The project was inspired by similar programs in Costa Rica and other tropical countries offering a sustainable income to indigenous peoples and an alternative to logging endangered forests, says Jane Breckinridge, program executive director. “Commercial butterfly farming is an exploding industry, with over $64 million in annual sales to butterfly exhibits at zoos and institutions, releases at weddings and funerals and educational caterpillar kits for schools,” Breckinridge says. The high demand for butterflies can help the state. “Oklahoma faces high unemployment rates in rural areas where jobs are scarce, Breckinridge says, “and the unemployment rate for Native Americans is significantly higher than average.” More than 2,000 butterfly and moth species are native to Oklahoma. Of those, only a handful is suitable to raise in captivity. Butterfly habitats must include specific plants that the insect will need throughout its life cycle. The program will provide equipment necessary for individuals to become commercial butterfly farmers as well as the essential training and business skills. – Jami Mattox


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The State

ICON

The Sears Years

Oklahoma theater legend Joe Sears wants to inspire a new generation of theater lovers with Tulsa Spotlight Theater.

E

ach Saturday since 1953, without a break, a cast of characters has taken the stage at Tulsa’s Spotlight Theater to enact a performance of The Drunkard. The production is legendary, and rumor has it that the play is the longest continuously running production in America. Such an illustrious performance calls for an equally celebrated leader. And now, the production and theater have one. Renowned stage actor Joe Sears has returned to the Oklahoma small stage after retiring from a legendary career. Sears is best known for the Greater Tuna plays, a comedy series that he coauthored with Jaston Williams and in which they costarred to play a cast of characters in a small Texas town. The Tuna era began in 1981 as a simple party skit and grew into four wildly popular plays, a stand-up comedy routine, a cookbook and an avid fan following. Sears’ performances in the Tuna series earned him a Tony Award nomination for Best Actor in a Play and the opportunity to perform at the White House twice. He has fond memories of The Drunkard, a production he remembers watching as a teenager growing up in Bartlesville. “The show stays the same, but the actors change,” explains Sears. “It’s the same show I saw back in the ‘60s.” In fact, The Drunkard dates back to the mid 1800s, and Tulsa’s tongue-in-cheek version has been ongoing since 1953. But, don’t be deceived by its longevity. Sears says the play is a fast-paced, laughfilled event that brings smiles to the entire family. “There are lots of fun things to keep the guest entertained,” says Sears. Before the evening’s main event, audiences enjoy The Olio and a sing-a-long. “Every week there are different acts,” explains Sears. “Sometimes there are jugglers, dancers, musicians, comedians or a magic act.” The production’s home is the Spotlight Theater on Riverside Drive. It’s even older than Tulsa’s Drunkard. A capital improvements campaign is underway to pay for necessary renovations and repairs of the theater, designed by renowned architect Bruce Goff and built in 1928. “The building needs to be restored for the generations of audi-

ences and actors to come,” says Sears. He hopes that the building can bring joy and inspiration to young actors, just as it inspired him when he was young. The Spotlight Theater has a popular children’s theater program. “My family history is steeped in Oklahoma,” says Sears, who once again calls Oklahoma home. “I started in theater here. I would have been perfectly content to spend my life in community theater here.” And, he’s returned to the small stage to encourage a new generation of actors. “I wanted to come back to offer something to my state, to work with Oklahoma kids,” says Sears. “I like to work with kids who wouldn’t normally have the opportunity to be on stage. When you have learned a discipline, apply the director’s teaching and receive the audience’s applause, it is so uplifting.”

BARTLESVILLE NATIVE JOE SEARS RETURNS TO COMMUNITY THEATER FOLLOWING A SUCCESSFUL PROFESSIONAL THEATER CAREER. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

oped as an exclusive residential area by Dr. G.A. Nichols in 1929. Nichols was also responsible for the development of many other notable neighborhoods in the Oklahoma City area, including the Paseo Arts District and Nicoma Park. – Jami Mattox


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The State THE INSIDER

Nostalgia For Yourself The Insider columnist John Wooley examines the appeal of the past and a present-day conundrum.

W

hen I was 15 years old, my friend Paul McSpadden came to my house for a visit, bringing with him something rare and beautiful: the first issue of a publication from 1940 called Wham Comics No. 1. A comic-book crazed teen – as was Paul – I had never seen a single issue from 1940 before; it was as though he had parted time’s curtain, reached in and pulled out a treasure from a wondrously different time and place. The curtain of time wasn’t the only thing that parted on that summer day in 1964. A big stack of comics I’d bought off the stands during the preceding few years parted from me as well. I was so crazy to get Wham Comics No. 1 that I traded Paul just about all my prime Marvel superhero comics, including first issues of The Fantastic Four, The Amazing Spider-Man and The Incredible Hulk. I figured something from that long ago had to be worth a whole raft of comics I’d bought for a dime and 12 cents in the recent past. Well, we now know how wrong I was. If I’d held onto those Marvels, I might be writing this column from a villa on the French Riviera. Although Paul didn’t hang onto them either – and I take some small solace in that fact – the comics I traded him are now worth umpteen hundreds of thousands of dollars. Meanwhile, the last time I looked, a pretty nice copy of Wham Comics No. 1 had sold online for $300. The purpose of this anecdote, however, is not to moan or mourn; it’s to help emphasize something that’s come home to me. As a lover of nostalgia – that siren call of an idealized time from your past – I now realize that if you live long enough, nostalgia for a period of time before your birth slowly metamorphoses into nostalgia for yourself. I don’t know how old I was when I first

realized that I had a deep, mysterious love for a past in which I had not been a participant. I do remember that in high school and college I was a sucker PHOTO COURTESY JOHN WOOLEY. for old movies, radio shows, 1940s comic books and the big bands of such long-ago names as Glenn Miller, Tommy & Jimmy Dorsey and my personal favorite, Hal McIntyre. Although it’s hard to imagine these days, when all the nostalgic entertainment you could ever want is available with a few keystrokes or clicks of the remote, finding what underground cartoonist R. Crumb called “the good old stuff ” was not easy in the late ‘60s. There were a few LPs you could buy of old big-band performances and radio dramas and comedies, if you knew where to look, but you were at the mercy of TV stations and, in bigger cities, the occasional revival-house movie theater when it came to watching vintage feature films. You took what they gave you, commercials and all. (A small number of old-time radio collectors did turn capitalist around that time and began selling copies of their shows on reel-to-reel tape, so a fan could at least build some kind of a personalized entertainment library.) There was a bit of a fad for nostalgia during this time, even though the notion of a young adult collecting old comic books or vintage movie memorabilia was unusual enough to warrant newspaper coverage. It happened to many of my friends, and also to me, in the late ‘60s, when I was attending Oklahoma State University, and several of us banded together in a nostalgia lover’s club known as the Oklahoma Alliance of Fans, better known as OAF. After all these decades, we OAFs still get together once a year, buying, selling, swapping and visiting – just as we’ve always done. But thanks to the relentless shoving of time, the stuff we’ve got to sell, trade or just show off now is just as likely to be from our lifetimes as not. When I traded Paul for Wham Comics No. 1, its date of publication was 24 years in the past, an era so different from my own that the book could’ve been drawn and colored by OKLAHOMA ALLIANCE OF FANS FOUNDERS (FROM LEFT) JOHN WOOLEY, DAVID SMITH AND BART BUSH.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

WHAM COMICS NO. 1, ISSUED IN 1940, TOOK ON A PERSONAL DIMENSION FOR THE INSIDER COLUMNIST, JOHN WOOLEY. GEORGE TAKEI OF STAR TREK AND SOCIAL MEDIA FAME VISITS WITH JOHN WOOLEY IN 1975. PHOTO COURTESY JOHN WOOLEY.


cavemen. Now, I think about what was happening 24 years ago in my life, and it seems like last week. I can remember when this whole idea of nostalgia for oneself first hit me, less than a decade after my acquisition of Wham Comics No. 1. I was in the Navy, stationed on a helicopter carrier that had just left Vietnam for Hawaii, where we were to pick up Skylab II. My friend and former roommate Bruce Shults – a fellow OAF – happened to be stationed at Pearl Harbor, and we had a great reunion. At some point, we decided to go to a local theater and take in the new film American Graffiti. Of course, it was terrific. But as I sat there and watched it unfold, something began to bother me. It took a while to figure it out, but I finally realized that this movie about, essentially, the final loosening of high school bonds, was set in the same time frame as my own – and my growing-up years had suddenly become quaint. It was still nostalgia, but it was tempered for the first time with an almost shocking sense of loss. The writer John O’Hara famously said that nostalgia was a kind of homesickness. Certainly, that describes nostalgia for yourself. Like homesickness, it’s an idealized vision of a place you loved, or think you did. What I try to remember now is that, like everyone who makes it through adolescence, I had my own problems and struggles during the teen and young-adult years, and one big reason nostalgia was so damned important to me was that I deeply craved it as an escape from some of the pressures of daily life. Everyone can use a little escapism, of course, but maybe your passion for it is directly proportional to your need for it. These days, I’ve come to terms with this changed face of nostalgia. I still love old movies – those made before my time as well as the firstrun films from my youth – and, as I’ve written in the pages before, I’m delighted to see so many of them, along with television shows I remember fondly, offered again by free, over-the-air HD channels like MeTV and getTV. They play like TV movies did when I was a kid, interrupted by commercials every 15 minutes or so, and I’ve even gotten used to those ads, which reflect, sadly enough, their aim toward the demographic that now includes me. (One ubiquitous spot begins with the announcement, “People who use urinary catheters are smiling!”) It’s taken me a little longer to accept the fact that the only oldies radio station in town now plays Guns N’ Roses when I’m expecting Lesley Gore. Peter De Vries, a novelist and writer for The New Yorker, is credited with the wry observation that nostalgia isn’t what it used to be – meaning, I think, that longing for the past in the past was better than longing for the past now, and nothing is as good as it once was. On the other hand, despite the long-ago hosing he gave me, Paul McSpadden and I have enjoyed a very good friendship for half a century, and without our shared love for nostalgia, we never would have met. The two of us still go to old bookstores together. We even occasionally make a trade. But believe me, if he ever turns up another copy of Wham Comics No. 1, I’m running the other way. No one’s that nostalgic.

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8/21/14 10:18 AM


The State OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Right On Track

T

Passenger train service between Tulsa and Oklahoma City is coming ‘round the bend.

he enduring allure of rail travel beckons Oklahomans to climb aboard a passenger rail between Sapulpa and Midwest City and then shuttle to the city centers of the state’s largest metropolitan areas. If successful, the route will expand to direct rail between downtown centers of both Tulsa and Oklahoma City and – via this crucial connection – almost anywhere in the U.S. The dream of Oklahoma passenger rail received a momentum boost from a 2006 regional rail summit of state legislators, officials from the Oklahoma Department of Transportation and Amtrak that was originated and hosted by attorney Rick Westcott, a Tulsa city councilor from 2006 to 2011. The state legislature formed the Eastern Flyer Rail Task Force in 2010 and, finding no Tulsans on the task force, the Tulsa City Council created its own citizen committee to offer input and appointed Westcott as its chair. “I’ve seen cities all over the U.S. use passenger rail as an economic tool and am convinced that the entire state would benefit,” says Westcott. “People need to know Amtrak is not the only model for passenger rail. There does not have to be large tax subsidies that people don’t like.” The future of Oklahoma train travel is bright, says Evan Stair, president of Passenger Rail Oklahoma, a grassroots nonprofit with a mission to promote passenger rail. Beginning in spring 2015, two trains a day will run between Midwest City and Sapulpa, with connecting shuttle bus services from Midwest City to Norman, Will Rogers World Airport and the State Capitol, says Stair. In Tulsa, shuttle buses will travel to Bartlesville, the University of Tulsa and Tulsa International Airport. For this route to succeed, both Westcott and Stair agree that people will have to use the

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

passenger service during the six-month trial period. “The long-term future of passenger rail in the state depends upon the success of the trial routes,” says Stair. “Route extensions could expand to downtown depots in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. The downtown Oklahoma City Santa Fe Depot is already used for Amtrak’s Heartland Flyer with stops in Norman, Purcell, Pauls Valley, Ardmore and in Texas – Gainesville and Fort Worth. The ultimate dream is a full-corridor route where rails already exist: Kansas City-Joplin-Tulsa-Oklahoma City-Fort Worth. This would allow direct train travel over Amtrak’s 46-state system. And, eventually, people could live in Oklahoma City and work in Tulsa, and vice-versa.” If the Midwest City-Sapulpa route proves viable, resolving the many intricacies required to make those last, necessary direct-rail connections to the city centers is certainly workable, says Westcott. These issues include ensuring that a 99year access privilege, granted to the State of Oklahoma by Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad when the state purchased the stretch of rail between Oklahoma City to Tulsa (aka the Sooner Sub), is also given to the current owner of the line, Iowa Pacific and Stillwater Central Railroad (SCR), a subdivision of Watco. Though these and other multi-entity details need resolving, Westcott believes “there are options, and I’m confident that these companies wanting to profit will work it out. Once SCR bought the Sooner Sub, the negotiations became private, so we can’t know the details. But this situation has great value to all parties involved. Let’s work out a deal.” Westcott emphasizes that while not as speedy as car travel, a train ride allows commuters time to either work or relax and enjoy the ride. Train travel is a passion for many, as exemplified by the 27-day run of Iowa Pacific’s Polar Express, already nearly sold out and departing from Bristow to the “North Pole” this winter. Passenger rail enthusiasts tout the opportunity for work and leisure in train travel compared to the constant vigilance demanded while driving a car. TRACY LEGRAND


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Q&A with Dr. Matt Griswold of 918 Chiropractic about

Treating more than just back pain

Dr. J. Matthew Griswold

Q: A:

Q: 918 Chiropractic 1322 E. 15th street Tulsa, OK 74120 918.212.8688

www.918chiropractic.com

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A:

Lately we are hearing more about chiropractic in the news. Chiropractic isn’t a new natural healing practice is it? The roots of Chiropractic can be traced as far back as 2700 B.C., but the practice of spinal manipulation was rediscovered in the US in the late nineteenth century. Recently, I have seen a shift towards the increased valuation of chiropractic care through the contemporary focus on real health and wellness.

Q:

So let’s get to your treatment style. Is it all about the cracking and popping we’ve heard about? The treatment style I use is tailored for the individual patient. I see patients in every stage of life. I was even able to take care of my newborn as soon as she was welcomed into the world! There are several ways to specifically move a bone without “cracking” and “popping.” Gentle specific care is what I specialize in.

Q: A:

A:

We understand you are an avid runner. Do people come to you with running or athletic injuries? 918 Chiropractic is very involved in the Tulsa athletic community. I’m proud to say that I have the honor of caring for everyday runners and cyclists, college and professional athletes, and, even an occasional Olympians. My job is to keep my patients doing what they love, whatever that may be and at any level. So you’re saying you treat more than just back pain? I have seen improvement in my patients with ADHD, asthma, back pain, bed wetting, colic, ear infection, and headaches, etc. Many people think of a chiropractor as a bone doctor who treats back pain. The truth is our primary focus is the nervous system that happens to be housed in the bones of the spinal column. The nervous system is able to control everything in the body at close to 100% health when the spine is properly aligned. 8/29/14 5:20 PM

OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

29


The State

SCENE

Larry Mocha, Leigh Goodson, 2014 Vision Honoree Jake Henry Jr., Konnie Boulter and John-Kelly Warren celebrate a record $300,000 raised at 2014 Vision in Education Leadership Award Dinner, benefiting Tulsa Community

The 2014 Kids’ World International Festival will be held Nov. 219-22 at the Exchange Center at Expo Square. Pictured are Julie, Sanjay, Maddi, Bella and Daya Meshri.

Blake Hastings, Fr. Brian Barker, Bro. Jack Hibbard and John Hastings attended the Caritas Circle dinner to thank benefactors to Cascia Hall.

Pam Carter, Susan Thomas and Kathie Hannagan enjoyed the Tulsa Botanic Garden’s Circle Dinner.

Lea, Hans and Peggy Helmerich attended a VIP dinner in honor of the grand opening and dedication of The University of Tulsa’s Helmerich Center for American Research. Emeka Nnaka, Victoria Johnson and Charlotte Long recently took part in United Way Emerging Leaders Society’s first-ever summit, titled “Converge.”

Jack Frank, Becky Frank, Kirsten Graham and Mark Graham attended the annual Executive Women’s International Executive of the Year dinner, this year honoring Becky Frank.

John Sullivan, Karen Davis, Judy Alexander and guest speaker Patrick Kennedy were among those that attended the Zarrow Visionaries dinner, presented by Mental Health Association Oklahoma. Bria Cornforth and Retta Cornforth enjoyed the blu Lounge party at the annual Oklahoma Regatta Festival. Kevin and Tammy Hern ware pictured with country singer Justin Moore at McDazzle, an annual fundraiser for the Ronald McDonald House.

Patrick Gordon, Rita Singer, Matt Moffett, Kate Jenneman and Sara Bost Fisher enjoyed the Artful Cocktail party, benefiting Tulsa Girls Art School.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

Jason and Ellie Bailey are pictured at Taste of Whittier, a fundraiser for the historic Kendall Whittier neighborhood in Tulsa.

Cherokee Chief Bill John Baker and Jennifer Loren are pictured at the Global Vision Awards Dinner, at which Baker accepted an award on behalf of Cherokee Nation Businesses.


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10:48 AM


The State

TULSA ARTIST PATRICK GORDON SPENDS MOST OF HIS WAKING HOURS IN HIS HOME STUDIO, WHICH WAS USED AS A LIVING ROOM BY THE PREVIOUS OWNER. TOP RIGHT: AN ECLECTIC MIX OF FURNISHINGS LEND TO THE STUDY OF GORDON’S WORKS, ON DISPLAY IN HIS LIVING ROOM. RIGHT: IMPLEMENTS OF THE ARTIST’S TRADE ARE EVERYWHERE IN GORDON’S HOME.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014


L I V I N G S PA C E

Good to be Home

Renowned artist Patrick Gordon returns to Tulsa and to an artistic space.

A

Photography by Nathon Harmon

rtist Patrick Gordon has easily settled back into Tulsa life after almost a decade in New York City, where his career flourished. Many Tulsans may remember him as P.S. Gordon, whose popular watercolors, drenched in vivid color with stunning detail of eclectic still lifes, gained the artist national attention by the time he graduated from the University of Tulsa with graduate work in watercolor. OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

Gordon had his first show in a New York City gallery by the time he was 21. He created two Mayfest posters, including one for the 25th anniversary, had shows in major galleries and museums across the country and was regularly commissioned to paint portraits and custom pieces. By 2003, Gordon was ready for a change. He relocated to New York City and transitioned from watercolors to large-scale oil on canvas, plus his signature changed from “P.S.” to “Patrick.” However, after years of living in a 1,500-square-foot loft, and as he edged closer to a milestone birthday, Gordon was beginning to feel the tug of returning to Tulsa. “I made wonderful friends in New York, and I miss them, but there is something about those 40-year-old friendships [in Tulsa] that I couldn’t duplicate there,” he adds. A few months earlier, he’d received a brochure about a home for sale on 21st Street from a friend in real estate. He still wasn’t ready to make the change, but that house “stuck in my head,” he says. The home lingered on the market for months, and when Gordon finally decided to relocate, he bought it. The home, built in 1940, sits across from the Skelly Mansion – “What a view I have!” he exclaims – and itself has an interesting history. After World War II, it was converted into two apartments. And it was the first of many Tulsa houses owned by the late Charles Faudree. The renowned interior designer lived downstairs, and his sister, Francie, resided upstairs. While the house has changed owners, most of Faudree’s original design remained. “The living room was dark, and the gold leaf ceiling had turned black,” says Gordon. But the house and wood floors were in good shape, so the biggest transition was painting most of the rooms white. Gordon also removed the wall that split the house into two units; but as homage to Faudree, the original wallpaper and light fixture remain in the entry. “I’ll never change that,” says Gordon. Because the house was to be Gordon’s working studio, he repurposed most of the rooms. The large living room serves as a studio where Gordon paints often 10 to 12 hours a day. The one exception is Friday, when Gordon and a friend spend a few hours perusing the area garage and estate sales, where he often finds unique items to

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

ELEMENTS, SUCH AS A WICKER TABLE FROM HIS CHILDHOOD AND DINING CHAIRS HE CUSTOMIZED, ARE BOTH UNIQUE AND PERSONAL FOR GORDON. TOP LEFT: ONE OF THE COLLECTIONS THE ARTIST HAS AMASSED THROUGH HIS WORK AND INTERESTS. TOP RIGHT: THE MASTER BEDROOM IS THE ONLY ROOM WHERE GORDON DISPLAYS WORK BY OTHER ARTISTS.


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The State add to his multiple theme collections. The original library is now the dining room, where Gordon uses the wicker table from his childhood, painted gold, mixed with a set of Louis XVI chairs. “I picked these up at a sale,” he says. Originally mahogany with yellow leather, he first painted the chairs white, then started experimenting with layers of color. When he liked the look, he added the nail head trim. The chandelier over the table is one he’s had for more than 30 years, making the move to New York City and back. The library shelves hold items he’s used in past paintings. Gordon’s eclectic style is especially evident in the living room, originally an oversized dining room. There’s an acrylic chair at one end and a pair of French bombe commodes covered in a jaguar-pattern cut velvet at the other. Formal chairs flank a stainless steel cocktail table. “From Home Depot,” he says, laughing. Upon closer inspection, the “table” is a storage unit for a pick-up truck. “In New York, every inch of space counts, and that was also my silver chest,” he says. On top is his collection of hearts. Gordon’s artwork is on display throughout the house. In his studio, portraits of his daughter made over the years adorn the walls. In the living room hangs his only still-life watercolor displayed in the home, the medium

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

TOP: GORDON’S HOME ALSO SERVES AS HIS STUDIO AND A BY-APPOINTMENT-ONLY GALLERY FOR HIS WORK. LEFT: A FRENCH BOMBE COMMODE COVERED IN JAGUARPATTERN CUT VELVET GRACES THE LIVING ROOM. BELOW: EVIDENCE OF AN ARTIST’S LIFE.


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The State

that launched his career. Using a centerpiece from a friend’s apartment in NYC, the painting is done on two pieces of watercolor paper to create the size. Only in his bedroom does he have other artists’ paintings. The kitchen update consisted of adding a mirrored backsplash and installing a new stove. The breakfast room is now a sitting area. Traditional furnishings are juxtaposed with a sculpture of a bale of hay used as a coffee table. Gordon explains the collage of paintings on the wall in the room. “[During] the month of May 2010, I stood at the same place every day looking out my apartment window and gave myself 10 minutes to paint the same view but from different perspectives.” Upstairs are two bedrooms – one for his grandchildren – plus Gordon’s office. The rest of the space has been transformed into his gallery. Because of his extensive connections in Tulsa, he was reluctant to work exclusively with any gallery, so Gordon’s work can be viewed at the residence by appointment. TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON

38

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

TOP: FUNCTIONAL WELDING MASKS MAKE BOLD STATEMENTS AS ART. LEFT: A SILVER TRUCK TOOL BOX SERVES AS A COFFEE TABLE FOR BOOKS AND A COLLECTION OF HEARTS. BELOW: GORDON WITH TWO WORKS DISPLAYING THE VIVID DETAIL FOR WHICH HE IS RENOWNED.


2014


The State

The New Normal

Opt for comfy duds and “normcore” staples for the fall.

VINCE SUEDE HIGH-TOP SNEAKERS WITH RABBIT FUR TRIM, $350, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

STYLE

ELIE TAHARI CASHMERE SWEATER, $398, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LES COPAINS PARKA, $2,495, SAKS FIFTH

ARMANI COLLEZIONI. PHOTO COURTESY SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

AVENUE.

JO IE R 8, S ABB IT AK FU SF RS IFT H A CAR F VE NU , E.

$19

KAREN KANE HOODED TOP, $79, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

PAUW PULLOVER CAPE, $1,740, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LANVIN SNEAKERS, $695, ABERSONS.

VINCE LAMB SHEARLING MOTO JACKET, $1,895, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. GLAMOURPUSS FUR-TRIMMED CAPE, $425, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LOEFFLER RANDALL LEATHER AND SHEARLING HANDBAG, $550, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MANOLO BLAHNIK SLOUCHY SUEDE BOOTS, $995, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LEATHER SLEEVES, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN.

JUNE FUR JACKET WITH


Star Jewelers loves the 918

Steve Cluck is showing his love of the Tulsa community with his newest art endeavor, the Don't Hate the 918 photo project. He is shooting photographs of the people of the 918, wearing Don't Hate the 918 T-shirts. The goal is to ultimately photograph 918 different people! You can see his photos at www. donthatethe918.com

What is more valuable than the most precious jewel?

Great relationships. Star Jewelers "loves the 918" and has been helping make the Tulsa and Broken Arrow Community sparkle for three generations. Owner Dayna Matheny is modeling one of the new T-shirts for this project. "Being community oriented is important to us. When I saw Steve was doing this project, I wanted to be involved and show our support." Star Jewelers is an illustration of stability and success and has occupied the same space in the Rose District, downtown Broken Arrow since 1973. It is one of only a few local jewelry stores to have an in-house jeweler – who also happens to be Dayna’s father, Hank. For over 41 years, customers have felt safe leaving their jewelry in his skilled, trustworthy hands for repairs. Star Jewelers features fine jewelry from some of the world’s top jewelry designers as well as their own custom designs. “We find interesting items from around the world,” she said, “and try to stay classic yet current at all times.” Visit their single location at 120 S. Main in Broken Arrow or learn more at www. starjewelers.com.


The State

COLOR

STEPHANIE KANTIS 18-INCH

GreenWith Envy

CLASSIC GOLD CHAIN, $275, WITH RECTANGULAR MALACHITE PENDANT, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

Fall’s favorite jewel tone comes in every shade. RAY BAN MIRRORED SUNGLASSES, $179, VISIONS UNIQUE EYEWEAR.

CHANEL LE

BCBGMAXAZRIA

VERNIS NAIL

FAUX LEATHER MINI

VERSACE IMAGE COURTESY OF CHANEL.

COLOUR IN

DRESS, $178, SAKS

MYSTERIOUS,

FIFTH AVENUE.

$27.00, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

KNIT DRESS, $525, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

THE ROW LEATHER JACKET, $2,790,

GUCCI. PHOTO COURTESY SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ABERSONS.

ALEXIS BITTAR WIDE LUCITE AND PAVE CRYSTAL HINGED BANGLES; $295 AND $175; SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

CAMO WEDGE,

J. BRAND OLIVE

$550, ABERSONS.

S.

, $195, ABERSON

CARGO JEANS

RENE ESCOBAR SILVER AND GREEN ONYX EARRINGS, $1,188, ABERSONS. HANKY PANKY SIGNATURE LACE BOY SHORTS, $29 EACH, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN.

PEDRO GARCIA

IMAGE CO

URTESY OF

CHANEL.

CHANEL QUADRA DOW IN EYESHA , NITIEN TISSÉ VE SAKS $61.00, ENUE. FIFTH AV


LIVE FROM NEW YORK ... IT’S KEY TO THE CURE! ©

Join Saturday Night Live and Saks Fifth Avenue in the fight against women’s cancers. Get the shirt, designed by rag & bone, available exclusively at Saks this October. Then shop October 16 to 19, when Saks will donate 2% of sales to local and national women’s cancer charities.* Special thanks to SNL’s current and former castmembers, the 2014 Ambassadors for EIF’s Women’s Cancer Research Fund and Saks Fifth Avenue’s Key To The Cure.

*SAKS WILL DONATE 2% OF SALES FROM NEW YORK, BEVERLY HILLS, SAKS.COM, AND OFF5TH.COM UP TO A TOTAL OF $500,000 FROM THURSDAY TO SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16-19 ALONG WITH 100% OF KEY TO THE CURE T-SHIRT SALES FROM OCTOBER 1 - DECEMBER 31 TO THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY FOUNDATION. PLEASE VISIT YOUR LOCAL SAKS FIFTH AVENUE STORE AND SAKS.COM/KTTC FOR INFORMATION ON YOUR LOCAL STORE’S DONATION. #SAKSxKTTC © SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE AND ITS RELATED CHARACTERS AND TRADEMARKS ARE PROPERTY OF NBCUNIVERSAL MEDIA LLC.


The State

TREND

Feature Creatures

LOEFFLER RANDALL CALF HAIR HANDBAG, $495, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

RENE ESCOBAR SILVER

ELIZABETH AND JAMES CALF

AND MOONSTONE

Some of this season’s biggest inspirations come from nature.

CUFF, $1,625, ABER-

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FACE A FACE CAT EYE SUNGLASSES,

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5,

$455, HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR.

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN SCARF, $575,

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TH

K NI AH BL E. O U OL EN V AN M TH A FIF

NI K S AV UED EN E UE PO , $2 IN 20, . TSA TO KS FIF EP TH UM AV EN PS UE , .

SONS.

JEA

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

FIF

HAIR CROSSBODY BAG, $445,

SEVEN FOR DIANE VON FURSTENBERG LEOPARD CALF HAIR CLUTCH, $268, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

ALL MANKIND BLACK BROCADE SKINNY

MANTU LONG-

JEANS, $265,

SLEEVE BUTTON

SAKS FIFTH

DOWN WITH

AVENUE.

EMBELLISHED NECKLINE, $905, SAKS FIFTH FRANK LYMAN

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DRESS, $185, DONNA’S FASHIONS.

YOANA BARASCHI REPTILE PRINT DRESS, $305,

44

LES COPAINS BUTTERFLY SWEATER, $1,195, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MILLY FRINGE MINI SKIRT, $210, MISS JACKSON’S. ALEXIS BITTAR DOUBLE-STONE BYPASS HINGE BRACELET WITH PYRITE, $275,

ALEXIS BITTAR

SAKS FIFTH

LUCITE AND

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LABRADORITE

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

SNAKE CLIP EARRINGS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

LES COPAINS BLACK EMBELLISHED SKIRT, $795, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHTOOS BY DAN MORGAN.

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45


The State

YO U R H E A L T H

Trust Your Gut

Understanding and managing irritable bowel syndrome can help make life easier.

bloating and even extraintestinal symptoms.” Despite its unpleasant attributes, IBS does not increase a patient’s risk of colon cancer like more serious conditions, such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, which are inflammatory bowel diseases. et’s face it: Bowel hab- However, to rule out these possibilities, Clark says it’s important to be its aren’t on the list of evaluated by a gastroenterologist. sexy subjects. But these “IBS is diagnosed after a thorough investigation of the gastrointestidays, they do seem nal tract has been undertaken to rule out other types of gastrointestinal to be a trending topic disease, and this may include performing a colonoscopy,” he says. as many people manage one of the “Also, gastroenterologists use specific criteria based on symptoms most common gastrointestinal disorders, and diagnostic investigation. Diagnostic testing is based on clinical irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). symptomology.” “It is estimated up to 20 percent Risk factors for IBS, as reported by the Mayo Clinic, include being of adults and children in North younger than 45, having a family history of IBS and being female – America suffer from IBS,” twice as many women as men are diagnosed. Additionally, individuals says Dr. Christian Clark, diagnosed with mental health disorders, including anxiety and depresa gastroenterologist sion, can be disproportionately affected. At this time, the cause of IBS at Adult Gastroenremains unclear. terology Associates “The etiology of IBS is not fully understood. Most recently, there Inc. in Tulsa. “The has been focus looking into whether intestinal inflammation, alternasigns and symptoms tions in the bacteria of the intestine, food sensitivities/allergies or the of IBS are quite variway in which the intestines digest food may play a role,” says Clark. able. Typically, patients “Controlling IBS symptoms includes a healthy, high-fiber diet, avoidwill describe altered bowel ance of trigger foods, exercise and management of stressors. habits (including diarrhea and Additionally, medications may be prescribed to treat IBS.” constipation), abdominal pain and REBECCA FAST

L

MANAGING SYMPTOMS

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the best way to manage IBS is to discover what triggers symptoms, then reduce or remove those causes. Recommendations include: Establish regular eating habits. Eating at regular times helps regulate your bowels. Opt for small, frequent meals instead of larger ones set farther apart. This will ease the amount of food moving through your intestinal tract. Eat fiber-rich foods. Try whole fruits, vegetables (including beans) and whole grains, including rolled oats, brown rice and whole wheat bread, but make changes slowly. Fiber helps move food through the intestine, but it takes time for the body to adjust to eating more. Adding too much too quickly may result in gas, bloating and cramping.

46

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

Drink enough fluids. Fiber draws water from the body to move foods through the intestines. Without enough water and fluids, individuals may become constipated. Watch what you drink. Alcohol and caffeine can stimulate the intestines; this can cause diarrhea. Artificial sweeteners that contain sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, mannitol and xylitol may cause diarrhea, too. Carbonated drinks can produce gas. Identify problem foods and eating habits. Keeping a food diary during flare-ups can help sufferers figure out what they may be eating that’s causing a problem. – RF


YOUR TRIP BEGINS HERE

Little Red River near Heber Springs

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overlooking the Buffalo National River, America’s first national river > Josie’s restaurant, Batesville > Blanchard Springs Caverns > folk crafts at the Ozark Folk Center > zip line adventure near Jasper


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Devil’s Den State Park

Our mountain getaway

Arkansas State Parks are natural places to reconnect. Cabins, campsites, lodges and scenic overlooks are available year-round. Make lasting memories here.

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At 2,753 feet, Mount Magazine is the height of vacationing in Arkansas – literally. The Lodge at Mount Magazine offers sweeping views of the Petit Jean River Valley, first-class accommodations, classic Southern cuisine, an indoor swimming pool, and fitness center. Spacious cabins with hot tubs stretch along the same bluff.

1-877-665-6343 • MountMagazineStatePark.com

One of Arkansas’s five state park lodges.


CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

A R K A N S A S

GASTON’S is a family-owned, first-

class resort on the world-famous White River. America’s memory maker for over a half-century, Gaston’s offers a complete vacation with the finest fishing, lodging and dining. The resort can outfit your adventures with boat rentals and full dock service. Experienced guides are eager to introduce you to the Great Outdoors. Gaston’s is committed to superior personal attention, exceptional food and the best recreational activities.

870-431-5202 gastons@gastons.com Gastons.com

OZARK GATEWAY

LOCO ROPES!

BENTONVILLE

USA Today Travel’s “10 Excellent Outdoor Adventures for Families.” Participants cross 30+ Treetop elements, including ziplines, tarzan swings, rope bridges, and swinging logs, offering challenges from the mildly cautious to the seriously adventurous! Tower Adventures include the roundtrip Flying & Screamin’ Pig Ziplines, the HotShot FreeFall, and the Planks Peak Climbing Wall. No organized event needed.

Popular year-round, the Ozark Mountains are especially beautiful in autumn. Scenic highways and byways cut through rolling hills to reveal stunning panoramic views of dazzling fall color. The great outdoors is the biggest draw to the region with world-class fishing, floating, hiking and biking, as well as unique adventures such as zip lining and caving. Charming cities and towns offer shopping, dining, arts, music, festivals and more. Order a FREE vacation guide to plan the ultimate getaway to the Ozark Gateway.

Experience Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art’s newest exhibit, State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now, open September 13, 2014, through January 19, 2015. This one-of-a-kind exhibition brings together the artwork of more than 100 American artists, ranging from works on canvas and paper to photography and video to installation and performance art. Venture to downtown Bentonville and explore 21c Museum Hotel, the Walmart Museum and an award-winning culinary scene.

locoropes.com 888-669-6717

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A R K A N S A S

ARKANSAS

GUIDE

2014

WATER WOODS Exploring lakes, rivers, trails and terrain.

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LIVING IN ARKANSAS

A beautiful vacation destination, Arkansas is also an ideal place to call home. Little Rock ranked first among Kiplinger’s “10 Great Places to Live.” Forbes named Northwest Arkansas and Central Arkansas as two of the “Best Places for Business and Careers.” Great cities, towns, attractions, museums, restaurants and festivals, as well as world-class educational and medical facilities, are located across Arkansas. Order your FREE copy of Living in Arkansas to learn more.

1-888-NATURAL RelocateToArkansas.com

ARKANSAS MOTORCYCLING GUIDE

ARKANSAS WATER & WOODS

From Delta plains to Ozark backroads, the Arkansas Motorcycling Guide showcases 21 classic rides across the state. Mapped out along the way are interesting stopovers and must-see attractions in bikerfriendly cities and towns. Also included are coupons for restaurants, lodges and other venues on the road. Plan your trip around an award-winning rally or festival.

In Arkansas, adventure is all around – from misty river valleys to rugged mountaintops, pristine lakes to lush woodlands – and autumn is the best time to seek it out. The all-new Arkansas Water & Woods showcases quintessential experiences in The Natural State – the things you really must see and do. Enjoy beautiful fall foliage while floating the Buffalo River, fishing on the Little Red River, hiking on Petit Jean Mountain or camping at an Arkansas State Park. Order your FREE copy today!

1-800-872-1259 Arkansas.com/motorcycling

1-866-566-5727 Arkansas.com

CONWAY is home to three colleges, a thriving business community, scenic lakes and parks, and a number of cultural and recreational opportunities. A creative blend of modern and quaint, Conway has the energy of a big city while it maintains its small-town quality of life that is second to none.

501-327-7788 ConwayArk.com


51st Annual Weinfest Wine Festival – October 11

WESTERN ARKANSAS’ MOUNTAIN FRONTIER

FORT SMITH

Beautiful scenery will surround you in a place steeped in history and hospitality. Visit Fort Smith’s scenic riverfront and historic sites. Delight in fall splendor on a train ride through the Boston Mountains. Discover wine tastings and vineyard tours in Arkansas Wine Country. Attend bluegrass festivals in Mansfield and Waldron, the Fall Arts and Crafts Fair in Van Buren or the Old-Fashioned Square Gathering in Ozark.

Named a “Top Ten True Western Town” for the past two years by True West magazine, Fort Smith is the setting for “True Grit” and future home of the national U.S. Marshals Museum. Relive America’s frontier past with a tour of Miss Laura’s, a former bordello that now serves as the Visitor Center, and the Fort Smith National Historic Site. Ride a restored electric trolley or take a train ride into the Ozarks. Enjoy eclectic dining and shopping, live music and outdoor adventures.

1-800-332-5889 visitwestarkansas.com

1-800-637-1477 www.fortsmith.org

Early Bird Concert Friday Evening • Located on Wiederkehr Wine Cellar Grounds • Arts & Crafts Exhibits • International food concessions • Weinkellar Restaurant (full bar) • Grape-stomping contest, Alpine games, Alpine horn blowing, barrel rolling, log toss and more • Swiss Family Bistro – food, wine tasting and full bar – I-40 exit 41 Special Weinfest Dinner In Weingarten Tickets at Door

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VAN BUREN

Experience fall time in the Ozarks and the Boston Mountains from a vintage excursion train. Take a stroll through the Main Street Historic District to shop the unique specialty shops and antiques, enjoy live music and great food. The Historic Drennen-Scott House, home of Revolutionary War descendant John Drennen and his family, is truly a treasure worth exploring. Fall Festival – October 10-12 For a free Visitor’s Guide, call or visit our website.

1-800-332-5889 vanburen.org

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Come Ride Our Roller Coaster Best Western Inn of the Ozarks is Eureka Springs’ only full-service resort. Come see why more couples, families and groups choose Inn of the Ozarks year after year. Plan your trip this fall and take in beautiful brightly colored foliage along scenic winding roads. • Award-winning rooms and luxury suites • Award-winning dining in our newly renovated Myrtie Mae’s Café • Rooms with balcony overlooking the Ozarks • 12-slot, covered parking lot for motorcycles • Eureka Springs Trolley Stop • Zip line across the street Myrtie Mae ’s Café Save with “Hot Deals” and Vacation Pa ckages ALL YEAR LONG ! Sign up for our free e-newsletter onlin e at www.innoftheoza rks.com.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

5/16/14 10:13 AM


The State

D E S T I N AT I O N

Yankee Colors

New England shows its true – and best – fall foliage colors in October. AUTUMN REFLECTIONS IN Oklahoma has spectacular autumn scenery, THE HOUSATONIC RIVER but New England is famous for it. Winding NEAR CORNWALL, CONN. drives up ancient mountains, quiet roads over scenic bridges and picturesque paths along tranquil rivers make a tour of New England’s fall colors not just possible, but downright inviting. Whether by two wheels or four, by foot or hoof, the New England countryside and its magnificent terrain of hillside forests, snowcapped mountains, steep cliffs and serene pastures make it the very picture of fall’s enchantment. Add steepled churches, weathering red barns and smoke-billowing farmhouses to that backdrop, and you have a New England that Ichabod Crane would recognize.

Northeast Kingdom, Vermont It seems that almost every image of the idealized American autumn splendor comes straight out Vermont. Considering that at least 75

THE VIEW FROM GORHAM MOUNTAIN IN ACADIA NATIONAL PARK, MAINE. PHOTO COURTESY NATIONAL PARK SERVICE.

percent of the state’s more-than-9,600-square miles is covered in forest, Vermont is the ultimate locale to take in the changing leaf colors. And its Northeast Kingdom – the state’s northeast corner – features exquisite views of autumn-tinged shores at Lake Seymour, hiking trails (such as the Long Trail) and those traditional covered bridges throughout the valleys. Take an extra memory card for the camera and some ready cash for apples and maple syrup at roadside stands. www.vermontvacation.com

White Mountains, New Hampshire If a trip to New Hampshire is in the plans – and it ought to be – visitors will want to consider the White Mountains, the northern range of the old Appalachian Mountains. The White Mountains are among the most rugged ranges in New England, and New Hampshire has designated a highway system that offers the best views of the changing flora. The White Mountain Trails is made up of two main trails – the northern loop and southern loop – along with a National Scenic Byway. One of the most beautiful stretches is the Kancamagus Highway, taking guests through little towns and villages that offer plenty of local charm. www.visitwhitemountains.com Mohawk Trail, Massachusetts One of the best-known scenic byways in New England goes right through the majestic Berkshires. The Mohawk Trail, which winds through Mohawk Trail State Forest in northwestern Massachusetts, is said to be an old path used by the American Indian tribes for trade and other maneuvers before colonial expansion. The trail takes guests across stunning scenery and vantage points, including the Western Summit, affording excellent vistas to mountains in the state as well as those in Vermont. Other points of interests include the Elk Memorial (the trail’s highest point), Salmon Falls and the Ice Age-carved Glacial Potholes, King Phillip’s Rock (the supposed location where the French first planted its flag in North America) and other natural and manmade wonders. www. mohawktrail.com Connecticut River Valley, Connecticut A map of Connecticut reads like an Emily Brontë novel with place names like Essex, Glastonbury, Windsor and Manchester. These towns, however, make up the Connecticut River Valley, which flanks the Connecticut River from the Long Island Sound inlet near Old Lyme all the way up to Massachusetts, cutting the state in half. The Blueway, a new federal designation of the entire river, invites tourists to explore the region, rich in history and great scenery even more exquisite in harvest season. www.ctvisit.com OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

T R AV E L E R ’ S NOTES

A Chemistry Lesson Why do leaves change color in autumn? According to the National Park Service website, www.nps.gov, leaves change color because of carotenoids, the pigment that produces the orange color in carrots, and anthocyanins, which give cranberries and plums reddish hues. As summer ends, the amount of sunlight decreases, causing trees to cease photosynthesis. Chlorophyll, the green pigment, breaks down, allowing the other pigments to shine through.

SILVER CASCADE FALLS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE’S WHITE MOUNTAINS.

Coastal Maine What does the seaside have to offer for autumn viewing? Plenty, as evidenced in the views of coastal Maine. The Acadia Byway, also known as the Acadia All-American Road, runs through breathtaking Acadia National Park and along a particularly scenic stretch of the craggy Maine shore. From land and higher elevations inside the park, guests can see the Atlantic Ocean’s exhilarating, chilly wake. From the harbors, the shoreline – alight with fall color – marvels the senses. If crowds aren’t in the plans, check out the views from Mount Battie in Camden Hills State Park, located west of Acadia. www.visitmaine.com Adirondack Lakes, New York No list of New England fall colors would be

complete without a stop in the Adirondack Mountains of north New York, and the Lakes Region offers some of the most incredible natural settings anywhere. Home to more than 600 lakes, river and streams nestled among the heights, the shifting palette of forests are even more striking when reflected by the mirror-like waters. Plus, the lakes region offers plenty of opportunities to get out of the car and walk through the woods as nature intended. www. visitadirondacks.com Litchfield Hills, Connecticut The Litchfield Hills of western Connecticut is a region treasured for its scenic beauty, especially in October. Following the Housatonic River, guests will find everything from museums and covered

How does weather and elevation affect fall leaf colors? Conditions occurring before and during the period in which chlorophyll breaks down will determine the brilliance of color, states the U.S. Forest Service website, www.fs.fed.us. A string of sunny and mild days with cool (not frosty) nights will bring out the best colors because sugars produced in the leaves in sunlight do not “drain out” of the leaves quickly. Leaves generally change color at higher elevations first because of the difference in temperature. bridges to tour guides dressed in colonial period dress. The region also is home to the village of Kent, Conn., renowned for its New England old-town warmth and shops that hearken to days past. As far as New England towns go, Kent is sublime under its orange, yellow, purple and rust canopy of leaves. KAREN SHADE

AUTUMN’S CANOPY IS SPECTACULAR ON NEW ENGLAND’S SHORELINE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014


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Say ? t a Wh By Paul Fairchild

Listening to your body’s cues – BOTH GOOD AND BAD – can help

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

LIFE HAPPENS. Things get hectic, the to-do

list gets longer, and it gets hard to dole out attention to competing priorities. But when your body talks, you should listen. Lingering colds and recurring headaches might be more than inconveniences. They don’t always go away by themselves, and just because you’ve been to the doctor this year doesn’t mean you’ve got a clean bill of health. “Several studies show that annual exams don’t affect mortality. You can get an annual exam, but if you don’t have any symptoms, there’s really no reason to do it,” says Dr. Laurence Altshuler, director of oncology intake at Tulsa’s Cancer Treatment Centers of America. “It’s not going to help you live longer. It’s up to patients themselves. If they’ve got symptoms, that’s when they need to go in and see the doctor.” Sometimes there are not signs of illness. However, if we are in tune with our body, we may be able to pick up on symptoms indicating something’s amiss.


TUMMY TROUBLES

We’ve all experienced tummy troubles. Whether it is gas, bloating, diarrhea or heartburn, digestive symptoms are often temporary and will pass. However, it is important to pay attention when issues affecting the digestive system persist. “Loss of appetite is a subtle thing, but especially if it’s associated with weight loss, it could mean that something’s going on,” says Dr. Frank Hamilton, a family medicine physician at St. John Health System. “I think that another thing would be change in bowel habits. If a person has regular bowel movements, then [develops] constipation or a change in the bowel movement size, that’s a sign that something else is going on.” Changes in stool color and consistency can also indicate a problem, Hamilton says. “If a person’s stool turned very dark, that can be a sign that there’s blood loss in the upper part of the GI tract,” he says. “[Stools] almost look black or tarry. A person might notice, but they may not feel all that bad.” It turns out that this is a somewhat common problem. Hamilton says that black, tarry stools most

often indicate gastritis or ulcers. “Most people think that when you have ulcers, you have pain,” he says. “Some people do, but some don’t.” Hamilton says that it isn’t always a patient that notices irregularities with his or her digestive system, either. Jaundice, a condition in which the skin takes on a yellow pigmentation, can point to digestive troubles. Though jaundice is often associated with infants or liver failure, Hamilton says that it could point to another problem. “Others can notice jaundice,” he says. “[Patients’] eyes may start looking a bit yellow, but people look at them and think, ‘Gee your color is really funny.’ That’s a subtle, early finding that could be related to the GI tract.” Hamilton says the real concern with jaundice is that it could point to pancreatic cancer. A growth could obstruct the bile duct, causing the jaundice. “Gallstones and hepatitis are not uncommon, and jaundice can also be a marker of that,” he says. Hamilton encourages everyone over the age of 50 to get screened for colon cancer in order to catch any problems as soon as possible. He also says that to keep the digestive tract in its best shape, drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration.

RESPIRATORY ILLNESS

Altshuler says perk up your ears when you get respiratory infections. Your body may be telling you that you’ve got more than just a cold. “I’ve had patients that say, ‘I had a respiratory infection, and the doctor said I had pneumonia and gave me antibiotics. It helped, but the infection never really cleared up.’ Eventually, they get another test and find out they have lung cancer. I’ve seen that quite often,” says Altshuler. The problem occurs when patientdoctor communication breaks down. Patients may downplay their symptoms because they don’t want to be seen as complainers. They may also downplay symptoms or fail to disclose them when those symptoms do not impede on dayto-day activities. Patients with colds, coughs and respiratory infections that don’t clear up with treatment need to tell their doctors. While they may be able to hack and get

through the day, they may be on their way to a case of pneumonia that could shut them down for days or weeks. A small improvement in a cold or cough that’s being aggressively treated isn’t enough. Schedule a follow-up appointment with the doctor soon, and dig into the details with the doctor, providing all the information the physician needs. Patients should also explore treatment timeframes with their doctors. In most cases, dramatic improvements should be seen within days of starting medication. Very seldom should treatment duration be counted in weeks. When the doctor prescribes, ask how long it will take to see improvement. Start the treatment, and, when time’s up, see the doctor again if the symptoms haven’t disappeared. OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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“IF THEY’VE GOT SYMPTOMS, THAT’S WHEN THEY NEED TO GO IN AND SEE THE DOCTOR.”

SWOLLEN LYMPH NODES

Another symptom to check is swollen lymph nodes. Altshuler has seen his fair share of cancerous tumors that were initially mistaken for swollen lymph nodes. If lymph nodes grow larger over time or change in texture – from rubbery to rock hard or vice versa – it could be a sign of something serious. If the cause of swollen lymph nodes is an infection, a physician will prescribe antibiotics and schedule a follow-up appointment for two to three weeks down the road. If there’s no improvement within the first few days of taking antibiotics, the patient should see the doctor sooner. “I recently had a patient that was put on antibiotics for a lump under his jaw. He saw some initial benefit during the first couple of days of taking antibiotics,” says Altshuler. “But after a week, he thought the lump had grown. Instead of going back to the doctor in three weeks, he insisted on coming back sooner. We biopsied the lump, and it was cancer. But he caught it at an early stage, and hopefully he’ll be cured.”

CHEST PAINS

Dr. Stephen Travis, an internist and pediatrician at the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, warns that chest pain always deserves attention. Most of the time these pains are harmless, but he urges patients to err on the side of caution. “Most chest pain and discomfort is not from your heart,” he says. “At the same time, there can be disastrous effects if it is your heart and you ignore it. Essentially, if you’re over 40 and get chest pain, it needs to be addressed.” Diabetics should be especially wary. About 25 percent of patients with diabetes don’t have the advantage of listening to their bodies. Cardiac nerve damage undermines the heart’s pain signals to the brain. In these cases, physicians look for reduced exercise tolerance, shortness of breath and other performance measures that might indicate coronary artery disease, which shows up in diabetics more often than in nondiabetic patients. “I’ve seen people that thought chest pain was acid reflux or heartburn,” Travis says. “Sometimes people attribute it to aging. They say, ‘I’m getting older, and my chest hurts when I walk up a couple of flights of stairs.’ They think it’s a normal part of aging, and it’s not.” Some patients, Travis says, are afraid of what chest pain might mean. They tell themselves that it’s temporary and will go away on its own, that no doctor is needed. Most of the time, they’re right. But that’s a call, especially if the pain persists, a doctor should make.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

SKIN GROWTHS

Skin cancer is on the rise, and the only way to get the drop on it is to know your moles. “If you see a mole change, notice it growing or if it bleeds too easily – those are all kinds of things you should bring to the doctor right away, the earlier the better,” says Altshuler.


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SLEEPLESSNESS

We may go through periods of fatigue in which we feel we can barely keep our eyes open, but what about the reverse? “Sleep problems are really common,” says Hamilton. “In this case, we talk to people about sleep hygiene. It can be as simple as not drinking caffeine into the evening. Hamilton points out that caffeine can affect the body for up to six hours. Drinking caffeine near bedtime can cause a person to not sleep well. Partaking in a highly stimulating activity just before bedtime – like watching television, exercising, getting into an argument – may also cause sleep troubles. Hamilton recommends participating in activities that help you wind down before bed, such as reading a book or taking a bath. And of course, high anxiety and stress levels can also prevent a person from sleeping. “Anxiety or high stress levels regarding things that are going on in a person’s life, that’s going to effect their sleep,” says Hamilton, “as will depression. One of the hallmark signs is what we call early morning awakening, where a person sleeps and wakes up and can’t go back to sleep. That builds on itself.” Hamilton says that if a person is struggling with mood issues and it’s causing sleep disruption, it’s time to see a physician. A sleep study can also shed light on sleep troubles as well and can help diagnose sleep apnea or other disorders. “Typically, you think about sleep apnea associated with people that have excess weight,” says Hamilton, “but even those whose BMI or body weight is appropriate, they can have those problems. See a doctor, especially if they feel like they’re choking or not breathing, tired and sleepy in the daytime.”

HEADACHES

Headaches speak volumes. The occasional headache is no big deal, but persistent headaches usually mean something else is going on. Throwing back Tylenol may take care of the pain, but the ultimate cause needs to be addressed. “It’s actually pretty rare, but I have seen a couple of episodes where patients complain of the worst headaches of their lives. In the world of medicine, that can be associated with cerebral hemorrhaging or bleeding. But it’s not common,” says Travis. Patients should worry about headaches when they’re severe, persistent and sudden, with no ramp-up and no history of severe headaches. Dangerous headaches are often accompanied by other symptoms, such as neck stiffness. Pay attention to the character of the headaches. Not all headaches are created equal, and a change in the character of headaches – a sharp pain instead of a dull, throbbing pain, or a change in the headache’s location, for instance – can indicate that there might be a bigger problem. “It’s rare, but people that ignore the bad headache can get very sick. If it happens, they should visit the emergency room or get in to see their primary physician as quickly as possible,” says Travis.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

CHRONIC FATIGUE

Chronic fatigue occurs when the body is fighting illness or disease. Healthy humans don’t get that tired. “We all get fatigued. We work hard. We’re tired at the end of the day,” says Altshuler. “But there’s a difference between regular fatigue and fatigue caused by a real problem. Most fatigue disappears with rest, and you go out and do the things you want to do. Fatigue from something that’s really a problem doesn’t get better with rest.”


“The heart of better medicine is the doctorpatient relationship.”

CHRISTINE E. FRANDEN, MD 866.696.3847 1819 EAST 19TH STREET, SUITE 302 TULSA, OKLAHOMA, 74104 MDVIP.COM/CHRISTINEFRANDENMD

Dr. Stephen Gawey Welcomes Dr. Christine Franden

T

Offering patients an MDVIP experience

o care for the increasing number of people looking for a primary care physician who is more available, Dr. Stephen Gawey welcomes to his practice Tulsa’s first female MDVIP-affiliated internist, Dr. Christine Franden. With ongoing healthcare changes, Dr. Franden believes MDVIP is the answer for those frustrated with the new “normal” that has become assembly-line care. Too often patients feel like a number lost in the system. “In my smaller MDVIP-affiliated practice, patients come first. I can spend more one-on-one time with each person to develop a meaningful relationship, and I offer conveniences not possible in a traditional primary care office with thousands of patients,” said Dr. Franden. Dr. Franden believes the best medicine requires time – time to listen and time to understand the whole person. Today, it can be difficult to get a timely appointment, and more time is spent waiting for the doctor than talking with the doctor. “I respect patients’ busy schedules by offering on-time, same- or next-day appointments, plus I can

be reached after hours by phone, email and text. And my visits last as long as a patient needs to address questions and work together minimizing risk for future illness and better managing chronic conditions,” explains Dr. Franden. The MDVIP approach is proactive rather than reactive by emphasizing prevention, early detection and wellness through individual consultations, comprehensive screenings and advanced diagnostic testing, followed by a tailored wellness plan. MDVIP-affiliated doctors advocate for their patients, coordinate specialist care and help them navigate a complex medical system. For an affordable annual fee, the MDVIP Wellness Program provides a level of personalized care and service that is hard to find in healthcare today. Patrick Keegan, a patient of Dr. Gawey’s, sums up his MDVIP experience - “This is the best healthcare that our country’s ever given. I feel like his arms are just wrapped around me.” Dr. Franden welcomes you to call for a complimentary get-acquainted meeting.

SP ONSORED EDITORIAL


TOP DOCTORS

2014

Top Doctors At some time in our lives, we will all need the expertise of a physician, whether it is for a routine check-up or something serious. It can be a challenge to find the right physician or specialist, but Oklahoma Magazine has taken some of the guesswork out of the process. We present the latest Top Doctors, a list of 150 doctors in 48 specialties compiled by publisher Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. of the top physicians in the state as rated by their peers. Some readers may turn to this list to seek out a physician; others may be delighted to find their doctor listed in the pages. We encourage everyone to factor in Top Doctors when it comes to making decisions about care.

OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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TOP DOCTORS Adolescent Medicine

PHILIP J. RETTIG Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians – Adolescent Medicine 1200 N. Phillips Ave., Suite 5400, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6208

Allergy & Immunology

WARREN V. FILLEY Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic 750 NE 13th St. Floor 3, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.235.0040 JANE T. PURSER Saint Francis Hospital Tulsa Allergy Clinic of Tulsa 9311 S. Mingo Rd., Tulsa, 74133 918.307.1613

Cardiac Electrophysiology KAREN J. BECKMAN OU Medical Center OU Physicians 825 NE 10th St., Suite 2500 Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001

Cardiovascular Disease

PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

MUHAMMAD ANWAR Norman Regional Hospital Heart Clinic Central Oklahoma 500 E. Robinson St., Suite 900, Norman, 73071 405.321.0199

Dr. Ali Moussa Medical Oncologist Tulsa Cancer Institute Moussa, a medical oncologist at Tulsa Cancer Institute, is known both for his expertise and his bedside manner. He has been listed as one of America’s Top Doctors by U.S. News & World Report in the field of medical oncology and has received Vitals Patients’ Choice and Compassionate Doctor awards, recognition earned through positive patient feedback. Although a cancer diagnosis can be devastating, Moussa finds joy in offering his patients hope. “Cancer is the most challenging disease of our modern age, and the cancer patient is the most compliant and appreciative,” he says. “Caring for them is very rewarding.” Despite the challenges, Moussa shares that cancer treatments continue to progress. “Through clinical trials we have the ability to offer more precise treatments. Tulsa Cancer Institute is the only facility in the greater Tulsa area that has an adult oncology research department,” he says. “This allows our doctors to perform genetic mapping of each person’s cancer and choose from over 100 trials open within Tulsa Cancer Institute through the National Cancer Institute and major pharmaceutical companies to personalize each patient’s care.” Moussa says his greatest accomplishments are “being able to follow up with patients ... diagnosed with stage IV cancer and being able to see them 10 or more years after their initial diagnosis going through life enjoying their kids and grandkids.” – Rebecca Fast

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

PAMELA CRAVEN Oklahoma Heart Hospital 5401 N. Portland Ave., Suite 380, Oklahoma City 73112 405.604.4460 JEFFREY A. CROOK Norman Regional Hospital Norman Heart & Vascular Associates 3500 HealthPlex Parkway, Suite 200, Norman, 73072 405.515.2222

Clinical Genetics

JOHN J. MULVIHILL Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Children’s Hospital – OU Medical Center, Dept. Pediatric Genetics 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2006

Colon & Rectal Surgery

ALAN M. KANESHIGE Hillcrest Medical Center Oklahoma Heart Institute 9228 S. Mingo Rd., Suite 200, Tulsa, 74133 918.592.0999

GARY D. DUNN OU Medical Center OU Physicians 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4500, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1400

DWIGHT W. REYNOLDS OU Medical Center OU Physicians 825 NE 10th St., Suite 2500, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001

Dermatology

MUHAMMAD SALIM Norman Regional Hospital Norman Heart & Vascular Associates 3500 HealthPlex Parkway, Norman, 73072 405.515.2260

Child Neurology

DAVID J. SIEGLER Saint Francis Hospital Child Neurology of Tulsa 6465 S. Yale Ave., Suite 320, Warren Medical Building, Tulsa, 74136 918.493.3300

Subtle Symptoms

JEFF ALEXANDER Saint Francis Hospital 6565 S. Yale Ave., Suite 503, Tulsa, 74136-8306 918.494.8333 RAYMOND L. CORNELISON 3727 NW 63rd St., Suite 205, Oklahoma City, 73116 405.608.4494 LAWRENCE J. GREGG Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E. 21st St., Tulsa, 74114 918.749.2261 DONALD RICHARD SEIDEL Tulsa Dermatology Clinic 2121 E 21st St., Tulsa, 74114 918.749.2261

Depression, as a medical condition, is more than just the blues. The illness affects mood, thinking and behavior and often goes unrecognized even by those afflicted. “[Depression] is an illness, not a personal failing,” says Dr. Matthew Meyer, medical director of Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital. “Early on in the illness, people may notice that they have more down days, have more trouble concentrating and are more easily overwhelmed by stress. As the illness progresses, people experience a persistently sad mood, poor energy and concentration, loss of interest in activities that they usually enjoy, excessive guilt and changes in sleep and appetite.” It is important that those living with depression acknowledge it and seek support, he advises. “The shame and helplessness that many people experience while depressed can be helped by talking with someone they trust – a friend, family member, clergy or physician,” says Meyer. “Someone who is in the midst of a severe episode of depression may have frequent thoughts that life is not worth living or even thoughts about ending their own life.” Like many other medical conditions, help is available. Depression is treatable. “Educate yourself about the treatment options that are available,” says Meyer. “Medication, psychotherapy or a combination of both can lessen symptoms and improve a person’s quality of life.” – Lindsay Cuomo


Script Smarts

THOMAS STASKO OU Medical Center OU Physicians Dermatology Clinic 619 NE 13th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6110

CHRISTIAN S. HANSON Hillcrest Medical Center Oklahoma Heart Institute 9228 S. Mingo Rd., Suite 200, Tulsa, 74133 918.592.0999

Diagnostic Radiology

DAVID W. HARRIS Saint Francis Hospital Warren Clinic Springer Building, 6160 S. Yale Ave., Floor 2, Tulsa, 74136 918.497.3140

KELLY N. MCDONOUGH Breast Imaging of Oklahoma 2601 Kelley Pointe Parkway, Edmond, 73013 405.844.2601 DEBRA S. MITCHELL Breast Imaging of Oklahoma 2601 Kelley Pointe Parkway, Suite 101, Edmond, 73013 405.844.2601 REBECCA G. STOUGH Mercy Hospital Breast MRI of Oklahoma 4300 McAuley Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73120 405.749.7077

Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism

D. ERIK ASPENSON Hillcrest Medical Center Oklahoma Heart Institute 9228 S. Mingo Rd., Suite 102, Tulsa, 74133 918.592.0999 MARY Z. BAKER OU Medical Center OU Physicians – Endocrinology 1000 E. 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1000

Family Medicine

LAMONT E. CAVANAGH Hillcrest Medical Center Sports Medicine & Family Medicine 1111 S. St. Louis St., Tulsa, 74120 918.619.4400 W. DEAN HINZ Norman Regional Hospital 3400 Tecumseh Rd., Suite 300, Norman, 73072 405.912.3120 LINDA A. OBERST-WALSH OU Medical Center 1111 S. St. Louis Ave., Tulsa, 74120 918.619.4600 TOMAS P. OWENS INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center Oklahoma Great Plains Family Medicine 3500 NW 56th St., Suite 100, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.951.2855 CYNTHIA L. TAYLOR Norman Regional Hospital Family Medicine Associates 1237 E. Alameda St., Norman, 73071 405.321.4511

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Patients often want to take an active, informed role in their health care, even though the complicated information can be overwhelming. Dr. Mitchell W. Duininck, a staff physician at Family Medical Care, affiliated with St. John Health System, and program director of In His Image Family Medicine, lays out a few key questions patients should ask about their medications. “Medication use should be constantly evaluated to make sure they are the right medications and the right doses,” says Duininck. Start by asking your doctor or nurse to explain why the doctor has chosen this particular medication and how you will know it is working, advises Duininck. “You can also ask for written information about the medication and research information about the medication on the Internet,” suggests Duininck. Discuss medication options and dosage. “Are there other options (you) could use? Are there any over-thecounter medications you could take instead? Is this the lowest dose that will work for you?” says Duininck. “Lifestyle changes, including exercise, weight loss, sodium restriction, smoking cessation, may decrease or completely remove the need for some medications.” Make sure to discuss allergies, current medications, possible side effects and the duration of the medication’s prescription, says Duininck. “Always let your doctors know all the medications you are taking, even those that are non-prescription or are supplements,” he says. “Medications can have interactions with each other that can be dangerous.” – Lindsay Cuomo Gastroenterology

MARKHAM NIGHTENGALE Saint Francis Hospital Adult Gastroenterology Associates 6465 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa, 74135 918.481.4700 HARVEY A. TATUM Hillcrest Medical Center Utica Park Clinic 1145 S. Utica Ave, Suite 701 Hillcrest Physician’s Building, Tulsa, 74104 918.582.6544 WILLIAM M. TIERNEY OU Medical Center OU Physicians 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8478

Geriatric Medicine

INSUNG KIM Saint Francis Hospital 6160 S. Yale Ave., Tulsa, 74136 918.497.3650 LAURENCE Z. RUBENSTEIN OU Medical Center OU Physician Senior Health Center 1122 NE 13th St., Suite 150, Oklahoma City, 73117 405.271.3050 PETER A. WINN OU Medical Center OU Physicians Family Medicine Center 900 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3537

Dr. Jose El-Amm Medical Director of Kidney Transplantation Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center As the medical director of kidney transplantation for the INTEGRIS Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute, El-Amm encourages everyone to become an organ donor. “The most rewarding outcome for patients with chronic kidney disease is a transplant,” says El-Amm. “My patients live longer and have a better quality of life if they are fortunate enough to get a transplant.” Dedicated to helping as many patients as possible, El-Amm has marked several milestones in his career, including opening Oklahoma’s first and only desensitization program, which helps some patients, who previously may not have been good candidates for a transplant, receive one. He also opened the state’s first and only active paired kidney donation program. This program increases the number of transplant recipients by allowing living donors and recipients to share organs with other living donors and recipients. El-Amm says the hardest part of his job is to be a part of the team who must refuse a patient for a transplant. “Sometimes the risk-benefit ratio favors a patient staying on dialysis,” he says. “We do it for the benefit of the patient, but it is always a heartbreaking decision.” – Rebecca Fast

OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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TOP DOCTORS Gynecologic Oncology

MARK C. GENESEN Saint Francis Hospital Tulsa Cancer Center 12697 E. 51st St., Tulsa, 74146 918.499.2000 ROBERT S. MANNEL OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center 800 NE 10th St., Suite 2100, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7770 DARON G. STREET Saint Francis Hospital Tulsa Cancer Center 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.499.2000 JOAN L. WALKER OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center 800 NE 10th St., Suite 2100, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7770

Hand Surgery

PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

THOMAS W. EWING Norman Regional Hospital Oklahoma Orthopaedic Institute 1020 24th Ave. NW, Suite 100, Norman, 73069 405.447.4999

Dr. Daniel Nader National Clinical Director, Pulmonary/Critical Care Chief of Staff Director of the Lung Center & Interventional Pulmonologist Cancer Treatment Center of America While Nader assumes multiple roles for Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA), he has a unified goal, which is providing extraordinary clinical expertise with compassionate patient care. Nader serves as CTCA’s national clinical director of pulmonary/ critical care and as chief of staff and director of the Lung Center & Interventional Pulmonologist at CTCA’s Southwestern Regional Medical Center in Tulsa. Through his work, Nader participates in the research of new therapies in emphysema and radiation therapy of lung tumors. “Serving as national director of pulmonary medicine for the entire CTCA enterprise, which includes five hospitals and an outpatient clinic, I have the opportunity to collaborate with some of the top pulmonologists in the nation, advancing care to our patients,” says Nader. “I am grateful to CTCA for the opportunity to use a broad range of advanced technologies to make a real difference in the lives of patients.” He shares that diagnostic procedures have significantly improved to the benefit of patients. “These advancements allow interventional pulmonologists to non-invasively biopsy and stage lung cancer, while possibly avoiding other more invasive procedures. Any time you can improve care or make it less intrusive is a big win for patients,” says Nader. “Pulmonary medicine has been a significant benefactor to technology but continues to allow physicians direct patient interaction. It’s encouraging to see patients return year after year and be able to have a good quality of life.” – Rebecca Fast

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

STEPHEN W. MIHALSKY OU Medical Center – Edmond 105 S. Bryant St., Suite 407, Edmond, 73034 405.348.5060 GHAZI M. RAYAN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center 3366 NW Expressway, D Building, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4888

Infectious Disease

DOUGLAS A. DREVETS OU Medical Center OU Physicians – Infectious Disease 711 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Suite 430, Presbyterian Professional Office Building, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6434 DAVID N. SCHECK Hillcrest Medical Center Infectious Disease Specialists Tulsa 1145 S. Utica Ave., Suite 800, South Physicians’ Building, Tulsa, 74104 918.582.6343

Internal Medicine

DAMON L. BAKER Oklahoma State University Medical Center OSU Internal Medicine 717 S. Houston Ave., Floor 3, Suite 300, Tulsa, 74127 918.382.5064 JOHN M. KRODEL Norman Regional Hospital Norman Clinic 950 N. Porter Ave., Suite 300, Norman, 73071 405.329.0121 EILEEN C. WEST OU Medical Center – Edmond 14101 N. Eastern Ave., Suite E, Edmond, 73013 405.359.0919

Interventional Cardiology

Warren Clinic Cardiology 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite A100, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.8500 JOHN R. HARVEY Oklahoma Heart Hospital 4050 W. Memorial Rd., Floor 3, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.608.3800 NAJI E. KARAM St. Anthony Hospital 608 NW 9th St., Suite 6100, Oklahoma City 73102 405.272.8477 AGHA K. KHAN Oklahoma Heart Hospital 5224 E. I-240 Service Rd., Floor 2, Oklahoma City, 73135 405.628.6265 WAYNE N. LEIMBACH JR. Hillcrest Medical Center Oklahoma Heart Institute 1265 S. Utica Ave., Suite 300, Tulsa, 74104 918.592.0999

Maternal & Fetal Medicine

NORA M. DOYLE Hillcrest Medical Center OU Women’s Health Specialists 4444 E. 41st St., Floor 3, Suite B, Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4203 MICHAEL O. GARDNER Hillcrest Medical Center OU Womens Health Care Specialists 4444 E. 41st St., Floor 3, Suite B, Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4203

RALPH DOUGLAS ENSLEY Saint Francis Hospital

Better Safe Than Sorry

Whether during a clinical breast examination or a self-exam, finding a lump in your breast can be a surprising and stressing discovery. Cancer is, of course, the main concern; however, it may be a fibroadenoma. Fibroadenoma is a benign, or noncancerous, mass that is common for women in their late teenage years and early 20s, with a second peak in incidence around 40, says Dr. Elizabeth Jett, director of the OU Breast Institute. “Fibroadenomas are nothing to worry about,” says Jett. “However, any new palpable lump in the breast needs to be fully evaluated with a physical exam and imaging. “Too many women are told not to worry because you are too young to have cancer,” she continues. “We see breast cancer in women in their 20s all too frequently. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.” Typically, an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan can be determined through imaging. However, Jett says, for older women, a biopsy is often performed. “Fibroadenomas can be left alone once they have been shown to be stable for two to three years,” says Jett. “There are characteristic imaging findings which allow us to follow these lesions for stability. “If the mass is increasing in size, it should be surgically removed,” she adds. – Lindsay Cuomo


BEST IN THE METRO, BEST IN THE STATE.

U.S. News and World Report has released its 2014-2015 hospital rankings, and for the third year in a row, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center is ranked best hospital in the OKC metro and Oklahoma’s best hospital, with four high-performing specialty areas. These rankings make it easy to find a healthcare provider with a proven track record. And we’re confident that you’ll find the same caliber of care at each of our 19 campuses and 100 clinics across the state, because INTEGRIS Health is Oklahoma’s Most Trusted Name in Healthcare. And we just proved it. Again.

integrisok.com | 405-951-2277

Diabetes & Endocrinology • Gastroenterology & GI Surgery • Nephrology • Pulmonology


TOP DOCTORS JOHN R. STANLEY III Mercy Hospital Perinatal Center of Oklahoma 4140 W. Memorial Rd., Suite 321, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.748.4726

Medical Oncology

SHERRI S. DURICA Mercy Hospital Mercy Oncology 701 E. Robinson Ave., Suite 100, Norman, 73071 405.321.4644 ALI H. MOUSSA Hillcrest Medical Center Tulsa Cancer Institute 12697 E. 51st St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.505.3200 GEORGE B. SELBY OU Medical Center OU Physicians Hematology/ Oncology 800 NE 10th St., Floor 2, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8299

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

ALEDA TOMA INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center Cancer Specialists of Oklahoma 3525 NW 56th St., Suite D-100, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.942.9200

Dr. Rebecca G. Stough Director of Imaging at Mercy Women’s Center Clinical Director at Breast MRI of Oklahoma, LLC Stough is a leader in early breast cancer detection and has a passion for the cause. “My mother and first cousin both had breast cancer that was invisible on the mammograms of that day,” says Stough. “With the advent of minimally invasive breast biopsies and digital mammography, the early diagnosis of breast cancer became possible.” Around this time, Stough turned her attention from CT scanning to mammography, and in 1999, she helped open Mercy Women’s Center, the state’s first facility offering digital mammography to all patients. However, she explains that despite the advances in digital mammography, there were breast cancers that were still unseen. To increase detection, Stough launched the first comprehensive breast MRI program in Oklahoma in 2002 and is now one of the country’s most experienced breast MRI radiologists. She is an international speaker and educator on breast MRI and MRI-guided biopsies and serves as an advisor to industry leaders in imaging technology. She finds her greatest satisfaction in helping patients. “Since these cancers are invisible by mammography and ultrasound, we perform an MRI-guided biopsy,” says Stough. “Thus, we are able to make the diagnosis months before it would have been identifiable by any other method. This could be lifesaving.” – Rebecca Fast

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Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine MARILYN B. ESCOBEDO Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center 1200 Everett Dr., North Pavilion, Floor 7, Room 7504, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5215

Nephrology

JAMES E. BOURDEAU Saint Francis Hospital 6465 S. Yale Ave., Suite 507, Tulsa, 74136-7807 918.481.2760 BENJAMIN D. COWLEY JR OU Medical Center OU Physicians – Nephrology 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6842 JOSE EL-AMM INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center Oklahoma Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute 3300 NW Expressway, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.949.3349 LUKAS HARAGSIM OU Medical Center 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6842

PRANAY KATHURIA Hillcrest Medical Center OU Physicians – Internal Medicine 4444 E. 41st St., Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4888

Neurological Surgery

SHON W. COOK Community Hospital 11317 S. Western Ave., Building 300, Oklahoma City, 73170 405.310.6977 EMILY FRIEDMAN Northwest Surgical Hospital 3433 NW 56th St., Suite 750, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.945.4900 TIMOTHY B. MAPSTONE Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Dept. Neurosurgery 1000 N. Lincoln Blvd., Suite 400, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4912

Neurology

KERSI J. BHARUCHA OU Medical Center OU Dept. Neurology 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5200, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3635

A Good Night’s Sleep

Sleep is as vital to health as eating or breathing, says Dr. Jana Loveless, sleep specialist at Oklahoma Heart Institute. “Your body will force you to sleep,” says Loveless. “The problem is your body might force you to have microsleep episodes while you’re driving or performing other hazardous activities.” Adults need seven to nine hours a night, she says. “We tend to not allow sufficient time,” adds Loveless. “It is much too common to sacrifice sleep for other things.” Extended sleep deprivation is likely to impact many aspects of life, from vigilance and memory to hand and eye coordination. Studies consistently find that the less sleep a person gets over time, the more he or she will be impacted. “Researchers never saw the test results plateau,” shares Loveless. “The results continued to worsen with deprivation.” Loveless offers several tips for the best possible night of sleep. “You need to have good sleep hygiene,” she says. “Aerobic exercise improves sleep quality and quantity. Stop caffeine a minimum of four hours before bedtime.” While alcohol may seem like a sleep aid, Loveless says that is not true. “The first half of the night will have more relaxed sleep, but [during] the second half of the night, sleep is much more fragmented [after alcohol consumption],” explains Loveless. “The net effect is much worse sleep quality and quantity.” A good routine leads to better sleep. A stable wake time will allow the body to get sleepy at an appropriate time, says Loveless. “We tend to delay wake time on weekends, which can severely impact our ability to initiate sleep for several nights after,” says Loveless. “We sleep best when our environment is dark, quiet and cool. Avoid TV or computers before bedtime.” – Lindsay Cuomo


Patient-Centered Cancer Care

OKLAHOMANS NO LONGER NEED TO TRAVEL OUT OF state to receive world-class cancer care. The Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma provides cancer care teams that are redefining patient-centered care in a new state-of-the-art facility.

As nationally recognized leaders in research and patient care, experts at the Stephenson Cancer Center are exploring new treatments and breakthroughs with advanced research and clinical trials right here at home.

The Stephenson Cancer Center annually ranks among the top five cancer centers in the nation for patients participating in National Cancer Institute-sponsored clinical trials, and it is one of 30 designated lead cancer 800 NE 10th Street Oklahoma City, OK 73104

centers in the Institute’s National Clinical Trials Network.

Phone (405) 271-6822 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo


TOP DOCTORS

Bare Bones

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Bone health likely isn’t at the top of most people’s health concerns. However, Dr. Loring Barwick Jr., a physician at Tulsa’s Riverside Primary Care, says bone health is developed early in life. “Bone health is developed by proper nutrition and exercise,” says Barwick. “If done in early life, our bones have a better chance of serving us well into old age.” It’s not news to most that a proper diet rich in calcium and vitamin D does much for bone health. “Calcium comes primarily from dairy products,” says Barwick. “The body makes its own vitamin D when exposed to the sun. The body is set up to preserve its bones naturally. However, there are some people who are predisposed to weak bones or osteoporosis.” Those with a maternal history of osteoporosis, low body weight, tobacco use and use of certain medications and those at an advanced age are at risk for osteoporosis, says Barwick. Females are also at a higher risk than males, and Barwick adds that menopause can contribute to calcium loss due to lack of estrogen. “There are usually no symptoms of bone loss,” he says. “Anyone over 65 should have a bone mineral density test.” There are prescription medications that can reverse bone loss safely, especially when paired with proper vitamin D levels, calcium intake and exercise, adds Barwick. – Lindsay Cuomo

Dr. Beverly J. Talbert Clinical Associate Professor Surgical Oncologist Stephenson Cancer Center Talbert has been an advocate for women’s health for more than 20 years. Today, she serves as a clinical associate professor and surgical oncologist at Stephenson Cancer Center at the OU Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. “When I finished my surgical training in 1991, women surgeons were still relatively uncommon,” says Talbert. “I felt that gave me a unique perspective on issues dealing with women’s health.” Talbert was also among the first physicians in Oklahoma to focus her practice exclusively on breast health and to champion a multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer treatment. Her career calling aligns with the mission of the Stephenson Cancer Center – to improve and extend the lives of cancer patients. As part of its Breast Cancer Program, she is among a team of breast cancer experts who focus on the full spectrum of breast oncology care, including prevention, detection, treatment and research. “Breast cancer affects one in eight women, most of whom will be long-term survivors,” says Talbert. “It has been most gratifying to watch the evolution of ‘personalized’ medicine, which recognizes the unique qualities of each individual patient.” – Rebecca Fast

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

EDUARDO A. DE SOUSA OU Medical Center OU Dept. Neurology 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5200, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3635 DAVID LEE GORDON OU Medical Center 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5200, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3635 RODNEY L. MYERS Hillcrest Medical Center Utica Park Clinic 1245 S. Utica Ave., Suite 330, Tulsa, 74104 918.560.3823

Obstetrics & Gynecology

JOHN MARTIN BEAL St. John Medical Center Tulsa Ob/Gyn Associates 2000 S Wheeling Ave., Suite 701 Williams Medical Plaza, Tulsa, 74104 918.747.9641 KATHLEEN HEFFRON Hillcrest Medical Center The Women’s Health Group 9001 S. 101st E. Ave., Suite 350, Tulsa, 74133 918.293.6200 JOSEPH ROY JOHNSON Oklahoma State University Medical Center 717 S Houston, Suite 200, Tulsa 74127 918.586.4500 MUKESH T. PAREKH Deaconess Hospital 5622 N. Portland Ave., Suite 240, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.943.6288 JOHN R. RESNEDER Norman Regional Hospital 900 N. Porter Ave., Suite 110,

Norman, 73071 405.366.8900

Ophthalmology

GARY T. DENSLOW Saint Francis Hospital Pediatric Eye Associates 4606 E. 67th St., Suite 400, Tulsa, 74136 918.481.2796 MARC A. GOLDBERG St. John Medical Center The Eye Institute 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 1010, Tulsa, 74104 918.584.4433 P. LLOYD HILDEBRAND OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Institute 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1096 REBECCA K. MORGAN OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Institute 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1793 JAMES M. RICHARD Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Children’s Eye Care 11013 Hefner Pointe Dr., Oklahoma City, 73120-5050 405.751.2020 R. MICHAEL SIATKOWSKI OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Institute 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Room 512, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1094 GREGORY L. SKUTA OU Medical Center Dean McGee Eye Institute 608 Stanton L. Young Blvd., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7806

Orthopaedic Surgery

ARTHUR CONLEY Community Hospital Oklahoma Sports Science & Orthopaedics 3110 SW 89th St., Suite 200E, Oklahoma City, 73159 405.703.7300 SCOTT J. DUNITZ St. John – Broken Arrow Tulsa Bone & Joint Associates 4802 S. 109 E. Ave., Tulsa, 74146 918.392.1400 CHARLES H. FUNDERBURK JR. McBride Clinic Orthopedic Hospital McBride Clinic 1110 N. Lee St., Oklahoma City, 73103 405.230.9270 WILLIAM A. HERNDON Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Childrens Physicians 1200 N. Phillips Ave., Suite 3100, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2669 TIMOTHY A. PUCKETT OU Medical Center 825 NE 10th St., Suite 1300, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2663 DAVID C. TEAGUE OU Medical Center OU Physicians Building – Orthopaedic Surgery 825 NE 10th St., Suite 1300, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2663 CARLAN K. YATES McBride Clinic Orthopedic Hospital McBride Clinic 1110 N. Lee Ave., Oklahoma City, 73103 405.230.9746


You Are Our ‘Top Docs’ Congratulations to the Norman physicians who’ve been named by America’s Top Doctors™! Your commitment to your patients and your passion for medicine is clear each and every day. Our community is thankful to have these amazing physicians. Muhammad Anwar, MD

Rita Hancock, MD

Christopher Paskowski, MD

Jeffrey Crook, MD

W. Dean Hinz, MD

John Resneder, MD

Tom Ewing, DO

John Krodel, MD

Muhammad Salim, MD

Eileen Fox, MD

Thomas Kuhls, MD

Cynthia Taylor, MD

James McCurdy, MD

To find these doctors and many more, please visit NormanRegional.com

Physician Office Network NORMAN REGIONAL 901 N. Porter Avenue Norman, OK 73071


TOP DOCTORS Otolaryngology KEITH F. CLARK 535 NW 9th St., Suite 300, Oklahoma City, 73012 405.272.6027

G. PAUL DIGOY Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Childrens Physicians 1200 N. Phillips Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2662 CHRISTOPHER A. PASKOWSKI Norman Regional Hospital Oklahoma Otolaryngology Associates 3650 W. Rock Creek Rd., Suite 110, Norman, 73072 405.364.2666 IVAN WAYNE OU Medical Center 13908 Quailbrook Drive, Oklahoma City, 73134 405.271.5950 DAVID W. WHITE SR Saint Francis Hospital Eastern Oklahoma Ear Nose & Throat 5020 E. 68th St., Tulsa, 74136 918.492.3636

Pain Medicine

PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

RITA M. HANCOCK Norman Regional Hospital Oklahoma Orthopaedic Institute 1020 24th Ave NW, Suite 100, Norman, 73069 405.447.4999

Dr. John B. Forrest Staff Urologist with Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma, Inc. Chief of Urology, St. John Medical Center Upcoming: Medical Director of Surgical Services and Director of Surgical Oncology St. John Medical Center With an already exemplary career in medicine, Forrest continues to be a leader in his field. On Oct. 20, he will become the medical director of surgical services and director of surgical oncology at St. John Medical Center. He currently serves as the chief of urology for St. John Medical Center and as a staff urologist with Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma. No matter what his title, Forrest says that, first and foremost, he enjoys helping patients alleviate or lessen the burden of urologic disease. He also enjoys working with a variety of professionals toward a common goal and feels privileged to have worked with his outstanding colleagues at Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma for the past 31 years. Since beginning his profession, Forrest has seen several significant advancements in the urology field and says that improved imaging techniques and instrumentation for surgical approaches without incisions, as well as the use of robotically enhanced laparoscopic techniques, continue to evolve. “In the last three years, six to seven new products for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer have been FDA approved,” says Forrest. “Urology as a field continues to advance on many fronts.” – Rebecca Fast

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

DARRYL D. ROBINSON Community Hospital Oklahoma Sports Science & Orthopaedics 3110 SW 89th St., Suite 102, Oklahoma City, 73159 405.703.4950

Pediatric Cardiology

EDWARD D. OVERHOLT Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Suite 5300, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4411

Pediatric Endocrinology

KENNETH C. COPELAND Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians Pediatric Diabetes/Endocrinology 1200 Children’s Ave., Suite 4500, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6764 DAVID H. JELLEY Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center Harold Hamm Oklahoma Diabetes Center 4444 E. 41st St., Suite SCC-1B, Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4803

Pediatric Gastroenterology

STEVEN FITTS Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis 591 E. 36th St. N., Tulsa, 74106 918.619.4323 JUDITH O’CONNOR Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center 1200 N. Phillips Ave., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6549

Pediatric HematologyOncology

825 NE 10th St., Suite 1700, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4864

RENE Y. MCNALL-KNAPP Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians 1200 Children’s Ave., Suite 10000, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4412

JUSTIN MICHAEL JONES INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center Jones Plastic Surgery 6305 Waterford Blvd., Suite 115, Oklahoma City, 73118 405.848.3459

WILLIAM H. MEYER Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Suite 10000, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4412

ARCHIBALD S. MILLER III Saint Francis Hospital Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery of Tulsa 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 315, Tulsa, 74136-8316 918.492.2282

Pediatric Nephrology

Psychiatry

MARTIN A. TURMAN Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Suite 14200, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.4409

Pediatric Pulmonology

JAMES A. ROYALL Children’s Hospital at OU Medical Center OU Children’s Physicians Divison Pediatric Pulmonology 1200 Children’s Ave., Suite 9100, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.2006

Pediatric Surgery

EDWARD G. FORD Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1305, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.9450

Pediatric Urology BRADLEY KROPP OU Medical Center 920 Stanton L. Young Blvd., WP 3150, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6900

OREN F. MILLER Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma 10901 E. 48th St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.749.8765

Pediatrics

EILEEN M. FOX Norman Regional Hospital 500 E Robinson St., Suite 2600, Norman, 73071 405.364.6432

JILL K. WARNOCK OU Medical Center OU-Tulsa Dept. Psychiatry 4444 E. 41st St., Floor 3, Tulsa, 74135 918.619.4400

Pulmonary Disease

RICHARD M. BREGMAN Saint Francis Hospital Sleep Medicine Associates 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 628, Tulsa, 74136 918.502.4888 FRED GARFINKEL OU Medical Center OU Wayman Tisdale Specialty Health Clinic 591 E. 36th St. N., Tulsa, 74106 918.619.8700 GARY T. KINASEWITZ OU Medical Center OU Physicians-Pulmonary Medicine 825 NE 10th St., Suite 2500, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001 DAVID C. LEVIN OU Medical Center OU Physicians Building 825 NE 10th St., Suite 2500, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7001 DANIEL A. NADER CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center Cancer Treatment Centers of America 10109 E. 79th St., Tulsa, 74133 800.788.8485

Radiation Oncology

THOMAS L. KUHLS Norman Regional Hospital Norman Pediatric Associates 808 Wall St., Norman, 73069 405.321.5114

TERENCE S. HERMAN OU Medical Center Oklahoma University Health Science Center 800 NE 10th St., Suite L.100, Oklahoma City, 73104-5417 405.271.5641

JILL S. WARREN OU Medical Center OU Pediatric Physicians 1200 N. Children’s Ave., Suite 6100, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6827

CLINTON A. MEDBERY III St. Anthony Hospital Southwest Radiation Oncology 1011 N. Dewey Ave., Suite 101, Oklahoma City, 73102 405.272.7311

VICTOR T. WILSON HealthPlex Hospital 700 Wall St., Norman, 73069 405.360.7337

J. SPENCER THOMPSON OU Medical Center 800 NE 10th St., Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.3016

Plastic Surgery

PAUL R. CALLEGARI Saint Francis Hospital 6585 S. Yale Ave., Suite 1050, Tulsa, 74136-8330 918.494.8200 CHRISTIAN EL AMM OU Medical Center

Rheumatology

TIMOTHY L. HUETTNER Saint Francis Hospital 5555 E. 71st St., Suite 7100, Tulsa, 74136 918.491.9007


UPCOMING EVENTS Managed by

2014

918.236.4500 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT BOKCenter.com 1-866-7-BOK-CTR Arby’s Box Office

20311 BOK Center.indd 1

8/21/14 18943 4:25 PM Tulsa Bone and Joint.indd 1

5/20/14 12:26 PM

Tulsa Cancer Institute congratulates: Mark Genesen, MD, Ali Moussa, MD and Daron Street, MD, FACOG for making the Top Doctors list. Our patients and staff appreciate your compassion and dedication!

Top Doctors are nominated by their peers in an extensive survey process of thousands of American doctors each year. These Top Doctors’ medical educations, hospital appointments, training and much more, are screened by the Top Doctors research team. At Tulsa Cancer Institute we have the largest team of medical oncologists in Oklahoma, with over 20 oncologists and more than 100 nurses and associates. Tulsa Cancer Institute has locations in Tulsa, Stillwater, Bartlesville and McAlester so patients can stay close to home during their treatments.

Dr. Genesen

12697 E. 51st Street South Tulsa, Oklahoma 74146 20350 Cancer Institute.indd 1

Dr. Moussa

Dr. Street

(918) 505-3200

tciok.org 8/29/14 3:34 PM

OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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TOP DOCTORS JOAN T. MERRILL OU Medical Center Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation 825 NE 13th St., MS 22, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7805 IRA N. TARGOFF OU Medical Center OU Physicians 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4300, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.8478

Surgery

WILLIAM C. DOOLEY OU Medical Center 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4500, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.7867

PHOTO COURTESY ACROBATANT.

JAMES R. MCCURDY Norman Regional Hospital Norman Surgical Associates 500 E. Robinson, Suite 2300, Norman, 73071 405.329.4102

Dr. David W. Harris Endocrinologist Warren Clinic Saint Francis Health System Harris, an endocrinologist with Warren Clinic, a division of Saint Francis Health System in Tulsa, consistently works to benefit patients through new research findings and is personally driven to help end diabetes. “Overall, endocrinology is a very challenging and intriguing medical specialty,” says Harris. “The diagnosis and management of diabetes and other endocrine illnesses requires intellectual endeavor, and it is very important to keep up with the latest developments in this specialty.” While growing up, Harris was very aware of diabetes because he had family members who had the disease. “When I had the opportunity to choose endocrinology as my emphasis in medical school, I did not hesitate,” he says. “Diabetes is a terrible disease and is a growing problem. I want to do all I can to combat it.” Harris shares that one of the greatest advancements in his field is the “elucidation of the human genome,” which “allows for more precise diagnosis, treatment and opportunities for a cure of many diseases,” he says. Harris has spent more than 25 years practicing endocrinology and has served on many committees of local and national endocrinerelated specialty organizations. “Endocrinology is a specialty that brings to bear outstanding knowledge gained by rigorous research to the exam room bedside to improve the lives of all endocrine patients,” he says. “What gives me pride as a physician is knowing that Warren Clinic is providing a service to the community. The most important thing that people have is their health. Being entrusted to take care of it is very rewarding and humbling. Seeing patients benefit from their medical treatment is very gratifying.” – Rebecca Fast

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

RUSSELL G. POSTIER OU Medical Center OU Physicians Dept. Surgery OU Physicians Building 825 NE 10th St., Suite 4500, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.1400 DENISE L. RABLE St. John Medical Center Breast Care Center 2000 S. Wheeling Ave., Suite 100, Tulsa, 74104 918.403.7120 LANETTE F. SMITH Saint Francis Hospital Breast Surgery of Tulsa 1836 E 15th St, Tulsa 74104 918.585.5658 BEVERLY TALBERT OU Medical Center Stephenson Cancer Center

800 NE 10th St., Suite 2300, Oklahoma City 73104 405.721.7226

825 NE 10th St., Suite 5400, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6900

Thoracic & Cardiac Surgery

DANIEL J. CULKIN OU Medical Center Dept. Urology 825 NE 10th St., Suite 5400, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.6900

MARY-JANE BARTH Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis 6151 S. Yale Ave., Suite 2403, Tulsa, 74136 918.494.1710 R. MARK BODENHAMER Oklahoma Heart Hospital Oklahoma Cardiovascular Associates 4050 W. Memorial Rd, Floor 3, Oklahoma City, 73120 405.608.3800 JOHN CHAFFIN INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center 3433 NW 56th St., B Building, Suite 670, Oklahoma City, 73112 405.951.4345 SCOTT K. LUCAS St. Anthony Hospital 608 NW 9th St., Suite 2110, Oklahoma City, 73102 405.310.3028 MARVIN D. PEYTON OU Medical Center OU Dept of Cardiothoracic Surgery 920 Stanton L. Young Blvd., WP Building, Suite 2230, Oklahoma City, 73104 405.271.5789 GOYA V. RAIKAR Oklahoma Heart Hospital – South Campus 5224 E. I-240 Service Rd., Oklahoma City, 73135 405.628.6815

Urology

JOHN B. FORREST St. John Medical Center Tulsa Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma 10901 E. 48th St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.749.8765 SCOTT E. LITWILLER Saint Francis Hospital Tulsa Urologic Specialists of Oklahoma 10901 E. 48th St. S., Tulsa, 74146 918.749.8765

Vascular & Interventional Radiology

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Kitchen and bath remodels are two of the costliest for a home, but they can also pay off in a big way. High-end features coupled with inspiring design can create spaces that are functional as well as beautiful. BY TAMARA LOGSDON HAWKINSON

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COMPLETELY CUSTOMIZED

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID COBB

THE KITCHEN OF A 1935 HOME WAS RENOVATED WITH MODERN TOUCHES AND TECHNOLOGIES, YET RETAINS SOME OF ITS TRADITIONAL CHARM. RIGHT: GLASS DOORS AND SHELVING ALLOW A VIEW THROUGH THE WINDOW FEATURED IN CUSTOM CABINETRY.

When Ross See, co-owner of Sees Design, bought his 1935 Oklahoma City Heritage Hills home, his initial focus fell on renovating the kitchen. “My goal was to update the kitchen but maintain the original integrity of the home,” he says. See gutted the space, removing the original hand-scraped white oak flooring that was reinstalled after a previous renovation. One of the biggest changes was adding the waterfall island that utilizes statuary white marble and incorporates a black granite farmhousestyle, front apron sink. All cabinetry was custom designed and painted. To keep an existing window, installing upper cabinets was impossible. In a unique approach, See designed a cabinetry piece that incorporates the window behind the glass front doors and also uses glass shelves. “During the day, natural light illuminates the space, and at night, special lighting highlights what is displayed in the cabinet,” he says. See also chose modernized appliances, including a Wolff stove with a custom lacquer and stainless steel vent above. A Sub-Zero double under-counter refrigerator and warming drawer were also added to the room. “In keeping with the period architecture, I chose to incorporate unlacquered faucets, door hardware and details in the pendant lighting that will gradually tarnish,” says See. OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SUBTLE PALETTE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCOTT MILLER

A modernized kitchen keeps with the traditional style of this home in the Forest Ridge development of Broken Arrow. Stuart Harle, AKDB and owner of Carriage House Design, worked previously with the homeowners and had an idea of their style. The 25-year-old kitchen was gutted and rearranged. An unnecessary door to the living room was removed, allowing for more cabinetry. A peninsula that divided the space was also scrapped and a spacious island added. Harle chose cabinetry from Plato Woodwork. The cabinets are painted a mushroom color with brown glaze. The decorative hardware is from Top Knobs, and countertops are white spring granite with an ogee edge. The backsplash is especially unique and utilizes polished pillow travertine paglierino marble. Harle added a gold and silver leaf square tile installed in a pinwheel pattern. The flooring is porcelain tile installed in a diamond pattern and accented with a traditional runner. The lighting was renovated and replaced with LED recessed cans in the ceiling; LED strips above and below the upper cabinets add ambiance. The three matching pendants from Progress Lighting accentuate the updated style with a traditional flair.

RECESSED CAN LED LIGHTS ACCENTUATE THE RENOVATED KITCHEN. TOP: THE CUSTOM CABINETRY FROM PLATO WOODWORK IS PAINTED A MUSHROOM COLOR WITH BROWN GLAZE.

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AN ELEGANT TRANSFORMATION

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN HARMON

Ronald and Mary Ray were ready to change their decade-old master bathroom. “This was a complete renovation,” says Lori Sparkman, owner of Fifteenth and Home Furniture and Décor. “We kept the same footprint of the space but took the room back to the studs.” Sparkman and Dave Trebilcock, owner of Trebilcock Construction, coordinated the two-month implementation. A new feature in the bath is the floor-to-ceiling glass steam shower. Visions Tile and Stone supplied the imported Italian tile that was selected for the flooring and shower. Sparkman also used a freestanding contemporary matte finish Aqua Stone soaking tub with Kohler’s Stillness floor-mounted bath filler. One of the unique changes facing the designer was the addition of a sparkling chandelier. “We imported the SLAMP Lillibet fixture from Italy,” says Sparkman. “It has 56 crystals made from laser-cut prisma acrylic.” The reflection of the window over the tub onto the vanity mirror then bounces back to the polished tile shower wall, adding to the daytime illumination. The gray painted vanity was designed by Sparkman and fabricated by Stuart Synar, owner of Phoenix Cabinets, and is topped by striking natural quartz countertops.

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THE FLOOR-TO-CEILING GLASS STEAM SHOWER MAKES A DRAMATIC STATEMENT IN THIS RENOVATED MASTER BATH. LEFT: THE CUSTOMIZED VANITY WAS DESIGNED BY LORI SPARKMAN, OWNER OF FIFTEENTH AND HOME, AND FABRICATED BY STUART SYNAR OF PHOENIX CABINETS. LEFT TOP: AN AQUA STONE SOAKING TUB AND A CHANDELIER ARE THE ULTIMATE IN CONTEMPORARY LUXURY.

OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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EVERYTHING BUT THE KITCHEN SINK WAS REARRANGED FOR AN EXTENSIVE REMODEL THAT INCLUDES HIGH-END TOUCHES. BELOW: A PASS-THROUGH MAKES AN OPEN-CONCEPT KITCHEN FEEL EVEN BIGGER.

A STUDY IN SERENITY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS HUMPHREY

Homeowners of this multi-level, 20-year-old south Tulsa home were ready to shed the typical 1990s yellow-andoak kitchen. Enter Russell Pippin, CKD and owner of Wood-Stone Design Studio. “We gutted the kitchen and removed doors and walls to enlarge the space,” says Pippin. He also added a large pass-through from the kitchen to the dining room. Only the sink remains in the same location. The existing classic 1990s golden oak flooring was refinished in graphite gray. Pippin designed the space using Omega Cabinetry. The base cabinets are maple with Smokey Hills gray stain. He chose to contrast those with a dark look in key areas. The island, refrigerator surround and glass-front cabinets over the pass-through are made of alder with chestnut stain. The countertops are honed pebble Caesarstone, while the island is white macabus quartzite. The backsplash consists of Italian Murano glass tile in a mosaic pattern of grays, browns and white that sparkles under the LED lighting. Cooking for this large family is more convenient since the original single oven, microwave and electric cooktop have been replaced with a double oven, microwave drawer and a KitchenAid gas cooktop.

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NOW AND ZEN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID COBB

Sarah McPhail, interior designer at SR Hughes, had no question about how to approach the interior of a home in an Oklahoma City micro-community created by architect and builder David Wanzer. “The exterior absolutely set the stage for the interior,” says McPhail. The kitchen was designed by Scott Pohlenz, AIA, NCARB and owner of Pohlenz-Valcucine. The cabinets are Demode by Valcucine and were imported from Italy. “The wood is from renewable sources, and the countertops are antibacterial acrylic,” says Pohlenz. All hardware in the kitchen is hidden, and there are no upper cabinets. All the appliances are fully integrated into the cabinetry. Existing Poltrona Frau barstools from SR Hughes set the bold tone. A Carolyn Cole original from Abersons Exhibits explodes with the same strong palette. In the adjacent eating area, McPhail continued the theme with a modern aesthetic utilizing a classic Knoll table with black leather chairs. The stark white chandelier is balanced with a colorful area rug. The homeowner also likes to blend modern and primitive, so an Asian sculpture, discovered at The Golden Triangle – an antique store in Chicago – is perched upon the kitchen counter overlooking the space.

THE CLEAN LINES IN THE KITCHEN DESIGN TAKE THEIR CUES FROM THE HOME’S ARCHITECT, DAVID WANZER. LEFT: THE WHITE CHANDELIER OVER THE DINING TABLE CONTINUES THE MODERN AESTHETIC.

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THE MASTER BATH OF THIS RENOVATED HOME WAS DESIGNED TO EVOKE THE FEEL OF A HIGH-END SPA. BELOW: A VANITY MADE FROM WHITE BIRCH WAS FASHIONED BY DAKOTA CUSTOM CABINETRY.

LARGE AND LUXURIOUS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCOTT MILLER

When Stuart Harle, AKBD and owner of Carriage House Design, met with the homeowners of this 20-year-old house in south Tulsa, he knew exactly what they wanted. “[The homeowners’] goal was to create a spa environment,” says Harle. “And it was important that the space function more efficiently.” The entire room was gutted. The vanity is now located where the shower once stood, and the shower now occupies an entire corner of the bath. A heated floor system was installed, and Harle selected porcelain tile to use throughout the space; the tile was specially selected to withstand the moisture from the new, oversized steam shower. Tile was also used as wainscoting and on the shower walls, ceiling and floor. A hexagonal tile inset forms a border on the shower floor that matches the vanity countertops. The white birch vanity from Dakota Custom Cabinetry is stained a beautiful caraway color with brown glaze highlight. The countertop is polished dark empadora marble with an ogee edge. The ultimate treat was the installation of a Victoria + Albert freestanding, heat-retaining bathtub made from volcanic limestone.

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SIMPLY SOPHISTICATED

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN HARMON

“I wanted to use traditional materials but in an updated way,” says Tyler Mosher of her new master bathroom in the Maple Ridge home she and her husband William recently renovated. Because of her experience renovating homes via the couple’s company, Nest, Mosher knew what she wanted. “With four kids, someone wet always seems to be in our bathroom,” she says, laughing. To address this challenge, Mosher tiled every surface, including the walls. Large, inexpensive subway tile in a matte finish is straight stacked from floor to ceiling. “I chose marble for the floor tile because I wanted it to feel warm and in keeping with the age of the house,” she adds. The vanity, crafted by Eric Fransen Custom Cabinetry, is wall mounted and provides the illusion of more space. Covering the vanity is Statuario marble installed in a waterfall design by Alvin Stone’s Wesley Nelson. When a void behind the wall was discovered, Mosher collaborated with Fransen to fabricate walnut storage and shelves. The chair and accessories come from Lori Sparkman, owner of Fifteenth and Home Furniture and Décor. The wall sconces are from Sonneman and create an unexpected sparkle. “It’s a bit of ‘glam’ in an otherwise clean room,” she says.

GLAM REVIVAL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN HARMON

When Tyler and William Mosher bought their 1920s-era home, they added 1,200 feet to the space; included in the new space is an updated kitchen. “I don’t like upper cabinets because it tends to close in the space,” says Tyler Mosher. “And I love a backsplash that goes to the ceiling.” What was a last-minute decision to use up marble slabs, the backsplash is now the eye-catching feature in the kitchen, along with the custom vent hood. “The brass vent hood was a must,” adds Mosher. After an extensive search for affordable, unlacquered brass faucets, Mosher found a company that would dip the faucets into brass so they will gradually take on a patina. Instead of an island, the couple uses a harvest table inherited from William Mosher’s grandmother. “We want the table to be a special gathering place for our family,” Mosher says. But she also wanted to mix old and new, so Lori Sparkman, owner of Fifteenth and Home Furniture and Décor, supplied the chairs and area rug.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

THE CENTERPIECE OF THE KITCHEN IS A CEILING-HIGH BACKSPLASH THAT WAS ADDED TO USE UP MARBLE SLABS. LEFT: THE LARGE, CUSTOM DESIGNED VANITY IS TOPPED WITH STATUARIO MARBLE IN A WATERFALL DESIGN. ABOVE: CUSTOM WALNUT STORAGE SPACE AND SHELVES OCCUPY A NOOK IN THE MASTER BATH. A CHAIR AND BATHROOM ACCESSORIES WERE PROVIDED BY FIFTEENTH AND HOME.


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Tectonic SHOCKS Over the past three years, Oklahoma has rattled its way to one of the top earthquake spots in the country.

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S

By Tara Malone

eek the lowest ground possible. Stay away from windows and exterior walls. Do not get into your car. Cover your head. Oklahomans know – as much as it is possible – how to stay safe during a tornado. But when buildings begin to sway and the ground shakes, many residents freeze in place, unsure how to take action. That’s because until a few years ago, most Oklahomans had never experienced an earthquake. In November 2011, a 5.7 magnitude earthquake struck near the Oklahoma town of Prague. For many Oklahomans, this was the first of many shocks to come. Now, seismic events are far more common in the state than severe weather. “The increase in the number of earthquakes in Oklahoma since 2009 has been extraordinary and dramatic,” says Robert Williams, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. Williams serves as the central and eastern U.S. coordinator for the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program. “From the mid-1970s to 2008, Oklahoma averaged about one or two magnitude 3.0 and greater (M3+) quakes per year. There have been many days since 2009 when Oklahoma has had more M3+ earthquakes in one day (for example Aug. 17, 2014) than in an entire year prior to 2009. So far in 2014, there already have been about 303 earthquakes of this size – more M3+ events in Oklahoma in 2014 than in California.” The Oklahoma earthquake situation is unique in the seismology field. “It’s not unusual around the U.S. to get brief periods where a locality will see an increase in the number of earthquakes in a swarm,” Williams says. “But the surprising thing about the Oklahoma sequence is that it has lasted so long (years, not weeks or months as has been typical of swarms elsewhere), the number of events keeps increasing and the area of activity also is increasing.” Williams says most earthquakes occurred in south-central and central Oklahoma in 2009 and 2010. The activity then expanded into


north-central Oklahoma and south-central Kansas in 2013-2014. “Except for the year 2012, the number of quakes of magnitude 3.0 and greater has also increased every year,” Williams says. Concern that Oklahoma may soon experience “the big one” is rampant among the population. This fear was substantiated this past year, when the USGS and the Oklahoma Geological Survey at the University of Oklahoma issued two joint statements – one in October 2013 and another last May – cautioning citizens about the rate of earthquakes in central and north-central Oklahoma and the potential for a larger temblor. “We wanted to let Oklahomans know that we were monitoring the situation and that

“We wanted to let Oklahomans know that we were monitoring the situation and that we were worried about a larger, damaging quake occurring.” we were worried about a larger, damaging quake occurring,” Williams says. “Both of these statements grew out of concern for the alarming number of earthquakes occurring. Both of these information statements are unprecedented for the USGS to issue for areas east of California. The May 2014 statement was prompted by a further increase in the rate of M3+ earthquakes.”

While seismologists at the OGS and OU’s Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy declined to comment regarding the rise in Oklahoma’s seismic activity, a presentation prepared by OGS and the college for a public town hall meeting on June 26 at Edmond’s Waterloo Baptist Church states that the chances of a large, damaging earthquake occurring are very small. Williams disagrees. “The concern is built upon a well-supported observation from monitoring earthquakes around the world for decades: The more little quakes you have, the greater the chances for a larger damaging quake,” Williams says. “Three months after the May 2014 statement, the earthquake rate has not decreased, and OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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the USGS still has the same concern for a Fracking typically causes very small larger and damaging earthquake.” micro-earthquakes that are rarely felt on the Williams says the chances for a larger surface. Injection wells, however, have been earthquake in Oklahoma have significantly the culprits in larger-scale seismic activity. increased. He points out, however, that this While there has been debate as to whether DR. WILLIAM ELLSWORTH OF THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY’S EARTHQUAKE SCIENCE CENTER SAYS concern is based on the behavior of natural Oklahoma’s earthquakes are the result of EVIDENCE EXISTS THAT OKLAHOMA’S RECENT RISE earthquakes. No one can yet confirm that the natural or man-made forces, more research, IN EARTHQUAKES CAN BE ATTRIBUTED TO HUMAN same relationship between small and large including Ellsworth’s findings, is substantiatCAUSES. PHOTO COURTESY DR. WILLIAM ELLSWORTH. earthquakes takes place during anthropogening the latter. Ellsworth cites, for example, ic, or man-induced, a recent study of seismic events. While disposal wells not all agree, Wiland earthquakes liams and a growing in Arkansas, number of other Colorado, Ohio, scientists believe the Texas and Oklaunderlying cause homa that indiof the state’s recent cates long-term, M3+ seismic events high-volume is indeed of anthropoinjection (greater genic origin. than 100,000 bar“I do believe that rels per month) wastewater disposal into deep earth is in injection wells is a risk factor for contributing to the inducing earthcause of some of the quakes. earthquakes,” WilBut fracking liams says. “Some and wastewater of the earthquakes disposal are not also could be natural new practices tectonic events. in Oklahoma. However, a number Indeed, some of peer-reviewed have argued that research papers on the decades-long the Oklahoma earthhistory of such quakes published in practices in the the last three years state proves support the concluthey cannot be sion that wastewater disposal is part of the problem. One of these responsible for the recent, sudden onslaught of earthquakes. Others, publications showed how the increased rate of M3+ quakes does not however, say the science regarding the source is clear. appear to be related to natural causes when looking back at the rate “Science doesn’t move forward by either popular opinion or conof Oklahoma earthquakes prior to 2009. Human-induced earthquakes sensus, but rather by formulating hypotheses that can be tested,” Ellsare not a new phenomenon; we’ve known for decades that injecting or worth says. “A hypothesis can only be disproven. That is the scientific withdrawing fluids from deep underground can cause earthquakes.” method. At this point in time, the evidence points to a human origin One of those studies linking injection wells to Oklahoma’s increase for the remarkable rise in earthquake activity in Oklahoma. I am not in earthquakes was published last year in the journal Science by Dr. aware of a viable alternative hypothesis.” William Ellsworth, senior research geophysicist at the Earthquake Ellsworth points to the recent research regarding the 5.7 magniScience Center of the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif. tude event near Prague that rattled buildings in the region and nerves Ellsworth, a Tulsa native, says he never once experienced an eartharound much of the state. quake while growing up in the Sooner State. “The November 2011 earthquake near Prague ruptured an ancient Ellsworth explains that earthquakes occur as rocks move rapidly fault that was well-oriented in the present-day stress field for slip,” he along a fault line. Certain stresses, such as increasing the fluid pressays. “Several papers have been published in scientific literature that sure along a fault line, can overcome the fault’s natural friction, causexamined potential causes of the Prague earthquake. They all coning a slip, and subsequently an earthquake. cluded that wastewater injection very close to where the earthquake “Although Oklahoma is far from the actively deforming plate sequence began was sufficient to destabilize the fault and cause it to boundary that rims the western United States and where most U.S. rupture in an earthquake, although there is a difference of opinion earthquakes occur, stresses are high and faults are close to the breakabout which specific wastewater wells would have contributed most ing point everywhere on Earth,” Ellsworth says. “So, it may take only to destabilizing the fault. They also note that there were no significant a small increase in the stress or a small decrease in the friction to earthquakes anywhere in the vicinity until after high-volume wasteinduce an earthquake.” water [injection].” Both hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” – the injection of highRegardless of the potential causes and the controversy surrounding pressure fluid to increase the permeability of previously difficultthem, one thing is certain: Oklahomans are on edge about their state’s to-penetrate rock formations – and oil and gas wastewater disposal newfound status as a tectonic hotspot. Damage from such events as via injection deep into the earth’s crust have been proven to cause the 2011 Prague earthquake have Oklahomans flocking to buy earthearthquakes. quake insurance for their properties.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014


“Adequate insurance coverage can give Oklahoma families a great peace of mind,” says Oklahoma State Insurance Commissioner John Doak. “We encourage homeowners to consider adding earthquake insurance to their policy, as it is not included in a standard policy.” Doak says that typically, an Oklahoma homeowner may pay between $1,000 and $1,500 per year for earthquake insurance. The deductibles for such insurance, however, can run high – sometimes between $5,000 and $10,000 or more – and the fine print is legion. For example, Doak says that separate deductibles may apply for individual structures, such as garages or fences or for personal items. In addition, earthquake insurance does not cover damage to land, such as sinkholes, or vehicle damages. Each company is different; Doak urges Oklahomans to obtain thorough details from their insurance brokers. Insurance only goes so far in allaying fears, say some Oklahoma citizens. “It feels scary that Oklahoma has become so seismically active lately,” says Sara, a Norman resident. “I don’t know anyone here who feels adequately prepared or sure of what to do when they happen. So far, everyone’s collective response seems to be to freeze where they are and wait until it’s over. It’s always a surprise, and since I have not grown up with the threat of earthquakes, I have no instinctive response like I do with a tornado.” Sara recently purchased earthquake insurance for her home in south Norman but says she is concerned that people are more worried about property damage when they also should consider their safety. “It feels like we aren’t taking earthquakes seriously yet,” she says. “Perhaps because we haven’t had a large enough one to do widespread and serious damage. It feels as though most people aren’t thinking about the potential for harm beyond property damage. I personally don’t feel very safe or protected in the event of a large earthquake, and I don’t think Oklahoma is safe at all. Our buildings are not built to withstand earthquakes, and people do not know what to do when they happen.” She is emphatic that science supports the relationship between earthquakes and wastewater disposal. “It seems pretty clear to me that the increase in seismic activity here is caused by injection wells,” she says. “I wish we were already exploring options on how to keep earthquakes from happening. I mean, if there was even the slightest possibility that we had control over this problem, wouldn’t you think it would be worth trying?” Kristy, a resident of Moore, also believes that oil and gas industry practices are behind the increase in earthquakes and says that the dramatic emergence of frequent earthquakes has left her “really scared,” despite also purchasing earthquake insurance for her home. “I do not feel prepared for a large earthquake situation,” she says, “and Oklahomans have not been adequately prepared for such an emergency. However, we are Oklahoma strong and have survived multiple F5 tornadoes, blizzards, flooding and even the Dust Bowl back in the day. I feel if Oklahomans had the proper instructions regarding what to do to prepare for the next earthquake, we would be all right.”

THE SKY IS NOT FALLING

As Oklahomans wait for a plan in response to the increase in earthquakes, they look for ways to protect themselves. What action should residents take when earthquakes occur? “Unlike tornadoes and severe thunder storms, earthquakes strike without any warning, and so preparedness is the key to surviving them,” says Dr. William Ellsworth, senior research geophysicist at the Earthquake Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, Calif. “Like tornadoes, you need to know what to do when one strikes, and equally important, what you should not do. Drop, cover and hold on when an earthquake starts and do not attempt to leave a building during the shaking.” Actions to take include: • Hide under a sturdy piece of furniture, such as a table or a desk, and holding on. Remember: drop, cover, hold. • Avoid exterior walls, windows and pieces of furniture that may fall, such as light fixtures and bookshelves. • Do not stand in a doorway; swinging doors can be dangerous. • Under no circumstances should you go outside during an earthquake. Falling structures, windows and power lines are very dangerous. If you exit the building after an earthquake, immediately move into an area that is clear from potentially falling buildings. Be aware of the potential for downed power lines, fires or gas leaks. On Oct. 16, millions of Americans will participate in the Great Central U.S. Shakeout drill. To register for the drill and to find more information on earthquake preparedness, visit www.shakeout.org/ centralus. “This is a great way to learn about earthquakes and be prepared to survive and recover quickly should a damaging earthquake occur,” Ellsworth says. Other resources include the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s site, www.ready. gov/earthquakes, as well as the Earthquake Country Alliance’s website (www.earthquakecountry.info/roots/), which includes information specific to dealing with earthquakes as a resident of the central United States. – TM

OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

PERSONAL TRAINER

Lack of Sexual Intimacy: What does it mean, and how do I deal with it? When your partner is not sexually responsive, it is easy to assume the worst. Some possible reasons for lack of sexual intimacy can be seen in the following dynamics for both men and women. For COURTNEY LINSENMEYERwomen in particular, emotional intimacy O’BRIEN, PHD, LPC, MHR is often closely tied to sexual intimacy – if there is excessive conflict or emotional detachment, a woman may shut down sexually. Poor sexual technique or sexual performance issues – for women, orgasms are often difficult to attain through sexual intercourse alone. Find alternate means. Erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation are also common but manageable obstacles in achieving mutually satisfying sex. Chronic depression, addiction and eating disorders can lead to reduced interest in sex. Sexual trauma if not dealt with, can spill over into an otherwise healthy relationship. Real or perceived rejection – often, one partner feels they always initiate sex. Shame about past sexual interactions – individuals who have engaged in sexual activity that runs contrary to religious convictions may feel guilt, impacting the present. Lastly, infidelity creates the widest separation in sexual intimacy. Regardless of the cause, communicate and encourage therapy with a licensed professional. Statistics show couples do overcome such issues with professional help.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250, Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl., Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

How does replacement cost really work?

.

A fairly common question from customers is why the insurance value on their homeowners insurance policy is higher than what the home is worth. The primary reason is that most homeowners policy contracts provide replacement cost JARED PETERSON coverage for the home. In the event of a total loss, the company has an obligation to replace/rebuild a NEW home at a level of “like kind and quality.” This obligation is to rebuild, not to cash settle for market value. This is why insurance agents and insurance companies need to insure the home for what it would cost to build a brand new home, not for what the home might sell for in the real estate marketplace. In addition, most replacement cost home policies will have an inflation guard provision which will increase the coverage of the home each year based on inflation and construction costs. If you would like to discuss this issue further or receive a homeowners insurance quote from AAA, contact a AAA agent nearest you.

JOHN JACKSON

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

VETERINARIAN

DR. RODNEY ROBARDS

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

Jared Peterson, AAA Oklahoma 2121 E 15th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.748.1030 Jared.Peterson@aaaok.org

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Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539-777-6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

Todd Petty, PT/CSMT Excel Therapy Specialists 918.398.7400 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. HOSPICE CARE

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ing. Any advice? Losing a loved one means facing a year of “firsts” without that person: birthdays, family events, and one AVA HANCOCK of the biggest is the holiday season of Thanksgiving and Christmas. I advise you to accept what you are feeling as it is a normal part of the grief process. After a loss, you must find a new normal. One way is through a grief support group where you’ll be with others who can emphasize. Grace Hospice is offering a free support group called, “Coping with Grief during the Holidays” Nov. 17 and 24 and Dec. 1 from noon to 1 p.m. Light snacks will be served, but feel free to bring a sack lunch. Please call Grace Hospice at 918.744.7223 to sign up or for more information.

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LEGAL SERVICES I recently paid off my mortgage. How long does the bank have to release it? Under Title 46 Section 15 of the Oklahoma Statutes, a mortgage holder has 50 days after the debt is paid to file a release of the mortgage BRAD BEASLEY with the county clerk where the mortgage is recorded. If the release is not filed within the 50-day period, a request in writing to release the mortgage should be made. The holder of the mortgage then has 10 days from the date of the request to release the mortgage. If the holder of the mortgage continues to fail to release the mortgage by the end of the 10-day period, a penalty will be incurred equal to the lesser of one percent of the principal debt, or $100 per day, for each day the release is not recorded. The total penalty may not exceed 100 percent of the total principal debt.

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Amy Kesner, All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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THE PRIME BONE-IN RIB-EYE STEAK IS A STAND-OUT MENU ITEM AT THE GEORGE. BELOW: OL’ BLUE EYES, A COCKTAIL AT THE GEORGE. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS.

FOOD, DRINK AND OTHER PLEASURES

I

Top Of The Town

The George Prime Steakhouse opens in Oklahoma City’s Founder’s Tower.

t’s been called the Space Needle of Oklahoma City: Founder’s Tower, a 20-story, space-age skyscraper complete with a rotating top, nestled in the urban heart of the state capitol. In the past, the pinnacle of the building was occupied by the now-defunct Eagle’s Nest. It was there that budding restaurant professional Kevin George first fell in love with this historic Oklahoma City landmark. “I have always loved the space on the 20th floor of Founder’s Tower,” George says, “and the feeling it gives you as you experience the 360-degree view of Oklahoma City. The panoramic view is something you just can’t get anywhere else, and I never tire of seeing it.” Once one of the only rotating restaurants in the world, the

top of the tower no longer pans mechanically, but it is still home to the most cutting-edge dining experience in Oklahoma City: The George Prime Steakhouse. Since The George’s opening this past summer, buzz about the restaurant already has proven well-justified. Add to the atmosphere a menu sophisticated enough to make your head spin (even if the restaurant no longer does), and you have one of the most impressive dining destinations in Oklahoma City restaurant history. George, a partner with the Interurban Restaurant Group, says he has always been a fan of the steakhouse restaurant and wanted to bring the modern iteration to Oklahoma diners. The eatery’s calling card is 100 percent USDA prime beef quality or higher, including a wide variety of Wagyu cattle cuts. George points out that while The George is a OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

steakhouse, the restaurant prides itself on a variety of high-quality offerings, including chicken, lamb, pork and seafood. The menu was developed by The George executive chef Joshua Valentine, a Del City native and former contender on Bravo television’s Top Chef. Diners will have a difficult time choosing between carnivore delights and the menu’s other temptations, including Carolina gold rice with lobster, pecans and cauliflower; fois gras with pistachios and pickled plums; and the bacon and onion tart. Deserving equally honorable mention are the creations of pastry chef Shelby Sieg. “I think a bite of anything on our menu will tell the story,” George says. The George Prime Steakhouse is yet another harbinger that Oklahoma City has arrived on the frontiers of modern cuisine. George says that over the years, Oklahomans have learned more about fine dining, which has broadened the horizons for the local food scene. “I think people have become much more educated when it comes to food and the preparation of food,” George says. “This requires restaurants to keep up and to stay in tune with new trends and cooking methods in the culinary world. This will do nothing but help Oklahoma City. I see the future as very bright for the food scene here, and [it’s] getting brighter.” The George Prime Steakhouse is open six nights a week at 5 p.m. for dinner, with lunch hours forthcoming. Reservations are recommended. Founders Tower, 5900 Mosteller Drive, Oklahoma City. 405.242.4761 TARA MALONE KEVIN GEORGE, OWNER OF THE GEORGE PRIME STEAKHOUSE, BRINGS A MODERN SENSIBILITY TO THE TRADITIONAL STEAKHOUSE RESTAURANT.

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T H E B UZ Z

Bruhouse Grill Broken Arrow may soon rival Tulsa’s 71st Street South corridor as a food lover’s paradise. One of the most recent additions to downtown Broken Arrow’s newly appointed Rose District is the Bruhouse Grill. The eatery offers a varied lunch and dinner menu, including a variety of soups and salads, starters, burgers, THE BRUHOUSE GRILL’S MARINATED CHICKEN SANDWICH WITH SWEET sandwiches and more. POTATO FRIES MAKES A GREAT LUNCH. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT. On a recent lunchtime visit, this writer started with the Bob Harley dip – a Mexican-style layer dip that includes beans, cheese and guacamole. For an entrée, the blackened chicken sandwich served with house-made orange marmalade sauce and a side of sweet potato fries followed. The orange marmalade sauce paired nicely with the fries, as well. It’s hard to find crispy sweet potato fries anywhere, and the Bruhouse didn’t disappoint. Desserts rotate, and the fried cheesecake was up on this occasion. Made in-house, dessert was delicious, even more evidence that this stop in a prime area of downtown Broken Arrow is worthy of its much-coveted spot. 201 S. Main St., Broken Arrow. 918.258.0101 – Jill Meredith FAV E S

All About Cha Stylish Coffee & Tea

Tea and coffee are rich, smooth, nutty, robust, green, floral, bitter or strong. They’re rarely “stylish” except when served at All About Cha Stylish Coffee & Tea. Owner Chang Yi opened the first location in Edmond four years ago and a second shop and cafe in Oklahoma City earlier this year. All About Cha quickly attracted students looking for a fun and funky stop for studying and visiting with friends. Yet, a menu offering a bewildering selection of teas (black, green, white, herbal and more) along with magical brews of Arabica and Robusta inspired an even greater patronage. All About Cha today brings scrumptious pastries, crepes, omelets, sandwiches and salads to the table. For dinnertime, it gets better – wraps, sushi and, for dessert, ice cream waffles. Let it be known, however, that All THE CAPPUCCINOS ARE ALMOST TOO PRETTY TO About Cha remains DRINK ... ALMOST. uncompromising PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. when it comes to brewing beauty and perfection in every cup. Soon, Tulsans will get to make themselves at home in the eclectic comforts of All About Cha – a new cafe is set to open at One Place, 202 S. Cheyenne Ave., near the BOK Center. 3272 S. Broadway, Edmond; 7300 N. Western Ave., Oklahoma City. www. allaboutcha.net – Karen Shade


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Taste

W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

ONION RINGS AT THE RED HORSE GRILL KEEP DINERS COMING BACK. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Red Horse Grill Ask anyone who grew up in Norman about local comfort food, and the name Red Horse Grill will inevitably make an appearance. Nestled for more than 20 years in a camouflaged corner of one of the city’s main shopping centers, Normanites who are in the know flock here for the same great food that was available when they were kids. Red Horse Grill is a local legend in the quintessential American feast – huge burgers, fresh-cut fries and sky-high milkshakes. While the establishment purchases fresh meats from a local butcher and all the fare is premium, the price is anything but. Burgers made this favorite eatery famous, but specials like the fish fry, Indian tacos and weekly Steak Tuesdays also have earned it a tasty reputation. Although Red Horse is under new ownership, the menu is still classic. 2205 W. Main St., Norman. www.redhorsegrill.com – Tara Malone

China Garden Chinese take-outs serving “Szechuan-style” dishes are as common as sunflowers in Kansas. But the difference between them and the fiery, vibrant cuisine of China’s Sichuan province is like the difference between a sunflower and the sun. You’ll find the real thing in east Tulsa. Owner Michael Wu graduated from Oklahoma State University, but grew up in Zhengzhou in central China. So why does he serve food from Sichuan? “Because my chef is from Sichuan,” he says, “and he was a chef in Chengdu [the province capital] for seven years.” China Garden offers Sichuan classics, such as Kung Pao chicken and double-cooked pork. For the more adventurous, there is saliva chicken, husband-and-wife lung slices and bubbling blood (a hearty stew of pig intestine, blood pudding, ham, tofu and a ton of chilies). Among the daily specials of spicy octopus and sun-dried pork belly is the latest craze in Beijing: dry pots, a mix of meat, peppers, ginger and chilies steamed in a flavorful sauce and served in a wok over a flame. 9720 E. 31st St., Tulsa. www.chinagardentulsa.com – Brian Schwartz

DRY POT DISHES, LIKE CHINA GARDEN’S SHRIMP DRY POT, ARE THE LATEST CULINARY CRAZE IN BEIJING. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

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S I M P LY H E A L T H Y Leaves are not the only things that change in fall. As temperatures drop, we tend to crave heartier fare that will stick to our ribs and warm us up from the inside out. Hearty, however, does not always equal heavy, fat-laden food. Butternut squash is one of those beautiful fruits of fall that tastes rich and decadent without the guilt. Considered a super food, the butternut squash’s orange flesh is packed with antioxidants, beta-carotene and vitamin B6. It’s also a good source of vitamin C, potassium and folate, a vitamin shown to help prevent some birth defects. To take advantage of these benefits, try baking the whole squash in the oven at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Once it is removed from the oven and cooled, it’s a cinch to peel. – Jill Meredith

Baked Butternut Squash with Apples Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Coat a 13-by-9-inch baking dish with cooking spray. In a saucepan, stir butter, maple syrup and apple juice together over low 1/4 c. butter heat until butter 1 1/2 c. pure maple syrup melts. Simmer until 1 c. apple juice mixture is slightly 1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon reduced, about 5 1/2 tsp. cloves minutes. Remove 1/4 tsp. ginger from heat and 1/2 tsp. salt whisk in cinnamon, 1 butternut squash (2 1/2-3 lbs., spices and salt. halved lengthwise and cut into In prepared baking 1/2-inch thick slices dish, alternate 4 Granny Smith apples (peeled, squash and apple cored and cut into slices) slices, overlapping and stacking. Pour reduced syrup over everything; cover with foil. Bake until squash is almost tender, about 40 minutes. Uncover and bake until tender, basting occasionally with syrup, about 15 more minutes. Yields 4-6 servings.


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VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE STAR DANCER (Now - Nov 1) Frank Cooper | Rose Washington | John Gaberino III Katia Anaya | Richard Cranford | Marlow Perkins Sipes

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FOOD EVENT

Brewing Up Fun

Oktoberfest wears a new name, but still boasts all the fun for which it’s known.

E

very year, the arrival of October brings to mind festivities, great beer and entertainment that’s all-things-Bavarian. Tulsa’s Oktoberfest began in 1979, and the festival continues to offer activities for all ages, including a children’s tent, the Dachshund Dash, authentic German music, a 5k run and much more. This year, the 2014 Linde Oktoberfest Tulsa takes place Oct. 16-19 at River West Festival Park, 2100 S. Jackson Ave. For the next five years, Linde Process Plants will be the title sponsor for the festival. Tonja Carrigg, Oktoberfest festival director, says the festival is popular because it is truly a community event and effort. “The entire community gets involved in every aspect of it, with more than 1,000 volunteers,” Carrigg says. The four-day festival promotes German culture as it benefits Tulsa River Parks. This year, it is expected to attract some 60,000 visitors. In the past, Oktoberfest in Tulsa has been named one of the top 10 fall festivals of its kind in the nation by USA Today. Festival highlights include six tents with 244 taps serving more than 50 kinds of beers, both imported and domestic; a beer barrel race; and a stein hoisting competition. Also this year, there will be more German entertainers than ever before. Besides the bands, there

GET READY FOR MORE

will be a European disco complete with a Ger- GERMAN DANCE AND MUSIC THAT’S WUNman DJ on Friday and Saturday nights. DERBAR AT LINDE In addition to all the fun, guests will find a OKTOBERFEST. PHOTO COURTESY RIVER variety of authentic German foods served by PARKS AUTHORITY. the German American Society in Tulsa, including brats on buns, kraut, potato pancakes and more. Other area restaurants and vendors serving wiener schnitzel, sausages, strudel and other German delicacies will also be on hand. “We want to encourage people to wear German-themed clothes, including lederhosen for the guys and dirndl for the frauleins,” Carrigg says. Oktoberfest hours are 5-11:30 p.m. on Oct. 16, 11 a.m.-1 a.m. on Oct. 17-18 and noon-6 p.m. on Oct. 19. Admission is $6 for adults throughout the festival except from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Oct. 17, which is free to all. Children 12 and under are free. Visit www.tulsaoktoberfest.org for a complete schedule of events and list of participating vendors. JILL MEREDITH

Owners William and Rachel Fontanez began their food truck business last year. A U.S. Army veteran, William Fontanez is the PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. head cook. Having grown up in Louisiana, he makes Cajun flavor the “house” specialty, but his Puerto Rican heritage also dashes Caribbean influences into the food. The result is a menu of gumbo (from vegan to ‘gator), Po’ boy sandwiches topped with just about anything pulled from the bayou and an array of entrees and sides with a decidedly tropical taste. Pulled pork and roast beef are succulent and tender for the open-faced sandwiches, and dishes like red beans and rice have struck a high note with La Gumbo’s fans. But offerings such as fried plantains, yucca fries and other specialties that hail from island living make this kitchen on wheels a standout in the buzzing food truck world. And, if that wasn’t reason enough to catch up with La Gumbo, we hear that the beignets are perfectly dreamy. Catch up with the spirited Fontanez and La Gumbo Ya Ya at www. lagumboyaya.com. – Karen Shade WILLIAM FONTANEZ BRINGS THE FRENCH QUARTER TO ANY STREET IN HIS FOOD TRUCK, LA GUMBO YA YA.

ON WHEELS

La Gumbo Ya Ya

Every day is Mardi Gras when La Gumbo Ya Ya rolls around the corner. One of Oklahoma’s most recognizable food trucks – the green, gold and purple striping helps – La Gumbo Ya Ya brings the French Quarter to the scene. 104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014


HOW TO

Cure for All Seasons

October ushers in cooler weather, Halloween and, to a hunter’s delight, deer season. While there are countless ways to prepare venison, making jerky is an easy, affordable and versatile option. According to the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation website, deer season begins Oct. 1 for archery, Oct. 25 for muzzleloader and Nov. 22 for other hunting guns and rifles. A license is required to hunt in Oklahoma, and they can be purchased at www. wildlifedepartment.com. Regulations and other information can be found there, too. What you won’t find there, however, are a ton of recipes for preparing venison. While everyone has their own ideas of the choice cuts to use for deer jerky, many sources and online forum users tend to recommend the rump roast, cut against the grain and well-seasoned. With the rise in popularity of stand-alone food dehydrators over the last few years, making jerky at home has become a trend. However, you don’t necessarily need a dedicated contraption to make great jerky. Slowly baking the strips of meat in the oven on low heat is another method. For an easy, tasty recipe, check out this adaptable version. – Jill Meredith

E N T E R TA I N I N G

Venison Jerky 1-1 1/2 lb. 4 tbs. 4 tbs. 2 tbs. 1/2 tsp. 1/4 tsp. 1/2 tsp. 1/4 tsp. 1

lean deer steak or roast, boneless Worcestershire sauce soy sauce liquid smoke flavoring cracked black pepper garlic powder salt onion powder 12-oz. can of beer (optional)

Slice venison into long strips. Strips should measure approximately one-inch wide and 1/8-inch thick. Combine the liquid and dry ingredients together in a large, resealable plastic bag before placing meat strips inside. Seal the bag and gently work the marinade so that it coats all around each meat strip. Refrigerate for about 24 hours. Preheat oven to 160 degrees. Place a large pan below oven racks to catch the drippings. Place strips onto a clean oven rack or on a metal screen about 1/8 inch apart. Do not overlap strips. Bake for six to seven hours, checking hourly on progress. When jerky has reached desired consistency, remove and allow strips to cool to room temperature.

Funny Mummy

For children, celebrating Halloween is a fairly straightforward program: Find a costume, ask for candy, get a stomachache. For adults, Halloween is a different affair. Some grown-ups don’t bat an eye. Others, however, take Halloween to the extreme. Parties, costumes and food and drink – the spookier the better – make the holiday what it is. For Owasso resident Kristina Ellis, Halloween entertaining is the chance to get a little creative in the kitchen. For her monthly Bunco group, she made Mummy Dogs, a fun Halloween-inspired snack. They couldn’t be simpler. Just a few ingredients and a little assembly, and these mummies are piping hot and ready for adults or kiddoes to enjoy. – Jami Mattox

Mummy Dogs Makes 10 mummies This recipe is adapted from Pillsbury. For a gourmet twist, substitute phyllo for canned dough, or use a high-end, thinly sliced smoked cheddar or gouda in place of the American cheese slices. 1 3 10

can refrigerated crescent dinner rolls or breadstick dough slices American cheese, divided into quarters hot dogs cooking spray ketchup, mustard or barbecue sauce, for serving

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. If using crescent rolls, unroll the dough, press together perforations and cut into strips. If using breadstick dough, roll individual breadsticks into long, thin logs. Slice cheese into thin strips and line the back of the hot dog. Wind strips of dough around each hot dog and cheese, overlapping the dough but leaving enough room at the top of one end to represent a face. Bake for 13 to 17 minutes, or until dough is golden brown and cheese is melted. Use mustard, ketchup or barbecue sauce to draw faces on the mummy dogs. OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Advertisers’ News

A PATIENT CHECKS INTO CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS OF AMERICA IN TULSA. PHOTO COURTESY OF CTCA.

Continuing Excellence In Care

Cancer Treatment Centers of America is the first Oklahoma hospital recognized with Quality Oncology Practice Initiative certification. Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) in Tulsa is the first hospital in the state of Oklahoma to be recognized by the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI®) Certification Program, an affiliate of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The QOPI® Certification Program provides a three-year certification for outpatient hematology-oncology practices that meet the highest standards for quality cancer care. “This certification acknowledges excellence in patient safety and care, especially related to chemotherapy, and is a direct result of our team of highly skilled oncology providers,” says Denise Geuder, RN, MS, CNOR, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer at CTCA. “We are proud to be the first certified program in the state of Oklahoma.” To become certified, hospitals submit to an evaluation of their entire practices and documentation standards and then undergo an on-site inspection and evaluation of core standards in treatment areas including: Treatment planning; Staff training and education; Chemotherapy orders and drug preparation; Patient consent and education; Safe chemotherapy administration; and Monitoring and assessment of patient well-being. 106

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

CTCA Clinical Support Director Teri Jennings, RN, OCN, who was involved in the QOPI® evaluation process, encourages patients to take an active role in their cancer treatment and to ask many questions. “Patient education is vital so that all aspects of the treatment are understood. Patients should feel comfortable asking questions of their clinical staff before undergoing any treatment, especially chemotherapy,” she says. Before undergoing chemotherapy, Jennings recommends patients ask the following questions: How long will the treatment take? Who should I call if I have problems? What side effects should I watch for? When should I call for help? How can I protect myself, but still have a good quality of life? Coweta resident Cathie Hogate, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011, underwent eight rounds of chemotherapy as part of her treatment. She says she valued the “eye-to-eye” chemotherapy education she received at CTCA. “When I was first diagnosed with cancer, I was in shock,” recounts Hogate. “Then I was in awe, or I guess you would call it denial. After all that wore off and I was sitting in front of the education nurse, who explained the process and type of treatment I was about to receive, it all sank in. It became real. My chemo education nurse was more than helpful and even had pictures of the various items that would be used, such as what a port looked like or what the bag looked like. Printed materials were also helpful to refer to later when I was at home.” Hogate, who recently celebrated her 65th birthday, shares the following advice for anyone who is about to start chemotherapy. “Educate yourself,” she says. “Ask a lot of questions, then trust your doctor to do the right thing. You need to be educated to make the right choices.” KENDRA THOMPSON No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results. To learn more about Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Tulsa, visit cancercenter.com or call 888.333.CTCA.


Be...A Servant Be...A Cascian John LaFortune graduated from Cascia Hall in 1977. After working as a professional photographer for 15 years, he returned to Cascia Hall in 1999 to serve as school photographer and instructor in the Fine & Performing Arts Department. John is a Kairos retreat leader and sponsors several extracurricular activities including Acoustic Instruments Club, Bowling Club, and Key Club which provides service in the Tulsa community. He is an Eagle Scout and currently serves as Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 26. “When I think of John LaFortune, the word that comes to mind is service,” said Headmaster Roger Carter.

John LaFortune Class of 1977

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Advertisers’ News

DANIEL BRUNSON, MANAGER OF HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR, AND RICK BRUNSON, COMPANY PRESIDENT, STAND BY A COMMITMENT TO MEET ALL THEIR CUSTOMERS’ NEEDS. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

Eye Candy

I

A Tulsa mainstay, Hicks Brunson Eyewear uses its years of expertise to tailor the perfect pair.

n 1929, Hicks G. Brunson came to Tulsa to open an American Optical Dispensary shop downtown. Since then, the Brunson family has continued to provide cutting-edge eyewear from a select line of designers. “In 1950, my great-grandfather purchased the company and changed the name to Hicks Brunson,” says store manager Daniel Brunson. “He opened a second location in Utica Square in 1952, just after Utica Square was built.” For the past 64 years, Hick Brunson has focused on fit as well as fashion, using expertise to take the guesswork out of finding the perfect pair of glasses. “We will help you find a selection of frames that will flatter your face shape and complement your natural coloring,” says Brunson. “Then you can choose the look that reflects your personal style and that you are most comfortable with. We may even custom design a frame for you. “We really like to have an interactive experience with our customers,” he continues. “We don’t make you have to figure it out yourself.” Part of the retailer’s long-term success has been the result of providing customers with a diverse selection from which to choose. Many designers that Hicks Brunson carries are not offered anywhere else in the state. “We like to work with designers that are as passionate as we are,” says Brunson. “A lot of our glasses come from independent artisans.” Zero G is a line that features lightweight, comfortable and durable frames with a clean, classic look. Leisure Society, designed by the much sought-after Shane Baum, are heirloom-quality frames made from pure Japanese titanium and coated in 12-, 18- or 22-karat gold.

108

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

Face A Face offers a collection of fun colors and shapes, and all frames are handmade in Paris. These are just a few exclusive lines that Hicks Brunson carries. “In 2009 I met Tom Davies,” says Brunson. “That relationship changed everything.” Davies, a British eyewear designer, is famous for his bespoke service, providing custom designed eyewear tailored for comfort with the perfect shape and color. “We have collaborated several times to produce our Tom Davies by Hicks Brunson Eyewear collection,” says Brunson. “Our newest collection, called Dekko Lux, makes use of fun cat shapes for women and classic wayfarer-inspired shapes for men. “[Tom Davies] eyewear can be tailored just like clothing,” explains Brunson. “Rather than pick a stock frame, you can create the perfect one for you.” Hicks Brunson’s dedication to providing for customers’ needs continues today. LINDSAY CUOMO

Hicks Brunson Cares Care Card week in Tulsa is Friday, Oct. 24, through Sunday, Nov. 2. Shoppers who have purchased a Care Card, benefiting Family and Children’s Services, can save up to 20 percent on most purchases at Hicks Brunson Eyewear during that week. “We want to make the most of the savings,” says store manager Daniel Brunson. “We will have two trunk shows to make the value even better.” From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Oct. 30, customers can browse through a large selection of Face A Face eyewear, featuring the latest fall fashions; and on Nov. 1, Hicks Brunson will host a Maui Jim show. “Maui Jim sunglasses are a very popular line,” says Brunson. “I think people will be excited to browse the large selection and the savings.” – LC


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Entertainment

PHOTO BY LAYNE MURDOCH/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES, COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER.

G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

M

Hometowns to Home Court

Ahead of a new NBA season, the Oklahoma City Thunder will play hard in Choctaw.

uch has been made in the media as of late about the new faces on the Oklahoma City Thunder team for the 2014-15 season and the effect they’ll have on Oklahoma’s golden team. Everyone wants to know if Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook and its veteran players can lead the Thunder into another NBA Finals. As speculation builds up to the preseason and first games of regular play, there’s one Thunder game that won’t stir as much attention. The Blue and White Scrimmage, set for Oct. 5, continues a tradition of bringing big NBA action to small towns around the state. In years past, the practice game has been played on hometown courts in Bixby, Moore, Yukon and Bethany. This year, the team heads for Choctaw High School, east of the capitol, with Rumble the Bison, the Thunder Girls and other courtside regulars. More than just good community relations, the Blue and White Scrimmage (which is free) gives fans the first chance to see the team in

action for a new season, something they don’t take lightly. Speaking of the preseason, OKC will take on the Denver Nuggets on Oct. 8 at the Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 W. Reno Ave., and the Dallas Mavericks on Oct. 10 and New Orleans Pelicans on Oct. 16, also at the arena. Following a preseason game against the Minnesota Timberwolves on Oct. 19 at the BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., in Tulsa, the Thunder will play its season opener against the Portland Trail Blazers on Oct. 29 back-to-back with a match against the Los Angeles Clippers on Oct. 30, both on the home court. One thing is certain, whether the Thunder brings the game to hometowns, home court or to the opposition, its fans will always be ready for the rumble and play. Single-game tickets for Thunder home games are available at www. nba.com/thunder. Also go online for details about the scrimmage and other Thunder activities. KAREN SHADE OCTOBER 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas Oct. 28-Nov. 2 Christmas arrives

early at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall for the live musical adaptation based on the children’s story. www.celebrityattractions.com

Carmina Burana Oct. 31-Nov. 2 Choreographer Ma Cong and Tulsa Ballet bring a contemporary vision of the timeless ballet and Orff’s powerful musical work to the stage at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsaballet. org

PHOTO BY PAPARAZZIBYAPPOINTMENT.COM,.

The Drunkard and The Olio

PERFORMANCES

Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas October is for creature features, costumed revelry and chills – all of which make the story about a green loner spying from his icy cave on the people in the valley below as he plots to wreck their lives a perfect night out for Halloween. Then again, Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas isn’t the macabre thriller of a hundred low-budget flicks. It’s the story found in a children’s book of the same name and the animated television special that followed it about the holiday spirit of giving and community – two things Mr. Grinch, with his tight shoes and a heart two sizes too small, lacks until he is rescued. Celebrity Attractions brings this fun, family musical to the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., in Oklahoma City Oct. 28-Nov. 2. The show then moves to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center, 101 E. Third St., in Tulsa. For more information and tickets, go to www.celebrityattractions.com.

Ongoing The melodrama continues with over-the-top characters plus an entertaining musical revue featuring celebrity drop-in guests most Saturdays of the year at the Spotlight Theatre. www. spotlighttheatre.org

IN CONCERT Gov’t Mule Oct. 1 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net John Pardi

tulsastatefair.com

Oct. 1 Tulsa State Fair. www.

Foster the People Oct.2 OKC Downtown Airpark. www.okcairpark.com Ringo Starr and His All Starr Band Oct. 2 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Skrillex

Oct. 2 Cox Business Center, Tulsa. www.bokcenter.com

Lecrae

Oct. 2 BOK Center. www.bokcenter.

com

Bret Michaels

www.tulsastatefair.com

Oct. 2 Tulsa State Fair.

Oklahoma International Bluegrass Festival Oct. 2-4 Cottonwood Flats,

Guthrie. www.oibf.com

Santana

Oct. 3 Brady Theater. www. bradytheater.com

Slaid Cleaves

www.bluedoorokc.com

PERFORMANCES Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike Oct. 3-12 Theatre Tulsa brings

Christopher Durang’s drama and Tony Awardwinning Best Play of 2013 about chaos among siblings to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.theatretulsa.org

Gutierrez Plays Chopin

Oct. 4 Pianist Horacio Gutierrez plays a classical program of Chopin and Brahms with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcphilharmonic.org

Simply Sibelius Oct. 4-5 The work of Jean Sibelius gets special attention from Tulsa Symphony at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsasymphony.org Creations in Studio K

Thru Oct. 5 Find out what Tulsa Ballet has been up to all summer with the new show in Tulsa Ballet’s studios. www.tulsaballet.org

An Inspector Calls Oct. 8-25 Inspector Goole is on the case in this Downton Abbeymeets-Sherlock thriller about a murder mystery at the Lyric Theatre on the Plaza stage. www. lyrictheatreokc.com Gloria [Cubed]

Oct. 10 It’s all in the name as the Canterbury Choral Society plays works bearing the name “Gloria” by Vivaldi and others at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.canterburyokc.com

Wait Until Dark

Oct. 10-18 The classic play best known for a film adaptation set in the 1960s gets bumped to the 1940s in a nod to film noir from American Theatre Company at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.americantheatrecompany.org

Smokey Joe’s Café

Oct. 12 Legendary group The Coasters headlines this award-winning musical revue of works by the songwriting team of Leiber and Stroller at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center. www.brokenarrowpac.com

Cherokee Art Market

112

Brown Bag It Oct. 15-Dec. 3 Bring your lunch and enjoy great music at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center most Wednesdays. www.tulsapac.com

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

All We Ever Do Is Talk About It Oct. 16-19 Theatre North presents an original play by Rodney L. Clark featuring a large cast and addressing communities and the battle for quality education at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsapac.com

Carrie the Musical

Oct. 16-Nov. 1 Oklahoma City Theatre Company sets the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall stage with a musical production adapted from the Stephen King novel. www.okctheatrecompany. org

Cinderella

Oct. 17-19 The fairy tale of a beautiful servant girl who finds Prince Charming is told in movement and music by Oklahoma City Ballet and the Oklahoma City Philharmonic at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www. okcballet.com

Consider the Oyster Oct. 17-Nov. 8 Carpenter Square Theatre tells the comedy of a man slowly transforming into a woman. www. carpentersquare.com Brain Storms: New Works by Young Writers Oct. 18 The winning

one-act plays from the Tulsa City-County Library’s Young People’s Creative Writing Contest are staged at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www. myticketoffice.com

Miró Quartet and Aeolus Quartet Oct. 19 Chamber Music Tulsa brings two stellar chamber ensembles to the Lorton Performance Center at the University of Tulsa. www. chambermusictulsa.org

Dowling & Hodges

Oct. 21 The dual piano ragtime concert presented by Ragtime for

Tulsa features Frederick Hodges and Richard Dowling, both acclaimed musicians in their respective genres, at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice.com

Ragtime for Tulsa An Evening of French Music

Oct. 23 The Concerts with Commentary series continues at the Lordon Performance Center with bass-bariton and pianist Brady McElligott and pianist Stuart Deaver. www.utulsa.edu

Straight No Chaser

Oct. 24 The popular a cappella group brings its Happy Hour Tour of tunes to the Brady Theater. www. bradytheater.com

A Salute to Sgt. Pepper

Oct.24-25 The popular Beatles tribute band Classical Mystery Tour plays with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcphilharmonic.org

Cinderella

Oct. 24, 26 Tulsa Opera brings the romance of a classic fairytale to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center stage. www.tulsaopera. com

Rodrigo and Tchaikovsky

Oct. 25 Signature Symphony will be led by Andres Franco, one of three finalists contending for the conductor’s baton in a year of concerts at the Tulsa Community College’s VanTrease Performing Arts Center. www.tulsacc.edu

Koresh Dance Company

Oct.28-29 The Philadelphia-based company presents the second installment of a three-year project displaying its depths in modern dance at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.choregus.org

Gaslight Anthem

www.cainsballroom.com

Oct. 3 The Blue Door. Oct. 3 Cain’s Ballroom.

America

Oct. 3 Riverwind Casino, Norman. www.riverwindcasino.com

If Birds Could Fly

Oct. 3 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com

Broncho Oct. 3 Opolis Bar & Micro Venue, Norman. www.opolis.org Naughty By Nature

Fair. www.tulsastatefair.com

Oct. 3 Tulsa State

The Amigos

Oct. 4 Woody Guthrie Center. www.woodyguthriecenter.org

Kill the Noise

Oct. 4 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Experience Hendrix Oct. 4 First Council Casino & Hotel, Newkirk. www.firstcouncilcasinohotel.com Halestorm

tulsastatefair.com

Oct. 4 Tulsa State Fair. www.

The Head and the Heart

Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Experience Hendrix

Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Oct. 5 Cain’s

Oct. 5 Brady

Nosotros, John the Conqueror Oct. 5 Guthrie Green. www.guthriegreen.com

Carter Sampson

Oct. 5 Mercury Lounge. www.mercurylounge918.com

Katy Perry

bokcenter.com

AFI Oct. 6 Beck

Oct. 6 BOK Center. www.

Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Oct. 7 Brady Theater. www. bradytheater.com


Tulsa Oilers www.tulsaoilers.com v. Wichita Oct. 26 v. Missouri Oct. 31 OSU Football

www.soonersports.com v. Iowa State Oct. 4 v. West Virginia Oct. 25

OU Football

www.soonersports.com v. Kansas State Oct. 18

TU Football

www.tulsahurricane.com

PHOTO BY PETER HAPOK.

v. USF Oct. 18

Ani DiFranco

IN CONCERT

Beck The faces Beck presents through his music are as different as Mellow Gold from Midnite Vultures – albums in which the recording artist gives personal license to define alternative rock before taking it where it’s never been. So when his 12th studio album was released earlier this year, the comparisons of Morning Phase to 2002’s atmospheric Sea Change rushed across the web along with praise for a return to elegant strummers with simmering lyrics. For many of us, however, Beck will always be at his best when indulging all his musical sides, and the anthemic drone of 1994’s “Loser” is as audacious as the day it was released. Beck returns to Tulsa to play the Brady Theater, 105 W. Brady St., on Oct. 7 at 8 p.m. It will be his first concert in T-Town since his 2008 show at Cain’s Ballroom. Tickets are $49.50-$59.50 at www.bradytheater.com.

K. Flay

Oct. 7 Opolis Bar & Micro Venue, Norman. www.opolis.org

Kalin and Myles

www.cainsballroom.com

Oct. 7 Cain’s Ballroom.

ShockFest

Oct. 12 Insane Clown Posse, more. OKC Farmers Public Market. www. okcfarmersmarket.com

Keys N Krates

Oct. 14 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Five Finger Death Punch, Volbeat Oct. 18 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www. chesapeakearena.com

Chris Robinson Brotherhood

Oct. 18 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Kinky Friedman

Oct. 8 Brady Theater. www.

Oct. 18 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Oct. 8 OKC Farmers Public Market. www.okcfarmersmarket.com

Bill Miller, Eliza Gilkyson, more Oct. 18 Woody Guthrie

Broken Bells

bradytheater.com

Method Man Pearl Jam

bokcenter.com

Center. www.woodyguthriecenter. org

Oct. 8 BOK Center. www.

Sarah McQuaid

John Moreland

Oct. 1 8 M e r c u r y L o u n g e . w w w. mercurylounge918.com

Oct. 8 The Blue Door.

www.bluedoorokc.com

Merle Haggard

Oct. 9 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Dan + Shay

Oct. 19 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Anna Nalick

Oct. 9 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

The Shook Twins Oct.19 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Motley Crue

Oct. 10 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

The Legend Oct. 19 Features Ben Harper and LP at Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa. com

The Wonder Years

Oct. 10 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Michael Fracasso, Joel Melton Oct. 10 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Cherub Oct. 11 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com Owen Temple

www.bluedoorokc.com

Oct. 11 The Blue Door.

Broken Bells

Neon Trees

Willie Nelson & Family, Kris Kristofferson Oct. 16 Grand Casino

Oct. 11 Vinyl Fest 2014, VFW Post 577, Tulsa. www.vinylfest.org

Brandon Jenkins

Oct. 11 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

EBS Rap Battle Music Festival Oct. 11 Norman. www.ebsent.com

George Thorogood & The Destroyers Oct. 11 River Spirit Casino. www.

riverspirittulsa.com

Horton Records Presents 12 Guthrie Green. www.guthriegreen.com

Oct.

Oct. 22 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Kip Moore Oct. 23 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. www.grandresortok. com

This Will Destroy You

Old 97’s Oct. 16 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Casting Crowns

Eliza Gilkyson

New Politics Oct. 24 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

www.bluedoorokc.com

Oct. 17 The Blue Door.

OK Electric Music Festival

Oct.

18 Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts.org

Joan Jett and The Blackhearts Oct. 18 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www. hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Foxing

Oct. 26 The Conservatory. www. conservatoryokc.com

Ani DiFranco

Oct. 26 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Macy Gray Oct. 26 Osage Casino, Tulsa. www.osagecasinos.com Jimmy Eat World

www.cainsballroom.com

Oct.27 Cain’s Ballroom.

YelaWolf

Oct. 28 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

GWAR Oct. 28 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net Shovels & Rope

www.cainsballroom.com

Oct. 29 Cain’s Ballroom.

David Nail

Oct. 30 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

KC and the Sunshine Band

Oct. 31 Riverwind Casino. www.riverwindcasino. com

The Floozies

bluedoorokc.com

Seth Walker

Broncho

party and concert at Cox Convention Center. www.lifeincolor.com

19 ACM@UCO. www.acm.uco.edu

Of Montreal

Oct. 21 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Oct. 15 The Blue Door. www.

BattleGrounds MMA Oct. 3 Mixed martial arts matches with eight fighters competing for title and prizes. Card includes Cody McKenzie, Brock Larson and Luigi Fioravanti. www.bokcenter.com

Oct. 31 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Oct. 14 Opolis Bar & Micro Venue, Norman. www.opolis.org

bluedoorokc.com

Oct. 11 First Council Casino & Hotel, Newkirk. www. firstcouncilcasinohotel.com

Oct. 2-5 The 10th annual festival celebrates with hours of rowing, kayaking, dragon boating and other events. Also look for the OGE NightSprints, the Oklahoma City Head of the Oklahoma race and the family festival in Oklahoma City’s Boathouse District. www.boathousedistrict.org

David Bazan with Passenger String Quartet Oct.

Miniature Tigers

Willie Nelson & Family

Oklahoma Regatta Festival

Oct. 23 Opolis Bar & Micro Venue, Norman. www.opolis.org Oct. 23 Cox Convention Center. www.coxconventioncenter.com

Nora Jane Struthers & The Party Line Oct. 25 Vanguard Music Hall.

www.thevanguardtulsa.com

Life in Color: Borgore

Oct. 25 Paint

Bill Hearne

Oct. 31 The Blue Door. www.

Richie Ramone’s Halloween Party Oct. 31 Vanguard Music Hall. www.

thevanguardtulsa.com

SPORTS OKC Thunder

www.nba.com/thunder

v. Denver Oct. 8 v. Dallas Oct. 10 v. New Orleans Oct. 16 v. Minnesota Oct. 19 @ BOK Center v. Portland Oct. 29 v. L.A. Clippers Oct. 30

OKC Barons www.okcbarons.com v. Texas Oct. 17 v. San Antonio Oct. 18 v. Texas Oct. 24

PRCA Pro Rodeo Oct. 3-4 See top competitors in their fields in a rodeo that includes bareback riding, steer wrestling, barrel racing, bull riding and more at this Tulsa State Fair attraction. Also look for concerts with Jerrod Niemann and the Casey Donahew Band both nights following the rodeo action. www. tulsastatefair.com St. John ZooRun

Oct. 4 Join the 10k, 5k or one-mile fun run at Tulsa Zoo with entertainment and more following. www.tulsazoo.org

Tulsa Run 2014 Oct. 25 The premier running event drawing world-class athletes from everywhere includes a variety of events, finishline festivities and pre-race activities. www. tulsasports.org/tulsarun U.S. Team Roping Championships Oct. 25-Nov. 2 The U.S. Team Roping organization holds one of its biggest events of the year celebrating “America’s cowboy sport” at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.ustrc.com

FAMILY Cartoon Classics

Oct. 5 The Oklahoma City Philharmonic plays music from Pinocchio and other favorite cartoon films and shows for its youngest fans at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcciviccenter.com

Day Out with Thomas

Thru Oct. 5 Thomas the Tank Engine pulls into the Oklahoma Railway Museum to hang out and celebrate adventure. www.oklahomarailwaymuseum.org

Hank the Cowdog: The Case of the Missing Cat Thru Oct. 10 When his

nemesis gets into trouble, only Hank can save the day with Oklahoma Children’s Theatre. www. oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

Oklahoma! Oct. 10-26 Clark Theatre stages the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic musical and romance set against Oklahoma statehood beginnings at Henthorne Performing Arts Center. www.cityoftulsa.org/henthornepac

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Entertainment

My Generation: Young Chinese Artists Oct. 25-Jan. 18 A new exhibition at

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA SPORTS COMMISSION.

SPORTS

Pumpkinville

Oct. 10-30 The Myriad Botanical Gardens’ Children’s Garden gets dressed for the season to welcome visitors to fun activities, a hay-bale maze, crafts, cider pressing and storytelling. www.myriadgardens. org

Center. www.myticketoffice.com

Haunt the Harn

BooHaHa in Brookside

Oct. 23 This familyfriendly Halloween attraction invites all to enjoy the historic Harn Homestead & 1889ers Museum with campfires, a hayride, pumpkin bowling and treats. www.harnhomestead.com

Walking with Dinosaurs Oct. 23-26 Puppetry and impressive animatronics make this arena spectacular that marches through prehistory come to life at Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

Magic Lantern Celebration on Paseo Oct. 26 Put on your costume or make

one when you arrive at the Paseo festival for families that includes trick-or-treating, a costume dance parade and treats. www.thepaseo.com Oct. 24 For the 24th year, the Brookside neighborhood hosts a day of Halloween fun that includes trick-ortreating with merchants, kid zones, pet and children’s costume contests and the parade. www.brooksidetheplacetobe.com

Bright Nights Oct. 24 Stay up late at Science Museum Oklahoma and its program for kids that’s a sleep-over with an educational experience. www. sciencemuseumok.org Haunt the Zoo for Halloween Oct. 2631 Oklahoma City Zoo brings a spooky-good time to its grounds for trick-or-treaters. Kids participate in games, costume contests and more. www.okczoo.com

HallowZooeen

Murder and Mayhem Haunted Trolley Tour

Storybook Forest

Oct. 23-30 This not-so-scary activity takes children and families through the woods of Edmond’s Arcadia Lake to visit scenes from storybooks while trick-ortreating. www.edmondok.com

Harold and the Purple Crayon Oct. 24 The Tulsa Performing Arts Center Trust welcomes the Enchantment Theatre Company and its stage adaptation of a book about an inventive little boy to the Tulsa Performing Arts

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Oct. 27-31 Trick-or-treat at Tulsa Zoo, where kids and families will also find carnival-style games, treats, a haunted train ride and great fun plus trick-or-treating. www.tulsazoo.org

Curious George Oct. 28 Literature Live! presents a stage adaptation of the popular children’s book about the adventures of a curious little chimp at the Cox Business Center. www.coxcentertulsa.com Art Adventures

Ongoing Children 3-5 experience art every Tuesday morning at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, Norman, with special guests. Go online for schedules and other information. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Second Saturdays

Ongoing Families enjoy the Philbrook Museum of Art and par-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

Tulsa Run The running world knows something about Tulsa that many of the city’s residents, perhaps, do not: The Tulsa Run isn’t just for racers. The annual sports event is scheduled this year for Oct. 25 and will include several 5k races, a 2k, a 15k race walk and the USA Master 15k Championship in addition to the main race. Competitors and their supporters are also welcome to the Tulsa Run Expo, open Oct. 23-24, at the Cox Business Center, 100 Civic Center, in downtown Tulsa. Gear and product exhibitors will be set up next to organizations with information about health and nutrition. The Finish Line Fest on race day also means plenty of live music, an awards ceremony and more for participants and spectators at the finish line. Go to www.tulsasports.org/ tulsarun for a complete schedule of events, the changed racecourse and, if you do want to run, registration information.

ticipate in art activities for free on the second Saturday of every month. www.philbrook.org

ART The Many Faces of Jerusalem Oct. 3-Jan. 31 The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art exhibits this collection of art quilts from the Israel Quilters Association that presents the patchwork of Jerusalem’s diverse life. www.jewishmuseum.net

Momentum Tulsa: Art Doesn’t Stand Still Oct. 3-18 The Oklahoma Vi-

sual Artists Coalition continues to show its support of young artists with its annual exhibition at Living Arts of Tulsa of work by artists age 30 and younger. See more at the Oct. 3 opening. www.momentumoklahoma.org

Macrocosm/Microcosm

Oct. 3-Jan. 4 A new exhibition at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art examines Abstract Expressionism in the American Southwest through works by artists from all over the country who found inspiration in the landscapes of Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico in post-World War II America. www.ou.edu/fjjma

TAC@AHHA

Thru Oct. 4 Members of the Tulsa Artists Coalition hold their 26th annual juried group exhibition at the Hardesty Arts Center with artwork across all media and disciplines. www.tacgallery.org

Cowboy Crossings

Oct. 10-11 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum hosts an opening weekend of two important shows – the Cowboy Artists of America 49th Annual Sale and Exhibition and the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association 16th Annual Exhibition & Sale. The former brings fine Western art in drawing to painting and sculpture, while the latter showcases exquisite silversmithing, saddlemaking and other artful crafts of practical implements from ranch life. Both shows run through Jan. 4. www.nationalcowboymuseum. org

the Oklahoma City Museum of Art looks at the new generation of Chinese artists born after the Cultural Revolution. The exhibit will include paintings, video installations, multimedia work and photography addressing issues of alienation, identity and rebellion. www.okcmoa.com

Hard Times, Oklahoma, 1939-40 Thru Oct. 26 Photographs by Russell Lee documenting the struggles of rural Oklahomans during the Great Depression for the Farm Security Administration create a portrait of history and heritage at Philbrook Museum of Art. www. philbrook.org

Twists and Turns Thru Oct. 26 108 Contemporary in Tulsa holds the joint show between Israeli artists Aleksandra Stoyanov and Zemer Peled. The exhibition features Stoyanov’s striking tapestries and Peled’s amazing ceramics. www.108contemporary.org Altared Spaces Oct. 26-Nov. 1 This art exhibition memorializing loved ones in the style of the Dia de los Muertos holiday of Mexico builds up to Living Arts of Tulsa’s Day of the Dead Festival on Nov. 1. www.livingarts.org Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves Oct. 26-Jan. 31 The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art brings a show of portraits by the accomplished photographer and actor best known for his role as the original Spock in the Star Trek franchise. www.jewishmuseum.net

Allan Houser: A Celebration

Thru Nov. 2 Philbrook Downtown features the paintings and influence of Oklahoma artist Allan Houser on the centennial of his birth year. www.philbrook.org

Alexandre Hogue: An American Visionary Thru Nov. 30 Gilcrease Museum

of Art presents this collection of more than 50 works by the revolutionary artist who made his name in painting scenes of the Dust Bowlravaged Southwest and Midwest with undulating lines. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Cherokee Art Market

John James Audobon and the Artist as Naturalist Thru Jan. 5 The

Art with Purpose: The Work of E.W. Deming Thru Oct. 12 Gilcrease

Born of Fire: Ceramic Art from Regional Collections Thru March

Oct.11-12 More than 150 artists are represented in the grand art show of American Indian fine art and craft pieces held at the Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino in Catoosa. www.cherokeeartmarket. com

Museum presents an exhibit of 30 rarely seen works from the permanent collection by the artist, who painted scenes of daily life among various American Indian tribes. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

famed naturalist and artist known for his vibrant paintings of American wildlife and plants is explored at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. www. crystalbridges.org

2 Fired clay takes many forms in this exhibition at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark., and explores its use and art through time and around the world. www. crystalbridges.org

Peter Mendelsund

Fever & Flash: Pop in the 1970s

Artistry in Wood Oct. 18-19 The Oklahoma City Woodcarvers Club woodcarving and sculpting show and sale takes place at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okcarver.org

Identity & Inspiration

Oct. 16 Philbrook Museum of Art welcomes the Alfred A. Knopf publisher’s art director to talk about his work, love of literature and more. www.philbrook.org

Impact: The Philbrook Indian Annual Oct. 19-Jan. 11 Philbrook Museum

of Art explores the impact of the Philbrook Indian Annual exhibition, a juried exhibition and sale that highlighted the fine art of American Indian artists from 1946 to 1979. Works from Allan Houser, Dick West, Joe Hererra, Helen Hardin and others entered into the annual through the years and purchased will be part of this retrospective show. www.philbrook.org

Transforming Hate, Changing Focus Oct. 24 All are invited to participate

in this special exhibition led by artists Marianne Evans-Lombe and Jessica Davenport at Living Arts of Tulsa. Participants will use materials to examine cultural symbols, social privilege and challenging perspectives. www.livingarts.org

Collectors’ Reserve: Small Works Exhibition and Sale Oct. 25-Nov. 9 The

annual art exhibit and sale at Gilcrease Museum brings new work by nationally recognized and emerging artists to the attention of buyers to benefit museum programs. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

Thru March 15 Pop art’s hold into the 1970s is the focus of a new exhibition at Philbrook Downtown and examines the contributions of Claes Oldenburg, Eduardo Paolozzi and others. The exhibit also features an album of Polaroid photos by Andy Warhol. www.philbrook.org Ongoing Philbrook Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s extensive collection of American Indian art work and artifacts. www.philbrook.org

Recent Acquisitions of Photography and Works on Paper Ongoing Art

work in a variety of media and styles collected over the past five years by the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art go on display for the public. Works include photos by Laura Gilpin, prints by Andy Warhol and more. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Opening Abstraction Ongoing Philbrook Downtown exhibits abstract work in all its manifestations. www.philbrook.org Illuminations: Rediscovering the Art of Dale Chihuly Ongoing Tour the Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s collection of glass art by the celebrated artist. www.okcmoa.com

Focus on Favorites

ongoing Gilcrease Museum highlights treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu


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Entertainment

36th Annual Nimrod Awards Ceremony and Dinner Oct.24 Awards

from the University of Tulsa’s Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry will be given at the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus. www.utulsa.edu/nimrod

Opus VIII: Party ZaZa, One Night Only Oct. 24 Allied Arts’ biennial gala has

built up to another big night at the Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club with great entertainment and an atmosphere reflecting elements of ZaZa, Dallas’ iconic hotel. www.alliedartsokc.com

IMAGE COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY MUSUEM OF ART.

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My Generation: Young Chinese Artists China’s Cultural Revolution ended in 1976, and the artists featured in Oklahoma City Museum of Art’s newest exhibition all were born after that chaotic, dangerous period. The country they would come to know and render would be different from the images of yesteryear’s party propaganda posters, but for these artists, the intrinsic social order and government continue to pervade art, culture and freedom in an increasingly liberalized China. My Generation: Young Chinese Artists presents paintings, video works, art installations, photography and mixed media works by a new generation of artists who work issues of identity, alienation and rebellion into their art. And they do it, often, under threat of reprisal. The exhibit runs from Oct. 25 to Jan. 18 at OKCMOA, 415 Couch Drive, in Oklahoma City. For more information, visit www.okcmoa.com. First Friday Gallery Walk

Ongoing The galleries of OKC’s Paseo Arts District welcome all each month. www.thepaseo.com

First Friday Art Crawl

Ongoing Stroll the Brady Arts District in Tulsa for new exhibitions at galleries and art centers as well as live music and other events at the Guthrie Green and other venues. www.thebradyartsdistrict.com.

2nd Friday Circuit Art Ongoing A monthly celebration of arts in Norman. www.2ndfridaynorman.com Weekends On Us

Ongoing Free admission to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum the first full weekend of every month. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

CHARITABLE EVENTS blu Lounge

Oct. 2 Visit with “Team OKC” athletes and other supporters at the Devon Boathouse over great food and with live music and cool blue lights. www.boathousedistrict.org

Broadway Ball 2013 Oct. 3 The 19th annual ball for Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma goes Motown for “One Night Only,” this year’s theme at the Skirvin Hilton Hotel. www.lyrictheatreokc. com Art on Tap

Oct. 3 Endless varieties of beer are served up with great food, art and conversation at the beer-tasting extravaganza taking place at and benefiting the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com

Breath of Life Gala

Oct. 3 Community leaders support the Oklahoma City chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation at this event complete with auctions at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. www.cff.org

Best in Ten Oct. 4 Join Carpenter Square Theatre for its annual fundraiser of 10-minute plays and a reception honoring Billie Thrash. www.carpentersquare. com Tulsa Hall of Fame Oct. 6 A great

San Antonio Fall Festivals

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

group of Tulsans are inducted into the Tulsa Historical Society’s Tulsa Hall of Fame at the 28th dinner and award ceremony at Southern Hills Country Club. Inductees are Anne B. Cleveland, Rosalind Cook, Burt Holmes, George Krumme, Rachel Perryman (posthumous), Jon

S t u a r t a n d R a n d i W i g h t m a n . w w w. tulsahistory.org

Raven Classic Golf Tournament Oct. 6 Riverfield Country Day School hosts the sixth annual four-man scramble tournament at Page Belcher Golf Course. www.riverfield.org

Cooking for a Cause Oct. 9 Help Iron Gate help Tulsa’s hungry with daily meals by taking a seat at this event that includes Tulsa’s top chefs giving cooking demonstrations and wine pairings at Metro Appliances & More. www.irongatetulsa.org Wine for Water and Service Learning Oct. 9 Leigh Goodson, president

of Tulsa Community College, welcomes guests to the Greenwood Cultural Center for a night of gourmet foods and great wines along with music, silent and live auctions and stories benefiting Just Hope’s work to build global partnerships and improve lives in rural Nicaragua. www.justhope.org

Winterset Launch Party

Oct. 10 The Osteopathic Founders Foundation holds its annual kick-off party leading to a grand gala in February 2015. www.osteopathicfounders.org

Laps for Little Ones

Oct. 11 Walk and run at Cascia Hall School to raise funds for the Little Light House, a school serving children with special needs. www.littlelighthouse.org

Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes Oct. 11 The walk event and benefit for the American Diabetes Association takes place at the University of Tulsa. www.diabetes.org

25th Annual American Airlines Charity Golf Tournament Oct. 13 More than 200 golfers from around the country play the greens at Broken Arrow’s Golf Club of Oklahoma to benefit Special Olympics Oklahoma athletes. www.sook.org

OCCJ Awards Dinner

Oct. 14 The Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice holds its 56th annual dinner and awards event honoring individuals for their work in communities. University of Tulsa President Steadman Upham will be honored at the Cox Business Center. www.occjok.org

OKC Charity Scotch Tasting

Oct. 16 Fine scotch and cigars are just the beginning of this premier event, which is held annually at a private home and benefits a charity. 405.706.7484

Orchids in October

Oct. 16 The annual Myriad Gardens Foundation luncheon and orchid sale benefits the Myriad Botanical Gardens’ ecology education programming. www.oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com

Tulsa Bone Bash

Oct. 18 Party for a good cause and the Arthritis Foundation at The Loft at First Place Tower. www.arthritis.org/ oklahoma

Oct. 24-Nov. 2 Get your Care Card to shop for awesome discounts around Tulsa and help Family & Children’s Services. www.fcsok.org

42nd Alpha Rho Arts & Crafts Benefit Bazaar Oct. 25 Alpha Rho, the

philanthropic organization, holds its long-running arts and crafts fair and market in Broken Arrow to benefit local, state and regional charities. 918.251.0617

War on Lupus Golf Tournament Oct. 27 Join the Lupus Foundation of Oklahoma at the Belmar Golf Club for play that benefits medical research. www.oklupus.org

Fashion a Cure Pink Ribbon Event Oct. 27 The fashion-oriented extravaganza at Southern Hills Country Club raises funds for Oklahoma Project Woman, providing free breast health screenings and other related services to low-income patients. This year’s special guest is New York designer Maria Cornejo. www. oklahomaprojectwoman.com

Corks & Kegs

Oct. 30 The Halloween-themed night at Cox Business Center includes great beers and wines along with bites from Tulsa’s finest restaurants. The night benefits the Sooner-Tulsa Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. www.cff.org

COMMUNITY San Antonio Festivals Oct. 1-30 Celebrate a fall to remember in San Antonio with unforgettable festivals and events. www. visitsanantonio.com Route 66 Celebrates Israel’s 66th Birthday Oct. 1 Author and Route 66 his-

torian Michael Wallis shares history of the Mother Road and how its renown has reached Israel and beyond in a community-wide celebration at the Campbell Hotel. 918.495.1100

Pumpkin Festival at Shepherd’s Cross Oct. 1-30 Drop in at the Claremore

farm for a look at country living and fall fun appropriate for all ages. www.shepherdscross. com

Mvskoke Hall of Fame

Oklahoma City Oilfield Expo Oct. 1-2 Get to know the industry at this trade show for professionals at the Cox Convention Center. www.okcoilfieldexpo.com

Light the Night Walk

Oct. 2 The 18th annual expo features vendors and representatives in the industry at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.ok.gov/marginalwells

12th Annual Buddy Walk

Oct. 3-4 Indian Territory history lives at Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserves’ festival that includes trades folk in period attire, American Indians in regalia and activities. www.woolaroc.org

Oct. 18 Citizens of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation are honored for their accomplishments and contributions at this induction gala event at River Spirit Event Center. www.muscogeenation-nsn.gov

Oct. 18 The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s evening walk fundraiser at Oklahoma Aquarium supports survivors and honors late loved ones. www. lightthenight.org Oct. 19 The walk benefiting the Down Syndrome Association of Tulsa takes place at Central Park at Union Public Schools. www.dsat.org

Tribute to Excellence Oct. 22 The Arthritis Foundation holds its 25th dinner and awards evening at the Skirvin Hilton Hotel. www. arthritis.org Uncorking the Cure

Oct. 23 Winning wines, delicious hors d’oeuvres, silent and live auctions – it’s what the night is about with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society at the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame. www.nationalMSsociety.org

Badges & BBQ

Oct. 23 Area law enforcement and fire department personnel grill up their best for guests and the competition at Christiansen Aviation/Jones Riverside Airport to help the Crime Prevention Network. www.okcpn.org

Signature Chefs Auction

Oct. 23 Top chefs present their best at the Skirvin Hilton Hotel for the March of Dimes. www.marchofdimes. com/oklahoma

Oklahoma Oil & Gas Trade Expo

Fall Mountain Man Encampment

Circle Cinema 10th Anniversary Celebration Oct. 3-4 A two-day mini

festival includes screenings by the deadCENTER Film Festival in Tulsa. www.okcastle.com

Haunted Castle Halloween Festival Oct. 3-Nov. 1 Guests will find spooky

and fun events for all ages at the Castle in Muskogee. www.okcastle.com

The 13th Ward

Oct. 3-Nov. 1 The Broken Arrow haunted attraction is back with more terror and (fake) gore to thrill. www.the13thward. com

FrightFest

Oct. 3-Nov. 2 Frontier City gets into the Halloween season for trick-or-treaters and more. www.frontiercity.com

Terror on 10th Street Haunted House Oct. 3-Nov. 2 The 10th year brings out

more spooky history and fun at this haunted house just two miles from Bricktown. 405.232.1816


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Entertainment

Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry brings together writers and students to celebrate writing. This year’s event will include panel discussions and workshops with Chris Abani, a PEN/Hemingway Award winner). www.utulsa.edu/nimrod

An Affair of the Heart

Oct. 2426 Handmade treasures, arts, crafts and more are back for holiday shopping at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.aaoth.com

Tulsa Cosplay Celebration

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA ZOO.

Oct. 25 A day of entertainment, costume contests, games and more await at the Guthrie Green. www.guthriegreen.com

COMMUNITY

Tricks and Treats Families can make the most of Halloween at one of the many trick-or-treat-themed events happening in Tulsa and Oklahoma City this month. From Oct. 10-30, the Myriad Botanical Gardens turns its Children’s Garden into Pumpkinville, an attraction offering a hay-bale maze, crafts, cider pressing and more (www. myriadgardens.org). A short drive to the historic Harn Homestead & 1889ers Museum offers Haunt the Harn on Oct. 23 along with a hayride, pumpkin bowling and treats (www.harnhomestead.com). Nearby Edmond brings back its Storybook Forest, Oct. 23-30, and a walk through scenes from storybooks in the woods by Arcadia Lake (www.edmondok.com). BooHaHa in Brookside takes place on Oct. 24 and is one of Tulsa’s biggest Halloween events for children (www.brooksidetheplacetobe.com). On Oct. 26, the Guthrie Green Sunday Market goes Ghouls on the Green with fun activities (www.guthriegreen.com). Over in the Paseo District of OKC, the Magic Lantern Celebration on Paseo on Oct. 26, lets children make their costumes for the costume parade (www.thepaseo.com). Also on Oct. 26, Oklahoma City Zoo’s Haunt the Zoo for Halloween opens for spooky-good time through Oct. 31 (www.okczoo.com), while HallowZooeen (shown) offers a carnival-style atmosphere and a haunted train ride at the Tulsa Zoo from Oct. 27-31 (www.tulsazoo.org). Art in the Square

Oct. 4 Artists set up works for sale and in-progress all around the Utica Square grounds for this favorite fall festival. www.uticasquare.com

Peace, Love & Goodwill Festival Oct. 4 You get all three plus great food from the top chefs in town with helpings of art and music on the grounds of the Myriad Botanical Gardens. www.peacelovegoodwill.org

Totem Pole BBQ & Music Fest Oct. 4 Foyil’s Totem Pole Park has the goods on fall barbecue, live music and uniquely-Okie totem poles. 918.283.8035

National Indian Taco Championship Oct. 4 Head to downtown Pawhuska for the best in fry bread buried under heaps of toppings. www.pawhuskachamber.com

Garden Tour for Connoisseurs Oct. 4 The Oklahoma Horticulture Society presents a tour of beautiful private gardens in the Oklahoma City area. www.ok-hort.org

Oklahoma City Gun Show

Oct. 4-5 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okstatefair. com

Repticon Oct. 4-5 The reptile and exotic animal convention takes place at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.repticon.com

Tulsa State Fair Thru Oct. 5 The fair is back at Expo Square with all the food, rides, attractions and fun that are its hallmarks. Look for concerts, culinary shows, petting zoos and more. www.tulsastatefair.com Oklahoma Writers Hall of Fame: Joy Harjo Oct. 8 The

Oklahoma Writers Hall of Fame honors the poet, writer and musician at Oklahoma State U n i v e r s i t y - Tu l s a . w w w. poetsandwriters.okstate.edu

InnoTech Oklahoma 2014 Oct. 9 The region’s largest business and technology conference and expo takes place at the C o x C o n v e n t i o n C e n t e r. w w w. innotechconferences.com Watonga Cheese & Wine Festival Oct. 10-11 What more could

you want in a festival? How about live entertainment, an art show, quilt show, parade and food contests in downtown Watonga? www.watongacheesefestival.com

Brush Creek Bazaar

Oct. 10-12 An outdoor festival that includes 80 arts and crafts vendors also features handmade items and a showcase of bluegrass, jazz and country music as well as clogging and other dance styles in south Tulsa. www.brushcreekbazaar.org

Haunt the River Oct. 10-Nov.1 Take the Halloweenthemed ride down the Oklahoma River for a real treat. www.okrivercruises. com Labapalooza

Katy Perry

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

Oct. 11 Lab Rescue of Oklahoma saves lives of homeless dogs and has fun at the same time at the Guthrie Green with fun, games, pet contests and a silent auction for supporters. www. labrescue.net

Art on Main Oct. 11 Join the scene in downtown Jenks for art, wine, jazz and fun. www.jenkschamber.com Chillin’ & Grillin’ BBQ Festival Oct. 11 The savory, smoky event that’s sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbecue Society and the OKBS Cleaver Team of the Year competition takes place at Sand Springs’ River City Park. www.sandspringschamber. com

Vinyl Fest 2014

Oct. 11 The second festival of vinyl albums and collecting will take place at the VFW Post No. 577 in Tulsa with bands and more fun in the Centennial Lounge upstairs. www.vinylfest.org

Metcalf Gun, Knife & Outdoor Equipment Show Oct. 11-12 Okla-

homa State Fair Park. www.metcalfgunshows. com

2014 Gold & Treasure Expo Oct. 11-12 A Gold Prospectors Association of America event at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.goldprospectors.org

Grand National & World Championship Morgan Horse Show Oct. 11-18 The big show of the

Morgan horse world is back at Oklahoma State Fair Park with more in excellence and fun. www.morgangrandnational.com

Dogtober Fest

Oct. 12 Pets are family, too, and welcome to this festival with entertainment, vendors, children’s activities and contests in Broken Arrow. www.villagevetanimalclinic.com

2014 TU Fall Outdoor Film Festival Oct. 13 The event screens

films by students from the University of Tulsa outside of the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus. www.utulsa.edu

6 Degrees of Bacon

Oct. 16 If you like bacon, downtown Oklahoma City is the place to be for bacon-inspired dishes, cocktails and entertainment. www. downtownokc.com

Linde Oktoberfest

Oct. 16-19 One of the best Oktoberfest events anywhere is back with more great beers, German food and Bavarian-style entertainment at Tulsa’s R i v e r We s t F e s t i v a l P a r k . w w w. tulsaoktoberfest.org

Fall Home Expo

Oct. 17-19 The Cox Business Center will have exhibits and vendors with the latest products and information about making house and home better. www.tulsahomeshows.com

Route 66 Flywheelers Gas Engine & Tractor Show Oct. 17-19 Restored and operating antique machinery is the main attraction. Look for tractor pulls and vintage farm equipment at Catoosa’s Rogers Point Park. www. route66flywheelers.org

U.S. National Arabian and Half-Arabian Championship Horse Show Oct. 17-25 Expo Square

Downtown Edmond Old Fashioned Fall Festival Oct. 25 The season’s fun gets wrapped into a charming package of activities and games all along First Street Edmond. www. downtownedmondok.org

Council Oak Ceremony 2014 Oct. 25 Join members of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation for honors at the Creek Nation Council Oak Park in Tulsa followed by stickball, dinner, arts and crafts and a stomp dance at the Tulsa Creek Indian Community. www.creektourism.com

Ghouls on the Green

Oct.26 There’s more to the Guthrie Green Sunday Market just before Halloween than most would expect. Don’t miss the fun and surprises for families. www.guthriegreen.com

Schmooza Palooza Party

Oct. 30 The networking event for Oklahoma City-area professionals is back at Oklahoma State Fair Park with live music, food tastings and more. www.okcchamber.com

Movies in the Park Thru Oct. 31 Tulsa’s Guthrie Green screens favorite comedies and dramas Thursday evenings through Halloween, which will feature Beetlejuice on Oct. 30 and The Rocky Horror Picture Show on Oct. 31. www.guthriegreen. com The Sanctuary Thru Nov. 1 The Oklahoma City haunted attraction opens for Halloween. www.thesanctuaryokc.com The Hex House Thru Nov. 1 This year’s attractions brings two haunted locations to the public, delivering on the promise to be one of the area’s best Halloween events. www.tulsahexhouse.com Reding Farm Haunted Maize Thru Nov. 2 Guests walk the cornfield and maze in Chickasha that’s filled with hidden frights. www.redsiloproductions.com

International Gymnastics Hall of Fame Ongoing Celebrate the ath-

letic and artistic elements of the sport while honoring its most accomplished athletes at Science Museum Oklahoma. www. sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

Destination Space Ongoing Revealing the amazing science that allows us to travel beyond the confines of earth. www. sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

becomes the hub of the Arabian horse world for this show of horsemanship and breeding excellence. www.arabianhorses.org

Walking Tour

Murder and Mayhem Haunted Trolley Tour Oct. 17-25 Take the

Gilcrease Films

trolley to Halloween fun at Arkansas’ Fort Smith Museum of History for gruesome stories from years past, treats, drinks and a peek at haunted sites in the museum. www.fortsmithmuseum.com

Theresa Caputo Live: The Experience Oct.20 Caputo from TLC’s

Long Island Medium brings her live show and readings to the audience at Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

Tulsa Run Expo

Oct. 23-24 Stop in at the Cox Business Center to see the latest in gear, health and well-being at this event tied to the Tulsa Run. www.tulsasports.org/ tulsarun

Nimrod Conference for Readers and Writers Oct. 24-25 The annual event of the University of Tulsa’s

Ongoing Take a walking tour of historic downtown Tulsa. www.tulsahistory.org Ongoing See various films throughout the month. www. gilcrease.org

OKCMOA Films Ongoing Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com Planetarium Shows

Ongoing Scie n c e M u s e u m O k l a h o m a . w w w. sciencemuseumoklahoma.org

To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM

Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at. OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR or email to events@okmag.com.


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TOM RINK CAN ALWAYS FIND MORE ROOM TO HANG HIS GROWING ART COLLECTION IN HIS TULSA APARTMENT. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

IN PERSON

T

Home Is Where The Art Is

A small apartment poses no problem for a determined art collector.

ulsa art collector Tom Rink lives in an 828-square-foot apartment, but that has not stopped him from collecting countless paintings and sculptures to display. The works cover his apartment walls “like a huge jigsaw puzzle,” Rink says, “and I just have to make sure I maximize the space to fit all of the pieces together.” Rink was a long-time Tulsa police officer before he obtained a master’s degree in library and information studies. He now serves as an academic librarian for Northeastern State University-Broken Arrow. The school has exhibited Rink’s collection three times in its Visitors Center Gallery. A print by Inuit artist Garry Meeches, Protecting Circle – a college graduation gift from his parents – may have been the piece that began Rink’s art collecting hobby; he points to it as a favorite in his collection. In the signed, limited-edition woodblock print, five bison 120

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | OCTOBER 2014

stand in a line, their manes flipping in the wind. Rink’s father, Bernie, worked at Northwestern Michigan College in Traverse City, Michigan, and held an annual Inuit art sale at the college as a fundraiser for the library in the 1960s. This sale became so popular that the Dennos Museum Center was built to house the large collection amassed by the college, says Rink. Though he and his father didn’t talk much about art, “I was certainly exposed to art early on, and I was able to develop a love for – and appreciation of – art in all forms,” he says. Rink’s love of American Indian art expanded when he moved to Tulsa in 1982 and visited the Philbrook Museum of Art and Gilcrease Museum on a regular basis. Though Rink considers Tulsa a wonderful environment to appreciate art, he noticed that no matter where his travels took him, he was constantly looking for local art to purchase. “[Most people] don’t really understand what

it means to collect to the point where you really do run out of wall space,” says Rink. But wall space is at a premium in his apartment. It took Rink two weeks to finish hanging the artwork when he moved. “Because I have so much art to display, I can’t afford to get cute with the presentation strategy,” Rink says. The paintings cover the walls, and glass and bronze sculptures are on wall displays and pedestals. When people visit Rink’s apartment for the first time, “they are struck by the eclectic variety of artists, styles and [media],” he says. “My collection is very colorful, and lots of guests comment on how bright and cheerful my apartment is because of the art.” Rink admits that his collection might eventually outgrow his display space. However, “one simply does not stop buying art because one has no more wall space,” he adds. SHAUN PERKINS


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October 2014 Oklahoma Magazine  

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