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MAY 2017

SPECIAL SECTION

Oklahoma Dentists Making dentist trips easier than ever

Grill The Art of the

Tips and tricks for an Oklahoma tradition

POFATHRRTEE 2

Downtown Renaissance

Business is booming in the hearts of Tulsa and OKC

Tulsa Shuffle

A look at the city's drumming legacy

The Flaming Lips

An interview with Wayne Coyne


Patient-Centered Patient-Centered Cancer Cancer Care Care

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Phone (405) 271-1112 Fax (405) 271-5797 Fax (405) 271-5797 stephensoncancercenter.org stephensoncancercenter.org

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Features May

46 Downtown Business Boom

2017 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XXI, No. 5

Increased entertainment, residential and transportation options have made downtown Tulsa and OKC more appealing to businesses.

From cooking essentials to tips from the chefs, Oklahoma Magazine takes a look at a celebrated Oklahoma tradition: grilling.

61 The Root of the Rhythm

Decades of Envelope-Pushing

No one’s ever told Wayne Coyne and The Flaming Lips to stop liking blood, skulls and gummies. Oklahoma Magazine sits down with the frontman to discuss everything from broken iPhones to his love of OKC.

WANT SOME MORE? SPECIAL SECTION

Oklahoma Dentists Making dentist trips easier than ever

SPECIAL SECTION

73

2

Oklahoma Dentists

Advancements in both technology and bedside manner are making a trip to the dentist less anxietyproducing than ever.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES

MAY 2017

May 2017

The Tulsa Shuffle has had as much musical influence as any Oklahoma legend. This prolific style has gone on to affect countless lives through songs now considered timeless.

58

PHOTO COURTESY WARNER BROS.

51 The Art of the Grill

Grill

Read expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

The Art of the

Tips and tricks for an Oklahoma tradition

ON THE COVER:

RT 2 PA OF THREE

Downtown Renaissance

Business is booming in the hearts of Tulsa and OKC

Tulsa Shuffle

A look at the city's drumming legacy

MORE PHOTOS

The Flaming Lips

An interview with Wayne Coyne

OKLAHOMA CITY CHEF SCOTTY IRANI GIVES TIPS ON HOW TO COOK THE PERFECT STEAK IN THE ART OF THE GRILL. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

View expanded Scene, Style, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS

The online calendar includes even more great Oklahoma events.


WITH A STROKE, TIME IS NOT ON YOUR SIDE.

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Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

11 State 14 16 18 20 22 24 26

Tulsa’s 1921 race riot ruined Greenwood, but two centers in the historic district offer hope.

People Culture History Makers Business Sports Insider

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11

29 Life and Style 30 34 36 38 40 42 45

Interiors

Christy Howell of Bella Vici creates a glamorous interior in Edmond.

Don’t let the warming weather cool down your fashion choices – all the essentials you need are here.

Scene

83 Taste 84 86 87

42

FYI City Life Health Destinations Style

Nic’s Place Diner and Lounge brings the state’s most famous burgers to a bigger location in Midtown OKC.

Local Flavor Chef Chat Random Flavors

83

89 Where and When 90 94

The beloved story of Simba, Nala and Mufasa returns to OKC in Broadway form.

In Tulsa/In OKC Film and Cinema

96 Closing Thoughts

4

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

89


Healthcare for life.

THE ROAD TO EATING DISORDER RECOVERY BEGINS HERE. For more than 20 years, the internationally-recognized Laureate Eating Disorders Program has successfully treated patients who struggle with anorexia nervosa, bulimia and other related conditions. As a part of Saint Francis Health System, our psychiatrists, therapists, dietitians and nurses work closely together as a multidisciplinary team to meet the individual needs of each patient while in a safe, supportive environment. For more information on the Laureate Eating Disorders Program, please call 918-491-5775 or visit laureate.com/eatingdisorders.

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OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA™

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Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204

This is your special day; celebrate in style with help from Oklahoma Magazine. Start with our June Wedding Guide, and be sure to keep an eye out for the 2018 Wedding Issue and the Oklahoma Wedding Show, both coming in January.

Copyright © 2017 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

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LET TER FROM THE EDITOR Oklahoma Magazine has always focused on health as a serious subject for readers by publishing monthly health columns as well as regular features on the topic. We’re continuing that focus this month with our special section on oral health. While many people avoid going to the dentist, oral health is important to people’s overall wellness. Many dentists are making the process more comfortable and convenient for patients. Whether you’re in need of a routine cleaning or are looking for more complex orthodontic care, our feature takes a look at the latest trends and provides a comprehensive listing of dental professionals so you can find the care you need. We’d like to offer a special thanks to the Oklahoma Dental Association for its assistance with this special section. Oklahoma has a rich music history, and this month we take a look at two stories that form part of that colorful tapestry. From Oklahoma City, we talk to Wayne Coyne of The Flaming Lips about everything from the band’s new album, Oczy Mlody, to why the group has never felt the need to move out of Oklahoma. In Tulsa, we explore the origin of the Tulsa Shuffle, a drumming style heard on tracks by artists as prolific as Eric Clapton. Finally, we’re continuing our Downtown Renaissance series with a look at businesses moving to downtown Tulsa and OKC. Many companies are choosing to move downtown to be close to the excitement in the city, and many employees are viewing that as a benefit as the cities continue to build on the “live, work, play” philosophy that is making downtown areas thrive. As always, feel free to contact me at editor@okmag.com. Sincerely,

FOR ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES EMAIL ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM 918.744.6205

OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA

2017

OKLAHOMA

Justin Martino Justin Martino Managing Editor

LOOK FOR THE RESULTS IN THE UPCOMING JULY EDITION.

What’s HOT At

Socialites

THE OUTSIDERS HOUSE

THE

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

In May, Oklahoma Magazine takes a tour of the newest developments in Downtown Tulsa and Oklahoma City. Meet the state’s top developers as we get a first-hand look at the exciting new urban living spaces soon to be available to those eager to live where they work and play. From high-end luxury condos to affordable studio apartments, Tulsa and Oklahoma City are transforming to accomodate both empty-nesters and young professionals alike. For even more information, read our three part feature on downtown living in the April, May and June issues of Oklahoma Magazine.

PHOTO COURTESY THE CURTIS BROTHERS HOME HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Votes 8

LIVE. WORK. PLAY. DOWNTOWN.

22k @TheOutsidersHouse 5k @OutsidersHouse A small house on the corner of Independence Street and St. Louis Avenue in Tulsa made its mark on the film history after appearing in the critically acclaimed 1983 film The Outsiders, directed by Francis Ford Coppolla and based off the S.E. Hinton book of the same name. The house is a special place not just for Tulsans, but for film fans all over the globe, as The Outsiders kicked off the careers of many famous stars. Today, The Outsiders House continues to draw fans on social media, posting both memorabilia from the film and updates on the house’s restoration.

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State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

A Scar That Teaches Tulsa’s 1921 race riot ruined Greenwood, but two centers in the historic district offer hope.

A

nniversaries don’t always bring pleasant memories. Some dates on the calendar remind us of horrific episodes, leaving us to shake our heads with disbelief. We may want to forget, but that’s about the worst we could do. The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 falls firmly into this category: a wretched event

THE TULSA SKYLINE PROVIDES A DRAMATIC BACKDROP FOR RECONCILATION PARK.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

11


The State REUBEN GANT, INTERIM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN CENTER FOR RECONCILIATION, FOLLOWS THE CENTER’S VISION TO TRANSFORM SOCIETY’S DIVISION INTO SOCIAL HARMONY.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

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that should be remembered so that we can learn and never repeat it. Today, the location of this millstone of hate and conflict offers beacons of hope for the future. The Greenwood District, epicenter of the riot in 1921, houses the Greenwood Cultural Center and the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation and Reconciliation Park, among other establishments. Rewind the clock 100 years; the Greenwood District in downtown Tulsa looks entirely different. The community thrived with prominent African-American-owned businesses and homes. “All manner of businesses, including hotels, movies theaters, churches, pharmacies, haberdasheries, professional offices, shine parlors, beauty salons and much more dotted the Greenwood District landscape. Home ownership and community pride swelled,” says Frances Jordan-Rakestraw, executive director of the Greenwood Cultural Center. Segregation laws led to the inception of this community, but the inhabitants did not limit their ability and created a thriving district with a bustling thoroughfare of commerce dubbed Black Wall Street. “In the face of restrictive laws and practices of society that forbade such an indepen-

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

dent entrepreneurially successful community [to be] possible in the U.S. during Jim Crow and segregation, Greenwood beat the odds,” says Reuben Gant, interim executive director of the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation. Everything changed precipitously May 31 and into June 1, 1921. That night, an angry white mob destroyed Greenwood by burning it to the ground. The riot left thousands of AfricanAmericans homeless and wiped out hundreds of businesses. The violence was not restricted to property. Between 50 and 300 people died; the death toll is not definitive. What is certain is that Greenwood and its inhabitants were devastated. The area was rebuilt after the riot by its victims, but the damage done to the lives and culture there was felt for decades. During the 1970s and ’80s, leaders recognized the need to preserve the history of the Greenwood district. The Greenwood Cultural Center was built. “GCC works primarily to teach about the history of the Greenwood District and preserve historical artifacts for educational purposes,” Jordan-Rakestraw says. The Greenwood Cultural Center has told the story of Greenwood for 30 years with pictorial exhibits showcasing the history of the area. It incorporates the preserved Mabel B. Little Heritage House, the only neighborhood home still standing from the riot. The center includes the Black Wall Street monument and photos, newspaper articles and maps illustrating the riot. “The Greenwood Cultural Center is an historical, economic and cultural focal point of the African-American experience in Tulsa and in Oklahoma,” JordanRakestraw says. The cultural center also houses the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation, which works to preserve the history and spirit of this community. It’s named for John Hope Franklin, a native of the black township of Rentiesville and graduate of Booker T. Washington High School in Tulsa. He received a doctorate

in history from Harvard and was the history department chair for many years at the University of Chicago. He wrote many books about the African-American experience. His father, civil rights lawyer Buck Franklin, defended many African-Americans during and after the race riot. “The center’s vision is to transform society’s division into social harmony,” Gant says. “In doing so, the center has adopted as its mission, ‘In the spirit of John Hope Franklin, the center promotes reconciliation and generates trust through scholarly work and constructive community engagement.’” This is accomplished through an annual national symposium that takes an in-depth look at reconciliation in its many forms and from a variety of angles, the gathering of archival information about Greenwood both before and after the riot, and dialogue in the community about reconciliation. Remembering the riot and the people whose lives were changed forever is important in order to learn lessons that we can apply today. The Franklin center highlights the impact that reconciliation can have on our community and the world. The center has created an “open forum to address the issue of race, to combat stereotypes and misperceptions that permeate throughout society because of unfamiliarity,” Gant says. This is all done in an atmosphere that encourages people from different walks of life to listen, interact and really hear one another with no expectation of conformity, and to foster greater familiarity and understanding, he says. Jordan-Rakestraw adds: “The 1921 Tulsa Race Riot must be taught. If we fail to understand our past, we risk making the same mistakes over and over again. Knowledgeable, thoughtful facilitators allow us to explore this history and the underlying racial context it reflects in ways that move us forward together as a community.” BONNIE RUCKER


The State

PEOPLE

From Polka Dots to Artistic Vision Wendeline Matson’s paintings meld seemingly mismatched objects with Tulsa’s landscapes.

C

TOP: MATSON DRAWS UPON THE SKYLINES OF TULSA AS INSPIRATION FOR HER ART. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

RIGHT: WILDFLOWERS AND BIRDS IS ONE OF MATSON’S PIECES.

PHOTO COURTESY WENDELINE MATSON

14

ombine bunnies, bicycles, wildflowers and rotary telephones with the colors of Henri Matisse and the lines of Paul Cezanne, and you’ll come close to the still lifes of Wendeline Matson. Tulsa, with its Art Deco skyscrapers, and the surrounding plains, with oil wells rising from the earth, provide a nearly perfect atmosphere for an artist whose work highlights shape and landscape. “Shape draws me in,” she said. “When I see certain shapes, I want to remember them.” Matson has an entire series of paintings called Prairie, comprising landscapes with figures or shapes like bunnies, bicycles and cows placed against them. “I’m totally inspired by this landscape,” she says. “Tulsa is a gorgeous city.” Matson says Tulsa feels a great deal like an East Coast city. When she moved from Fayetteville, Arkansas, 15 years ago, she quickly realized Tulsans take artists seriously as professionals, and that respect has made her feel at home. Tulsa gives Matson, who is constantly observing the world, much visual stimuli. “If I see something that inspires me, the sky or illustrations, I can try to paint it, but it ends up being totally different,” she says. “You try to take what you see and make it your own.” Matson attributes her love for color to her need for vision correction in childhood. Until sixth grade, she saw the world in blocks of color. “I had polka dots on my bedroom wallpaper, for example, and didn’t realize it,” she says. After getting glasses, Matson says detail, particularly a sense of line, began to develop her artistic vision. As she got older, Matson was drawn to Henry Hensche’s colorist movement, in which colors are made to appear brighter than in real life. While earning a bachelor of fine arts degree at the University of Arkansas, with additional work in Italy, Matson studied painting and sculpture. She recognizes David Hockney and Milton Avery as her greatest inspirations. “David Hockney is one of those people who just made me want to paint,” says Matson, who works

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

primarily on canvas with acrylics. She sometimes paints with oils, depending upon the project. Matson, whose husband is a petroleum geologist, is fascinated by industrial equipment. Objects such as light bulbs already appear in her work, but in the future she might include her perspective on industrial beauty, both small and large utility mechanisms. Matson’s paintings bring life to an odd shape found in her bedroom window or to objects relegated to antiquity like rotary phones. Matson frequently has shows in Boston at Jules Place and in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at the Giocobbe-Fritz Fine Art gallery. Her next solo exhibit in Tulsa is slated for 2018 at the MA Doran Gallery. BRANDI GENTRY


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The State

C U LT U R E

Hearing the People Sing Painted Sky Opera in OKC brings performances to intimate, common venues.

W

hen we conjure images of opera, several pictures may come to mind: glittering jewelry, tuxedos and top hats, the prestige of a seat in the box. For centuries, opera has been the musical territory of the rich and famous, as much a social event as an art form. These days, opera has taken a turn for the egalitarian, and audiences no longer need be wealthy to appreciate the beauty of this distinct musical expression. Enter such companies as Painted Sky Opera in Oklahoma City. Founded in 2015, Painted Sky is a nonprofit organization focused on bringing a rich, comprehensive opera experience to intimate venues, from tiny stages in art museums to rooms in schools and libraries. “We are following a formula that has been working well for new opera companies in the United States: introducing opera to our community by taking opera to them,” says Barbara DeMaio, executive director and co-founder of Painted Sky. Raised in a musical family – her father was a minister of music, her mother a pianist, her sister a trombone player – DeMaio had a lifelong dream to be an opera singer. She lived in Italy for 16 years and played some of the most illustrious opera houses in the world before returning to Oklahoma to teach at the University of Central Oklahoma as an artist-in-resi-

ROB GLAUBITZ AND BARBARA DEMAIO BRING A NEW OPERA EXPERIENCE TO OKLAHOMA.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

dence. It was at the Edmond college that she met Rob Glaubitz, who shared DeMaio’s dream of starting a company that has since become Painted Sky Opera. The neophyte troupe didn’t shy away from challenges during its sold-out inaugural season, which included Joseph Haydn’s La Canterina (performed in the cozy auditorium at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art) and an up-close and personal performance of Guiseppe Verdi’s La Traviata in the Freede Little Theatre at Civic Center Music Hall. “We’ve brought opera to Oklahoma City in a way that has not been done before,” DeMaio says, “[in] small, intimate theaters that help the public feel opera in a wonderful, visceral way. We’ve also brought opera to schools, retirement homes, community groups and public spaces.” DeMaio believes that despite any perceptions or past history, opera is accessible – and enjoyable – for everyone. “We sincerely believe that if we can get someone into the theater, they are going to like opera,” she says. “It is a winning combination of musical theater, orchestra, great singing and fabulous stories. Our sold-

out performances are a sure sign that there is already an audience for opera here in Oklahoma City, and our aim is to introduce more Oklahomans to this wonderful art form. “Children, who don’t have preconceived notions, love our performances. As my colleague Rob Glaubitz says, ‘You’ve not lived until you’ve seen a sixth grader being introduced to opera for the first time.’” Painted Sky recently wrapped up its auditions for the 2017-18 season, which will include Giacomo Puccini’s Tosca; Souvenir, a work about (in)famous “singer” Florence Foster Jenkins and her pianist; and Jake Heggie’s Three Decembers, based on Terrence McNally’s script Some Christmas Letters. “We already have an excellent orchestra in the [Oklahoma City] Philharmonic, an outstanding Equity Theatre in CityRep, and a long tradition of musical theater with Lyric Theatre,” DeMaio says of OKC’s performance culture. “The only thing lacking, up to now, was a professional opera company. We are hoping to fill that gap.” TARA MALONE


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The State

HISTORY

A Bygone Civilization

The Spiro Mounds offer a look into what Oklahoma looked like before Europeans arrived.

O

TOP: THE SPIRO MOUNDS HOLD MANY ARTIFACTS OF A PAST CIVILIZATION. MOST OF THE SPIRO MOUNDS LET LEADERS PHYSICALLY DWELL ON A HIGHER LEVEL THAN OTHERS.

PHOTOS COURTESY OKLAHOMA TOURISM

18

ur country is less than 250 years old and our state is 110, so history before then, in context, is difficult to come by. But this land was inhabited long before it was the state of Oklahoma or part of the United States. “Native Americans have been in eastern Oklahoma for over 12,000 years, and it is possible that there have been people in the state over 27,000 years,” says Dennis Peterson, manager of the Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center, the only place in the state where the public can get a glimpse of Oklahoma before Europeans arrived. The Spiro Mounds, in the far eastern part of the state less than 10 miles from the Arkansas line, provide the opportunity to learn about a civilization that existed in what is now Oklahoma long before modern history began. More than 1,100 years ago, the area on a bend of the Arkansas River was prime for farming as well as trade and a place from which to lead nations of people.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

“Around A.D. 850, the elite community and surrounding city where the Spiro Mounds site is now was a growing control point for trade and transport moving along the Arkansas River,” Peterson says. The “elite community” were the leaders who worked and lived on the mounds. The mounds themselves served several purposes. Each was created by hauling and piling bucketfuls of dirt and mostly constructed as a place to erect a house or other ruling structure. The types of mounds at Spiro consist of one burial mound, two temple mounds and nine house mounds, but Peterson says they were all set up for one general purpose: leaders ruling from above. “Think of [the mounds] like when you go into a courtroom and the judge sits above everyone else or in a church when the pastor stands on a dais,” he says. “It both physically and psychologically separates the leader and institution from everyone else.” Many mysteries surround the Spiro people and the long-ago community. According to Peterson, even with all the archaeological work done over the years, only about 15 percent of the 150 acres that are preserved have been investigated. One major question that is yet to be answered is what caused the demise of this civilization. The mound center thrived from about 900 until the end of its use in around 1450. Little is known

about why it was abandoned and why the supporting city surrounding the mounds continued to be inhabited for an additional century. Visiting the Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center provides the opportunity to tour the mounds, as well as view interpretive exhibits of some of the thousands of artifacts excavated from the site’s burial mound. On May 6, the center will hold its annual Archaeology Day and Birthday Bash celebrating its opening in 1978. There will be several special tours and exhibits available to learn more about this long-ago settlement. As we learn from what the Spiro people left behind, our lives are enriched by creating connections to our shared past. BONNIE RUCKER


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The State

DAVID MOONEYHAM OF LUNAR ECLIPSE FORGE FOCUSES ON UNIQUE, MULTI-USE KNIVES. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

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F

Renowned, self-taught OKC bladesmith crafts customized knives that fire the imagination.

rom a scandi to a wa gyuto, David Mooneyham forges all sorts of knives into creation. The native Oklahoman crafts a variety of blades, but he has a passion for knives with basic, multi-use functions. “I specialize in unique kitchen knives,” Mooneyham says. “My more period-accurate pieces include a lot of Anglo-Saxon or Scandinavian, such as a scandi, which is a sort of Viking utility knife. I recently made one from the circa 600-800 period with a steel blade and carved maple handle.” Some knives aren’t flashy, but they’re interesting to make, Mooneyham says. Recently, he forged a wa gyuto, a Japanese chef’s knife, for a customer to his Oklahoma City shop. “Although it is simple-looking, it is very difficult to execute,” he says. “The handle has three pieces, which includes ebony, metal spacers and burrow wood, yet it is simply shaped.” Mooneyham’s bladesmithing skills scored a spot on the History Channel’s Forged in Fire. On each episode of the reality show, four bladesmiths compete in a threeround elimination contest to make bladed weapons, with the overall winner receiving $10,000 and the day’s championship. Mooneyham carries his title proudly. With an interest in fantasy books, like

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

Lord of the Rings, and Scandinavian and Viking history, Mooneyham began learning the craft in 2000 when he obtained a charcoal forge and some scrap metal. It was slow and difficult at first, but he forged ahead despite unfavorable results and a load of bad information. “I don’t know at what point I decided to do this; I just picked up a piece of steel, started filing on it and made costume pieces,” he says. “Later, I started learning about real bladesmithing. It was a long road and I had to unlearn a lot of misinformation.” After years of “doing it wrong,” Mooneyham started connecting with the right people to hone his metallurgical and practical skills to become the self-taught bladesmith champion that he is today. “It is amazing how 15 minutes with someone who knows what they’re doing is worth a year of you doing it yourself,” he says. Mooneyham’s main focus to create commission pieces that interest him or allow him to learn something knew. “I don’t do the same thing twice very often, so most of the time I am working on something that is new to me,” he says. “It is constantly a learning experience, and that’s the coolest thing to me. I love learning and figuring stuff out.” Whether he’s working with a new material or learning a new technique, Mooneyham will continue to grow in his craft …

and his passion. “There is something magical about the idea of taking this raw piece of material and turning it into a tool that is beautiful and functional and is going to last years beyond me,” he says. “Everything I make is going to be here long after I am gone.” You can see some of his pieces on his website, lunareclipseforge.com. ALAINA STEVENS


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BUSINESS

The State

Animal Adjustments

C

A Tulsa chiropractor helps pets and working animals recover from ailments and injuries.

hiropractor Chuck Zoellner has expanded his practice to include our favorite fourlegged friends. “If it’s on Old McDonald’s farm, I can probably adjust it,” he says. Zoellner has worked on dogs, cats and cows, but it was his daughters’ love of horses that drew him to the specialty. “We already rode horses as a family every weekend at my brother’s ranch, and my daughters also took horseback riding lessons and loved being around these gentle giants,” he says. “But it was when we were watching equestrian at the Summer Olympics on TV and my youngest daughter asked me in a 9-year-old voice: ‘Dad, those horses are so beautiful, but I want to barrel race instead of jump. Do you think I can ever be the best barrel racer?’ When she asked me that, I knew I had to broaden my training to involve animals.” Zoellner treats hip, leg, neck and back issues for family pets and working animals. “I am slowly letting the word out with my human patients that I can adjust animals, but, even with a slow approach, it is steadily picking up,” he says. “I have a wide variety of clients, ranging from ranchers to CEOs to competitive athletes who need help treating their furry family members.” Zoellner says the practice is similar to his work with human patients. “When an animal is out of alignment, just like a person, they can be agitated, grumpy, lethargic or show other symptoms of being sick,” he says. “Sometimes horses and dogs just won’t move because they are hurting, or they may act out – again, just like a person – and grunt, kick their feet, cry, nip or just push you away. When I encounter this, I have to reassure the patient that I am there to help and not hurt.” Because he has to earn the animal’s trust, Zoellner says he can’t put time limits on his appointments with a quadriped. “Animals are not like people in the fact that you can’t always control them or tell them sentences and assume they understand to calm down or tell you what hurts,” he says. “You really have to gain the animal’s trust simply because they are in pain and

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

can’t communicate through words. Touch, demeanor and approach are important with animals.” The nonverbal communication can make monitoring improvement simpler, however. “What is great about animals is their motion doesn’t lie,” he says. “I examine before

and after and, if I can fix them, it is noticeable. Sometimes it is difficult for people to remember how far they have progressed, whereas with an animal it is apparent right away.” Zoellner says he likes that animal chiropractic allows him to take his practice outside, where he can enjoy nature while working. “I also feel that it helps me create a great bond with my daughters,” he says. “It makes me feel amazing when my daughter says she wants to be a chiropractor or a veterinarian and take over the family business someday.” BETH WEESE

DR. CHARLES ZOELLNER HAS RECENTLY EXPANDED HIS CHIROPRACTIC PRACTICE TO INCLUDE PETS AND WORKING ANIMALS.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

“What is great about animals is their motion doesn’t lie.”


The State

THE WARRIOR DASH, HELD THIS MONTH IN INOLA, HAS A VARIETY OF DIFFERENT OBSTACLES ON THE 5K COURSE. PHOTO COURTESY RED FROG EVENTS

SPORTS

A 5K for Cancer’s Sake The annual Warrior Dash in Inola helps fund proton radiation therapy for children at St. Jude.

O

klahomans who find a run through the park a bit boring will have an option to try something different this month when the Warrior Dash

sets up in Inola. In 2009, Red Frog Events launched the very first Warrior Dash, a 5-kilometer obstacle run that would eventually become synonymous with the adventurous nature of its participants. The first run, in Joliet, Illinois, sold out almost immediately. Since then, more than 3 million people have participated in the Warrior Dash, which quickly became a success, spread out nationally and found a home in 2011 at Moore’s Flying M Ranch in Inola. This year’s run is May 6. Molly Chernick, Red Frog’s senior manager of operations, says the company chose Inola because “Moore’s Flying M Ranch is a beautiful property.” The layout and landscape of the ranch allow for Red Frog’s creative team to build unique, challenging courses for every iteration of the run. The ranch is 35 miles east of Tulsa, which Chernick says was another factor taken into consideration for selecting the location. The Warrior Dash and Red Frog have partnered with St. Jude to raise more than $13.5 million for proton therapy, the most advanced form of cancer radiation technology available to patients. St. Jude seeks to produce the first

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

such therapy specifically designed for children. Janet Horst, owner of a Tulsa clothing boutique, ran the Warrior Dash in 2011 and 2012 and plans to run it this year. She describes the race as the “most fulfilling and exhausting run I have ever participated in” and recommends mild training beforehand to get the most out of the event. Horst ran the race alongside her husband and son, both of whom enjoyed the event and plan to run again. The family agrees that the run was a great way to come together to fight cancer. The race presents its runners with a reason to leave their normal weekends behind and embrace an adventure – a challenging gauntlet of 12 obstacles that can include ropes, giant nets,

slides, climbing of vertical walls with toeholds, bridges, water pits, mud mounds, pipelines, crawls under barbed wire, trenches and leaps over small fires. Before and afterward, athletes can enjoy a festival featuring food, drink and music. “It’s a race that anyone can start and everyone can finish,” Chernick says. “Warrior Dash is a fresh and unique approach to your typical 5K.” The Warrior Dash occurs in other states, too. Wisconsin, New York, North Carolina, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, Michigan, Maryland, Illinois, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Louisiana, Florida and Texas have runs after the one in Inola. GAGE FRONCZAK


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The State

to tour and record, making noise as a bluesbased artist regionally and nationally ever PHOTO COURTESY SCOTT ELLISON since. His new disc, Sanctified, is due out May 6 from Connecticut-based Red Parlor Records. Because of a deal between Red Parlor and RED Distribution, a Sony company, this disc, according to Ellison, “kind of kicks everything up for us. It’s really going to help make everything more global.” What that potential global audience gets with Sanctified is not only a singer-songwriter-guitarist at the top of his game, but a stellar supporting cast of Tulsa musicians, including, to tie back to the first paragraph, some stars from the dawn of T-town rock ’n’ roll. “Junior Markham’s playing harmonica on like three songs, Chuck Blackwell’s playing drums on the first track, and Jimmy Karstein’s on percussion on one song,” says Ellison, citing three musicians in that influential first wave of rockers who came out of Tulsa clubs and headed to Los Angeles to ply their trade in the late ’50s and early ’60s, eventually leaving their marks on the national scene. Sanctified also features contributions from well-known Tulsans who established their rock ’n’ roll credentials a bit later, like drummers David Teegarden and Ron McRorey, keyboardist Walt Richmond, bassist Gary Gilmore, guitarist Charles Tuberville, and singers Chris Campbell and Marcy Levy, INSIDER the latter a former Tulsa resident living in Southern California. In addition to Ellison’s touring band – bassist Matt Kohl and drummer Robbie Armstrong – other musicians heard on Sanctified include Hank Charles, Jon Glazer and Danny Timms on keyboards; Brad Absher on guitar; bassist Jon Parris; drummer Tim Smith; and horn players Steve Ham and Mike Bennett. The late Ron Martin’s bass playing Scott Ellison’s latest album draws from a wellspring of musicians. even shows up on one of the cuts via a track recorded years ago that Ellison reworked for the new disc. nyone who’s regularly visited this column knows I especially enjoy sharing Ellison’s long been known for using top Tulsa musistories about projects that put veteran cians on his records. But this time, he says, he went all in. Oklahoma musicians in the spotlight. “I used even more of the Tulsa guys on this one,” he The history of rock ’n’ roll is so short, says, “a lot of the guys I’ve played with for the past 45 relatively speaking, that some of its first practitioners years.” are still making music, and when that happens with acts He laughs. around here, it’s a good reason for celebration, or at least “I’m dating myself there, but there’s no other way to observance. say it. These are the favorite guys I’ve played with and looked up to, people like Walt and Charles and Marcy Tulsan Scott Ellison, I hasten to add, isn’t one of and Chuck and Gary Gilmore. It’s basically Scott Elthose First Rockers. He has, however, been making lison with the Tulsa all-stars,” he says. “The greatest of music for a good long while. According to my files, the first time I wrote about him was in 1988, just after he re- the greats are on this record, and that’s how I wanted it to be. I wanted to use everyone. It’s a taste of all the leased his debut single. By that time, he’d been living in best guys I’ve played with in my life, and that’s kind of Southern California for about five years, working on his a cool thing.” own blues-oriented music and touring extensively with Also noteworthy is the presence of another top Tulsa a reconstituted version of the 1960s hitmakers the Box act on the album, if only in spirit. Ellison’s fellow Tops. Before that, he spent the better part of a decade bluesman Steve Pryor, who died exactly a year before playing the Tulsa club scene. Eventually, Ellison returned home, and he’s continued Sanctified’s scheduled release, is represented by one of SCOTT ELLISON’S LATEST ALBUM FEATURES HIS FAVORITE OKLAHOMA MUSICIANS.

Tulsa’s Rock Royalty Rules

A

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017


the songs Pryor recorded on his first major-label disc, 1991’s Steve Pryor Band. “It’s called ‘Last Breath,’ which is song No. 10, the last song, on that record,” Ellison says. “A bunch of us played that song at the Steve Pryor tribute show [June 4, 2016, at Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa]. I had that CD and loved that song. I thought it was tailor-made for me – just the way it was constructed. It was in my key to sing, and the slide [guitar] thing on it was perfect. It’s one I wished I would’ve written. “So we did it on the gig, and it went so well that I said, ‘Guys, you know, we’ve got to record this.’ It came out really well; I think it’s one of the strongest tunes on the record, and it’s the only time I did somebody else’s tune, one I didn’t write. I dedicated the record to Steve Pryor.” All of the songs on that 1991 Pryor disc, including “Last Breath,” were co-written by the Pryor band members with Scott Hutchison, who’s also been a collaborator of Ellison’s for some time. Hutchison adds to his substantial list of recorded compositions with several co-written songs on Sanctified, as do Richmond, Tuberville and Campbell. Richmond was the producer of Ellison’s previous record on Red Parlor, Elevator Man, which rose to No. 22 on Living Blues magazine’s national airplay chart. “Walt had such a great approach to Elevator Man,” says Ellison. “He said, ‘You need a straight blues record,’ so that’s what we did. Then, to follow it up, we did this one, which is more of a group effort. There are four producers on it, and I didn’t want it to look like a Britney May Spears record, so I came up with ‘produced by “Rett.”’” 2017 SCI_Ok Mag (CS).pdf 1 3/9/17 4:11 PM If you take a look at the list of collaborators on Sanctified, includ-

ing Ellison himself, and note the first initials of four of their last names, the mysterious “Rett” becomes less of a mystery. But don’t let that get around. “I want somebody in Germany to go, ‘Hey, this Rett guy, he’s really a good producer. We’ve got to get him over here to produce this record for us,’” says Ellison with another laugh. “I’d like to kind of create an illusion, keep the mystery going.” Meanwhile, there’s the record itself to promote and the jobs to play. And while Ellison’s been promoting discs and playing gigs for decades, the chart success of his previous CD and the involvement of the giant Sony Corporation in Sanctified seem to have boosted him to the next level. “You know how crazy it is in the music business,” he says. “It’s so insane. But we’re seeing things happen faster. For example, some of the places I’ve played before are now giving us national-act nights when we tour. We’re starting to get treated more like a headliner. “It’s a gradual climb. It’s a slow process, but while I have the opportunity with Red Parlor and the Sony situation I’m going to use it. It’s kind of bizarre because your nose is to the grindstone, you’re working and working and working, and all of a sudden things are happening faster. You’re working so hard that you don’t realize it sometimes, but then all of a sudden something good comes in and you think, ‘Well, that’s because of the Sony thing.’ “In blues, in the music business, there’s no guarantee. But this is a good lift for me.”

“In blues, in the music business, there’s no guarantee.”

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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

Let’s Fly a Kite Kite flying in Oklahoma has a history rich with philanthropy.

F

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

lying kites may be a fun activity on a nice day, but it’s also a hobby that is steeped in giving back to the community in Oklahoma. Jason McCaleb, Tulsa resident and regional director for the American Kitefliers Association (AKA), also serves as administrator for the Tulsa Wind Riders Kite Club. The club was formed by current president Larry Stiles and Richard Dermer, who died in 2014. Dermer co-founded Hideaway Pizza with his wife, Marti, and was a former president of the AKA. The Dermers traveled to many countries teaching people to build kites and designed their own high-performance version of the sled kite. Recently, Hideaway Pizza donated 9,000 kits to the Tulsa Regional STEM Alliance for its first Statewide Kite Festvial, which will be held May 5 at the University of Tulsa. McCaleb works with many different nonprofits for the Wind Riders and the AKA, including school districts and the Tulsa Boys’ Home. His own love for kites and giving back developed after meeting Dermer and Stiles. “I didn’t fly kites until about five years ago, then I met Richard and Larry, and I saw Richard and his wife donate their time,” he says. “It showed me you could really do something fun and give back to your community. That multiplied more than I could have imagined.”

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style INTERIORS

Upscale Design by Feel

Christy Howell of Bella Vici creates a glamorous interior in Edmond. By M.J. Van Deventer • Photos by Amber Page

G

lamour assumes a new personality at a home in north Edmond featuring the interior design talents of Christy Howell, owner of Bella Vici, an upscale firm in Oklahoma City’s Deep Deuce area. When completed in October, the home became the centerpiece of the annual Street of Dreams Home Tour, sponsored by the Central Oklahoma Home Builders Association in Edmond. Christy came to the project while it was under construction by Authentic Custom Homes. With no real homeowner to satisfy, Christy could create interiors for a home that she envisioned an upscale family would enjoy. For her, the finished home was the “silver lining” to an unusual project. She was hired to create the interior design color scheme for the home, but the project provided many more construction challenges and opportunities to show her talents. Majoring in interior design at the University of Central Oklahoma in Edmond, she graduated in 2005. Five years later, she established Bella Vici. This was also the first home that the builder created at this higherincome level, she notes. “I had to assure him it was OK to be more upscale,” says Christy, who wanted to push the budget envelope to achieve her design goals with the project. “Designing the interiors was both challenging and very rewarding.” Christy calls the style of the two-story, 6,000-square-foot home

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

“a modern farmhouse design,” minus the traditional cows or chickens typical of most farmhouse settings. It is upscale, in appearance and function, and features numerous cutting-edge design ideas. The home has many unusual features, found in the construction details, choice of custom-designed industrial hardware from England used in the kitchen, game room, master bath and lighting fixtures throughout the home. Every room has some element that could easily be called “a conversation piece.” A visual feast can be enjoyed in the variety of textures used throughout the home. That design characteristic is seen in velvet headboards, quartz sinks, stainless steel holders for wine bottles, metallic paints, textured walls and wallpaper that has a flowing marbled effect. “I like to use at least three to four textures and patterns in a room,” Christy says.

CLOCKWISE: THE HOME IS LOCATED IN NORTH EDMOND. THE HOME’S IMPRESSIVE CONTEMPORARY ENTRY GIVES A GLIMPSE OF THE OPEN LIVING, DINING AND KITCHEN AREAS. WHITE CEILINGS THROUGHOUT AND WHITE-WASHED FLOORS ARE IMPRESSIVE AND WELCOMING DESIGN FEATURES FOR GUESTS. THE WINE CELLAR IS LOCATED UNDER THE STAIRWAY AND NEAR THE KITCHEN AND DINING AREA ON THE HOME’S MAIN LEVEL. THE WORK STATION ISLAND FEATURES A UNIQUE GLASS AND WATERFALL EDGED TOP THAT EXTENDS TO THE FLOOR FOR MORE VISUAL APPEAL.


MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

Throughout the home, the floors are a light white-washed engineered wood with a subtle hint of gray. While each room has a distinct design personality, there is a sense of continuity in the color palette of whites, grays and touches of black that give the home a unifying, cohesive, serene theme. Pops of color, which Christy calls bright hues, provide a visual counterpoint to the overall quiet, soothing color palette. Special accents and furnishing accessories include clever or surprising touches, especially in children’s bedrooms. A hallmark of the home is a spacious, well-appointed, two-story closet that would be the envy of any person who loves dressing well. Built-in cabinetry circles the room and provides ample storage space as well as a large area for hanging clothes according to seasons, color hues, functions or categories. A central dressing and storage island is designed for accessories and a small dressing seat provides comfort while you decide on shoes and accessories to complement the day’s wardrobe. It would be impossible not to covet this room for your own home. Other special features include a movie theater adjacent to the game room, a pantry in the kitchen easily accessed from the garage, a wine cellar beneath the staircase on the main floor and an upstairs study hall flanked by chalkboards for a family’s children. In addition, there are an exercise room and a his-and-hers, luxurious, combined shower in the master bath, overlooking the area’s beautiful greenbelt. Christy laments that it’s sometimes difficult to get high-quality specialty products in the design world. However, for this intriguing project, she pulled out all the stops. She spared nothing in terms of resources to help the builder create a design masterpiece for an upscale family enjoying life to the fullest in this elegant, functional, unique, inspiring home in beautiful surroundings.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Bonus photo gallery @ OKmag.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

CLOCKWISE: A CUSTOMDESIGNED RAILING, WHICH MATCHES THE ENTRY STAIRWAY RAILING, SURROUNDS THE UPPER LEVEL OF THE TWO-STORY CLOSET AND COMPLEMENTS THE WHITE CROWN MOLDING. THE SHOWER’S PLUMBING FIXTURES ARE PLACED ON THE IMPRESSIVE MOSAIC FLOATING WALL IN THE CENTER OF THE SHOWER, WITH FULL WALKAROUND ACCESS. A STANDING, TWO-SIDED FIREPLACE SEPARATES THE MASTER BEDROOM FROM AN ADJACENT AREA. THE PENDANT LIGHTS REVEAL THE VARIED ANGLES AND VERTICAL LINES IN THE ROOM.


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Life & Style

2nd

OF A 3 - PA R T S E R I E S

F YI

Downsizing an Empty Nest

Limiting and boxing up children’s keepsakes help the transition to a smaller home.

W

hile raising children, couples often move to larger houses with more space, multiple rooms and big backyards. But once the kids leave, many parents find their homes to be more than they need and possibly a financial burden. For these empty nesters, the transition to a smaller home can be overwhelming … and may have inspired Wendell Berry to write, “Don’t own so much clutter that you will be relieved to see your house catch fire.” Professional organizers such as Faith Conaway, a licensed real-estate agent and owner-founder of Completely Organized Tulsa, can help ease the stress. “Managing a ‘downsize’ can be difficult, especially when kids have left,” Conaway says. “It’s hard for parents to get rid of their kids’ items. If the children didn’t come back for their stuff or take their stuff with them when they left, they probably don’t need all of it in the first place.” She explains that if a parent had

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

the foresight to plan, then every child should have a container already filled with keepsakes like school work and baby memorabilia. However, if that’s not the case, the “one box rule” applies. “Fill up one box of items for each kid to have,” she says. “The sooner parents start to downsize and get rid of unnecessary stuff, the easier it will be when they get into retirement age.” Anne Spero, owner of Organized Living in Tulsa, specializes in solving chronic disorganization and hoarding. “Do include the children in the decisions to part with some items,” she says. “Ask them what is special to them. Don’t keep every school paper, but create criteria that can be adhered to, such as ‘Just keep the creative writing,’ or perhaps a couple of artworks from each year. I would never want someone else to make that decision for me, so I think we have to give them that same respect.” She adds that with our culture of new media, young adults are more open to keeping a digital history but one should still consider future

generations. “Our digital age will lessen the special mementos from ancestors,” Spero says. “The next generation won’t have their parents’ love letters. Keeping a sample of these items is certainly acceptable; the key is to not keep in excess and to keep it simplified and labeled.” Conaway follows one of writer Anthony J. D’Angelo’s aphorisms, “The most important things in life aren’t things,” because it encourages us to prioritize our lives and not become bogged down by our belongings. “I remind my clients that things are just things,” she says. “If there was a fire and everything was lost, those things lost don’t really matter. Family and relationships are what matter. Teaching your kids to not be attached to stuff is a great thing to start at a young age. “Remember, there are always people who are willing to help. Having someone who is not related, such as a professional organizer, help with downsizing and organizing is worth it. Time is money.” REBECCA FAST


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FUN FACTS

Life & Style

PEOPLE HAVE SWUM IN BATH LAKE SINCE THE TOWN’S INCEPTION. PHOTO COURTESY OF MEDICINE PARK

P O P U L AT I O N

382

1908 E S TA B L I S H E D

AREA

1.7 square miles, part of

Lawton’s metropolitan statistical area.

CIT Y LIFE

Mighty Mite

T

Tiny, eclectic Medicine Park attracts nearly 100 times more visitors than it has residents.

iny Medicine Park has always been too big for its breeches … not because it wants to be, but because it has to be. The village with granite cobblestones annually hosts 30,000 shoppers, hikers, bikers, swimmers (in Bath Lake, smack in the middle of town) and backpackers. Active lifestyles define this gateway to the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, the oldest such facility managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Medicine Creek has served native people for tens of thousands of years and the town since it began seven years after the nature preserve was created in 1901. “The town’s a real mixed bag,” says Jean Schucker of the town’s Economic Development Authority. “We like it that way. Shoot, I’m an old hippie. It’s always been eclectic.” Concurring, Mayor Jennifer Ellis says Medicine Park has “business people, musicians, artists, military, retirees, judges, lawyers, physicians … any other job you can think of … all living and working together.” Bicyclists can pedal a few minutes north to Lake Lawtonka, renowned for trails ranging from easy to difficult. Those exploring on foot can find nirvana a little west in the Wichita Mountains, which offer sightseeing, birding, rigorous hikes, primitive camping

36

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

and world-class rock climbing. Elmer Thomas, a state politician who later served in the U.S. Senate for 24 years, began the town as a private resort and dammed the creek to bring in tourists for the waters’ supposed healing properties. Medicine Park attracted the famous (Will Rogers, Wiley Post, Roy Rogers, Dale Evans) and the infamous (Pretty Boy Floyd, Bonnie and Clyde, Al Capone) but struggled after the Great Depression and World War II. The economy rebounded with development in the 1990s. The annual Red Dirt Ball, a free music festival, draws retirees, motorcycle clubs and lovers of Oklahoma’s unique musical genre, red dirt. Cade Roth and the Blacksheep, and 11 other bands play May 26-28. Bath Lake, open from Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day, has a footbridge and a walkway to an island gazebo. On sunny winter days, Schucker says Medicine Park bustles with folks in search of a scone, full meal, snack or cup of coffee. “We get people from everywhere: China, South Korea, Germany, the British Isles, Scandinavia, Egypt,” she says. “Most come for the wildlife refuge, then find us on our website. People always say, ‘Oh, my gosh. I didn’t even know this was here.’” BRIAN WILSON

A N A L L- D AY PA S S

to swim in Bath Lake costs

$2.

THE FINE FOR

taking a cobblestone

from Medicine Park or the nearby Wichita

Mountains Wildlife Refuge can be up to

$500.

.

THERE ARE

650 BISON

ROAMING

THE

WILDLIFE REFUGE.

THE REFUGE

15 miles designated contains

of

hiking trails.


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37


Life & Style

H E A LT H

Beyond Simple Weight Loss or Gain

disturbances tend to be a chronic issue that contributes to ongoing struggles.” We form our body perceptions through the lens of family, society, culture, environment and individual experience. “The messages we are sent from family members, friends and society about what it means to be a woman or man play a role in how we view ourselves, and it shapes the views we have about who and what we are supposed to be and look like,” Jones Millions with eating disorders suffer from the associated physical, says. “Eating disorders are a bio-psychoemotional and mental demons. social disease with our family, social lives and media-driven, thin-body ideal playing significant roles in the formation of one’s t least 30 million Ameribody image.” can women and men of Emily Christensen, Ph.D., a licensed all ages suffer from eating professional counselor with St. John Medidisorders, according to the cal Center Behavioral Health, says the two National Association of most common eating disorders are anorexia Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disornervosa and bulimia nervosa and that eating ders. In addition, eating disorders have the disorders of any variety are 2.5 times more highest mortality prevalent in women rate of any mental than in men. She adds illness. that some other types “The messages we Varied and have emerged. are sent from family complex, eating “Most recently disorders are serious a third category of members, friends conditions that can binge eating was recand society about include an irrational ognized,” Christensen what it means to be fear of gaining says. “This struggle weight, compulsive may not necessara woman or man play overeating and a a role in how we view ily include purging distorted body behaviors, but solely ourselves.” image. the experience of Marissa eating until uncomJones is fortable, eating when a licensed therapist and certified not hungry or eating too quickly. Feelings eating disorders specialist with the related to this include feeling embarrassed Laureate Eating Disorders Program, by the amount of food consumed, disgusted an internationally recognized program by one’s own body or the eating process, or at Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hoseven guilt after eating.” pital in Tulsa. Another category not yet classified is “Eating disorders are chronic illnesses overexercising, or anorexia athletica, where that lead to many medical complications, a person’s compulsive exercise damages the such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, body and causes malnutrition, metabolic neurological and endocrine issues, in addi- and endocrine derangements, and decreased tion to psycho-social issues,” Jones says. bone density. She says many factors contribute to “Similar to this new trend is orthorexia, eating disorders, especially genetics and which is an obsession about the ‘right’ or temperament. ‘pure’ or ‘healthy’ foods,” Christensen says. “A majority of the population have “These people spend most of their time experimented with diets or had some obsessively planning meals, preparing meals struggle with body image at some point and even carrying their own food supply in their lives,” she says. “However, they around with them. They fail to enjoy their do not form eating disorders because food, suffer social isolation and even isolate only a small portion of the population themselves to avoid temptation or exposure has the genetic makeup that leads to an to ‘bad’ foods.” eating disorder. For those who believe they may have an “On the other hand, what starts the eating disorder, Jones recommends visiting eating disorder and what keeps it going a specialist for help. may be two different things. Body image REBECCA FAST

A

38

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017


Counsel for the Business of Life Serving our clients’ needs for 40 years

In December 1976 four young attorneys – Allen E. Barrow, Jr., Robert W. Gaddis, David W. Griffith and William R. Grimm – decided to form a law firm specializing in business related matters. They announced the opening of their law firm at 1600 Philtower Building on March 7, 1977. Within a few months, they added a fifth young lawyer – William E. Farrior. Over the next several years Barrow, Gaddis, Griffith & Grimm, P.C. gained a reputation for providing sound legal advice to the Tulsa business community. The law firm continued to add attorneys and quickly outgrew its Philtower office. In November 1981, cramped for space and no place to grow, the law firm, together with several of their banking and real estate clients, created Main Plaza Associates, Ltd to purchase two art deco buildings and a parking lot at 6th & Main Street. The law firm moved into its new office location in the spring of 1982 and remained at the Main Plaza buildings for the next twenty-six years. The law firm changed its name to Barrow & Grimm, PC in 2001 when two of its founding partners retired. The Main Plaza buildings were sold in November 2004, but the law firm remained as a tenant for a brief period. In 2006, Barrow & Grimm, PC doubled in size with the addition seven lawyers joining their practices from three different Tulsa law firms and once again the law firm was operating in cramped quarters. On February 1, 2008, Barrow & Grimm, PC moved to the 9th Floor of the office building at 110 W. 7th Street, where it operates today with twenty-seven lawyers and an office staff of sixteen legal assistants and general staff members. For over forty years, Barrow & Grimm, PC has been one of Tulsa’s finest law firms for individuals, entrepreneurs and businesses seeking legal advice for their important matters. The attorneys and staff of Barrow & Grimm, PC wish to extend their heart-felt “thank you” to the innumerable clients, business organizations, colleagues and friends who have made our successful longevity possible. Thank you Tulsa – “America’s Most Beautiful City!”

Established in 1976, Barrow & Grimm, PC is a commercial practice law firm serving a wide variety of corporate, partnership, and individual clients. 110 W. 7th St., Ste. 900 | Tulsa, OK 74119 | 918.584.1600 | www.barrowgrimm.com


Life & Style

D E S T I N AT I O N S

A Tranquil and Tasty Port

Portugal has seaside and historical attractions, plus those delicious fortified wines.

I

f you like being on the water and crave serenity, you’ll love Portugal. The country was named after two roman cities, Oporto (Porto) and Calem or Cale (Vila Nova de Gaia), now cities in Portugal. Porto + Cale = Portugal, which literally means “tranquil port” (also from the RomanCeltic place-name Portus Cale). There is also port. These fortified wines of Portugal are fabulous. In the early 1700s, English firms bought their wine from Portugal and added extra alcohol beforehand to survive sea travel. Today, aguardente, similar to brandy, is used by Portuguese to sweeten and increase alcoholic content for port with popular brands still carrying English shipping company names. Portugal’s ships sailed uncharted seas during the Age of Discovery and the

40

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

names of famous captains, such as Vasco da Gama and Ferdinand Magellan, are taught in history classes worldwide. Portuguese is spoken in 23 countries.

Porto

Often hailed as the world’s port capital, Porto is a seaside treasure at the mouth of the Douro River. Wines from grapes harvested from vineyards along the rich, scenic Douro are aged here and its historic city center is a UNESCO site. Visitors marvel at the 19th-century Palacio da Bolsa (the city’s stock exchange) sitting beside the St. Francis Church of Porto, known for its artistically decorated apse chapels and altar pieces. There are inexpensive trams to ride, pastries to be nibbled, tripe soup to be sipped, cable cars to glide above scenic views and stairs to hike to the top of Clerigos’ Church’s bell tower with 360-degree views of the city.


Gaia

This No. 1 tourist attraction lies across one of the steel-network arched bridges spanning the Douro from Porto to Vila Nova de Gaia. Spend time browsing among the 60-odd port “lodges” and stroll along corridors lined floor-to-ceiling with wooden casks of aging wine. Gaia’s riverside cafes, restaurants and bars are sites from which to watch sailboats used to transport wooden casks from vineyards to the lodges. At night multi-colored rooftop neon signs tout port brands and illuminate houses rising along the riverbank.

Lisbon

Portugal’s capital is the 10th richest city in Europe and the oldest city in Western Europe, around since the days of Julius Caesar. Must-sees include the UNESCO-designated, four-story limestone Belem Tower, located on a small island in the Tagus River and one of the Seven Wonders of Portugal. Nearby is Padrão dos Descobrimentos, a soaring monument to the Age of Discovery and tribute to Portugal’s Prince Henry the Navigator, patron of explorers during that historic time. Alfama, along the Tejo River, is one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods with restaurants, bars and historical attractions such as the medieval Castle of São Jorge, once a royal residence now offering superb public views of the city, and the Lisbon Cathedral, oldest in the city.

CLOCKWISE: SIX PORTUGUESE KINGS WERE BORN IN COIMBRA. PHOTO BY ANTONIO SACCHETTI

BELEM TOWER IN LISBON IS FOUR STORIES TALL. PHOTO BY JOSE MANUEL

PORTUGAL OFFERS MANY STUNNING VIEWS FOR VISITORS AT NIGHT. PORTO’S STREETS BUSTLE WITH COMMERCE.

PHOTOS COURTESY PORTO CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

THE PALACIO DA BOLSA PORTO, THE CITY’S STOCK EXCHANGE, IS RENOWNED FOR ITS ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS. PHOTO BY PAULO MAGALHAES

THE ORNATE BIBLIOTECA JOANINA WAS BUILT IN THE 18TH CENTURY. PHOTO BY NUNO CALVET

Coimbra

Six Portuguese kings were born here, with the University of Coimbra, one of Europe’s oldest, a top attraction in the nation’s thirdlargest city. The 18th-century Biblioteca Joanina (library) offers marvelous city views as well as its own fresco ceilings, gilded archways and elaborate carvings.

Regua

The Douro Museum here is a renovated 18th-century building and highlights the wine, flora and fauna of the Douro region with a special emphasis on viticulture, plus a wine bar to contemplate what you have seen.

Pinhão CLOCKWISE: THE BELEM TOWER IS IN LISBON. THE BELEM TOWER SITS ON AN ISLE IN THE TAGUS RIVER. THE BIBLIOTECA JOANINA HAS FRESCO CEILINGS.

In the heart of the nation’s wine country, Pinhão’s bucolic countryside is blanketed with vineyards offering spectacular hillside views. Gustave Eiffel, architect of Paris’s Eiffel Tower, built an iron bridge, one of six notable bridges in the area. CHUCK MAI, AAA OKLAHOMA

PHOTOS BY ANTONIO SACCHETTI

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

41


Life & Style

ETNIA BARCELONA WHITE GOLD SUNGLASSES, $265, HICKS BRUNSON

ST YLE

Summer Essentials

KAREN KANE OPTIC BLOOM BUTTERFLY BLOUSE, $138, DONNA’S FASHIONS

Don’t let the warming weather cool down your fashion choices – all the essentials you need are here.

REBECCA MINKOFF POPPY PRINT FLORAL TOP, $118, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE ALEXIS BITTAR LUCITE LARGE CRYSTAL AND WOODGRAIN CLIP-ON EARRINGS, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

PARKER EMBROIDERED MULTI-COLORED DRESS, $298, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

STEPHANIE KANTIS JEPANG SEMIPRECIOUS MULTISTONE NECKLACE, $285, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

THREE FLOOR COLD SHOULDER LACE DRESS, $480, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

DELFI COLLECTIVE OFF THE SHOULDER RUFFLE DRESS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN

ALEXIS BITTAR PATTERNED LUCITE CUFF, $165, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

KYBOE! MUSTARD SILICONE AND PINK SILICONE STAINLESS STEEL STRAP WATCHES, $190 EACH, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

NAEEM KHAN

ALE XIS BITTAR LUCITE AND CRYSTAL CUFF, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

42

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

ALICE AND OLIVIA BUTTON UP PRINTED BLOUSE, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE


KAREN KANE OPTIC BLOOM EMBROIDERED FLORAL TOP, $118, DONNA’S FASHIONS STEPHANIE KANTIS SEMI-PRECIOUS MULTI-STONE DROP EARRINGS, $125, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALICE AND OLIVIA RUFFLED HALTER DRESS, $330, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

JOE’S HI-LO DISTRESSED DENIM PENCIL SKIRT, $178, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

REBECCA MINKOFF HIBISCUS RED ONESHOULDER RUFFLE TOP, $138, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

KUT FROM THE KLOTH OFF THE SHOULDER DENIM FLUTTER SLEEVE DRESS, $83, DONNA’S FASHIONS

JOE’S EMBROIDERED DENIM SHORTS, $168, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALICE AND OLIVIA PATTERNED FIT AND FLARE DRESS, $275, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

TOMMY BAHAMA FLORAL LEISURE DRESS, $178, DONNA’S FASHIONS

STEPHANIE KANTIS GOLD AND BEADED MULTI-STONE NECKLACE, $345, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

TILO INFINITE-PRINT COTTON SCARF, $125, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

ALTUZARRA

IC! BERLIN B CIRCULAR RONZE SU $499, VIS NGLASSES, IONS

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

43


Life & Style

TORY BURCH ZIGZAG STRIPED TOTE, $295

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO LACED LEATHER BALLET FLATS, $625 TORY BURCH ESTRELLA LEATHER SLINGBACK SANDALS, $295

TORY BURCH PEARL STUDDED SHOULDER BAG, $575

MILLY MULTI-COLORED CLUTCH, $255 JIMMY CHOO SEQUIN AND FEATHER EMBELLISHED SUEDE ANKLE-STRAP SANDALS, $1,595

LOEFFLER RANDALL PINK CLUTCH, $275

ST YLE

A Pop of Whimsy

Shoes and handbags are the cherry on top of any outfit. Make them colorful.

LOEFFLER RANDALL STRIPED TASSEL POUCH, $175

MANOLO BLAHNIK FLORAL EMBROIDERED DENIM SLINGBACKS, $815 SALVATOR FERRAGAMO METALLIC ESPADRILLE FLATS, $475

TORY BURCH NAVY AND GREEN COATED CANVAS TOTE, $195

TORY BURCH NAUTICAL STRIPED SANDALS, $195

TORY BURCH ESTELLA SILK BLEND RING SLIDE SANDALS, $350

TORY BURCH PRINTED LEATHER CHAIN SHOULDER BAG, $625

44

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN, ALL ITEMS FROM SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

TORY BURCH NAVY AND CREAM COATED CANVAS TOTE, $195


SCENE

BACK ROW: POLLY NICHOLS, SALLY STARLING; FRONT ROW: MARY NICHOLS AND GREATGRANDDAUGHTERS; LEGACY & LEGENDS CELEBRATION, JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OKLAHOMA CITY, OKC

TOM & CHERYL EVANS, RITA & SAM COMBS; EXCELLENT IN LEADERSHIP GALA, LEADERSHIP OKLAHOMA, OKC

BARRY & BECKY SWITZER, MONICA BASU, TODD BROWN; CARNIVALE, MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OKLAHOMA, TULSA

MORRIS R. GESSOUROUN, CHRISTY EVEREST, ENES KANTER, WILLIAM H. MEYER, JIMMY EVEREST; JIMMY EVEREST CANCER CENTER VISIT, CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, OKC

ISAAC & LINDSEY HELMERICH, PETER MADDEN, MEREDITH SIEGFRIED MADDEN, LUCKY LAMONS; ST. JOHN STREET PARTY PREPARATIONS, ST. JOHN, TULSA

MIKE TURPEN, MARNIE TAYLOR; OKLAHOMA CONFERENCE ON NONPROFIT LAW & FINANCE; OKLAHOMA CENTER FOR NONPROFITS, OKC

MATT ROBERTS, WILL HILL, TIM TINGLE, MARK WILSON; FESTIVAL OF WORDS, TULSA CITY-COUNTY LIBRARY, TULSA

JOE & LUCIA O’CONNOR, KEVIN SARTORIUS, KATHY CRAFT, ROCHELLE & JOHN DOWDELL; COOKING UP COMPASSION, CATHOLIC CHARITIES, TULSA

RAND & JEANETTE ELLIOT, DEBORAH MCAULIFFE SENNER, JAMES PICKEL; HONORARY CHAIR EVENT, ALLIED ARTS, OKC MAX & MARIAN VOWEL, MICK & SUSAN CHAMPION; CASA CASINO, TULSA CASA, TULSA

GENE RAINBOLT, CHARLOTTE LANKARD, KIM & DAVID RAINBOLT; DISTINGUISHED CITIZENS’ AWARD DINNER, BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA, OKC

PATRICK KEEGAN, BECKY DIXON, MICHELLE NICOLE & HEATH EVANS; WOMEN OF THE YEAR PINNACLE AWARDS PATRON PARTY, YWCA, TULSA

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Bonus photo gallery @ OKmag.com MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

45


LIVE WORK PL AY

POFATHRRTEE 2

The Downtown

Business Boom

The growth in downtown Tulsa and OKC brings new businesses to these areas.

While part of the renaissance of downtown Tulsa and Oklahoma City has focused on creating more activity when businesses close for the day, the revitalization of downtown life has created a culture that’s attractive to businesses. “There’s definitely the idea that you can get a cheaper location or cheaper office if you are out in the suburbs, but there’s kind of a feeling that being downtown is bigger than just having your office there,” says Kyle Johnston, marketing and promotions manager for the Tulsa Downtown Coordinating Council. “It’s being part of the community.” A downtown location has multiple advantages for companies. The daytime population of downtown Tulsa is more than 40,000 people, which creates an area ripe for busi

46

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

nesses to reach out and create a network. Johnston also notes there has been an increase in retail space in downtown Tulsa. “The biggest reason [for the increase of retail business] is just the large amount of people during the day, but what has really boosted it lately is the new residences that are coming online,” he says. “We have three new apartment buildings that have come up in the last three months. We’ve got four more coming up, probably before December. There are going to be hundreds of new residents downtown, so there are going to be new places to shop.” Whether companies choose to locate downtown to appeal to employees looking for a downtown lifestyle, to network with the other businesses or to provide services for a growing population, the bottom line is the same: downtown is open for business.


WORKING DOWNTOWN

Two companies talk about how a downtown address provides a benefit to them.

ROBERT EVANS, CEO OF OSEBERG, SAYS THE COMPANY THRIVES IN THE ENVIRONMENT CREATED BY OKC’S INNOVATION DISTRICT. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

GENTNER DRUMMOND, PRINCIPAL OWNER OF BLUE SKY BANK, SAYS THE BANK’S EMPLOYEES ENJOY WORKING IN DOWNTOWN TULSA. PHOTO BY SCOTT MILLER

1.3 OKC’s innovation district covers around

square miles.

THE INNOVATION DISTRICT OKC is focusing on creating an area for startups with its innovation district,

an area that stretches from Automobile Alley to the Oklahoma Health Center. The area, which houses the city’s bioscience sector, has already demonstrated success is incubating startup businesses. The Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce and other organizations and community members are working with the Brookings Institution and Project for Public Spaces on an 18-month study on the district. The study is

Just as people who choose to live downtown make that decision for different reasons, businesses based downtown often use a number of factors that may vary by company. Oseberg, a company providing data analysis for the oil and gas industry, isn’t new to Oklahoma City’s downtown, but it did recently move its office from Bricktown to Automobile Alley, which is part of OKC’s Innovation District. “Oseberg is a startup, and we feed off of the energy of other entrepreneurs, innovators and startups,” says Oseberg CEO Evan Anderson. “One of the great things about the innovation district and Automobile Alley is that other like-minded, innovative companies are nearby, such as Exaptive or Tailwind, and we can meet them easily for coffee, exchange ideas and hear about what they are up to.” Moving offices to a thriving, interesting district also helps companies attract the best talent. “New recruits love that we are located in the innovation district,” Evans says. “Being able to walk to coffee shops and restaurants is a huge draw since most of Oklahoma is not very walkable. Also, our office is made with exposed bricks on the wall and has lots of great natural light. It just looks and feels cool.” In Tulsa, Blue Sky Bank is the only community bank with offices downtown – and the company chose to locate in The Boxyard, a complex of shipping containers that Blue Sky principal owner Gentner Drummond says matches the attitude of the bank. “The Boxyard is an unconventional development that is reflective of Blue Sky Bank’s unique approach to banking,” Drummond says. “We aspire to meet our customers where they are and to exceed expectations. The Boxyard permits us to bring needed banking services to Tulsa’s downtown and East Village.” Drummond says there are multiple benefits to locating a branch of Blue Sky Bank downtown. As a community bank, it gives downtown residents and employees a convenient option for keeping money in Tulsa instead of using a regional or national bank. And many of the bank’s employees enjoy the convenience of the location. “Many of our employees live or aspire to live in Tulsa’s downtown,” Drummond says. “Irrespective of their residential location, all of our employees who work in The Boxyard are delighted to be in such a vibrant and growing district of Tulsa.”

part of the Bass Initiative on Innovation and Placemaking, a joint initiative of Brookings and Project for Public Spaces that was launched in late 2015. The area not only provides a place for startups to meet and share ideas, it also has retail businesses that include coffee shops, yoga and fitness studios, restaurants and multiple breweries. “I feel that the innovation district constantly pulses with energy, and Oseberg and our team can feed of of that energy,” says Evan Anderson, CEO of Oseberg. MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

47


LIVE WORK

BRINGING BUSINESS TO TOWN

PL AY

COX BUSINESS CENTER HAS SEEN AN INCREASE IN CONVENTIONS IN TULSA. PHOTOS COURTESY COX BUSINESS CENTER

CONVENTIONS PROVIDE REVENUE AND A CHANCE TO SHOWCASE REVITALIZED DOWNTOWNS. While businesses setting up permanent residence in OKC and Tulsa provide

economic boosts to these cities, they also take advantage of the opportunities offered by hosting conventions, which bring visitors and tourism into the state. While making the downtowns attractive to visitors is an important step, it takes a good deal of work to increase the convention trade. “The meetings and convention business in OKC is comprised of both corporations and associations, and we go about attracting them in essentially the same way,” says Dennis Johnston, vice president of sales and services for the Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau. “If the company is located in Oklahoma, that makes it much easier. Most companies like to show off their home base, and we work directly with them to make that happen. Otherwise, we identify what companies and organizations would be a group fit into our facilities and solicit directly to them.” The staff at the bureau will attend more than 30 events this year to promote OKC as a destination for conventions. Johnston says many businesses or organizations are interested in what options are within walking distance after the meetings are done. “Once they see Bricktown, it’s a pretty easy sell,” he says. Tulsa has benefited from an increased presence from the convention industry, says Kerry Painter, general manager of the Cox Business Center. “We are now hosting some conventions are that exponentially growing and are almost to the point of outgrowing us,” she says. “Thank goodness for the new Vision package – this will save these groups from leaving us and going to another city.” Painter says the impact on the city during local events is clear. Conventions fill restaurants with large crowds at meal breaks, and people stayed in hotels all over the city when the Bassmaster Classic was held in Tulsa. Tulsa continues to benefit from conventions after they close, however, as people may return for personal vacations later. If a destination visit is positive, more than 75 percent of attendees will consider returning for leisure travel, Painter says. If the experience is negative, only 4 percent are likely to return. “The thing that people often miss is that if the experience is great when they are here, if the town is friendly, safe and enjoyable, they are shown to return for the same convention many times over and also for personal leisure visits with friends and family to ‘see more’ and spend more time,” she says. “Which equals more money!” The impact has been felt in OKC as well, where the city has seen a 41 percent increase in the number of groups booked into the city. In 2016, the economic impact of conventions and meetings was more than $65 million, Johnston says. That number is expected to increase as efforts continue, including goals to double the size of OKC’s convention center. “If you want to know the positive impact of conventions on OKC, just talk to the restaurant and bar owners, retail operators, rental care operators and taxi drivers,” Johnston says. “They understand the direct impact of meeting/conventions and amateur and pro sports and all the horse competitions that are held at Norrick Arena every year. “Without tourism, and this is really what we are talking about, every household in Oklahoma would have to pay $1,192 more in local, state and federal taxes.”

48

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017


DOWNTOWN TRANSIT Living downtown is more popular than ever, but how long do people who make the daily commute spend on the road?

MINUTES FROM TULSA

22 18 19 18 20

BROKEN ARROW

OWASSO JENKS SAPULPA GLENPOOL

MINUTES FROM OKC

21 16 15 17 27

EDMOND MOORE

THE VILLAGE

MIDWEST CITY NORMAN

Times taken from MapQuest

BIG CHANGES ARE UNDERWAY FOR TRANSPORTATION IN DOWNTOWN OKC AND TULSA. Ah, there’s nothing like the

sound of jackhammers in the morning. OK, maybe not, but those are the sounds of progress in downtown Oklahoma City as the MAPS 3 Streetcar moves nearer to completion. Scheduled to open in early 2019, the streetcar will connect downtown and its surrounding districts, including Midtown, Automobile Alley and Bricktown. At the time of writing, the streetcars themselves are being fabricated in Pennsylvania, while the historic Santa Fe Station on Gaylord Boulevard is being renovated to serve as the downtown transit hub. And there are more good things to come, according to David E. Todd, MAPS project manager. “It is anticipated that it [the streetcar] will take some cars off the street while providing an alternative mode of transportation,” he says. “While it is limited at this time, it will serve as the beginning of a larger alternative transportation network.” Jane Jenkins, president and CEO of Downtown Oklahoma City Inc., says that “across the country, modern streetcars have proven to be effective in supporting downtown development. In Oklahoma City, we expect the new streetcar system to be highly popular with residents, downtown employees and visitors, adding character, convenience, business development and improved quality of life. The Oklahoma City Streetcar will support and add to the urban lifestyle that is critical to attracting and retaining young professional workers, but I anticipate that retirees, baby boomers and tourists will also use it heavily.” Michael Scroggins, public information officer for EMBARK, says that in addition to the streetcar and the renovation of the Santa Fe Station, the re-launch of the Spokies bike share program and the completion of Project 180 will contribute to the revolution in downtown OKC transit options. “Each of these projects is uniquely different,” Scroggins says. “However, a common thread is that they all work in tandem to improve our ability to connect and make connections.” Downtown Tulsa is experiencing its own transit renaissance. Since fall 2015, the Loop has connected some of downtown Tulsa’s most popular areas, including the Brady Arts, Deco and Blue Dome districts. The route runs Friday and Saturday nights until 2 a.m., and according to Tulsa Transit Interim General Manager Debbie Ruggles, there are plans to expand the route to the Gathering Place in 2019. “The service from downtown to the Gathering Place will allow downtown residents and visitors to the area to experience a world-class park as well as the Arkansas River,” Ruggles says. “While the route is not yet final, it may also serve Brookside, Utica Square and Cherry Street, giving downtown residents and visitors the opportunity to buy groceries, shop, and frequent restaurants and bars.” Also launching in 2019, the new Peoria Avenue bus rapid transit will serve downtown northbound and southbound every 15-20 minutes. “Tulsa Transit once had a much more robust transit system than it has today,” Ruggles says. “Economic downturns have continued to reduce fleet size, shrink the service area, and increase the time between routes. There is a renewed interest in public transit today as the baby boomers are facing the loss of their cars and millenials either do not want a car or want to use their money on things other than car-related expenses. With the overwhelming passage of permanent, dedicated funding for transit in the spring of 2016, many people believe there may be a resurgence of interest in public transit in Tulsa.” PHOTO COURTESY THE CITY OF OKLAHOMA CITY

THE DAILY COMMUTE

TARA MALONE

ONLINE Tulsa and OKC Transit maps @ OKmag.com MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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GRILL GR L The Art of the

An Oklahoma tradition comes alive in the spring.

Perhaps no smell evokes spring in Oklahoma as much as a freshly fired grill. Oklahomans take grilling and barbecue seriously, and while the spring may come with additional chores such as mowing the lawn, it also provides a reason to get out of the kitchen and do some outdoor cooking. From essential grilling tools to tips from chefs, we look at one of Oklahoma’s favorite foods. MAY 2017| WWW.OKMAG.COM

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THE CAVEMAN COMETH Chef Scotty

Irani explains how his inner Neanderthal emerges to grill the perfect steak. When man

the danger of accidentally starting fires is front and center. Burn bans in some of our counties restrict the use of outdoor cooking, and that typically refers to charcoal or wood grilling.

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

first discovered and protected fire millions of years ago, it was not something kept sacred because it provided warmth for his family and protection from wild animals and enemies. No, it was sacred because how else was he going to grill that brontosaurus T-bone? Now don’t start commenting on how early man and dinosaur did not exist at the same time. I got it! My point is that from the dawn of man and his discovery of fire, sure as you are sitting down reading this article, man discovered how to grill meat outdoors. It is primal instinct. Cooking our food outside is wired into our DNA. It is the smell of slowly rendered fat hitting the fire with a sizzle and spatter. It is smelling that aroma from the clouds of smoke billowing up from the heat source, knowing that we are feeding ourselves and our families, and sustaining the human race. Actually, it is simply outdoor grilling, and it’s what we Oklahomans do! Oklahomans are notorious for grilling, and thank you, fire, for that. From early spring through the first frost of autumn, we grill, be

it a boneless leg of lamb in spring for Easter or smoking a ham in the homemade smoker your daddy welded together. The Fourth of July features steaks, burgers and hot dogs at the lake. In autumn, we tailgate outside Boone Pickens Stadium (hey, I’m a proud OSU alumnus; go write your own article). Whatever grilling event it is, we are there with charcoal or propane and something good is about to hit that grill. Speaking of charcoal and propane for grilling, what gives? Well, that kind of depends on taste. Growing up in Sapulpa in Creek County (Salute!) and with Persian kabobs, ribeye steaks and barbecued chicken, I can tell you my preference is charcoal. It adds a grilling flavor synonymous with summer. Those pillow-shaped carbon briquettes mixed with mesquite wood shavings bring out the inner caveman in me. The whole act of building the briquettes into a pyramid just so, lighting them, kicking back with a cold beverage and waiting for the ice-white briquettes to glow red is the perfect pre-party for what is about to be dinner. The challenge with charcoal is just what I described. It takes some time to get those coals white hot and it takes patience. There is also the mess and cleanup afterward. With our recent dry spells in Oklahoma,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017


Propane is a lot easier to handle. This modern way of cooking is also a cleaner way to grill outdoors. There is no spent ash to clean up, risk of embers burning down the garage, or getting soot all over your face … well, technically. Time is also a factor. Basically, your only pre-party for propane grilling is to heat up the grill. Just barely enough time for one leisurely beer, but still, when the kids are hungry, time is of the essence.

Here’s what to do

There are many schools of thought when grilling the perfect steak. Some people, like my father, are hell-bent on marinating the steak first. Start with a generous soy sauce and lemonpepper soak, then fork it to kingdom come in order to tenderize the steak and inject the marinade. Once again, I was raised on it and will never pass up a steak dinner from my dad, but, in my humble opinion, marinating a steak is not the key. Something I learned from my early days in the restaurant business while working with the owner and operators of Cattlemen’s Steakhouse in Oklahoma City is that when you have a good steak – and by good streak, I mean good marbling – marinating and tenderizing are not necessary. Everyone knows the fat in meat gives flavor and provides tenderization. You also know we refer to the fat running through the meat as marbling. The amount and quality

of marbling are how a steak is graded, with prime having the most amount of marbling (and cost), then choice, which is the second highest and found in a many good grocery stores. The select and standard grades come in third and fourth, and finally canner and cutter round out the grading designations. So choose a good marbled steak based on your pocketbook and shopping options, and know the grades of meat you purchase. Next is seasoning. You cannot beat good old salt and pepper when grilling a beautiful steak – coarse, kosher or flake salt, something that will really stick to the meat. Regular old table salt is not good enough. Cracked fresh black pepper or fresh cracked blended peppercorns are the best. There are also specialty blend seasonings like Chicago Steak Seasoning, good old Lawry’s Seasoned Salt or anything from the In the Kitchen With Scotty line of seasonings (wink), but seasoning with salt and pepper right before you grill is ideal. I am also not a fan of seasoning ahead of time, then grilling. Salt extracts moisture from meat and make it dry. Try seasoning just before you grill; it makes a great difference.

Another good tip: Let the meat come to room temperature before grilling. This actually goes for any meat you cook, especially the thicker cuts. Allowing a good steak to “warm up” ensures even cooking. Think about it. If the meat is cold, it takes longer on the grill for the heat to penetrate that muscle and cook the meat to desired doneness. Speaking of doneness, there is no shame in checking your steaks with a good meat thermometer, right in the center of your steak. Depending on what degree of doneness you like your steaks cooked, always remember to remove the steaks from the grill 5 degrees below the desired temperature. The temperature of meats, no matter how they are cooked, increases at least 5 degrees off the fire. We call this “carry over cooking.” So for a medium-rare steak, pull the steak off the grill at 130 degrees Fahrenheit. RARE .......................................125 degrees MEDIUM-RARE .........................135 degrees MEDIUM ..................................145 degrees MEDIUM-WELL DONE ................150 degrees WELL DONE ..............................160 degrees SCOTTY IRANI, INTHEKITCHENWITHSCOTTY.COM

Plums with Burrata Cheese and SCOTTY’S SALAD Grilled Prosciutto Salad With Pomegranate Syrup THE SALAD 3-5 ripe plums (any variety will work) 4 ounces prosciutto 4 ounces burrata cheese Fresh arugula Pomegranate syrup

Grill plums by cutting in half, removing the pit, and placing flat side down on a hot grill. Grill long enough to show grill marks. Dress a large salad platter or plate with fresh arugula, and place grilled plums, slices of prosciutto, and quartered burrata cheese on top. Arrange as you will. Drizzle on homemade pomegranate syrup before serving.

POMEGRANATE SYRUP 1 quart natural pomegranate juice (no added sugar) 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice Place all ingredients in a sauce pan and bring to a slow simmer. Reduce to half the amount, or to the consistency you desire. Cool and use on salads, desserts or cocktails. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container.

GRILL ESSENTIALS These tools will help turn you into a grill master. Whether you’re just getting started

PHOTOS COURTESY CHAR-BROIL

or you’re already a pro at outdoor cooking, having the right tools can make a difference.

1 Perfect for cooking diced vegetables and smalller food like shrimp, a porcelain topper keeps food from falling into the fire and has a non-stick coating for easy cleanup. $11.99 2 A good pair of meat shears will allow easy, precision cutting for any type of meat. $5.99 3 If you’re working over an open flame, you’ll want to protect your hands. Silicone grilling gloves will help keep your hands safe. $19.99 4 No one wants to see food cooked on a dirty

grill. Keep your cooking surface clean with a grill brush. $17.99 5 A chimney starter is the perfect way to make sure your charcoal is evenly lit. Just fill it, light a fire underneath and wait for your coals to be ready. $14.99 6 Accuracy is a must if you want your food at exactly the right temperature. An instantread thermometer will make sure nothing spends too long on the grill. $19.99

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6 MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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BACKYARD TIPS Local

barbecue competitors offer advice and share tricks for the grill.

Sommelier at the Coals

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

Tulsan Randa Warren is proof that you never have to stop learning. Warren has cooked over charcoal since her college days and competed in barbecue competitions for the past 19 years. She also recently started competing in steak competitions and says she is learning everything she can about that field. As a master sommelier, Warren also brings an unusual perspective to the world of grilling and barbecue. “To become a master sommelier requires intense study and dedication, not to forget passion for the field, and I apply this same dedication and love to barbecue and smoking,” she says. “I take barbecue classes all over the country from top cooks, and I feel that has helped my skills greatly in competitive barbecue and even grilling at home. “And when wine meets wood – that’s another totally cool topic. Pairing a lush, rich and fruity red zinfandel with juicy baby back ribs with a sweet and sticky Blues Hog Barbecue Sauce – now that’s a little slice of heaven and a great food and wine duo.” For anyone starting to grill or barbecue, Warren suggests time-honored advice: “Practice, practice, practice.” Learn about the different cuts of meat, take classes, read internet forums on barbecue and practice what you learn. “There are lots of your friends who will eat your practice foods and, with every whiff of smoke off your grill, you get better and better,” she says.

Darian “Kosmo” Khosravi started working at a barbecue pit when he was 13 and hasn’t slowed since. The Tuttle resident entered his first barbecue competition in 2003 by using store-bought rubs and spices that didn’t suit his taste. “I found out quickly that most of the flavors I was looking for, no one made,” Khosravi says. “So I started dabbling in it and started making my own, then some guys told me I ought to sell them. So we started in 2009, and it keeps growing and growing and keeps getting bigger.” Today, Kosmo’s Q ships its products across the United States, as well as to Canada and Mexico. The company also has dealers in the United Kingdom and Australia. Khosravi himself stays busy by attending more than 30 competitions a year and has won multiple grand and reserve grand championships. With all that experience, Khosravi has cooked everything on the grill from steak and seafood to an entire chicken-fried steak meal, including mashed potatoes and gravy. One of his favorite items to cook is something you’ll find on many grills across Oklahoma this summer: cheeseburgers. “I like to mix a little bit of ground up pork in my hamburger meat,” he says. “I actually like to do hot sausage, so I’ll cut two pounds of hamburger meat to a pound of hot breakfast sausage. It just adds a different level of flavor that explodes, and it keeps the burger juicy because the pork has a higher fat content.” For beginning grillers, Khosravi recommends learning to cook the meat correctly, and a key element is temperature. Always carry a meat thermometer, he says. “I know some of the best chefs in the world, and they all carry a thermometer,” he says.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

PHOTOS COURTESY DARIAN KHOSRAVI

A Kosmic Passion


CHARCOAL OR GAS? The source of heat is a constant dilemma in grilling. No matter what you’re

grilling or how much time you spend preparing, before the grubs hits the grill you’ll have to decide on what kind of grill you’re using. There are many positives to using a gas grill: there’s less preparation time and less cleanup, and the controls make it easier to manage the heat of the flame. Those arguments are unlikely to sway charcoal or wood purists (or people who mix both), however. Charcoal and wood smoke add their own flavors to the food. Charcoal also can get hotter than most gas grills, which helps sear steaks on the outside while keeping them red or pink on the inside. Ultimately, it may come down to personal preference – or having one of each and using whichever is best for you at the time.

KEEPING AN EYE ON HEALTH

Eating charred meats may greatly increase your cancer risks.

ABOVE: THE SMOKE FLAVOR FROM A CHARCOAL GRILL IS A MUST FOR MANY BACKYARD COOKS. LEFT: GAS GRILLS LET YOU START COOKING WITHOUT MUCH PREPARATION TIME AND ARE EASY TO CLEAN AFTER.

PHOTOS COURTESY CHAR-BROIL

HEALTHY SPICES Turmeric is good to try mixed with a mustard marinade or added to a relish, especially on poultry. It has a subtle, nutty flavor and adds anti-inflammatory properties to your dinner.

Ginger

offers a bit of bite to any marinade and helps with digestion. Try it on red meat, including sirloins.

While grilled meat may be considered healthier, how you prepare meat for grilling and how you cook the meat can have a large effect on the potential for health problems. “Research suggests that grilling meats at high temperatures over an open flame leads to fat dropping from the meat … which creates chemicals that may increase the risk of cancer,” says Jessica L. Engelbrecht, a clinical oncology dietician with Cancer Treatment Centers of America. “The substances in meat react under high heat to form carcinogenic compounds called heterocyclic amines (HCAs), which can damage the DNA of our genes and potentially contribute to the development of certain cancers, specifically colon and stomach cancers.” There are ways to help control the formation of HCAs, however. Engelbrecht suggests a few simple tips, including marinating the meat first, especially with citrus, which has vitamin C, helping to protect against HCAs.

Rosemary

is very fragrant and a tasty addition to meat marinades. A bonus is that rosemary’s antioxidant properties help to neutralize harmful carcinogens from forming while meat is being browned.

Cinnamon

is also packed with antiinflammatory and anti-tumor

She also suggests thawing meat before cooking it, grilling smaller pieces that cook more quickly, and cooking all meats on top of foil, in a foil package or as far away from the heat source as possible. “Avoid eating charred meat, which has the highest concentrations of HCAs,” she says. “One study found that eating charred, welldone meat on a regular basis may increase your risk of pancreatic cancer by up to 60 percent. Other research suggests heavily charred meats have been linked to colorectal, stomach and breast cancers.” If people are looking for healthy food to grill, Engelbrecht suggests grilled vegetables, fruit kebobs with tofu or leaner meats such as chicken and fish. “When it comes to meat in general, a good rule is to eat grilled meats in moderation,” she says. “Fruit and vegetables are great options and don’t take long on the grill. Some of my favorites are asparagus, peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, corn, apples and pineapple.”

properties. It goes well with meats and is delicious in marinades.

Garlic

adds a kick of flavor and has immune-boosting properties. Its high sulfur content has been shown in research to help prevent the formation of cancer cells, specifically for colon cancer.

Information from Jessica L. Engelbrecht, Cancer Treatment Centers of America MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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KNOWING YOUR CUTS O’ MEAT

A little education beforehand saves embarrassment at the patio party. For years on The Late Show With David Letterman, the comedian had the audience game “Know Your Cuts of Meat.” While the feature produced much laughter and embarrassment, you don’t want that with patio guests.

Strip steak

Be it a New York strip, Kansas City strip or top sirloin, this cut comes from the rear of a cow’s short loin. The meat of the matter is a chewy, tightly textured, moderately tender, nicely marbled strip. One debate is whether to sear first, then cook … or the opposite. Just don’t turn something succulent into shoe leather.

Knowing your cuts of meat is vital. Beef, pork and chicken vary in texture and density, even within the same animal. Grilling pork chops is not the same as barbecuing ribs; chicken breasts cook differently than drumsticks and thighs. Here’s some insight into popular cuts of meat that people put on the grates. BRIAN WILSON

BEEF Ribeye

With nice marbling, tenderness and lots of juice, a ribeye is the bovine equivalent of a lamb chop. This cut comes from the upper rib cage of a cow; sometimes butchers will set out 2-pound monsters with massive bones.

T-bone

This is a slightly smaller version of the porterhouse and cut from the front part of the short loin. The strip steak side is more tender than the porterhouse’s. Try to get a cut that’s at least an inch thick.

Filet mignon

From the center of the short loin comes this buttery tenderness. This cut is so lean that it might turn flavorless on the grill, so bacon wraps come in handy. Some prefer grilling a chateaubriand (a large filet) because it reduces overall surface area and retains flavorful juices.

Brisket Hamburgers

Ground beef is what’s left over after a cow’s steaks, roasts and chops are cut. Don’t skimp on the fat if you want a juicy burger; go 80 percent lean, 20 percent fat. Have two zones of temperature (high-medium heat and low-medium heat); searing patties renders fat (and adds taste), but they should hit the grill’s “cooler” side to finish cooking.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

Porterhouse

This cut, also from the rear of the short loin, has flavorful strip on one side, tender filet on the other, connected by a T-shaped bone. A porterhouse is thick (up to 2 inches), so expect leftovers.

No matter how you smoke this enormous cut of muscle (12-18 pounds) from the cow’s chest, you need 12-20 hours. Some like dry rubs, absorbed into the brisket 24 hours before smoking; others inject a spicy vinegar-olive oil marinade into the fibrous mass. Regardless, go low and slow with smoke and indirect heat.


FISH

CHICKEN Breast

One tip to keep breasts from drying out while grilling over indirect flames or heat is to brine them with sea salt for 1-2 hours before adding whatever spices and sauces you want for flavor.

Drumsticks, thighs and wings

Bones give these dark-meat cuts their flavor, so some just brush them with olive oil and pepper before grilling over indirect flames or heat. Others go the sauce route. Satay (a sweet, sour and hot peanut sauce) is a challenge, but be careful not to burn it.

Salmon

Tuna

Catfish

Tilapia

Don’t dry out this saltwater beauty; 5 minutes is enough. Brush with oil and seasoning. Keep the skin on and grill only on that side. Ditch the batter and frying pan. Firm fillets in ice water, brush with oil, cover with hot spices, and go to it.

PORK

Tenderloin

Ham steak

Ham, from the upper part of a pig’s leg, is flavorful dark meat. Grilling a thick slice of ham takes a matter of minutes. Experiment: rub a few steaks, mop a few others, leave some without seasoning and let the heat bring out the juices.

This cut, generally 1-2 pounds, is from the pig’s back strap. Because it’s relatively lean and mildly flavored, consider a spicy brine for 1-2 hours because it can dry out quickly. Mopping with sauce is a good choice.

Coat with butter and seasoning; grill about 5-6 minutes per side. A cold marinade is another effective method.

Ribs

Chops

Like ribs, there are all kinds. The porterhouse, with a T-bone, has much meat and a bit of tenderloin from the lower back. The ribeye comes from the center of the loin in the rib area. Sirloin comes from around and above the hip. The New York, also called a Center Cut, is boneless and originates above the loin chops toward the head. The blade is from the beginning of the loin near the shoulder.

This fish dries out quickly, too. Brush with oil and seasoning, and grill about 2 minutes per side. Keep the middle moist or raw.

Steak

This is a pork roast that’s been sliced and comes from the shoulder. They have lots of flavor because of marbling and grill quickly.

Achieving the ultimate goal (tender meat falling off a rib) can be done with varying techniques. One approach is grilling ribs in a large tin of beer or placing beer in a tin below the meat and letting the liquid evaporate inside the cooker. Develop your own dry rub and apply it 12-24 hours before grilling or smoking. Baby backs come from the rib cage closest to the backbone; country-style means meaty, boneless tenders from the upper rib cage and the fatty blade end of the loin; spareribs, cut close to the pig’s belly in the same area where bacon originates, are enormous (3-5 pounds).

Sausage

The most popular grilling sausage (minced meat in a casing) is the bratwurst. Cook over indirect flames or heat after searing enough for grill marks. Once they shrink and begin to spew juices, you’re ready.

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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e lope e v En i g n i h s u P Decades of

By Justin Martino

S. SY WARNER BRO PHOTO COURTE

No one’s ever told Wayne Coyne and The Flaming Lips to stop liking blood, skulls and gummies. As frontman for The Flaming Lips, Wayne Coyne has been part of some of the most unusual projects in music in the past 35 years, including releasing a 24-hour song held on a USB stick sealed inside a human

skull. But today he’s dealing with a much more mundane problem: a broken phone. “My screen was really broke, and I took it to – not Apple dealers, you know, they’re just dudes who are fixing

it, and part of it was fixed and then secretly parts of it are messed up,” he says. “So I’ll take it back to them, and they’ll fix it up.” It’s an odd start to a conversation that eventually includes everything MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

59


from encasing the blood of musicians who worked with the group in a vinyl record to reading books written in languages Coyne doesn’t speak, but there has always been a combination of the absurd and the normal with Coyne and The Flaming Lips, who recently released their latest album, Oczy Mlody. Formed in 1983, the psychedelic band recorded on an independent label until signing with Warner Bros. seven years later. Despite

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reaching mainstream success with The Soft Bulletin and Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots (which went gold in the United States and platinum in the United Kingdom), Coyne still lives and works in Oklahoma City. “It never occurred to us that we should be part of the music business or entertainment industry,” Coyne says. “Still even now, that just isn’t part of the way we think. Even back then in the very earliest ’80s, we were glad we could record here and do it all ourselves. We made our very first record here. I did the album cover at my kitchen and sent it off to a place that manufactured it all.” Since signing with Warner Bros., Coyne has become known for projects atypical of the music industry. For Heady Fwends, where the band collobarated with musicians including Bon Iver, Erykah Badu, Chris Martin of Coldplay and Yoko Ono, the Lips released a limited edition record that had small amounts of blood sandwiched into the vinyl. An EP titled Gummy Skull Song was placed on a USB drive and enclosed in a brain-shaped gummy that was, in turn, placed in a gummy skull. And 7 Skies H3 was a single song on a USB drive placed in a human skull provided by Skulls Unlimited, an Oklahoma City company. While each of those projects received a good deal of attention, Coyne says that was never the original intention – they were just projects that interested him, and his contract with Warner Bros. allows him to work on less mainstream projects on his own.

“I like all those sorts of things, so I pursue it, but I wouldn’t think it was anything other than that, and anyone doing anything radically different should be doing it just for those reasons,” he says. “I think because of the way The Flaming Lips are, I think people allow that we’ll do these freaky things, and we have a reasonable chunk of our audience that likes that. So we can put things out, and it appears to work and support itself, but I think a lot of audiences would be freaked out if they had to listen to a record full of blood. “I mean, I want to do it, and most of the things The Flaming Lips are about, I say I want to do it and nobody stops me. So we get to make movies and videos and gummy skulls and real human skulls, and no one has said, ‘No, you can’t do that.’” The band released Oczy Mlody on Jan. 13. Coyne chose the title, Polish for “eyes of the young,” from Blisko Domu, a Polish translation of Erskine Caldwell’s novel Close to Home. Coyne says he liked the phrase and picked the book up because he liked the cover, but he found himself looking at it more in following weeks. “It was only after I put it in my bag and had it for a couple of weeks that I looked at it and was like ‘Ah, I kind of like this,’” he says. “It’s funny when you read things that are in languages that you understand – you’re immediately transported into someone else’s thoughts and you don’t really have to work at it. But when you don’t know what it’s saying, it’s kind of like trying to read in your dreams. I don’t know if you’ve ever been aware of what’s happening in your dreams and you try to read a newspaper or something. You can’t read it because the mechanism of reading is someone else’s thoughts, and you just get to pick them up a piece of a time. The same thing kind of happens when you pick up a book when you don’t know what it’s saying.” The band is on tour, but Coyne says the Lips already have potential future projects. Like most of Coyne’s ideas, however, nothing is certain at the moment, and it’s likely the next project will follow whatever ideas grab him and lead him down new paths. “You know, we never had something that was so mega-successful we were compelled to keep copying it,” he says. “It always sort of seemed like, ‘Well, I think people like it enough,’ and you might as well go on whatever path you desire at that moment and not worry about it too much. I’m glad we’ve been able to always say, ‘Here’s the kind of music we want to make now, and here’s the kind of stuff we want to do with our production’ and all that sort of stuff. It’s insanely rewarding and satisfying, and it’s wonderful on an artistic level.”


The Root of the Rhythm The Tulsa Shuffle has had as much musical influence as any Oklahoma legend.

By Bobby Dean Orcutt

“But in the heart of America ... we’ve got the beat That’s guaranteed to tap your toes Oklahoma’s got the Tulsa shuffle... And this is the way it goes....” “The Tulsa Shuffle” by The Tractors

JAMIE OLDAKER PLAYED ON 11 OF ERIC CLAPTON’S RECORDS.

PHOTO BY MARY OLDAKER

PADDY RYAN PERFORMS. PHOTO COURTESY PADDY RYAN

The musical legacy of Oklahoma is far-reaching. Often the focus might be on an acclaimed folk-singing Depression-era hero, a rock ’n’ roll guitar picker from West Tulsa and a prodigiously talented piano player. But there is something overlooked in a narrative only about Woody Guthrie, J.J. Cale and Leon Russell. There’s something sitting in the background that keeps the songs moving forward in time, something as masterful as a lick or a lyric: a distinct drumming style that has gained international recognition. That style, eventually known as the Tulsa Shuffle, has gone on to affect countless lives through songs now considered timeless. How did it start? How has Oklahoma produced some of music’s most respected drummers? The origin story of the Tulsa Shuffle is one layered in years of dust and myth. Even the name is a mystery. Lore says the title was coined by Oklahoma author and historian John Wooley. “As much as I’d like to take credit for the term, I can’t. I’ve used it over the years, but I’m sure it was in the local lexicon well before I came on the scene,” Wooley says. “I’ve often wondered about the profusion of Tulsa drummers.

Leon did more than his share to get his Tulsa musician friends, including drummers, work in [Los Angeles], but that still doesn’t explain why there are so many good drummers from that area.” It’s been said that Tulsa drummers don’t play the part; they play the song. “You don’t notice the drummer because it’s part of the song,” Tulsa-based drummer Paddy Ryan says. “The thing about the Shuffle is there isn’t a definition; it’s a vibe, not a straight beat, something you can’t really pin down.” Ryan is a man for hire and became known and respected for playing with artists such as the Secret Sisters, John Moreland, Parker Millsap and John Fullbright. His work has led to sharing the stage with acts opening for legends Elton John and Willie Nelson. According to Ryan, the Shuffle is a lessis-more mentality with simple “rules”: play softer until it’s time to kick it up; don’t come in full force; don’t showboat; hang in the back; keep it tasteful. “Sometimes I don’t even use any cymbals,” he says. “People love it; I get gigs.” An essential element of the Tulsa music scene is trust. The drummer trusts the bass player. The guitar player trusts the rhythm section. They all trust the songwriter. Much of this can be traced to the early days of working with Oklahoma icons Russell and Cale, kids who became stars and took their hometown peers with them. “Stay back, keep it easy, and you had better be on time,” David Teegarden Sr. says to those attempting the job. Teegarden took the lessons he learned in Tulsa as a session player for Shelter Records at Russell’s Church Studio with him to Detroit in 1968. There, he found a thriving rock scene fueled by acts such as Iggy Pop, Ted Nugent and the MC5. Coming from a town at a cultural crossroads that served a thriving music community, Teegarden developed a style that allowed him to float between gigs and MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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CLOCKWISE: DAVID TEEGARDEN IS BUILDING A RECORDING STUDIO IN TULSA.. PHOTO COURTESY PHIL CLARKIN

PADDY RYAN SAYS THE TULSA SHUFFLE COMES WITH A “LESS-IS-MORE” MENTALITY. PHOTO BY TAYLOR ORION MITCHELL

DAVID TEEGARDEN (LEFT) AND JAMIE OLDAKER COLLABORATE. PHOTO COURTESY PHIL CLARKIN

DAVID TEEGARDEN PLAYED WITH BOB SEEGER ON “AGAINST THE WIND”. PHOTO COURTESY PHIL CLARKIN

genres, especially country, rhythm and blues, jazz and rock ’n’ roll. This unique style of playing attracted the attention of a young howler named Bob Seger. The admiration was mutual. “He was the only white guy I ever saw that sounded like Wilson Pickett,” says Teegarden, whose work with Seger garnered a Grammy for the classic “Against The Wind.” Teegarden once again calls Tulsa home, and he is hard at work building a recording studio “that will sound as good as the Church Studio could have sounded.” An artist’s home often affects the art itself. It could be argued that if you stood by the Frisco tracks, the beat of the freight trains chugging along would hold an unmistakable similarity to “Lay Down Sally,” one of Eric Clapton’s biggest hits. The song was penned in Tulsa by singer Marcy Levy, with percussion provided by a baby-faced Jamie Oldaker. Over time, this young man played on 11 Clapton records and some of the singer’s biggest hits. Competition in the music industry is fierce, but Oldaker forged a lasting career and legacy. “I’m uncompromising. I don’t know what it is,” he says. “Maybe it’s where I’m from. Maybe it’s the people. Maybe it’s the strength that Oklahomans have.” Oklahoma has contributed much to the worlds of folk, rock and country music, but its influence on jazz cannot be ignored. This musical melting pot left its mark on a young

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Oklahoman, Jim Keltner, the son of a jazz drum-playing father and western swingdancing mother. A sudden move at 13 found Keltner calling California home. Moving across the country at that age has a way of romanticizing the past that we remember as adults, the places we once called home and the people we once knew. Keltner left, but he never forgot. “The taste of the tap water – it’s like nowhere else on Earth,” he says. “I’ve been everywhere and the tap water in Tulsa is different. The way a burger tasted from the little stand at Pine and Cincinnati. The way the milkshakes tasted. Things about Tulsa I’ve never found anywhere else.” He also never forgot the sense of belonging he felt in Oklahoma. He looked at guys in the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section or the Swampers, and how they represented a place, something more than an individual. Keltner aspired to this and, when Russell, Cale, Carl Radle and Chuck Blackwell proved themselves as forces on national and international stages, he felt an instant connection to these Oklahomans and their art. And by that point, Keltner had made a strong name for himself. Time saw Keltner play on classics like John Lennon’s Imagine album and Bob Dylan’s single “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door.” Keltner’s resume reads like a Best Of list because, through his session work, he became the most sought after drummer in the industry.

Keltner is content to remain in the background as the nameless constant. To illustrate this point, examine the supergroup The Traveling Wilburys, with recognizable names: Dylan, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne and George Harrison. On drums is Buster Sidebury. Who? Buster Sidebury is Jim Keltner … a humble man who is arguably nothing short of a legend … a man who loves his work, has no intention of stopping soon and cherishes the memories of his time in Oklahoma. Again and again, Tulsa inarguably produces remarkable drummers. Paddy Ryan. Chuck Blackwell. Jimmy Karstein. David Teegarden. Jamie Oldaker. Jim Keltner. Brandon Holder. The list goes on. As for the Shuffle, it would appear there is no perfect timing, no certain pattern, no definable characteristic. It is a vibe. It is a groove that draws people toward it. It is a beat that will keep going as long as there are people to dance. Wooley sums up the root cause of the rhythm: “As I’ve noted before, much of the sound simply goes back to brotherhood and camaraderie.” The Tulsa Shuffle was born of a place where jazz and country two step side by side. Born of Oklahoma, it provided the beat to songs that changed the world and created men as recognizable as your uncle or grandfather … just some Tulsa boys, playing that Tulsa Shuffle.


Stinnett & Associates

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Melinda Stinnett Managing Director Melinda Stinnett is no stranger to pushing the limits when it comes to entrepreneurial success. Recently named 2017 Oklahoma Small Business Person of the Year by the U.S. Small Business Administration, she has more than 27 years of experience advising companies on operational, compliance and financial matters. Melinda founded Stinnett & Associates, a professional advisory firm, in 2001 based on “doing the right thing” and a desire to provide value-added solutions to help clients manage risk and improve performance. Fast-forward 16 years later and that philosophy has catapulted Melinda’s business from a one-woman show to a certified Women’s Business Enterprise with offices in Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Dallas, Houston, San Antonio and Denver – boasting more than 100 team members. “The best indicator of Stinnett’s approach, reputation and resources is our client response,” Melinda notes. “We’ve been fortunate to provide advisory services to public, private and many Fortune 500 and Fortune 100 companies, with much of our growth attributed to satisfied client referrals.” As the firm’s capabilities grew, so did Stinnett’s offerings. Today, the company’s areas of expertise include internal audit, Sarbanes-Oxley compliance, business process design and re-engineering, cybersecurity reviews, business continuity and disaster recovery, FCPA compliance, vendor audits and fraud investigations. The firm caters to industries ranging from energy, financial services,

manufacturing and higher education to aerospace, governmental, non-profit and retail sectors. “We regard ourselves as an extension of our client’s business operations, rather than outside consultants,” Melinda says. “We combine a sophisticated practice with approachability and our clients view us as trusted business advisers. Stinnett is one of few firms in our region that specialize solely on process improvement-redesign and internal controls offerings.” Melinda adds that her achieved success reflects the entire Stinnett team’s hard work and is a true testimony that together we are greater than the sum of our parts.

8811 S. Yale Ave., Suite 300, Tulsa, OK • 888.808.1795 stinnett-associates.com • ContactUs@stinnett-associates.com SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Keller Williams Realty

Heidi Bents Realtor For the Oklahoma Region, Heidi Bents once again achieved “Double Gold Award” in 2016 for Keller Williams Realty. Bents ranks as one of Metro Tulsa’s “Top 100 Realtors” highlighting 2016 sales and volume index from Metro Tulsa’s MLS. Heidi has also received the “Distinguished Realtor Designation” from the Expert Network, which is conferred upon the top 3 percent of U.S. realtors. Since 1991, Heidi gratefully serves Oklahomans by providing concierge realty service and expertise for clients. Honoring each partnership by advocating client goals is key. For sellers, Bents offers proven target-market strategies with professional polish. She patiently plays matchmaker, connecting buyers to their dreams of “home.” Securing desirable property and streamlining the transaction are added benefits. She specializes in luxury residential, new construction, resale, executive transfers, investors and farm/ranch. Bents attributes success to a solid network built on trustworthy relationships with both clients and

associates. Her knowledge of local economic trends is crucial to understanding the local housing market. As a Top Producer, she believes her strengths can be attributed to her business degree, the marketing tools she engages to reach the buying population and her background in residential design. Her eye for detail helps her successfully sell listings, and she’s not afraid to look for open-ended possibilities to maximize outcomes. Heidi thrives on negotiating and creative problem solving, resulting in a 100 percent success rate from contract to close. “To me, the most successful transactions are wrapped with prayer, the realistic need of the client is met and everyone walks away from the closing table feeling like a winner.” A mother of six, she understands the unique dynamics of the families she serves. Discovering people’s needs during a time of transition is where her knowledge of the marketplace shines. “We begin as partners in real estate,” says Bents. “I intend to end as friends.”

4745 E. 91st St, Tulsa, OK • 918.313.1786 www.heidibents.kw.com • heidibents@kw.com

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

OSU Center for Health Sciences Kayse Shrum, D.O. President

President Shrum is a native Oklahoman who earned her Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree from the Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. She joined the medical school faculty at OSU Center for Health Sciences (OSU-CHS) in 2002 and was named provost of the OSUCHS and dean of OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2011. In 2013, she was promoted to president of OSU-CHS, becoming the youngest and first female president and dean of a medical school in Oklahoma. Under her leadership, OSUCHS has doubled the number of students enrolled, expanded residency training programs in Oklahoma, established new academic programs, ushered in a state-of-the-art simulation building, and raised more than $22 million in private support. President Shrum also implemented highly successful rural primary care physician pipeline programs to increase the number of medical students from rural Oklahoma. President Shrum holds the George Kaiser Family Foundation Chair in Medical Excellence and Service and the Saint Francis Health System Endowed Chair of Pediatrics and Professor of Pediatrics. She is active in a variety of professional and charitable organizations. President Shrum is the Vice President of the Oklahoma Osteopathic Association. She is also a board member of the Children’s Hospital Foundation at Saint Francis, Blue Cross and Blue

Shield of Oklahoma, BankSNB and Southwest Bancorp, PLICO, Oklahoma State University Medical Authority and Trust, and OSU Center for Health Systems Innovation. President Shrum has been recognized for her leadership and contributions to improving health outcomes in Tulsa and Oklahoma. She was named a finalist for the Journal Record’s 2015 Woman of Year award and inducted into Connors State College Athletic Hall of Fame in 2013. She also received the Oklahoma Osteopathic Association’s Outstanding and Distinguished Service Award in 2014 and the Tulsa Mayor’s Commission on the Status of Women’s Pinnacle Award for Health in 2012.

1111 W. 17th Street, Tulsa, OK • 918.582.1972 www.healthsciences.okstate.edu SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Raymond James Financial Services, Inc.

Susan Cobey CFP® Susan is a Certified Financial Planner™ professional, Wealth Advisor and Senior Portfolio Manager, focusing on investments and tax minimization strategies. She brought more than 30 years of experience to Raymond James Financial Services when she joined the firm in 2014. Previously, she worked on Wall Street in New York City and at both Morgan Stanley and Merrill Lynch in Tulsa. Susan focuses on a select group of clients who seek an extraordinary level of knowledge and experience and desire the highest level of service and attention. She uses a five-step process that results in a highly customized financial strategy. She works closely with the client’s tax and legal advisors to coordinate complex objectives and goals and helps manage all aspects of their finances and investments. Developing long-lasting client relationships, she is considered their personal confidant. The client-centered approach includes the disciplined five-step process that enables her to craft a blueprint plan that deals with unique challenges. The result is a highly tailored financial strategy specific to each client, helping them achieve their goals and manage risk through proper asset allocation and diversification on market risk-compared investments. Ongoing review and re-evaluations provide adjustment opportunities for not only the client’s changes but also for

the changes in the investment markets and risk management techniques. In the past years, she was honored to have been selected as one of Oklahoma’s Top Ten and Top Five Financial Advisors. She also was selected to attend the Barron’s/Winner’s Circle Top Women Advisors Summit, a gathering of the nation’s elite financial advisors. She is a graduate of the Wharton School of Business for Financial Advisors. She is active in the community and lives in Tulsa with her husband, Bob. CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER BOARD OF STANDARDS INC. OWNS THE CERTIFICATION MARKS CFP® AND CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ IN THE U.S., WHICH IT AWARDS TO INDIVIDUALS WHO SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETE CFP BOARD’S INITIAL AND ONGOING CETIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.

6846 S. Canton Ave, Suite 160, Tulsa, OK • 918.488.0935 www.raymondjames.com

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Seed Technologies, Inc.

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Jennifer Jones President and CEO

Who says Technology is just for men? Jennifer Jones, President and CEO of Seed Technologies, Inc., wrote her first computer program before she even attended high school. Her father was an entrepreneur and programming pioneer who provided his children with computer equipment long before computers were common appliances. Shortly after receiving her first BASIC programming book for Christmas at the age of 12, Jennifer had written her first program and began what was later to be destined a life-long career in the technology business. Today she has spent the last 20 years working as a software architect designing web-based applications ranging from complex e-commerce websites to custom accounting or operational systems. Applying the classic programmer “I can build it” approach, Jennifer entered into the unknown territory of running her own business in 2004. She started working as a freelance

programmer and had enough business to incorporate and hire employees by the end of that year. While Jennifer and her team specialize in designing and programming custom web-based software for manufacturing, accounting and integrated e-commerce solutions, Seed’s team also excels at delivering web-based marketing solutions that promote brand awareness and increase lead generation. Because the firm employs “in-house” programmers, rather than outsourcing to freelancers or overseas firms, Seed is able ensure quick response times to meet the needs of its clients.

5109 S. Wheeling Ave. Ste. 200, Tulsa, OK • 918.742.0028 www.seedtechnologies.com SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Tulsa Federal Credit Union

Teri Aulph, CHRO | Susan Williams, CFO | Kolette Sawyer, CMO

At Tulsa Federal Credit Union, we are proud to have a team of highly experienced female banking executives whose dedication and passion for our community shape our work. Their expertise and professionalism help make Tulsa FCU a leader in serving the financial needs of our members. As SVP/Chief HR Officer, Teri Aulph drives the credit union’s efforts to attract talent and develop leaders who go above and beyond in service. Susan M. Williams, EVP/CFO, guides Tulsa

FCU’s mission to maintain the highest standards in compliance and corporate responsibility. With the growth of Tulsa FCU throughout Northeast Oklahoma, SVP/CMO Kolette Sawyer is key to our efforts of ensuring an excellent member experience and inspiring positive community engagement. Together with their colleagues on the Tulsa FCU executive team, these women drive Tulsa FCU’s commitment to trust, integrity, teamwork and making a difference.

9323 E. 21st Street, Tulsa, OK • 918.610.0200 www.tulsafederalcu.org • eservices@tulsafederalcu.org

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McGraw Realty Grand Lake

4/14/17 5:16 PM

Diana Riley Patterson, top real estate associate for McGraw Realtors Grand Lake, was awarded 2016 $15 MILLION Club in Volume Sales overall at McGraw Realtors. She was also recognized for being in the top 150 Realtors in Tulsa. Having had her license for 38 years, she has only been in the business since 2006. Born and raised on Grand Lake and from a real estate family, her specialty is South Grand Lake, and she loves listing and selling waterfront and water view properties.

Diana Patterson Realtor 1001 McGraw Realty Grand Lake.indd 2

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1639 N 3rd St, Langley, OK • 918.629.3717 southgrandlake.com • dpatterson@mcgrawok.com

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Recovery in Oklahoma, LLC. Dr. Amy Kesner has served in the field of mental health for more than 20 years. She earned her doctorate degree in psychology from Saybrook University in San Francisco and practices in Oklahoma as a licensed professional counselor (LPC) and drug and alcohol counselor (LADC). She worked for 15 years with children placed in Therapeutic Foster Care addressing attachment issues and trauma. Dr. Kesner has provided alcohol and drug counseling for more than 20 years and worked at Brookhaven Psychiatric Hospital in Tulsa. Dr. Kesner started her own practice, Amy Kesner Counseling Services, in 2012, and in 2014 she assisted in the certification of a mental health agency, Keystone Counseling and Therapeutic Services, in Cleveland Oklahoma to provide quality services to rural communities. Currently, Dr. Kesner serves as Clinical Director for the Tulsa office of Recovery in Oklahoma, LLC, where she continues to find ways to help those in need and educate on topics related to mental health, addiction, motivation and personal growth.

Dr. Amy Kesner Clinical Director 1008 Recovery in Oklahoma.indd 1

MKK Law is owned by Mary Kathryn Kunc. As a dedicated law firm, we offer highly specialized services in a select few practice areas. We are a small group of proactive attorneys well established in our areas of practice, providing one-on-one service to clients. Our practice areas include Corporate and Business Law; Civil Litigation; Family Law; Estate Planning and Probate; Workers’ Compensation; Employer’s Liability; Dispute Resolution; Administrative Law and Utility Regulation.

5550 Lewis Ave. Suite 305, Tulsa, OK • 918.691.2226 www.recnok.com • info@recnok.com

MKK Law

4/12/17 2:18 PM

D. Craig Johnston | Mary Kathryn Kunc, P.C. | Angie Sullivan, P.C.

909 Cedar Lake Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK • 405.755.8100 www.mkklaw.us • office@mkklaw.us SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Keller Williams Realty

Kat Morrissey Realtor

Morrissey has been fortunate to have found a career that allows her to be creative and strive to do the best for her clients. Because of this, she has been a multimillion dollar producer every year since her second year as a Realtor. “I have found some amazing role models in women in this business that have made me realize how versatile and how much we bring to the table,” she says. “Most of us have been wives and mothers and are natural multitaskers and problem solvers, which is mandatory in this business.” 4745 E. 91st Street, Tulsa, OK • 918.606.7170 www.kw.com • justsoldbyagirl@yahoo.com

Avansic

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Elizabeth Downing President & COO

4/4/17 4:52 PM

Elizabeth Downing is the President and COO at Avansic: E-Discovery and Digital Forensics. Since she helped found Tulsa-based Avansic in 2004, the company has grown to serve legal professionals and corporations across the country. Her scientific background is called upon as she oversees data processing for litigation and online document review. Outside of Avansic, she is a fiber artist and actively involved in the art and social services community. 15 E. Fifth St. Suite 1800, Tulsa, OK • 918.856.5337 www.avansic.com • experts@avansic.com

The Healthcare Private Bank

Charlotte Mindeman SVP & Managing Director

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Charlotte Mindeman showed her ability to find individualized solutions for customers by playing a key role in developing the Healthcare Private Bank in 2016. The bank specializes in helping healthcare professionals by offering services developed for their needs and hectic schedules. She has been in banking for over 30 years and has a heart for her community, partnering with organizations like Clarehouse, Tulsa Habitat for Humanity and Eastern Oklahoma Donated Dental Services (EODDS). 7136 S. Yale Ave. Suite 120, Tulsa, OK • 918.237.4832 www.healthcareprivatebank.com cmindeman@healthcareprovatebank.com

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Mariner Wealth Advisors

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Jana Shoulders, CPA, AIF®, AEP® Managing Partner

Suzanne Wheeler, CFP®. AIF®, CeFT® Partner, Senior Wealth Advisor As advocates for our clients, we have one responsibility: To put you first. Mariner Wealth Advisors believes everyone can benefit from professional advice. As your advocate, they help you make informed financial decisions and provide peace of mind by insulating you against issues others may not have considered. They believe the best advice is centered around anticipating and solving problems. Jana Shoulders and Suzanne Wheeler, along with the rest of the Mariner team, work hard to develop meaningful, lasting relationships with clients and their families. Whether it is creating a wealth plan, helping you through a liquidity event, transferring wealth or helping you through a life transition,

Shoulders, Wheeler, and the entire Mariner team are passionate about helping you pursue your financial goals. As a national company, Mariner Wealth Advisors is privately owned, has 17 locations and serves clients in 48 states. With the core value of putting clients first, Mariner is committed to giving back to the communities where they live and work and has donated more than $3.5 million to charities since the company was founded. The Mariner Foundation, an employee-based charitable foundation, supports underprivileged children and their families. Because the company feels so strongly about giving back, every associate is provided paid time off for community involvement each year.

4200 E. Skelly Drive, Suite 950, Tulsa, OK 918.991.6900 • www.marinerwealthadvisors.com

5708 N.W. 135th St., Suite C, Oklahoma City, OK 405.353.1540 • www.marinerwealthadvisors.com

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

The Bama Companies, Inc. Paula Marshall has taken The Bama Companies to new heights during her three plus decades as CEO. Her company has set benchmarks in producing quality products for some of the nation’s largest restaurant chains. Sweet as Pie Tough as Nails chronicles Marshall’s journey from teen mom, working on the plant floor, to becoming CEO of one of the largest innovators and manufacturers of bakery products. This and Marshall’s other books can be purchased on Amazon. 2745 E. 11th Street, OK www.bama.com

Paula Marshall CEO

Play by Design

Cheryl Sumners Owner

With over 15 years of experience in playground and shade systems, Play By Design creates custom solutions for outdoor spaces of all sizes. Owner Cheryl Sumners works personally with each client from start to finish to ensure every space meets the community’s needs. Specializing in ultra-safe, inclusive systems for children ages 6 months to 12 years, Play By Design is proud to be a contractor for A Gathering Place for Tulsa, and works with school systems, municipalities, community organizations and universities. 3619 E. 105th Street, Tulsa, OK 918.809.2293 • www.playbydesigninc.com playbydesigninc@hotmailcom

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Easing Dental Fears and Anxieties

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Dentists today emphasize increasing comfort and lessening pain during procedures.

he thought of visiting a dentist fills many people with fear and anxiety, so dentists urge you to share your concerns and consider the many ways they offer patient-centered care with maximum comfort and minimal pain. “A major reason that many people do not seek dental treatment is … fear of the dentist or dislike of being in a dental office,” says Dr. Jennifer Jenkins of Dental Design Studio in Norman. “Thankfully, patient-centered care has become the standard in our field. Many dental offices provide a more comfortable environment so that patients can be as relaxed as possible.” Her office includes amenities such as private treatment rooms with windows, adjustable dental chairs for patients with back or neck pain, and the option of listening to music. She also emphasizes that communication is key. “Teeth can be strange because it may not look like it hurts on an X-

ray, CT scan or even when we look directly at a tooth,” Jenkins says. “The only way that the dental team can know what a patient is feeling is by the patient telling us. Our hope is that patients feel comfortable enough with us and our team that they can share with us.” Dr. Creed Cardon of Spring Dental in Tulsa agrees that communication on both sides is the easiest way to create an anxiety-free trip to the dentist, and he makes sure his staff can treat patients of any kind. “A big component is the team members we hire,” he says. “We train them heavily so they can communicate effectively with anyone. We want to see all patients from all walks of life. We try to have clean, open facilities where anyone can walk in and feel at home.” Dr. Mike McInelly, owner of Spring Dental, says the root of dental care should start with the patient, not the procedure. “How we think about the experience is starting with a patient and

working backwards into how we map that patient’s care,” he says. Dr. Lauren Avery, co-founder of Mint Dental in Tulsa, highlights patient comforts such as massage chairs, quiet hand-pieces and intraoral cameras. And for patients with serious dental phobia, Avery offers two kinds of sedation, nitrous oxide and oral sedation. “The nitrous oxide just relieves anxiety; it ‘takes the edge off’ and helps people relax,” Avery says. “It is immediately reversible after a few minutes of 100 percent oxygen at the end of the procedure. “With oral sedation, we give people medication to make them very relaxed – in a state between asleep and awake. We monitor their blood pressure and oxygen levels throughout the procedure to maintain safety. They have to take the whole day off and have a caretaker to drive them to and from the appointment and help them that afternoon. The patient usually has no memory of the appointment.” MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Jenkins and Cardon stress that overcoming a fear of the dentist is important to your overall health. “Periodontal or gum disease has been scientifically linked to major health issues, such as heart disease, diabetes, adverse pregnancy outcomes and osteoporosis,” Jenkins says. “Untreated dental decay can lead to infections that can be life threatening in some situations.” Cardon adds that psychological benefits can accompany a healthy set of teeth and gums. “If you are missing a front tooth ... it really plays with your confidence,” he says. “I can’t tell you how many times we’ve fixed a front tooth on someone and they say, ‘I can finally go to that job interview now,’ or ‘I can finally get married now.’ They can do things they feel like they couldn’t have done before because of the way they looked.” Jenkins says having functional, pain-free teeth helps to improve your quality of life. “Although many people are not fond of visiting the dental office, routine dental care helps make life the best that it can be,” she

says. “We encourage everyone to find their dental home where they can establish and build long-term relationships with their dental team.”

Hi-Tech = More Choice

New dental technologies give patients more options. A popular choice to help straighten teeth is Invisalign, custom-made clear aligners that fit over your teeth and slowly shift your teeth into place. Dr. Mike Hinkle, founder of Utica Dental in Tulsa, is an award-winning, preferred provider of Invisalign. He often lectures on the benefits of Invisalign and has had six patient cases published among Invisalign’s “Best 100 Cases in the World,” a showcase of top clinical outcomes. He has found that Invisalign fixes bite problems faster and more predictably than regular metal braces. “Invisalign is superior to metal braces in almost every category of treatment for orthodontic therapy,” Hinkle says. “Invisalign allows the patient to keep their mouth 200 percent cleaner than regular braces so you have a fraction of the decay and spotting that is normal after braces are removed.” He also remarks that benefits of having straight teeth include making it easier to keep your teeth clean, reducing your chance of cracked or broken teeth, and decreasing your risk of periodontal disease. Avery notes that Invisalign isn’t only for adults. “We also can treat teens with Invisalign if they are responsible, since they will need to not throw away the appliance,” she says. “What people may not know is that a limited five- to six-month Invisalign treatment for minor corrections of anterior teeth is very popular.” Avery says another trend in dentistry is a renewal of conservative tooth restorations

DENTAL PROFESSIONALS LISTING courtesy the Oklahoma Dental Association. The Oklahoma Dental Association fosters an awareness of the obligations and responsibilities of the dental profession to society, to help advance the art and science of dentistry, and to promote public health and health services in the state of Oklahoma.

BROKEN ARROW ENDODONTICS James Strand 918.615.3600 David Woodard 918.493.3500

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GENERAL PRACTICE George Ballew 918.258.1547 Julia Baty 918.342.6505 Micah Bevins 918.252.4444

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

Patricia Cannon 918.455.4242 Dennis Carlile 918.258.8658 Trischa Clarke 918.615.3580 Evan Clothier 918.251.3333

Baohanh Dang 918.249.0249 Steven Deem 918.355.1391 Myrna Domoney 918.250.0624 Drew Endicott 918.451.0211 Randy Fagan 918.455.6406 Todd Gentling 918.251.8141 Warren Good 918.743.6151 Wesley Hodge 918.250.9520 Steven Hogg 918.455.8899 Jason Holland 918.492.3003 Valerie Holleman 918.893.3414

TIPS FOR GOOD DENTAL HYGIENE » » » » » » » » »

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Brush twice daily Floss daily Use an electric toothbrush Change your toothbrush every three months Use a mouthwash Visit your dentist at least twice a year for evaluation and cleanings Avoid sugary and acidic foods and drinks If drinking sugary or acidic beverages, do not sip them over a prolonged period of time; consume in one sitting If you experience dry mouth, do not use candies to promote saliva production use dry-mouth products that are sold at drug stores and drink plenty of water If you have crowded teeth that are difficult to clean, consider orthodontic treatment, regardless of your age.

Provided by Dr. Jennifer Jenkins, Dental Design Studio

because of the ability to join materials to a tooth. “We used to be able to do this when gold was popular,” she says. “Then when people wanted porcelain or white teeth, we weren’t able to give them that appearance without being more aggressive. We used to have to remove more tooth structure to restore teeth. For example, doing a crown that covers the entire tooth because we weren’t able to bond the materials to the tooth. “Now, because our bonds are so strong, we can remove less tooth and actually bond the porcelain in place. The more of your natural tooth structure that is present, the better it is in the long run.”

Timothy Hughes 918.455.3777 Michael Kincaid 918.258.8515 Matthew Kincaid 918.258.8515 Sally Le Robert Mongrain 918.250.9528 Bennett Parks 918.806.2123 Charles Roskamp 918.451.0211 Joseph Shoop 918.872.9030 Jordon Smith Daniel Stos 918.455.9444 Gary Theobald 918.455.0811 Reggie Thomas 918.455.0123

REBECCA FAST

Angela Tran 918.851.4896 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY Donald Johnson 918.499.5800 Larry Lander 918.808.6912 Gregory Segraves 918.449.5800 Christopher Templeton 918.508.2121 Vic Trammell 918.449.5800 ORTHODONTICS AND DENTOFACIAL ORTHOPEDICS Kevin Duff y 918.249.1818 Clinton Emerson 918.459.0092

Thomas Griffin 918.455.0976 John Lockard 918.455.0976 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY James Owens 918.455.7700 Johnny Starkey 918.392.0575

EDMOND ENDODONTICS David Bird 405.748.6000 Stephen Martin 405.848.7994 Jackson Sullivan 405.844.8444


GENERAL PRACTICE Clay Algeo Marc Arledge 405.341.1250 Jeffrey Baggett 405.341.8884 Thomas Ball 405.348.2641 Laura Ballinger 405.844.8445 Taylor Barton 405.348.2266 Kari Bender 405.341.9351 Abhinav Bhatnager 405.212.4549 Bryan Blankenship 405.401.6150 Carol Blossfeld 405.475.9221 Steven Brown Thomas Brown 405.341.5660 Steven Carson 405.513.8516 Stephen Cash 405.285.8600 Doug Chancellor 405.843.3600 Michael Chandler 405.330.4630 Euna Chang 405.799.0800 Michael Cheng 405.330.2123 Ameel Coury 405.348.9551 Zachary Dacus 405.271.5444 Venkata Digumarthi 405.466.2535 Nha Duong 405.943.9010 Erika Eaton 405.271.4058 Lee Eliot 405.340.5110 James Farley 405.348.5100 Brett Francis 918.968.1606 Tracey German 405.271.8294 Philip Gray 405.330.5458 Ronisha Gray 405.569.2604 Kimberly Greenlee 405.563.7097 Shannon Griffin 405.348.2266 Michael Hansen 405.757.2030 Joe Harris 405.513.8100 Kenneth Harrod 405.842.4646 Brent Haynes 405.821.0171 Tanner Hays 405.340.5110 Craig Herwig Charles Hetrick 405.341.7046 Matt Holloman 405.341.7046 Clifford Hooper 405.341.1835 James Hooper 405.348.1672 Jennifer Hunter 405.529.5003

James Joern 405.262.1919 Krista Jones 405.341.0203 Jessie Kierl Gene Koop 405.348.0728 Mhd Kouzbari 586.746.4492 Mitchell Kramer 405.341.6134 Leta Langford 405.232.8631 Grady Lembke 405.330.6020 Samantha Marley Harrod 405.842.4646 Mary Martin 405.513.8516 Arthi Matta Judson May David Minyard 405.330.9444 Bill Motsenbocker Tung Nguyen 405.285.8811 James Peck 405.562.9550 Gowthami Rayani 405.769.3301 Mack Rudd 405.844.6333 Richard Safi 405.340.8011 M. Smith 405.341.7773 Julie Speights 405.202.8777 Steven Strange 405.341.4040 Jamie Talley 405.216.3434 Michael Wallace 405.340.0411 William Ward 405.471.9056 O. Watson 405.820.6454 W. Waugh 405.341.6134 Daniel Wilguess 405.341.6134 V. Willcox 405.341.8804 Vincent Willcox 405.341.8804 Jack Willoughby 405.341.8518 Josh Woodward 918.260.0012 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL PATHOLOGY Glen Houston 405.715.4500 Peter Carlson 405.577.7744 Sam Jones 405.285.7466 Robert Lamb 405.348.8184 Michael McKinney 405.340.7263 ORTHODONTICS AND DENTOFACIAL ORTHOPEDICS Brian Amy 405.947.1526 James Kierl 405.341.5020

Thomas Kierl 405.341.5020 Shannon Lewis 405.330.5095 Anaita Mullasseril 405.878.8899 Ruchi Nanda 405.330.9911 Geoffrey Sparks 405.947.1526 Mark Youngker 405.752.0300 Heather Zweifel 405.271.4148 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Bobby Cheatham 405.562.2222 Dirk Eckroat 405.513.8811 Martha Garzon 405.348.5757 James Murtaugh 405.834.9393 Robert Steele 405.341.3030 PERIODONTICS Blaire Bowers 405.509.8932 Robert Carson 405.271.5714 Harold Hall 405.271.8001 Tapan Koticha 405.271.5444

JENKS ENDODONTICS Edward Grimes 918.492.9415 GENERAL PRACTICE Russell Coatney 918.299.4477 Dale Kasting 918.245.5984 Michael Keenan 918.271.5346 Kevin Ray 918.299.2182

NORMAN ENDODONTICS Percy Bolen 405.329.7936 Spencer Hinckley 405.329.7936 Nathan Hinckley 405.329.7936 Steven Powell 405.307.8200 GENERAL PRACTICE Jeffrey Austin 405.447.9441 Jamie Belknap 405.329.6603 Philip Beyer 405.321.7392 Gabriel Bird 405.321.2525 Stephen Bradley 405.321.5823 James Brown 405.329.7040 Kristen Campbell 405.329.6603 Bobby Carmen 405.364.2200

Jason Chang 405.360.2404 Tennille Cheek Covey 405.733.1641 Rebecca Copelin 405.253.4364 Stacia Dowell Carmen Freiberg 949.422.4035 Wallace Haskett 405.364.6064 Jeffrey Hill 405.360.2380 Karen Holubec Sorsby 405.701.7965 Benjamin Humphrey 405.360.7800 Jennifer Jenkins 405.321.6166 Mohammad Karami 405.447.2900 DeNae Kirkpatrick 405.692.1222 Larry Lavelett 405.360.0018 Gary Lawhon 405.321.2300 Brett Leemaster 405.364.7385 Kyle Leisher 405.329.8420 Jeff Lunday 405.387.9462 Derek Mask 405.321.5143 Audrey May Jones 405.737.5123 Jim McCaskill 405.447.4400 Zachary Moffitt 405.360.3800 Julia Morrison 405.632.6688 Geoffrey Potts 405.447.5577 Amanda Pound Venk 405.321.6506 Eric Pratt 405.273.6637 Janet Reid 405.321.4060 Marilina Resasco Pratt 405.632.6688 H. Ritchey 405.329.4141 Douglas Rockwood 405.271.5988 William Skaggs 405.360.0215 Donna Sparks 405.329.6603 Jim Spurgeon 405.364.7385 Sara Spurlock 405.321.6166 Braden Stoltenberg 405.759.0664 Robert Talley 405.321.8030 Michael Tinsley 405.360.5566 Randall Venk 405.321.6506 Robert Wells 405.329.2121 Susan Whiteneck 405.321.6166 Ronald Williams 405.364.7385 Edwin Wilson

James Yeary 405.329.7171 William Yeary 405.329.7171

NORMAN ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY Edmund Braly 405.364.6777 Perry Brooks 405.329.3500 Lauren Lunday 405.329.3500 Vincent Montgomery 405.292.8900 Michael Saumur 405.292.8900 ORTHODONTICS AND DENTOFACIAL ORTHOPEDICS Michael Behrmann 405.741.1962 Robi Craig 405.321.1926 G. Frans Currier 405.271.6087 Jay Fitzgerald 405.360.7716 Phillip Parker 405.329.8853 Mark Revels 405.321.2735 Timothy Shannon 405.321.2735 Ryan Streight 405.321.1926 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Don Roberts 405.360.5233 PERIODONTICS Joseph Feng 405.329.6106 Scott Renfrow 405.329.6106

OKLAHOMA CITY DENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH Kay Beavers 405.271.5988 Ann Truong 580.331.3423 ENDODONTICS Nicole Chung 405.982.2121 Dayna Duke 405.748.6000 Andrew Goldbeck 405.271.5550 Leslie Hardy 405.748.6000 Myron Hilton 405.748.6000 Dennis Leseberg 405.843.9330 German Luezas 405.844.8444 Kim Wilkinson 405.242.2083 GENERAL PRACTICE Parul Ajmani

Barry Amos 405.748.5000 Ryan Arnold 405.735.5733 I. Ashmore 405.949.0123 Glenn Ashmore 405.945.8942 Randy Atkinson 405.525.3000 Wesley Barker 405.722.7071 Lillian Barnes 405.682.9557 Courtney Barrett 405.831.0385 Terry Bass 405.848.7780 Jeannie Bath 405.232.8631 Bryce Baumann 405.840.4544 Robert Baumann 405.840.4544 Justin Beasley 405.755.5400 Edward Belz 405.848.0041 Ashley Bledsoe Cook 405.943.8575 Marie Bockus 405.354.1861 Elizabeth Bohanon 405.755.9014 Gina Booker Bostick 405.419.9800 Dominique Bowers 405.632.6688 Leon Bragg 405.522.7592 Tim Brooks 405.752.0600 Hugh Burch 405.842.4774 Scott Carel 405.789.5300 Jay Case 405.799.9123 Mary Casey Kelly 405.848.6684 Misty Chaser Stephen Chastain 405.755.9050 Jae Choi Gregory Clifford 405.872.9597 Raymond Cohlmia 405.271.6326 Matthew Cohlmia 405.848.3783 Ray Cohlmia 405.848.3783 Bailey Coleman 405.232.8743 Richard Corwin Kenneth Coy 405.271.5444 Patrick Crowley 405.751.5515 Dunn Cumby 405.271.4919 Curtis Cunningham 405.271.5735 Russell Danner 405.749.1676 Roderick Davies Terry Deason 405.691.1860 Kathy DeHart 405.418.0888 Gary Dempsey 405.947.0044

Gayle Dennehy Katherine Dillard Calvin Doan 405.524.3356 Kali Domoney Neill Dubberstein 405.946.3344 Zane Dubberstein 405.946.3344 Lynne Dunham 405.722.0841 Katharine Dunnington 405.949.0123 Joseph Fallin 405.848.2886 Emile Farha 405.474.3300 Michael Fauks 405.946.6136 Christopher Faulconer 405.631.0322 Shakir Feroz Taylor Field Michael Fitzgerald 405.631.4800 Mike Fling 405.848.6743 Westley Freeman 405.632.2316 Charles Fritch 405.946.1479 Terry Fruits 405.632.6968 Hayden Fuller Donna Galier Paul Garetson 405.948.7055 Keith Gibson 405.942.6222 Sandra Grace 405.840.3424 Kelly Greenlee 405.732.2230 Barry Greenley 405.271.5346 Chandler Hall Kristie Haller 405.840.4544 Ashley Hancock 405.843.5537 Mark Hanstein 405.235.7288 Dennis Harris 405.634.1977 J. Harris 405.848.8838 Joy Hasebe 405.271.3956 Paul Heath 405.682.0609 Erin Heathcock 405.947.1525 Janet Hendrick 405.692.5800 Jeffrey Hermen 405.621.2100 Megan Hill 405.721.9300 Maria Hoang 405.631.4439 David Hoang Meghan Hodges 405.692.1222 William Holcomb 405.942.7771 Richard Hollander 405.737.8831 Jon Holman 580.471.8097 Colin Holman 405.735.6600

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Joe Isaacson 405.943.8575 Katherine Johnson 405.232.9721 Ann Johnson 405.271.6326 Hyung Jun 405.692.1222 Landon Keaster Peter Keith Mark Kelly 405.622.5612 Rebecca King Rackley 405.271.5579 Michael Kirk 405.848.3719 Lauren Klaus 405.820.7774 Melinda Knight 405.524.7214 Valeriya Knight William Kohs 405.681.6601 Anusha Koneru 806.367.0989 Nipun Kotha 405.632.6688 Amy Kuker 405.810.8995 Ashley Lanman 405.840.4544 David Lawrence Kevin Layton 405.728.3300 Jean Lee Qiong Amy Liu Eric Loper 405.947.0564 Edward Lorents 405.769.3373 Lori LoVette 405.525.5555 James Lowe 405.848.3535 Jorge Madamba 405.352.0636 Matt Maune Garrick McAnear 405.603.4662 Jack McCalmon 405.632.5561 Kesa McConnell 405.943.0123 Mark McLaren Michael McLeod 405.427.0237 Daniel McNair 405.848.3179 Daniel Messer 405.761.1580 David Mier 405.848.4545 John Miller 405.632.5562 Lindsey Miller 405.912.3300 Robert Miller 405.271.5735 Earl Miller 405.632.5562 Brad Mitchell 405.755.2670 Carlton Montgomery 405.631.4439 Tina Morehart 405.208.8844 George Naifeh 405.755.3550 Anjali Nanda Monica Neely 405.302.0100 Ryan O’Sullivan

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Abbey Onan 405.271.5714 Laura Ousley 405.755.4450 Alan Owen 405.721.1616 Chandani Patel Mark Phan 405.708.7176 Christian Pilgrim 405.691.0836 Benjamin Pinkston 405.843.9731 Raymond Plant 405.752.2499 Beau Porter 405.348.2641 Dana Price 405.848.6744 Gary Rahill 405.728.7171 Randall Rahill 405.942.2842 Chandy Randall 423.504.3526 Jennifer Rapini 314.249.0000 Karen Reed 405.348.2266 Nicole Reynolds 405.823.9639 Philip Ring 405.621.1555 Yousef Salous Rodney Sandburg 405.378.6800 Chris Saxon 405.840.9054 Lance Schmidt 405.751.4556 Troy Schmitz 405.455.1534 Brandon Schultz 405.748.6000 Susan Settle 405.271.5988 Erin Sexson 405.622.5612 Paul Shadid 405.631.1531 Jeff Shadid 405.722.7777 Paul Shadid 405.631.1513 Shachi Shah 405.216.5299 LaTonya Shelton Miller 405.524.7214 Robert Shirley 405.946.4416 Steffan Sigler 580.704.9328 Johnny Siler 405.271.5346 David Simon 405.728.7171 Jaymi Simpson Wert 405.732.1181 Floyd Skarky 405.843.5885 Brooke Snowden 405.681.6668 Ali Somjee 405.473.2743 Bryan Sorgen 405.946.5198 James Sparks 405.721.1300 Lauran Spencer 405.732.1012 Gregory Spielmann

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

Tristanne Spottswood 405.691.3399 Sterling Stalder 405.634.7303 John Starcevich 405.946.5585 Roy Stevens 405.631.9699 Trena Stewart Green 405.629.0020 Jimmy Swan 405.720.2828 Jim Taylor 405.722.4400 Stephen Taylor 405.722.4400 Diana Thien 405.605.4900 Charles Torbeck 405.946.7711 Charles Towe 405.848.8745 Steve Truong 405.605.2332 Ryan Turpin 405.527.0409 James Underwood 405.631.0322 JayCee Van Horn Phoebe Vaughan 405.271.2380 Shyler Vincent 405.843.5885 Vinh Vu 405.703.7070 Jason Wallace Dustin Watterson 580.925.3286 Jennifer Wilbourn 405.376.2072 Jana Winfree 405.271.5502 David Womble 405.722.7042 Patrick Woods 405.751.0358 Douglas Woodson 405.232.8743 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL PATHOLOGY David Lewis 405.271.4333 Robert Phillips 405.769.4445 Lida Radfar 405.271.5988 Stephen Young 405.271.5444 Farah Masood Linda Otis 405.632.6688 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY James Baker 405.636.4230 Robert Bryan 405.285.6255 Kent Cohenour 405.848.7994 Lester Cowden 405.751.3312 William Croom 405.271.4441 Michael Duff y 405.848.7994 Emily Frye 405.751.3312 Jeremy Goodson 405.755.4826

Jay Harlan 405.632.9726 Edwin Henslee 405.733.1701 Tracy McIntire 405.848.7994 Steven Meltzner 405.749.4267 Jacob Mendenhall 405.463.0004 David Schwartz 405.691.0100 Scott Searcey 405.848.7994 Kevin Smith 405.271.4955 Steven Sullivan 405.271.4955 Zeneida Vasquez 405.703.1000 James Wendelken 405.848.7994 Craig Wooten 405.751.7600 ORTHODONTICS AND DENTOFACIAL ORTHOPEDICS John Archer 405.947.1526 David Birdwell 405.604.3745 John Clayton 405.271.6087 Jeff Cohlmia 405.751.0300 Terry Cotterell 405.741.1962 Jeremy Dewbre K. Elassal 405.692.2722 Melissa Farrow 405.631.8822 Vernon Heim 405.755.8153 Payam Ishani Afousi Richard James 405.848.2884 Michael Kierl 405.787.2001 Herbert Klontz 405.848.4809 Shannon Maddox 405.946.5558 Justin Power 405.947.1526 Andrea Rios 405.294.7880 J. Michael Steffen 405.341.2587 Ryan Theobald 405.947.1526 Christian Zylinski 405.843.9690 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY William Bozalis 405.946.2455 Thai.An Doan 405.752.5437 David Evans 405.495.5600 William Farmer 405.947.1525 Andrew Guthrie 405.946.0686 Kevin Haney 405.271.5444 Donald Haskins 405.947.1525 Somer Heim 405.919.6384

Sallie Lau Jason Lee 405.947.1525 Robert Molloy 405.692.1222 Brent Moody 405.755.8020 Jemima Poitevien 405.350.1139 Amanda Ward 580.248.8418 Theresa White 405.616.7336

Jeffrey Housley 918.272.4242 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Jeffrey Ahlert 918.272.1444 PERIODONTICS David Stapleton 918.376.2191

TULSA

PERIODONTICS

ENDODONTICS

John Dmytryk 405.271.5444 Jacob Hager 405.636.1411 Mary Hamburg 405.947.0486 Robin Henderson 405.947.0486 Ryan Lanman 405.840.2834 Karen Luce 405.271.5444 William Reeves 405.751.5333 Greg Shanbour 405.634.2239 Gregory Shanbour 405.650.0337

Alvaro Gonzalez 918.524.3366 Eugenia Johnson 918.994.6000 William Johnson 918.493.5001 Michael Kubelka 918.494.4144 David Maddox 918.493.3500 Zackery Ritter 405.612.7797 Laurie Southard 918.493.3880 Amy Stone 918.481.6622 Byron Tucker 918.524.3366 Kent Wyatt

PROSTHODONTICS Lars Bouma 405.755.7777 Susan Brackett 405.755.7777 Bryce Dorrough 405.632.3525 Nancy Jacobsen 405.271.3956 Thomas McGarry 405.755.7777 Paul Mullasseril 405.271.6400 J. Reneau 405.840.3363

OWASSO ENDODONTICS Christopher DeLong 918.272.2488 GENERAL PRACTICE Mark Argo 918.274.8500 Karla Boyd 918.272.0031 Bobby Bratton 918.272.1256 Matthew Gray 918.272.9510 Heng Lim 918.274.3779 Erin Smart 918.781.6500 Joshua Sorenson 503.547.5667 Dirk Thomas 918.376.2700 Jayson Voto 918.272.5381 Christopher Ward 918.274.4466 ORTHODONTICS AND DENTOFACIAL ORTHOPEDICS Brent Dobson 918.272.4242

GENERAL PRACTICE Richard Amilian 918.493.1886 Bryan Archer 918.494.4445 Frank Archer 918.938.6161 Jamie Ariana 918.346.6016 Bonnie Arnould 918.496.3377 Forrest Arnould 918.496.3377 Lauren Avery 918.346.6016 Benson Baty 918.496.1051 Kathryn Beller 918.461.2766 Terry Bennett 918.582.8651 Steven Berklacy 918.743.0700 Seth Bingham 918.492.7010 Wesley Black 918.745.0500 Fred Blythe 918.622.5700 Nathan Bowen Jeffrey Broermann 918.492.1106 Richard Brown 918.492.8675 John Bubert 918.743.3503 Craig Buntemeyer 918.743.9275 Jennifer Burkitt 918.250.5030 George Bussman 918.836.6884 Richard Canady 918.523.9200 Changa Cannon 918.446.2700 Conrad Casler 918.477.7677

Carolyn Caudle 918.582.3877 Jerome Cha 918.286.7776 Raymond Clock 918.834.1587 Jan Cobble 918.496.2481 George Colpitts 918.477.9000 Neil Cornell 918.481.4949 Walter Davies 918.477.7774 Mark Davis 918.742.8100 Brett Dieterlen 918.299.2400 Craig Dudley 918.749.1747 Howard Dunlap 918.481.3256 Michael Engelbrecht 918.492.9420 William Evans 918.665.2676 Beau Evans 918.665.2676 Jerry Finnell 918.585.2254 Robert Flint 918.749.3600 John Fonder 918.747.8802 Steven Fooshee 918.245.0229 David Freet 918.249.0249 Zachary French 405.948.4900 Ronald French 918.743.6158 Melissa French 405.818.0042 Mark Gaches 918.505.9237 Kenneth Garner 918.742.1480 John Garrett 918.585.3744 Dalia Georgy 918.216.1000 Benjamin Gerkin 918.493.1005 Stephen Glenn 918.748.8484 Randall Graham 918.249.0249 Daniel Griffiths 317.437.7900 Stanley Groom 918.628.0311 John Groves 918.299.7474 Neil Hasty 918.298.5544 Lindsey Helmerich 918.224.0369 Franklin Henrich 918.528.6555 Kathryn Henry 918.742.1987 C. Hinkle 918.712.0000 Arthur Holleman 918.382.1255 Amelia Hopper 918.794.0099 Bruce Horn 918.492.9090 Kevin Howarth 918.492.7010


Dental Profiles Michael Howl 918.749.1626 Nicholas Hunter 918.742.1987 Douglas Jackson 918.663.0284 Larry James 918.665.0015 Courtney Johnson Fred Kapple 918.743.8539 Trevor Knowles 918.742.4500 Gary Kuenning 918.622.0145 John Landers 918.307.0599 Marti Levinson 918.496.1358 Steve Lusk 918.664.9995 Brittany Macleod 918.258.9983 Tracie Malloy Ted Marshall 918.492.6200 Molly Marshall Hays 918.492.6200 Joseph Massad 918.749.5600 Mark Massaro 918.743.9924 Dale Mathis 918.663.5215 Randall McCormick 918.743.2346 Eugene McCormick 918.743.7444 Hugh McDougall 918.742.8775

Thomas McGinnity 918.834.2330 Parnam Mohanna 918.216.1000 Mohsen Moosavi 918.836.6884 John Mose III 918.294.9750 Mazen Naaman Nicole Nellis 918.518.6305 Ernest Nelson 918.652.3676 Eric Nielsen Michael O’Brien Samuel Owens 918.455.7700 Jeff Parker 918.744.6080 Kenneth Parks 918.836.5338 Kylie Parrish 918.251.1521 Karen Pate 918.627.6364 Rajesh Patel 918.369.3024 Glenda Payas 918.492.3003 Douglas Pittman 918.492.8577 Nathan Powell 918.664.6845 Jillian Prather 918.274.4466 Terry Rigdon 918.494.8666 Jerry Robertson 918.492.7263

Dean Todd 918.493.2444 Shannon Toler 918.747.6453 Michael Toole 918.743.9946 Vic Trammell Christopher Tricinella 918.628.0834 Corbyn Van Brunt 918.494.4001 Jonah Vandiver 918.299.7750 Kristie Vinson 918.492.1917 Dennis Vo 918.251.1521 Scott Wagner 918.622.3915 Sharon Wann 918.743.2928 Matthew Warlick 918.459.9090 Chadwick Webster 918.307.0307 Jason Weilacher 918.742.2488 Scott West 918.481.4910 Lauren Whenry 918.994.7645 Steven White 918.663.5538 Jacob Whitney 918.245.5979 Mark Whitney 918.492.3771 Robert Willis 918.688.8848 Kevin Winters 918.528.3330

John Rogers 918.933.4889 Jerry Schoeffler 918.492.9711 Wade Sessom 918.496.2481 Michael Shepherd 918.627.6761 Newton Simer 918.299.2298 Gary Smith 918.280.0880 Brice Smith 918.494.9070 Gregg Smith 918.747.0850 Lindsay Smith 918.742.6321 Wrany Southard 918.294.1144 Michael Steffen 918.663.7928 Richard Stephens 918.494.7055 Clinton Stevens 918.587.1303 Daniel Stipe 918.949.4450 Kimberly Stokes 918.622.3353 Carla Sullivan 918.496.1358 Marc Susman 918.663.9990 Shane Tewis 918.259.0239 Wes Thompson 918.619.6200 Mark Tiernan 918.749.1639

C. Rieger Wood 918.742.2488 Gary Wood 918.747.1133 Michael Wynn Justin Young 918.691.0262 Xuemei Zhao 918.251.3333 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY Danny Cannon 918.743.1351 Lawrence Cuzalina 918.392.0880 Heath Evans 918.449.5800 Jerry Greer 918.747.4760 Lloyd Hudson 918.491.9996 Roger Janitz 918.445.0013 Sirish Makan 310.872.8681 Christopher Mastin 918.495.1800 Richard Miller 405.624.1300 Thomas Rogers 918.747.4760 Donal Woodward 918.492.6994 ORTHODONTICS AND DENTOFACIAL ORTHOPEDICS Mark Andregg 918.296.3006

Emily Carter 918.986.9986 Llon Clendenen 918.932.2707 Jonathan Cooper 918.488.8889 Charles Flint 918.496.1155 Blake Henry 918.294.7705 Robert Herman 918.492.4822 Michael Hosier 918.523.4999 Douglas Kirkpatrick 918.747.1346 Thomas Kirkpatrick 918.747.1346 Joseph Lai 918.747.1346 Van Nowlin 918.492.6464 Anand Patel 918.749.8817 Kyle Shannon 918.743.2321 Patrick Shannon 918.743.2321 Kyle Vroome 918.742.7361 Wayne Wyatt 918.496.1155 PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Kerry Edwards 918.742.9810 Gary Fisher 918.744.1555 Sarah Fox 918.492.1106

R. Grant Gerety 918.493.3031 Charles Keithline 918.895.6933 April Lai 918.742.9810 Feiya Li 918.585.3744 Mark Morrow 918.742.9810 Michael Riggs 918.384.0099 Ryan Roberts 918.970.4944 James Steyer 918.299.1600 Ronald Winder 918.743.2525 PERIODONTICS Ray Beddoe 918.451.2717 William Burchard 918.748.8868 Kenneth Ray 918.492.7581 Trung Tran 918.288.0818 David Wong 918.749.1850 William Wynn 918.492.0737 PROSTHODONTICS Roman Lobodiak 918.743.1558

Parkside Dentistry, PLLC Dentistry

Parkside Dentistry offers comprehensive dental care in the Edmond/OKC metro area. We offer preventative and restorative services, dental implants, and Invisalign orthodontics. Dr. Lee Eliot and Dr. Tanner Hays have more than 40 years of combined experience, and regularly invest their time in continuing education courses to provide the latest in dental treatment. Our staff is dedicated to delivering comfortable, compassionate care.

Lee Eliot, DDS | Tanner Hays, DDS

Combined 40+ years of experience

924 Robtrice Ct. Edmond, OK

3002 Parkside Dentistry.indd 2

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405.340.5110 www.parksidedentistryok.com

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Dental Profiles

Emerson Orthodontics Orthodontics

Dr. Clinton Emerson

Specialization

Special recognitions

Orthodontics

Former President of the Oklahoma Orthodontic Society

A native of Broken Arrow, Dr. Clinton Emerson loves going to work every day. “I love orthodontics and the opportunity it gives me to change people’s lives. Whether people come to us wanting me to give them the smile they have always desired or allow them to chew their food better, I never get tired of seeing the end result,” says Dr. Emerson.  Dr. Emerson attended Harding University in Searcy, Arkansas, where he met his wife, Amy, who is now a pediatrician working to promote early childhood literacy in Tulsa. After graduation, Dr. Emerson taught high school math and science for two years before deciding to become an orthodontist. He began his dental school training at the University of Mississippi Dental School, and after he graduated with honors, the Emersons moved to New Orleans where Dr. Emerson received his Certificate in Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics from Louisiana State University School of Dentistry.  They have been back in Tulsa since 2004, providing the highest quality orthodontic care to area patients. In 2012, Dr. Emerson expanded his practice with the opening of Oklahoma’s first and only 100 percent cosmetic orthodontic office in Midtown near Utica Square,

called Esthetique by Emerson. Today, patients receive care from Dr. Emerson and his highly skilled team at both locations.  Outside of the office, the Emersons are blessed to have four children, and their family participates in frequent mission trips including time spent in the Ukraine, Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and New Orleans.

421 W. Stone Wood Dr. Broken Arrow, OK 918.505.9241 www.emersonbraces.com

1560 E. 21st St., Ste 100 Tulsa, OK 918.551.7755 www.emersonbraces.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

Cosmetic Orthodontics Incognito Invisalign

Southwest Society of Orthodontists

Lingual Braces

Elite Lingual Orthodontists Oklahoma Dental Society Broken Arrow Chamber of Commerce 2015 Business of the Year

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Dental Profiles

Spring Dental Dentistry

Dr. Creed L. Cardon Doctors that give back. You might look and think, “Is this a dentist?” The short answer is YES! This is a picture of Dr. Creed Cardon on a dental mission trip in Peru. But his practice is so much more than that! It’s a group of local people who are passionate about what they do and believe in exceeding your expectations as a patient while also paying it forward. Last year, the Spring Dental family received an award for donating more time and money than any other dentist in Oklahoma! If you are looking for a dentist who is making a difference and wants to help you, then Spring Dental is where you belong! Contact one of our convenient locations that are open during the day, evening and even weekends. See you soon!

Specialization

Special recognitions

General Dentistry

American Dental Association

Oral Surgery Root Canals Wisdom Teeth Veneers Periodontics

Oklahoma Dental Association Tulsa County Dental Society

Implants

American Academy of General Dentists

Crown & Bridge

LDS Academy of Dentists

Sedation

Outstanding Clinician Award

Sleep Apnea Pediatrics Clear Braces Same Day Whitening

4955 S.Peoria Ave. Brookside 918.895.6568

6634 S. Memorial St. Memorial 918.872.7140

11720 E. 21st St. East Tulsa, OK 918.437.9111

530 Plaza Ct. Sand Springs, OK 918.245.8333

101 S. Adair St. Pryor Creek, OK 918.825.7111

1829 S. Wood Dr. Okmulgee, OK 918.756.6500

5401 Taylor St. Bartlesville, OK 918.333.4500

64 S. Elm Pl. Broken Arrow, OK 918.940.3244

601 E. broadway St. Cushing, OK 918.285.5500

2909 Azalea Park Dr. Muskogee, OK 918.682.0544

504A S. Lynn Riggs Blvd. Suite 100, Claremore, OK 918.283.7377

www.thespringdental.com

Special advertising section

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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of CIRCLE RED

The Circle of Red is an elite group of professionals with a passion to fight heart disease and stroke in women. Members are committed to significantly improve the health and wellbeing of the Tulsa community.

Anne Adams

Teri Aulph

Vicky Benedict

Leah Bowles

Sheryl Chinowth

Rocky Goins

Spring Gray

Susan Gross

Dana Haynie

Shari Holdman

Anita Holloway

Caron Lawhorn

Marcia MacLeod

Sheri Miksa

Nicole Morgan

Tara Mundell

Dr. Saran Oliver

Vida Schuman

Kala Sharp

Judy Shouse

Mteesa Shouse

Lynn Sund

Join us for the Go Red For Women Luncheon on May 12, 2017 at the DoubleTree Downtown Tulsa. For tickets visit, tulsagored.heart.org.

918.877.8361 | #tulsagored

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA Platform Sponsor

Signature Sponsors

Taylor Chinowth

Rebecca Darrow

Media Sponsors

OKLAHOMA

Caron Davis

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Patricia Renton

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Photography by Box Portrait Gallery NOT PICTURED: Byron Bighorse, Jennifer Bighorse, JoAnna Blackstock, Lory Bryant, Brandi Bynum, Dr. Heather Cha, Penny Colantonio, Raney Cooper, Susan Crenshaw, Carl Ducato, Robyn Ewing, Stephanie Fullerton, Barbara Garland, Cathy Gates, James Gates, Shannan Gulbis, Aimee Hass, Stephanie Heckenkemper, Kip Herburger, Nancy Hermann, Joan Hunt, Nancy Hynes, Ellen Ichinose, Jillian Ihloff, Kelly Johnson, Michael Johnson, Barbara Knowlton, Lisa Korner, Jane Land, Maren Lively, Ron Macleod, John Meinders, Jennifer Palmer, Kimberly Pearson, Frauke Quiroga, Shane Randolph, Susan Rogers, Hayley Rose, Dan Simoni, Blake Steudtner, Melinda Stinnett, Susie Wellendorf MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS HOSPICE CARE

FINANCIAL ADVISOR

My sister was diagnosed with terminal cancer and her diagnosis is not good. Her doctor has recommended we explore hospice care. She is concerned about the cost involved. What can she expect?

How can I help support my aging parents with their finances?

I first want to reassure you that most private in insurance companies will cover hospice care. Medicare typically covers it as well. My advice is to first review your policy and check with your insurance company to find out what is covered. At Grace Hospice we believe every patient has a right to hospice care. We work closely with our patients and their families to help them navigate the process and the options available to them. At Grace Hospice we are committed to making sure each person who needs hospice care has access to it, regardless of ability to pay. For more information, please call Grace Hospice at 744-7223. AVA HANCOCK

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL Can you insure the biggest day of your life? For most brides and grooms, their wedding is the biggest day of their lives and can include a tremendous amount of expense, planning, and stress. While you can’t always control things like the future in-laws or the occasional wedding crasher, RUSS IDEN you can purchase a wedding policy to protect the essentials on your special day. Wedding insurance is a special events policy that protects a couple’s investment in case circumstances change beyond their control like weather damages to the wedding venue, the dress shop holding the gown closing unexpectedly, or wedding gifts being stolen. With today’s weddings having an average price tag of $27,000, it’s not worth taking the chance. If you’re in the market for a policy, look for coverages that protect things like cancellation or postponement, lost deposits, event photographs & gifts, and of course, liability. When possible, plan to buy a policy sooner than later, since expenses can begin early in the process. By taking time to insure your special day, you can relax and think of the memories that will be made. If you have questions about wedding insurance or any other insurance needs, call a AAA agent near you.

Russ Iden AAA Oklahoma 918.748.1034 800.222.2582, x1034 russ.iden@aaaok.org

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Health challenges such as memory loss and dementia may cause seniors to lose track of financial responsibilities. If you notice your parents are struggling with finances, approach the situation delicately and follow these steps to create a support plan: DAVID KARIMIAN CFP®, CRPC® • Designate someone committed to the best interest of your parent to take the lead on financial matters. • Ensure each asset is properly titled and has a beneficiary that reflects your parent’s wishes. • Establish automatic bill pay where you can. • Create a retirement income strategy – or document your parents’ income if they’re already retired -- so it’s clear what their sources of income are and how they will pay for expenses. • If your parent is still fairly independent financially, remind him or her about the prevalence of money-related scams. If you are concerned about your parents’ memory issues, try to lay out a caregiving and financial plan of action while they are still able to be part of the conversation. Consulting with a financial advisor or attorney familiar with elder law issues may help get the discussion started.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

PERSONAL TRAINER Why can’t I lose weight as fast as I did during the first month of my diet? Scientifically, in order to lose one pound of fat (3,500 calories), your food intake must be 3,500 calories less than your usual calorie expenditure. The first two weeks of a reduced calorie diet, up JOHN JACKSON to 70 percent of the initial weight loss is in the form of water. As your body burns its most accessible fuel – the glycogen stored in the muscles – it releases three or four grams of glycogen. For the first two weeks of a low-calorie diet, you may lose three or more pounds per week. This is a dramatic amount of weight loss, but it isn't until about two weeks into your reduced-calorie diet that your body starts burning fat. Fat contains more calories per pound than glycogen, meaning it takes longer to lose fat. After the first couple of weeks into your diet, it is crucial that you exercise. This is because your body will start to convert protein from lean tissue into energy, actually burning up muscles for energy. Exercise will keep your muscle mass from diminishing, furthermore a nutrient rich food program will keep you healthy and energized.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST What can I do to protect my skin this summer? During the summer months it is essential to protect your skin from the sun, especially your face, neck, chest and hands. Make sure to choose a sunscreen that is formulated for your skin care needs and that blocks both UVA (accelerates aging and cause MALISSA SPACEK many types of skin cancer) and UVB (causes burn) rays – checking the SPF is not enough. SPF ratings examine only UVB rays. Circaidia® SPF 37 protects against both UVA and UVB rays and other environmental factors. It is specially formulated to last all day under makeup and through sweat, and its oil-free formula works great on all skin types, even sensitive skin. Call today to schedule a complementary consultation to discuss your summer skin needs.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

ATTORNEY AT LAW I was injured on the job, now my employer is harassing me. Can I lose my job because I got hurt at work? An employer may not discriminate or retaliate against an employee for filing a claim, retaining a lawyer to represent you for the claim, or testiESTHER M. SANDERS fying about a workers compensation claim. Furthermore, the employer may not discharge an employee as a result of being off work due to the injury. The Oklahoma Workers Compensation Commission has exclusive jurisdiction for a violation of this law, per Oklahoma Statutes Title 85A Section 7, under the current law.

Esther M. Sanders Sanders & Associates, P.C. 1015 S. Detroit Ave. Tulsa, OK 74120 • 918.745.2000 Telephone 800.745.2006 Toll Free Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

You’re Welcome, OKC Nic’s Place Diner brings the state’s most famous burgers to a bigger location in Midtown.

T

MONSTER BURGERS AND ONION RINGS ARE A FAVORITE COMBO AT NIC’S. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

here comes a time in everyone’s life when you ask a pressing question: Is the line worth the meal? For years, this was the dilemma facing anyone craving Nic’s Grill, Oklahoma City’s tiniest proprietor of monster burgers. Recently named the second-best burger joint in the nation by TripAdvisor (whatever, South Dakota), all you had to do to find Nic’s was follow the line down North Pennsylvania Avenue between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. It was an exercise

in frustration for eager diners, but oh so worth the wait. Now, OKC residents and visitors can have their burger and eat it too, so to speak. Dining prayers were answered when Nic’s Place Diner and Lounge, a new, expanded location, opened in Midtown. At first glance, you might think you were in the wrong eatery. Ample seating, flowers, impeccably turned-out wait staff, mood lighting – we were afraid this was not the Nic’s that we all have grown to know and love. We were wrong, in error. We’re

sorry, Nic. We don’t know what we were thinking. Please don’t cut off our burger access! The new and “improved” Nic’s is still the perfect local grub hub, despite the swankier decor. It’s perfect for either a nice date night (established couples only – it’s going to get messy), a large family gathering, or just as a place to kick back with a drink to watch a Thunder game. While some more traditional dinner offerings are on the menu, and they look amazing, you’re crazy if you go for anything other than the MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

burgers. The OMG is aptly named – a half-pound of beef smothered in grilled onions, mushrooms, jalapenos and pepper-jack cheese with mustard and mayo, because, like Liz Lemon, we can have it all. The structural integrity of the Fat Dena is not to be trusted, but it’s worth it for the mountain of chili, cheese, sour cream and guacamole. It’s like a taco, if a taco were a burger the size of your skull. If you’re feeling brave, you can go full Build-A-Bear on your burger with toppings like pepperoncini, egg, salami or bleu cheese, to name a few options. If you have trouble choosing between the hand-cut fries or the onion rings – and you should – just get both and thank us later. Above all, this is the best of Nic’s Grill (the food) without the worst (the line and the limited hours). The original Nic’s will always have a place in our hearts, but Nic’s Place Diner is definitely a new favorite.

JUSTIN “NIC’ NICHOLAS OPENED AN EXPANDED LOCATION OF HIS ORIGINAL RESTAURANT LAST FALL. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

TARA MALONE

LO C A L F L AV O R

A Place of Happy Refuge Zomi employees, escaping tragic conditions in Myanmar, make Kai Burmese cafe blissful.

K

ai Burmese cafe is a happy place. There are always family groups scattered about, with parents chatting to acquaintances at other tables while toddlers run giggling through the aisles. Groups of workers relax (you can hear their laughter); bunches of serious young men, students perhaps, engage in discussions; everybody seems to know everyone else. The woman stirring sizzling chili peppers in a wok waves to a young couple heading for their big black SUV. Sometimes you can’t tell the staff from the customers. One of the students turns out to be your waiter. Friendly, fluent in English, he could be a native Tulsan. But four months ago, he was in a bleak, dismal refugee camp in western Thailand. “I was there for 10 years,” he says. He, like everyone at Kai, is Zomi and grew up in a tiny village in the remote, verdant hills of western Burma, now called Myanmar. Those Zomi villages were happy places too, people say, until the army arrived to rape, to torture and to kill. Thousands of Zomi refugees live in Tulsa. They never need government assistance. “Just find us a job,” says Vung Cing, “and

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we’re OK.” She owns the restaurant; she’s always busy, in motion; she smiles a lot. “My mom ran a little teahouse in Kalaymyo town. There was no electricity, so when I was 10, my mother taught me how to cook rice over a fire. All my recipes come from her. She was a great cooker.” Plates begin to arrive. Full of eye-catching, vibrant color, they are the standard foods of Burma but unlike anything you’ve ever seen. There’s A Meeta Tot, a mix of spiced fried beef, cabbage, tomato and a spicy sweet sauce. “We really love that dish in Kalaymyo.” And then there’s Nan Gyi Tot. “This is Burma’s favorite food,” Cing says. Chicken is minced and mixed with spices (“and I grind all our spices myself”), then used to coat thick noodles. The idea sounds strange but it’s hard to stop eating it. “We also have noodle soup,” she says, “and the recipe comes from my husband. He spent 10 years in a refugee camp in Malaysia, and learned to cook Chinese-style.” Her attention is caught by one of the playing children. It’s her son. “He’s 21 months old,” she says, “and already he wants to speak only English. We try to get him to speak Zomi at home.” BRIAN SCHWARTZ

PLATES FULL OF EYE-CATCHING, VIBRANT COLOR ARE STANDARD AT ZOMI.

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER


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Taste

JARED CHAMBERLAIN HAS FOLLOWED HIS FAMILY’S COOKING LINEAGE.

PHOTOS BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

OYSTERS ROCKEFELLER 12 2-3 oz ¼ lb 2 tsp 2 tsp ¼ cup 1 cup ¾ lb 1 lb

oysters mozzarella bacon, chopped garlic, minced shallots, minced Pernod heavy cream cream cheese baby spinach, stemmed and chopped

Render and brown bacon. Add spinach on high heat, sear. Add garlic and shallots, cook lightly without browning the garlic.

Deglaze with Pernod. Add heavy cream, reduce by half. Add cream cheese, simmer and stir until incorporated.

C H E F C H AT

The Boss of Bodean

Jared Chamberlain helms the ship at Tulsa’s premier seafood restaurant.

T

ulsa born and bred, chef Jared Chamberlain has generations of culinary skills in his genes – and he’s not fighting the family tradition. Both his mother and grandmother owned and ran restaurants in metropolitan Tulsa, and he’s following in their footsteps. “I was born in the business,” he says. And in the business he stayed. After graduating from Oklahoma State UniversityOkmulgee’s culinary program, he worked at local eateries like El Guapo’s Cantina, Oscar’s Gastropub, Gatsby’s Grill and his mother’s joint, The Route 66 Diner. In recent years, he’s climbed his way up the ladder at Bodean Seafood, from chef de cuisine to executive chef, and he’s proud to helm the ship at a restaurant with a deep familial anchor. “Bodean is a great place to work,” he says. “It is an awesome restaurant led by an awesome family.” The family he refers to is the Faulkner clan. Bob Faulkner was an original partner in the Bodean Seafood Market, along with partner Dean Carroll. (The two men meshed their first names together to create the name.) The restaurant portion of the estab-

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lishment opened in 1980, but the seafood market has been around since 1968. This unique facet of Bodean makes it a prime joint for seafood fanatics and, consequentially, a chef’s dream job. “Because we’re a wholesaler, my access to ingredients is way better than any other restaurant in town,” he says. “I get first dibs on a ton of really nice stuff.” Despite this major leg up, there’s always pressure to remain popular in the city’s everchanging social landscape, since restaurants can spring up and fade away in the blink of an eye in today’s world. “We have to work really hard to stay relevant,” Chamberlain says. “We bring in more contemporary dishes. We try to have a little bit for everybody. But we are the premier seafood restaurant in town, and that helps quite a bit.” Seafood may be Chamberlain’s expertise at work, but off the clock he keeps his options open. “I really like Asian food as far as exploring, but I try to be well-rounded,” he says. “Grandma said if you learn to like everything, you never have to eat anything you don’t like. That’s how I was raised.” MARY WILLA ALLEN

Spread oysters onto a sheet pan, chill. Place a small dollop of sauce on top of each oyster once chilled.

Place in oven preheated to broil. Cook until sauce is hot, remove from oven

and sprinkle shredded mozzarella onto each oyster.

Place back in oven until cheese is fully melted and begins to caramelize.


R A N D O M F L AV O R S PHOTO COURTESY EL RANCHO GRANDE TULSA

A TEX-MEX TRADITION

El Rancho Grande has been a Tulsa staple in Tex-Mex cuisine since 1953. The owners and staff work hard to preserve the restaurant and its more than 60-year history while incorporating contemporary changes to keep the look fresh. They seem to have struck the perfect balance, evidenced by their constant stream of newcomers and seasoned regulars, some of whom date to the restaurant’s earliest days. El Rancho Grande’s Night Hawk combo – two enchiladas covered with chili con carne plus one soft taco – was also named one of the Five Greatest Mexican Meals in the United States by Gustavo Arellano in his book Taco USA. 1629 E. 11th St., Tulsa; elranchograndemexicanfood.com

If you’re looking for the marriage of upscale and contemporary, visit FLINT, nestled inside the Colcord Hotel in Oklahoma City. This stylish joint serves quality American fare like brined pork chops and homemade meatloaf, plus carrot cake, brunch foods, appetizers, classically curated cocktails, coffees, teas and juices. One of the restaurant’s greatest assets is the patio, which offers outdoor seating with a view, a fire pit and live music on Thursdays and Sundays. 15 N. Robinson Ave., OKC; flintokc.com.

TAKE A DOUBLESHOT DoubleShot Coffee Company doesn’t kid around when it comes to the sources of its brews – you can choose featured coffees or other beverages based on their areas of origin. They have coffees hailing from Africa, South America, and Central America, along with local brews. You can even purchase a monthly coffee subscription if you’re so inclined. DoubleShot also sells all the supplies to become a coffee connoisseur by grinding, brewing and drinking your own coffee. Fear not – the high-quality coffee does not overshadow the delectable pastries. 1730 S. Boston Ave., Tulsa; www.doubleshotcoffee. com

PHOTO COURTESY FLINT

SUGAR, SPICE AND EVERYTHING NICE When you find yourself cruising Broken Arrow’s Main Street, make a pit stop at Not Your Grandma’s Cupcakes. Some cupcakes in the bakery’s repertoire are standard delicacies, like the Slow Poke, made with turtle cheesecake, fudge and pecans. Others are a bit funkier, like Bringing Home the Bacon, with a savory mix of butter pecan cake and – you guessed it – bacon crumbles. Others still are seasonal treats, like The Eggnog, piled high with cinnamon and nutmeg to get you in the holiday spirit. Regardless of the dessert you choose, you’ll leave NYGC with a smile. 1810 S. Main St., Broken Arrow; notyourgrandmascupcakes.com.

PHOTOS COURTESY DOUBLESHOT COFFEE COMPANY

PHOTOS COURTESY NOT YOUR GRANDMA’S CUPCAKES

AMERICAN FARE WITH A FLAIR

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YOUR HOME YOUR TEAM YOUR WEATHER

METEOROLOGIST

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Where & When

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

Can’t Wait to be King

PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS, COURTESY OKC BROADWAY

T

The beloved story of Simba, Nala and Mufasa returns to OKC in Broadway form.

he Lion King is, arguably, the most beloved Disney movie to date. With a genius mixture of comedy and heartbreak (the stampede scene, anyone?), plus unforgettable musical numbers and endearing characters, this 1994 film has stood the test of time to become a bona fide Disney classic. For those who want more than to religiously rewatch the film or anticipate the live action version (that has yet to announce a release date), snag a ticket to the Broadway adaptation hitting the Civic Center Music Hall, courtesy of OKC Broadway. Nia Holloway, who plays Simba’s voice of reason/best friend/betrothed, Nala, promises a thrilling show from start to finish. “You’re still going to get that feeling you got when watching it as a kid – that same

excitement,” she says. “The story is the same. The difference is seeing it with no distractions. Everything is live; that’s the beauty of theater.” Holloway, who snagged the role at 17 despite Disney’s age requirement of 18, is the youngest woman to play Nala in the Broadway production’s 19-year history. She’s now 21, but still finds the magic in every performance. “You’re going to be speechless, because everything is right there in front of your face. The emotions are live, the people are real, and the costumes are absolutely amazing,” she says. Although the show stays loyal to the movie in terms of plot, characters and music, Disney took creative liberties by expanding Nala’s role to include more musical numbers. Holloway’s newly added favorite is “Shadowland,”

which brings the audience into the second act and serves as Nala’s paramount moment in the show. “‘Shadowland’ is where the story turns – you get into the darkness and realness of the story. You’re going to go on an emotional roller coaster,” Holloway says. “Nala starts at a point of vulnerability, and by the end of the song it’s all triumph and victory. It definitely tugs on the heartstrings.” Holloway’s biggest suggestion to viewers is to truly unplug before the show begins. “I hope people come in and turn their phones off and really have no expectations,” she says. “Because they’re all going to get exceeded anyway.” The show runs May 9-28. Visit okcbroadway.com for tickets. MARY WILLA ALLEN

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PERFORMANCES CELTIC WOMAN May 3 MABEE CENTER This

CENTER This stunning triple-

multi-platinum international sensation and 2017 Grammy nominee returns with its new tour, Voices of Angels.

bill evening of contemporary ballet features three works: Cacti, A Million Kisses to My Skin, and Cripple and the Starfish. – tulsaballet.org

TULSA OPERA PRESENTS: TOSCA May 5 TULSA PAC In this

THEATRE TULSA PRESENTS: JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR May 12-14, 18-20 TULSA PAC This rock-opera

–mabeecenter.com

masterpiece of operatic melodrama, mortal enemies Mario Cavaradossi and Baron Scarpia compete for the same woman, the diva Floria Tosca. – tulsaopera.com

AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH KRISTIN CHENOWETH May 6

BROKEN ARROW PAC

Chenoweth has had an extraordinarily diverse career – from Broadway to TV to the big screen. – brokenarrowpac.com

TULSA BALLET PRESENTS: SIGNATURE SERIES May 11-14 LORTON PERFORMANCE

chronicles the final days of Jesus Christ, told from the perspective of friend, disciple and betrayer, Judas Iscariot. Feel the power, the glory, the love and the passion. – theatretulsa.org

TULSA SYMPHONY PRESENTS: THE FIREBIRD May 13 TULSA PAC Even without

the ballet theater, Stravinsky’s music summons the imagination to delight in Russian fairy tales of the magical glowing bird, which can be a blessing or a curse to its owner. – tulsasymphony.org

CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS PRESENTS: SOMETHING ROTTEN May 23-28 TULSA PAC Set in 1595,

this hilarious smash tells the story of Nick and Nigel Bottom, brothers desperate to write a

hit play. When a soothsayer says the future of theater involves singing, dancing and acting, Nick and Nigel try to write the world’s very first musical.

– celebrityattractions.com

TULSA DRILLERS GAMES

ONEOK FIELD Catch the Drillers in action as they take on opponent after opponent at ONEOK Field. Grab a hot dog and a beer and relax as the Drillers chase victory.

– m.milb.com

DODGEBRAWL May 13 BOK CENTER This one-day

dodge ball tournament allows each team to play for the charity/nonprofit of its choice. Each winning team’s selected charity/nonprofit will receive a financial donation on behalf of the tournament.

– bokcenter.com

BREEDER’S INVITATIONAL May 13-27

EXPO SQUARE This

nonprofit was formed to

promote the cutting horse industry by building another major event. In its first 12 shows, the Breeder’s Invitational has paid out nearly $20 million and is ranked as one of the major events in the industry.

– breedersinvitational. azurewebsites.net

ROUGHNECK ROLLER DERBY May 27 NINOWSKI RECREATION CENTER Tulsa County’s

only World Flat Track Derby Association group is a sisterhood composed of diverse, passionate athletes training hard to win. Cheer on the team as they take on Confluence Crush and enjoy some hard-hitting, family-friendly fun! – roughneckrollerderby.com

COMMUNIT Y

A Month of Festivals

May is festival season in Oklahoma, and the entire state has multiple offerings, so choose a few or visit each one. MISFest, the Blue Dome Arts Festival and Mayfest all sweep Tulsa this month. MISFest, short for Music Is She Festival, kicks off its inaugural year May 13 and focuses on the impressive talent of local female musicians. Several artists from around the state come together at River West Festival Park from 2 to 11 p.m. Tulsa’s beloved Mayfest commemorates 45 years and runs May 18-21. The festival offers music, food, fun and art in a welcoming, warm and high-spirited atmosphere. The Blue Dome Arts Festival has its 14th anniversary May 19-21 in the historic Blue Dome district. The event promises outstanding art in every medium imaginable, plus kids’ zones, food trucks, music and more. “Festival goers are so impressed at all of

WAKA FLOCKA FLAME

Dunstin Pittsley Band will open for Robin Trower, coming to Brady Theater May 3.

– bradytheater.com

SPORTS May 1, 6-9, 19-22, 30-31

CONCERTS ROBIN TROWER May 3 BRADY THEATER The

the amazing art that comes out of our great state,” says Jo Armstrong, executive director at Blue Dome. “You can feel great about the fact that any purchase supports an Oklahoma artist.” Oklahoma City has no shortage of festivals, either, like the Downtown Edmond Arts Festival (May 5-7) and the Paseo Arts Festival (May 27-29). Both events underline Oklahoma’s immense artistic talent. “We pride ourselves as being a festival for the artists,” says Amanda Bleakley, executive director at the Paseo Arts Association. “The Paseo Festival has a sense of community unlike any other.” Proceeds fund the association’s many programs. For more information, visit eventbrite. com, tulsamayfest.org, bluedomearts.org, downtownedmondok.com and thepaseo.org.

HALL & OATES, TEARS FOR FEARS May 4 BOK CENTER Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees Daryl Hall and John Oates partner with international multi-platinum selling band Tears for Fears for a 29-city North American tour, and they’re kicking it off in Tulsa.

BOK CENTER The Grammy-

nominated artist/producer duo, on its biggest tour, has multi-platinum artist Kiiara as a special guest.

– bokcenter.com

– bokcenter.com

CITIZEN COPE May 4 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO

“Rawness improbably balanced by a mixture of danger and delicacy,” says a Rolling Stone writer, gives Citizen Cope his edge. As a singer, songwriter and producer, he stands alone – an artist immune to corruption. – riverspirittulsa.com

SILVERSUN PICKUPS

May 5

BRADY THEATER See

Silversun Pickups live with special guest KIEV at Brady Theater. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the show begins at 8 p.m.

– bradytheater.com

CHANCE THE RAPPER May 9

BOK CENTER Chance

the Rapper is on his North American tour with tracks from his award-winning album, Coloring Book.

– bokcenter.com

RASCAL FLATTS May 12 RIVER SPIRIT CASINO

NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK, PAULA ABDUL, BOYS II MEN May 24 BOK CENTER The aptly titled Total Package Tour is the group’s biggest lineup yet. Paula Abdul makes her return to the stage for a set that includes seven No. 1 hit singles, while Package Tour alums Boyz II Men deliver their trademark sound to fans nationwide. – bokcenter.com

THE BROTHERS OSBORNE May 26

CAIN’S BALLROOM

Brothers Osborne recorded their newest album, Pawn Shop, during breaks in their busy touring schedule by using members of their own touring band. The album sounds like a group of road warriors who’ve spent years sharing bus seats and hotel rooms and creating the sort of chemistry that can’t be faked. – cainsballroom.com

FOSTER THE PEOPLE

Rascal Flatts, the most awarded country group of the past decade, has earned more than 40 trophies from various prestigious associations in the United States. – riverspirittulsa.com

May 31

BRADY THEATER Don’t miss the boys of Foster the People as they play classics like “Pumped Up Kicks” along with new material from their most recent album.

– bradytheater.com

ART

CROSSING BORDERS May

5-25

LIVING ARTS OF TULSA

Through the Crossing Borders project, Living Arts wants to give voice to American immigrants coming to build a better life for themselves and their families. – livingarts.org

FROM MY POINT OF VIEW: INDIANS ILLUSTRATED: THE IMAGE OF NATIVE AMERICANS IN THE PICTORIAL PRESS May 5 GILCREASE MUSEUM

FIRST FRIDAY ART CRAWL BRADY ARTS DISTRICT This

year-round monthly event features all of the galleries, studios and museums as well as the part-time galleries in various shops opening their doors to show art. The Art Crawl is open

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

– cainsballroom.com

THE CHAINSMOKERS

May 5

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riotous rapper, who penned hits like “O Let’s Do It” and “No Hands,” has undergone an artistic transformation since his 2010 bombastic debut, Flockaveli. May 16

John Coward, University of Tulsa associate professor of communication, will discuss his newest book, which covers the stereotyping of Native Americans in journalism and media history in the late 19th century. – gilcrease.org

May 13

CAIN’S BALLROOM This

from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and is the perfect Friday night outdoor activity for people of all ages.

– thebradyartsdistrict.com

OKLAHOMA ECO-SCAPES May 5-June 18

AHHA TULSA Come and

explore the art of Douglas Shaw Elder, who celebrates the state of Oklahoma through his artistic expressions. – ahhatulsa.org

SECOND SATURDAYS

May 13

PHILBROOK MUSEUM

Bring out the inner artist in each member of the family and experience Philbrook in a whole new way. Visit on the second Saturday of each month for free family-friendly art activities, tours and scavenger hunts for kids of all ages. – philbrook.org

VETRI May 25-June 25 AHHA TULSA Visit this

unique exhibit to see colorful, one-of-a-kind glass creations from the Tulsa Glassblowing School in collaboration with AHHA Tulsa. – ahhatulsa.org

PHOTO COURTESY TULSA INTERNATIONAL MAYFEST

Where & When

IN TULSA


COMMUNITY annual event, hosted by the German-American Society of Tulsa, features authentic German entertainment by the GAST folk dancers together with outstanding polka bands, food, drink and activities for kids. – gastulsa.org

RESTORING HARMONY POWWOW May 6 WESTSIDE YMCA This

annual celebration recognizes National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day. This event begins with stickball games that will take you back in time, plus a full day of activities culminates in a contest for dancers of all ages. This free event is sure to be fun for the whole family. – ihcrc.org

JENKS AMERICA FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL May 6 DOWNTOWN JENKS This

– jenkschamber.com

SUPERRIGS TRUCK BEAUTY CONTEST May 18-20 EXPO SQUARE SuperRigs

feature entertaining events for drivers and their families, including a variety of vendors, a scavenger hunt, prizes, games, the Rotella Road Show and the Rotella T6 BBQ Pitt. Enjoy the weather, people and events! – exposquare.com

CHARITABLE EVENTS A STATELY AFFAIR May 1 SOUTHERN HILLS COUNTRY CLUB This event recognizes icons for Oklahoma State University in Tulsa and honors their significant contributions to the community and state.

– astatelyaffair.com

ANNUAL AWARDS LUNCHEON May 2 SOUTHERN HILLS MARRIOTT HOTEL This

event highlights Goodwill employees, business partners and event sponsors. – goodwilltulsa.org

TULSA TYCOONS May 2 COX BUSINESS CENTER

Tulsa Tycoons will include a mobile auction, networking opportunities, stories of Junior Achievement impact and Monopoly-themed games.

– jaok.org

5X5 ANNUAL FUNDRAISER FOR THE TULSA ARTISTS’ COALITION May 5

Cruisin’ in the ArtCar

is the perfect way to spend a day exploring downtown while enjoying great food and music. This event features a wide variety of food trucks offering an eclectic mix for diners, as well as some of the top musicians and artists from the Tulsa area.

Tulsa constantly finds ways to explore artistic expression, and Living Arts’ ArtCar weekend is no exception. This three-day event combines functionality, creativity and ingenuity with the end results being beautifully decorated vehicles and family fun.

There is a wide range of creative options for ArtCar. One can decorate a car, motorbike, scooter or any other mode of transportation in a number of ways. Some create superficial changes, such as temporary addons with paint, glue or sparkles. Others go all out and completely reshape their vehicles through expert welding. From enthusiastic novices to professional artists, any and all are encouraged to participate. And you aren’t without help – Living Arts hosts workshops before the event to assist those who need guidance. At the end of the event, four vehicles are chosen as winners and receive trophies. Those vehicles are showcased at Mayfest and the Blue Dome Arts Festival. ArtCar occurs May 18-20 in downtown Tulsa. Visit livingarts.org for details.

TAC GALLERY TAC’s one and only fundrasier features art by over 200 artists, all 5x5 inches in size and sold for $55. – tacgallery.org THE OUTSIDERS 50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION AND FUNDRAISER May 6 CAIN’S BALLROOM This

night will serve as a fundraiser to restore and preserve the legacy of The Outsiders house in Tulsa. – cainsballroom.com

RUN FOR THE ROSES May 6 PAVILION EXPO SQUARE

The Tulsa Boys’ Home signature Kentucky Derby-themed fundraising event offers races simulcast live, on-site betting, silent and live auctions and more. – tulsaboyshome.org

CF GOLF CLASSIC May 8 CEDAR RIDGE COUNTRY CLUB This golf tournament

offers morning and afternoon prizes as well as silent and live auctions. – cff.org/tulsa

PHOTO COURTESY LIVING ARTS

GERMANFEST May 5-7 GAST CENTER This

ART

SPORTS

PHOTO BY GEORGIA READ COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY BOATHOUSE ASSOCIATION

Explore the Whitewater

With the addition of RiverSport Adventures to downtown, Oklahoma City’s metropolitan area has seen an outpouring of new events based around water-related sports. The newest incorporation is the Whitewater Festival, a fourday celebration with intense competition in a variety of categories. Spectators can cheer on whitewater rafters and kayakers, as well as witness the R4 Rafting National Championships, which features a taxing downriver marathon, sprint race, head-tohead elimination and slalom race. (R4 is a raft with four paddlers.) The Whitewater Festival showcases athletes competing in the USA Canoe/Kayak Canoe Slalom trials to qualify for the 2017 World Cup. In addition, guests can enjoy downriver and

freestyle kayaking competitions and common additions that will appeal to any festival-goer. “There will be local vendors, music and obviously beer,” says Zach Datko, the rafting operations manager at RiverSport. “[It] wouldn’t be a whitewater event without good beer and watching rafts duel it out on a Olympic whitewater course.” Datko believes this event is only the start of a growing interest in whitewater events in the city. “The whitewater world is small but very exciting. I think this will be a big step into introducing whitewater to the city,” he says. “There are many events and festivals that we can host on our amazing Olympic course.” The event takes place May 18-21. Visit riversportokc.org for more details. MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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TEE OFF FOR TOWN AND COUNTRY May 8 MEADOWBROOK COUNTRY CLUB Proceeds from this

Chuck Wagon Wonders

The Chuck Wagon gathering returns to the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum on Memorial Day weekend for its 28th year, combining food, family and history. “The chuck wagon was America’s first food truck,” says Tara Carr, communications coordinator at the museum. “It remains an iconic symbol of the American West. This tradition is meant to connect people with the West of the past, but also the West of today.” Along with a variation of delicious chuck wagon food samples, visitors can enjoy a petting zoo, square dancing, artisan demonstrations, live music and more. The gathering is a big hit with kids, but adults can have just as much fun exploring the sounds, sites and tastes of the event. “The Chuck Wagon food samples are especially fun for adults because they get to try something new at each wagon,” Carr says. “Musical entertainment featuring red dirt, folk and country styles bands will be playing throughout the day, as well as a sharpshooting presentation.” The gathering takes place May 27-28, and children 12 and under get in free. Visit nationalcowboymuseum.org for details.

event benefit Town and Country School, serving children with learning differences, attention disorders and autism spectrum disorders. – tandcschool.org

Har-Ber Village Museum in Grove takes visitors back in time to pioneer-era exploration, with historic buildings, hands-on activities, self-guided tours and the annual Civil War Days, a two-day event highlighting the lives of both soldiers and civilians during that compelling time in history. “As visitors stroll through the village grounds, they will come upon living history reenactors living their daily lives as impacted by the war,” says Amelia E. Chamberlain, executive director at the museum. “Visitors can shop at a camp store, talk to a Civil War surgeon, see civilians preparing their meals, visit with soldiers from both sides

elegant fundraiser at Tulsa Source for Hearing Loss and Access, to benefit deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals.

– tsha.cc

WHITE PARTY May 12 THE VAULT Morocco: where you can dance the night away while draped in white and partake with Tulsa’s best mixologists.

– whitepartyok.com

Taylor Mac’s dark comedy is the story of a 21st-century prodigal son. A veteran with PTSD responds to his father’s stroke by coming home to help care for him, but finds himself in the aftermath of another regime overthrow. – okctc.org

SOUTH PACIFIC Through

May 7

JEWEL BOX THEATRE

The Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning musical takes nurse Nellie Forbush to an island paradise during World War II with such classic songs as “Some Enchanted Evening’,” and “There is Nothin’ Like a Dame.” – jewelboxtheatre.org

LMAO #6 COMEDY SHOW May 11

CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL

The LMAO #6 Comedy Show features Lil Duval, Luanell

PHOTO COURTESY HAR-BER VILLAGE MUSEUM

Strides provides opportunities for people within a community to get involved by forming walking teams to benefit those with cystic fibrosis. Chip in to help those in need. – cff.org/tulsa

CHIP IN TO REBUILD

May 22

FOREST RIDGE GOLF CLUB

Join the fun at Chip in to Rebuild Golf Tournament for a day of golf, raffles and food. – rebuildingtogethertulsa.org

and other comedians and will provide a night full of laughs.

– okccivicentermusichall.com

THE DINNER DETECTIVE MURDER MYSTERY SHOW May 6, 13, 27

SKIRVIN HOTEL America’s

largest interactive murder mystery comedy dinner show solves a hilarious case while you feast on a fantastic four-course dinner. Beware: the killer is hiding somewhere in the room, and you may find yourself as a prime suspect. – thedinnerdetective.com

OKC THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS: THE TOXIC AVENGER May 25-June 3 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL

Based on the cult classic film of the same name, The Toxic Avenger is a campy yet topical musical that explores pollution and the monsters – or heroes – it creates. Don’t miss this fun night! – okctc.org

SPORTS

– teamusa.org/usa-softball

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

– jdrf.org

PERFORMANCES

teams in the state compete. All games take place in the state-of-the-art ASA Hall of Fame Stadium.

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The Promise Ball includes dinner, a silent and live auction as well as Junior Diabetes Research Foundation’s signature Find a Cure program.

IN OKC

OSSAA SLOW PITCH STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS May 2-3 ASA HALL OF FAME STADIUM Watch the best

May 20

VINTAGE ‘53 WINE DINNER

OKC THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS: HIR May 4-6 CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL

and much more.” For children and adults alike, Chamberlain believes “the best way to learn history is to experience it first-hand,” and the reenactors make that learning both easy and interesting. The event has also seen tremendous growth over the past five years. “We started this event in 2012 with three reenactors. Now we have over 20 stations with nearly 100 volunteers participating in the event,” she says. The Civil War Days event runs May 20-21. Visit har-bervillage.com for details.

TULSA PROMISE BALL

GREAT STRIDES May 20 CENTENNIAL PARK Great

May 12

Civil War Days

A black-tie gala affair like no other brings together leaders in the community to learn about the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa’s cultural initiatives. – ahhatulsa.org

COX BUSINESS CENTER

TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY This is the most

C U LT U R E

CREATE GALA May 13 HARDESTY ARTS CENTER

GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON May 12 DOUBLETREE DOWNTOWN

Go Red for Women encourages women and their families to take action and live a healthier life. – tulsagored.heart.org

PHOTO COURTESY NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM

Where & When

FA M I LY / K I D S

OKC DODGERS GAMES May 6-10, 18-25

CHICKASAW BRICKTOWN BALLPARK Don’t miss

America’s favorite pastime at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark as the OKC Dodgers take on other Minor League teams. – milb.com

CONCERTS HINDER AND NONPOINT May 5 DIAMOND BALLROOM

Singalong anthems, such as “Get Stoned” and “Lips Of An Angel,” shot Hinder to megastardom, establishing the band as the next wave in anthemic rock. – diamondballroom.net

HILLSONG YOUNG AND FREE YOUTH REVIVAL USA TOUR May 9 THE CRITERION Join Hillsong to experience the youth revival.

- criterionokc.com


TRAVIS SCOTT May 12 THE CRITERION Experience

Travis Scott on his The Planet of the Birds Tour.

– criterionokc.com

TIM MCGRAW AND FAITH HILL May 13 CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA Soul2Soul The World

Tour 2017 hits 65 cities to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the record-breaking Soul2Soul II tour, the highestgrossing multi-year country music tour of all time. It is the first time Faith Hill has toured since 2007.

– chesapeakearena.com

SOUNDBITES May 13 KERR PARK SoundBites

include live music, yard games and a food truck at each of four monthly events. Attendees are encouraged to bring their lunches on concert days. Picnic blankets and bottled water are provided at no charge. Each of the free SoundBites events features performances

by artists from the Academy of Contemporary Music at the University of Central Oklahoma – ACM@UCO – in Bricktown. – downtownokc.com

ARLO GUTHRIE May 16 HUDSON PERFORMANCE HALL Over four decades, Arlo

Guthrie has toured throughout North America, Europe, Asia and Australia and won a broad, dedicated following. In addition to being an accomplished musician – playing the piano, six and 12-string guitar, harmonica and a dozen other instruments – Guthrie is a natural storyteller whose hilarious tales weave seamlessly into his performances. – hudsonperformancehall.com

MUSHROOMHEAD May 18 DIAMOND BALLROOM See

Mushroomhead live with special guests Sunflower Dead, The Browning, Relicseed, Less Than Human and VooDoo Dolls. – diamondballroom.net

COMMUNITY OKLAHOMA RIVER CRUISES: HISTORY COMES ALIVE May 6 OKLAHOMA RIVER In April

2008, Oklahoma River Cruises launched a ferry transit along a seven-mile stretch of the Oklahoma River with the Devon Discovery. The Devon Explorer and Devon Pioneer later joined the fleet for specialty cruises and private charters. – okrivercruises.com

NATIONAL TRAIN DAY

May 6

OKLAHOMA RAILYWAY MUSEUM Learn about the

advantages of rail travel and the history of trains. The train leaves Oakwood Depot at the museum several times a day This event is sure to be an afternoon of fun for people of all ages.

– oklahomarailwaymuseum.org

ONA COIN AND CURRENCY SHOW May 6-7 STATE FAIR PARK The

Oklahoma Numismatic Association hosts it annual spring show. Browse though all kinds of money, both new and old from all over the world in the Hobbies, Arts and Crafts Building. – travelok.com

OKLAHOMA CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL May 12-13 COX CONVENTION CENTER

This beer, cider and mead tasting event, in its sixth year, focuses on producers from Oklahoma, the United States and around the world.

PHOTO BY JASON SQUIRES COURTESY ROCKLAHOMA

– oklahomacraftbeerfestival.com

POP UP SHOPS IN THE PARK May 13 HAFER PARK Head to

Edmond this Mother’s Day weekend for an afternoon spent browsing more than 100 vendor booths. Find handmade jewelry, re-purposed items, home decor and more.

– dirtroaddixies.com

OKC LITFEST May 13-14 DOWNTOWN LIBRARY This

second annual event has poetry, fiction and storytelling of all kinds. Enjoy the beauty of literature with speakers, readings and more. – okc-litfest.org

MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH

May 14

NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM Provided by The

Petroleum Club, the buffet features carving stations, a variety of vegetables, fresh salads, and other tempting side offerings. Extensive dessert buffets complete the menu.

– nationalcowboymuseum.org

NEW FILM SERIES May 19 21C MUSEUM HOTEL Art

goes to the movies with 21c Oklahoma City’s Filmography, a free monthly series at 21c Oklahoma City in partnership with deadCenter Film and the OKC Film Society. Filmography takes place on the third Friday of each month at 8 p.m.

– 21cmuseumhotels.com

EATS ON 8TH FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL May 20 EIGHTH AND HARVEY This

free, monthly, family- and pet-friendly street fest builds around the city’s top gourmet food trucks and live music on the third Saturday of each month from noon to 8 p.m. Come out and enjoy the warm weather with family and friends at this delicious festival. – visitokc.com

SYMPHONY SHOW HOUSE

May 21

4808 ROSE ROCK DRIVE, OKLAHOMA CITY Enjoy an

exciting presentation of interior and exterior design while supporting music education in Oklahoma. Top talents of interior and exterior design bring you beautiful spaces filled with hundreds of remarkable and unique items – and almost everything is on sale. Don’t miss out! – okcorchestraleague.org

MUSIC

Rocklahoma Returns There’s nothing quite like the magic of an outdoor concert, and Rocklahoma in Pryor has an entire agenda full of rock music heaven planned for Memorial Day weekend. Expect “lots of surprises,” says Joe Livtag, executive producer of the festival. “Every year some unexpected things happen with the artists. But that’s what makes these festivals memorable – not everything is scripted to the letter.” Rocklahoma started in 2007 as an ’80’s hair band festival, but, since 2010, the producers have tried to widen the scope of both the talent and the audience by branching out into mainstream rock with current and classic elements. Since this change, several legendary acts have graced the Rocklahoma stage. “There have been some bucket list perform-

ers – Guns N’ Roses, Kid Rock, The Scorpions, Motely Crue,” Livtag says. “Being able to stand on the side of the stage and watch these bands that I grew up loving playing this festival ... these are some of the greatest memories.” Outdoor activities are always tricky in Oklahoma, especially in the spring, but Litvag and his team are fully prepared for the fickle weather. “Typically we work with the National Weather Service, and we’re in constant contact with other meteorologists,” he says. “The safety of the fans, the artists and the crew is our No. 1 priority.” Rocklahoma runs May 26-28. For a lineup and directions, visit rocklahoma.com.

CHARITABLE EVENTS

AROUND THE STATE

AMERICAN TOURIST CELEBRATES CINCO DE MAYO May 5 OKLAHOMA CITY FARMERS MARKET Join Upward

Transitions for an evening of silent and live auctions, live music, dancing, food and drinks. – upwardtransitions.org

DOWNTOWN EDMOND ARTS FESTIVAL 5X5 ART SHOW FUNDRAISER May 5-7 DOWNTOWN This celebration

of art features 5-inch-square art by 55 different artists, all for $55 apiece. – edmondfinearts.com

RUN FOR THE ROSES HOPE GALA May 6 CHEVY BRICKTOWN EVENTS CENTER The Hope

Gala includes live viewing of the Kentucky Derby, the Pick the Winning Horse raffle, dinner, and silent and live auctions. – centraloklahoma.jdrf.org

JA CLASSIC CORPORATE

GOLF CHALLENGE May 8 GAILLARDIA GOLF CLUB

Join Junior Achievement for a day of camaraderie and fun contests, plus activities benefitting the nonprofit. – jaok.org

GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON May 11 NATIONAL COWBOY AND WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM Go Red for Women encourages women and their families to take action and live a healthier life. – heart.org

WOMEN BUILD 2017 May 13 NATIONWIDE Women Build

brings together women from all walks of life to address the housing crisis facing millions of people nationwide.

– cohfh.org

THE LETTER CARRIERS’ FOOD DRIVE May 13 STATEWIDE Letter carriers

in 198 Oklahoma cities will help stamp out hunger by collecting food donations on their mail routes. – okfoodbank.org

PERFORMANCES JIM GAFFIGAN May 5 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE The brilliant

of the secrets behind Gilley’s longevity is his ability to balance the heart of an entertainer with the brain of a businessman.

Jim Gaffigan is on his Fully Dressed Tour.

– riverwind.com

RON WHITE May 19 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Comedian Ron

WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Cracking

– winstarworldcasino.com

RODNEY CARRINGTON May 26-27

“Tater Salad” White first rose to fame as the cigar-smoking, scotch-drinking funnyman from the Blue Collar Comedy Tour phenomenon, but now as a chart-topping Grammy-nominated comedian and a feature film actor, White has established himself as a star in his own right.

– riverwind.com

MICKEY GILLEY May 20 RIVERWIND CASINO, NORMAN Mickey Gilley has

accomplished what most artists only dream of — a long and fulfilling career marked by loyal fans and financial success. One

up crowds for over 20 years, join Carrington as he brings his unique brand of stand-up comedy back to the stage at WinStar World Casino and Resort. – winstarworldcasino.com

CAU CHUYEN TINH TOI: THE STORY OF MY LOVE May 28 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO, THACKERVILLE Paris by

Night artist Nguyen Hong Nhung celebrates 10 years as one of the hottest ballad singers in the Vietnamese music industry. Guaranteed to be an alluring night, Story of

MAY 2017 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

93


Where & When

My Love will feature over 20 top hit songs from Nhung’s

greatest hits.

– winstarworldcasino.com

SPORTS OKLAHOMA STATE COWBOY FAST DRAW SHOOTOUT CHAMPIONSHIP May 19-21

CREEK COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS Come see

the fastest guns in the West. This event celebrates Western heritage and highlights the culture and practices of early Oklahoma settlers. – travelok.com

SPRING TRAIL RIDE May 20 WOOLAROC MUSEUM AND WILDLIFE PRESERVE This

country retreat of oilman Frank Phillips is hidden away in the beauty of the rolling Osage Hills southwest of Bartlesville. The trail ride covers approximately 15 miles of terrain that is rarely, if ever, seen by the general public.

– woolaroc.org

TOUR DE MEERS May 27 MEERS VOLUNTEER FIRE STATION Ride along with

excited guests as you get a tour of Meers during this annual event. – tourdemeers.org

CONCERTS

include the Turnpike Troubadours, Cody Johnson and the Josh Abbott Band. Don’t miss this exciting weekend of great music. – visitstillwater.org

ROSE ROCK MUSIC FESTIVAL May 5-7 NOBLE The Rose Rock

Music Festival begins with a carnival, art and craft vendors, great festival food and more. Saturday brings the festival into full swing with a parade, car show, poker run, a carnival, and of course, great music ranging from country, blues and rock to classical and retro pop. – nobleok.org

BARRY MANILOW May 12 CHOCTAW CASINO, DURANT Barry Manilow

THACKERVILLE America’s

favorite country music trio, Rascal Flatts, takes the stage for an unforgettable show in the Global Event Center. – winstarworldcasino.com

THE BREEZIN’ AND BREATHLESS TOUR WITH GEORGE BENSON AND KENNY G May 13 CHOCTAW CASINO, DURANT Guitarist and

songwriter George Benson joins contemporary jazz saxophonist Kenny G for The Breezin’ and Breathless Tour. – choctawcasinos.com

CHOCTAW CASINO, DURANT Don’t miss one of

most iconic bands in American history take the stage to perform beloved classics. – choctawcasinos.com

RASCAL FLATTS May 13 WINSTAR WORLD CASINO,

– choctawcasinos.com

country music’s shining stars in an electric concert as Toby Keith takes the stage.

COMMUNITY

19th-century reenactors and experience a celebration of May Day, the beginning of the growing season. Visitors enjoy social activities, entertainment, agricultural demonstrations, food and more. – okhistory.org

OKLAHOMA STEAM THRESHING AND GAS ENGINE SHOW May 5-7 STEAM PARK GROUNDS, PAWNEE Gates open at 8

a.m. daily for exhibits including antique power exhibits, saw mill, machine shop, wheat threshing and more.

– oklahomathreshers.org

FESTIVAL OF THE CHILD

May 6

YUKON CITY PARK Festival

of the Child celebrates the magic of childhood in an entertaining atmosphere. Over 50 interactive games await.

– cityofyukonok.gov

CHICKASHA SWAP MEET May 10-12

712 E. CHOCTAW AVE. At

the state’s longest running auto swap meet, you can buy or sell all auto-related items, be they cars, trucks, antiques, classics, memorabilia, parts, literature or signs.

– hemmings.com

FOR EVEN MORE

EXCITING EVENTS

IN TULSA, OKC AND AROUND

THE STATE, HEAD TO

OKMAG.COM.

94

A half-century after S.E. Hinton’s novel about disaffected teens debuted, Tulsa celebrates.

HUEY LEWIS & THE NEWS

TOBY KEITH May 17 CHOCTAW CASINO, DURANT Witness one of

MURRELL HOME MAY DAY CELEBRATION May 2 GEORGE M. MURRELL HOME, PARK HILL Join

In Praise of The Outsiders

May 20

comes to the stage to celebrate a career spanning 50 years, with hits like “Mandy” and “Can’t Smile Without You.”

– choctawcasinos.com

FILM AND CINEMA

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

Around Town

There may not be any bit of Tulsa pop culture more hallowed than S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders. Long before I moved to the Sooner State, I had some knowledge of Tulsa’s streets thanks to this classic of young-adult fiction. Fifty years on, the novel still pulses with life and feels worth celebrating. Tulsa certainly thinks so because there’s a large semicentennial celebration planned for the book this month. Included in this bash will be several screenings of Francis Ford Coppola’s film adaptation of the novel playing May 7 at Circle Cinema. A lower-profile production than his films from the 1970s, Coppola’s ’80s take on the book is full of nuanced pleasures, heightened for residents by the director’s choice to actually film in Tulsa. On hand at the screenings will be actors C. Thomas Howell, Ralph Macchio and Darren Dalton, who play three of the main disaffected teenagers in the film.

At Home

Before Scarlett Johannson became a household name, she starred in a number of quirky indie films, none with a more devoted cult than the 2001 comedy Ghost World. Terry Zwigoff ’s dyspeptic adaptation of a graphic novel by Daniel Clowes, the film follows smart-mouthed Enid (Thora Birch) as she drifts through life after her high school graduation. With a best friend (Johannsson) who’s changing faster than she is, and a potential older love interest (a touching Steve Buscemi), Enid must navigate the waters of adulthood as best she can.

A somewhat familiar storyline gets pepped up by zippy dialog and some mortifying dark comedy. Get the new director-approved special edition from the Criterion Collection and add this wonderful film to your rotation.

In Theaters

Ah May, the beginning of blockbuster season proper. Though some always sneak in ahead of time, May is when the big studio guns come out literally and figuratively. This season is no exception as Disney bookends the month with two huge properties, Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2 and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales. Of the two, I’m far more excited about Guardians (I stopped paying attention to the Pirates movies 10 or 12 sequels ago) and hope it delivers on some of the unfulfilled promise of the first film. Despite its extraterrestrial setting and game cast, the first Guardians film fell a little flat; the plot never fully congealed. Even with Chris Pratt’s charisma in the central role, the cheeky humor felt slightly out of place with the attempt to create huge stakes. But there was enough to like, so a subsequent try may get things right. The film seems to aim at two goals: advancing the mythology of the Guardians themselves (while building their interpersonal relations) and getting ready for the subsequent appearance of archvillain Thanos in later Marvel films. Let’s hope the balance works nicely and one side doesn’t overwhelm the other. ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

PHOTO COURTESY MARVEL/DISNEY

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Derek Masengale

K

JRH-TV storm chaser Derek Masengale got his start from his hot air balloon business – when a meteorologist he took for a ride saw how important meteorology is to flying balloons, he invited Masengale to his first storm chase. Masengale says he was hooked from the start. He’s been chasing storms for 34 years and working the last 20 of those professionally for The Weather Channel and local television stations. In addition to storm chasing, he also works a fulltime job as a surgical assistant and board eligible orthopedic physician assistant. We recently talked to Masengale and got his thoughts on …

… his most unnerving experience.

In 34 years of chasing, I’ve had several unnerving experiences, but one of the most recent was the tornado last year that hit Tulsa. I literally drove through the tornado as it crossed Bird Creek in Owasso on Highway 169. Luckily it was at one of its weak points in the life cycle, so I was able to get back to the chase and, in fact, chased for another two hours after that.

… balancing storm chasing and his full-time job.

Sometimes it is difficult to balance storm chasing and surgery, but fortunately a lot of the storms occur later in the afternoon or early

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2017

evening in the spring, especially following the daytime heating, which allows me to work my normal job and be finished in time to catch the storms as they form.

… modifications to storm-chasing vehicles.

My storm chase vehicle is no different than any other truck of its kind other than the fact that it has all the equipment that I use, such as cameras, laptops and communications equipment. There are a couple of chasers in the country that have tornado intercept vehicles that are constructed much like a tank, but those are not typical storm chaser vehicles.

… tips for staying safe in severe weather.

Listen to the meteorologist and the storm chasers reports. When they say there’s a tornado in your area, heed those warnings and take shelter immediately. But I think the most important safety tip is to have a plan in place before storms arrive and practice that plan to know where you are going to take shelter before the storms arrive. Also, have a bag ready with flashlights, weather radio, extra shoes, your medicines you might take and a change of clothes for each person.

… why he enjoys storm chasing.

I think the biggest misconception that people have about storm chasers is that we’re always all about the thrill. While that is true to some extent – I do love the thrill of the chase – my first and foremost reason to go out and storm chase, at times spend my own money, spend my time, put the wear and tear on my own vehicle, is to simply inform and keep the public safe. I love what I do. And I love meeting the people that I’ve met, including some that came up and told me that hearing my report of a tornado on the ground near their area actually prompted them to take shelter, which possibly saved their lives. That is the reward that I get for doing what I do and doing what I love.

PHOTO COURTESY DEREK MASENGALE

C LO S I N G T H O U G H T S


Oklahoma Magazine May 2017  
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