Page 1

MAKE TIME FOR TULSA TEA

KRISTA TIPPETT ON BEING

A DESIGNER'S ECLECTIC HOME

TULSA COACH READY TO SHOCK MAY 2014

ALLAN HOUSER

A look at one of the 20th century’s most influential artists

SPECIAL REPORT:

AEROSPACE

IN OKLAHOMA

WOMEN HELPING OTHERS

MOORE: ONE YEAR LATER A COMMUNITY STILL IN RECOVERY


#bloomtown #funinthesun #springinthesquare

Capture, Share #uticasquare

uticasquare.com

Experience Utica Square in full bloom during Spring in the Square. Saturday, May 17th from 10am to 5pm. You’re invited to tour our flowerbeds, purchase flowers, and talk with expert gardeners. Bloomtown, in front of the Lolly Garden, will be full of kid-friendly festivities from 10am to 3pm. And be sure to enter our photography contest for the chance to win a $1,000 Utica Square gift certificate compliments of Commerce Bank.


VOL. XVIII, NO. 5

FEATURES

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May 2 014 O K L A H O M A M A G A Z I N E

Those Oklahoma Skies

Oklahoma is a bastion for myriad industries, including agriculture and oil and gas; the state’s two biggest cities were founded on these. But flying under the radar is the state’s robust aviation and aerospace industry, one that addresses all parts of the industry, from manufacturing and maintenance to the latest technology in the aerospace industry.

66

The Transcendent Allan Houser

73

Women Helping Others

Women in Oklahoma have not always had an easy go of it. Studies regularly cite disparities and disadvantages that the state’s female residents face. Contributing editor Meika Yates Hines profiles six female advocates who hope to change the state of affairs for women in Oklahoma.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

The art world remembers the late Allan Houser this year, the centennial of his birth. Born and raised in Oklahoma to the Haozous family – part of the Chiricahua Apache band imprisoned with Geronimo by the U.S. in 1886 – Houser found his ultimate freedom in art and transcended expectations and all categories.

Remembering May 20

It was a day in which ominous weather patterns all but guaranteed a severe weather event. No one could have imagined, however, the destruction that was left after an EF-5 tornado ripped through central Oklahoma, saving its most horrific power for Moore. Contributing editor Tara Malone shares the stories of six individuals impacted by the storm about their experiences and recovery, which is ongoing.

New & Improved!

OKMAG.COM

HIGH TEA AT STONEHORSE

BOB BURKE’S MANY COLLECTIONS

A DESIGNERS ECLECTIC HOME

Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read expanded

TULSA COACH READY TO SHOCK MAY 2014

May 2014

articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS: View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

ALLAN HOUSER

A look at one of the 20th century’s most influential artists

SPECIAL REPORT:

AEROSPACE

IN OKLAHOMA

WOMEN HELPING OTHERS

MOORE: ONE YEAR LATER A COMMUNITY STILL IN RECOVERY

may Cover.indd 2

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PLAZA TOWERS ELEMENTARY TEACHER LINDSIE WRIGHT RECOUNTS THE HORROR OF THE MAY 20, 2013, TORNADO IN MOORE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

4/16/14 3:58 PM

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.

Get Oklahoma

On The Go!


RECOGNIZING NATIONAL STROKE AWARENESS MONTH

BECAUSE EVERY SECOND COUNTS DURING A STROKE, THE ST. JOHN HEYMAN STROKE CENTER TEAM STANDS READY 24/7 WITH QUALITY CARE. Our multidisciplinary team of doctors and specialists excel in early identification and immediate treatment, utilizing the latest technology to help prevent permanent or long-term damage. The St. John Heyman Stroke Center is the first comprehensive stroke center in eastern Oklahoma certified by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association and The Joint Commission, an honor attained by only the top 10 percent in the nation.

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Contents

DEPARTMENTS

35

The State

13

Oklahoma residents take advantage of an online trend in which homeowners rent out rooms – and sometimes entire houses – to travelers who are looking for more than a hotel experience.

16 18 20 22 24 28 30 35

People 3 Qs Culture Smart Move The Insider Oklahoma Business Scene Living Space

Renowned Oklahoma City interior designer Carson See renovated an historic home and filled it with eclectic pieces of furniture and art that represent a life of travels.

38 40 42 44 46 48

42

Color Trend Style Beauty Your Health Destination

Teatime comes to T-Town with Stonehorse Cafe & Market’s Tulsa Tea. Guests find themselves in the middle of a new tradition combining elements of the classic English tea with casual comfort and fun over bite-sized treats, champagne and a lot of tea.

92 93

What We’re Eating Food Event

Entertainment

95

Our favorite Lone Star maverick entertainer, Lyle Lovett, is back in Tulsa but leaves His Big Band at home. Lovett & His Acoustic Group are set to play the Brady Theater. Just don’t touch his hat.

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89

Taste

89

13

Calendar of Events

In Person

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

95


Sharolyn D. Cook, D.O. |

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY

WARREN CLINIC

With an inquisitive mind and a passion for helping those with critical heart problems, Dr. Sharolyn Cook considers herself lucky to be part of the region’s best cardiovascular team.

How did you become interested in internal medicine? In high school, I knew all of the bones of the human body. My teacher said, “You could be a doctor some day.” Years later, while working as an X-ray technician, I asked the doctors how they diagnose a condition and I always wanted to know more. That’s when I knew I really wanted to be a doctor.

Do you have a special motto you live by? Yes, Isaiah, 40:31 of the Bible: Those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.

What is the most amazing thing to you about the human body? The heart is unbelievable. Nothing in nature works as hard and is as resilient. No other organ has the ability to compensate to adverse conditions and repair itself to the same degree. The more we study it the more mysterious and marvelous it becomes. Every day I witness just how miraculous the heart truly is.

circulatory problems that could have been greatly reduced if not entirely prevented. And, of course, regular exercise also does wonders for the heart and circulatory system.

What sets Warren Clinic and the Heart Hospital at Saint Francis apart from others? When I arrived I was struck by how knowledgeable and helpful the people were. They took me under their wing, so to speak. I have some great mentors and I’m very lucky to be a part of Warren Clinic’s team of medical experts. The staff is very friendly and also very hard working. That combination of friendliness and a strong work ethic really does set us apart. Warren Clinic provides a multispecialty group of physicians who can assist all of my patients under the umbrella of one health system.

Is there one thing you wish every patient knew? Take good care of your body and it will serve you well for a long time. I always advise a diet high in fruits and vegetables, and with less red meat, sugar and salt. Too many people suffer from heart and

Warren Clinic Cardiology of Tulsa 6151 South Yale Avenue, Suite A-100 | Tulsa, Oklahoma 918-494-8500 | saintfrancis.com/hearthospital SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL | THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | WARREN CLINIC | HEART HOSPITAL AT SAINT FRANCIS | SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL SOUTH | LAUREATE PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC AND HOSPITAL | SAINT FRANCIS BROKEN ARROW


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JAMI MATTOX ASSOCIATE EDITOR KAREN SHADE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS TARA MALONE, CHRIS SUTTON, JOHN WOOLEY, MEIKA YATES HINES GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN GRAPHIC DESIGNER NATE PUCKETT DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, J. CHRISTOPHER LITTLE

NOw OpeN

Albert Bierstadt Sierra Nevada Morning oil on canvas, 1870, GM 0126.2305 Title sponsor of the Gilcrease Museum 2013-14 exhibition season is the sherman E. smith Family Foundation.

1400 N. Gilcrease MuseuM rd. Tulsa, OK 918-596-2700 Gilcrease.uTulsa.edu TU Is an EEO/aa InsTITUTIOn. 18805 Gilcrease.indd 1

3/20/14 1:40 PM

IT’S A PIECE OF CAKE

Let Oklahoma Magazine be your guide in planning the be big day! Look for our Summer Wedding Guide in the June issue.

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SAMANTHA E. GRAMMER CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2014 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily TM represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates. 2013

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

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EDITOR’S LETTER

THE VOTES ARE IN!

2014 Look for The Best of the Best of Oklahoma.

“We (teachers) kept shouting reassurances – ‘It will be over soon.’ ‘We are okay.’ ‘Stay calm.’ At one point, an overwhelming sense of peace came over me. We were in the moment, and there was nothing we could do about it.” It’s a day that none of us will forget. On May 20, 2013, an EF-5 tornado swept through the city of Moore, destroying everything in its path, including two elementary schools. Lindsie Wright, a teacher at Plaza Towers Elementary, related the events of that day to contributing editor Tara Malone as part of a series of interviews recounting the tragic event. In the hours and days following the horrible storm, first-person accounts poured forth, each person’s tale as fearful and agonizing as the next. Yet it’s the report from inside Plaza Towers Elementary – where dozens of children sheltered in halls, in restrooms, with nothing but a few walls, a roof and brave teachers to protect them from one of Mother Nature’s most violent acts – that brings the horror of that day to life. Seven children died in Plaza Towers as a result of the tornado. Seventeen more died in the storm, and more than 350 were injured. The tornado left more than $2 billion in damage as it remained on the ground for 39 minutes. The day before, on May 19, an EF-4 tornado ripped through Shawnee, killing two. On May 31, the widest tornado ever recorded touched down southwest of Oklahoma City. It killed eight – including four storm chasers – and injured more than 150. After events such as those that unfolded throughout May, I have often heard some people living outside of Oklahoma question why anyone would take the chance of living in such a tornado-prone locale. We live in Oklahoma because it’s our home. It’s where we go to school, go to church, raise families, celebrate life’s great moments and grieve the worst. Weather in Oklahoma is its own beautiful, majestic, violent entity. After the May 20 tornado, when first responders and volunteers immediately began search and rescue efforts, when family and strangers opened their homes to those displaced, when an entire state rallied around a community that had lost so much, the question about why I choose to live in Oklahoma was answered again and again. Jami Mattox Managing Editor

THE AFTERMATH OF THE MAY 20, 2013, TORNADO CAN BE SEEN IN THIS PHOTO TAKEN SOON AFTER THE STORM. PHOTO BY JESSICA KIRSH / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Coming in July.

Don’t miss this exciting issue. Call 918.744.6205 or email advertising@okmag.com

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014


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For years, some Oklahoma residents have been calling for passenger rail service to connect Oklahoma’s two major metropolitan areas. Now it appears a possibility, but there’s a large hurdle to overcome. A recent U.S. Census report cites two of Oklahoma’s western communities as part of the 10 fastest growing in the U.S. We take a look at the population boom and contributing factors.

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The State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

World Wide

Wanderlust Oklahomans take to the Internet in search of – and to supply – hospitality.

S

JESSICA BRENT REGULARLY RENTS HER HOME TO TRAVELERS ON THE WEBSITE AIRBNB. COM. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

ome motels may leave the light on. Others might love having you there. But with Airbnb. com, you can be king of your choice of castles. Founded in 2008, Airbnb is a network of hosts from nearly 200 countries offering any kind of accommodation you can think of – from single rooms to entire villas, Airstream trailers to tents. Travelers bored with the flat pillows and institutional paintings typical of traditional hotels are flocking to the unusual options Airbnb hosts provide, often at a fraction of the cost of a hotel room. Cynthia Mitchell, of Oklahoma City, says she was a bit apprehensive at first about using Airbnb to travel. “I heard about Airbnb from an Internet news story about cheaper ways to travel,” she says. “I looked at their website and just kept it in the back of my mind as an option, but since I’m okay with staying at cheaper hotels, I never really thought it would be something I would take advantage of personally.” Then in November 2012, Mitchell faced a travel dilemma: No hotels were close enough to her remote destination. That’s when she decided it was time to give Airbnb a try. “I found a perfect place to stay just minutes from where some of my family would be staying,” she says. “I filled out a profile and contacted the host. She had a cabana-type room off of her house that she had available. I was not quite sure how it would be, but it ended up perfect.” Since her initial experience, Mitchell no longer hesitates to book via Airbnb. She has nabbed some cozy accommodations in multiple cities, and even made a few friends. “Getting to stay with local people is one of my favorite parts,” she says. “Sometimes at hotels, the workers don’t know the area well, but when you are staying in someone’s MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

home, they usually know what is available close and in the town in general. There is also the potential to meet people from all over the country and the world and get some of the best advice about local activities.” For Airbnb novices, “make sure that you read everything that is available about a place before you book. If something or someone gives you the creeps, move on; there are usually plenty of places to stay in the areas that I have looked,” Mitchell says. Most hosts, far from being unsettling, are more like Mark McConnell, a freelance carpenter who rents out his home in Oklahoma City to Airbnb travelers. McConnell says that growing up with parents who often opened their home to guests, friends and those in need inspired him to become an Airbnb host. In addition, McConnell says his own experience in traveling using the website Couchsurfing.com placed him in unique accommodations with generous hosts. “Several years later, when I was back in Oklahoma City and had a place of my own, I was happy to begin returning the favor by opening my own space to other couch-surfers who needed a place to stay when they passed through,” McConnell says. “In the past few years, I’ve had individuals, friends, couples and even small groups come through and stay with me who were traveling by such diverse modes as bicycle, motorcycle, car and even hitchhiking. It’s actually a lot of fun.” Lured by the promise of a bit more reliability, McConnell soon moved his hosting offers to Airbnb. During a typical week, he has a couple of guests at his studio home near the Linwood and Crestwood neighborhoods. His studio is a good example of why so many travelers are being lured to Airbnb for unique places to stay; McConnell has renovated the space to be an example of “green” living. “When I moved into the studio several years ago, I gutted the place once more, started over and recreated the space to make it more my

CAUSE

14

TARA MALONE

RED DIRT RELIEF

A group of Oklahoma musicians is on a mission to raise awareness for the need for health care, and they’re using their strongest tools to do it: their voices. The Red Dirt Relief Fund was founded several years ago, according to Brad Piccolo, a member of the Red Dirt Rangers. “There’s been a brotherhood and sisterhood of people that help others in times of need, in case of accident, fire, flood. We would throw impromptu concerts to raise money and awareness. It happened on a regular basis,” Piccolo says. “… We started a nonprofit that could collect money officially through donations, con

own style,” he says. “That style is eclectic, it is minimal, it is creative, it is natural and it is as environmentally friendly as I could manage.” For instance, McConnell chose paints that contain no volatile organic compounds. Instead of utilizing chemicals, he stained the concrete floor using coffee grounds and iron sulfate. He also furnished the space with many items that were either found, reclaimed or exchanged in barter. “I stained my oak butcher block counters with an iron oxide ebony stain I made by mixing apple cider vinegar and steel wool,” he says. “I put in slate tile. I installed all-wood blinds. It’s really a fun place,” he says. Like McConnell, Jessica Brent had previously hosted travelers through Couchsurfing.com. She made the switch to Airbnb to make a bit of extra money and to provide visitors with a great local experience. “I really enjoy making “I really enjoy making sure travelers leave with sure travelers leave with a positive impression of Tulsa,” Brent says. “…I like enabling visitors to experience Tulsa from a a positive impression local’s perspective by staying in a unique neighof Tulsa,” Jessica Brent borhood and exploring downtown based on local recommendations. I think the first time, visitors says. “…I like enabling are surprised by what Tulsa has to offer, and we visitors to experience are increasingly becoming a regional destination. I often use Airbnb when I travel, so I know Tulsa from a local’s that the experience you have staying at an Airbnb perspective by staying in place versus a hotel can be a lot richer, and I’m glad to provide that for people traveling to and a unique neighborhood through Tulsa.” and exploring downtown Brent, who has hosted for about a year and a half, rents out her historic Dutch colonial in Brady based on local Heights for $100 per night, plus a small cleaning recommendations.” fee. It’s a win-win for both Brent and her guests. “A lot of hosts will just rent out a bedroom in their house, but I prefer to make my entire home available because I don’t really like sharing my personal space with strangers, and I can also charge more for the entire house,” Brent says. “When I have guests, I just tidy up the house, pack up a bag and my dog and go stay with my partner for the duration of the reservation. The guests have to agree to take care of the cat, but everyone seems to love having him around.” Both guests and hosts alike emphasize that Airbnb is, above all, a network built on mutual trust. “First, you have to recognize that Airbnb is very much a community of people that are looking for something different and unique in their travels,” Brent says. “Even though I rarely meet my guests face-to-face, I have to put in time answering their questions and making sure they have a great stay. Second, trust your gut. Airbnb, as with most of the new sharing economy platforms, is built on trust. It takes a leap of faith to hand your keys over to a complete stranger, and you have to be discerning. I’m quick to turn down requests if something seems weird or if it seems like the person doesn’t quite get it. For Airbnb to work, both the guest and the host have to approach it with shared respect and trust.”

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

certs, etc., to raise more to help more people.” Piccolo says that with the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, the musicians and artists that make up the Red Dirt Relief Fund felt it was a good time to raise awareness about how easy it is to get insurance. To get the message out, the group recorded a video for “Stand,” a song touting the benefits of insurance coverage. The video is set for release at the beginning of May. With the video produced by Sterlin Harjo and the song recorded by Red Dirt legend Steve Ripley, “Stand” features more than 60 Oklahoma musicians.

“It was an honor to stand with so many of my fellow brother musiTHE RED DIRT RANGERS cians for such a worthy (FROM LEFT) ARE BEN cause,” says musician HAN, JOHN COOPER AND BRAD PICCOLO. Brandon Jenkins, who PHOTO BY KELLY KERR. participated in the project. “Once again, we come together under the banner of music to make a difference in the world.” – Jami Mattox


The State

FRED WILLIAMS, A WNBA COACH FOR MANY YEARS, NOW HEADS THE TULSA SHOCK. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

PEOPLE

Ready To Shock Veteran WNBA coach Fred Williams is ready to take Tulsa’s team to the top.

G

rowing up playing basketball with Reggie Theus might have prepared Fred Williams for the tough job he has ahead of him as head coach of the WNBA Tulsa Shock. Williams says that Theus, who played for the Chicago Bulls and is now men’s head coach at California State-Northridge, “beat him off and on” at games when they were growing up in Compton, Calif. “There’s a big challenge ahead, and I’m up for challenges,” he says. “I know things are tough and shaky, and that’s why I’m here – to help and to give some of my basketball knowledge as a coach and myself as a person for the city of Tulsa.” Williams has gained a good idea of the team’s strengths and weaknesses from watching game footage and playing against the team, and he knows “we have to get better defensively over our opponents to lower the scores and create an opportunity for the offense.” He says he plans to help the team move in this direction by relying on what has worked for him the past six years as head coach of the Atlanta Dream. “My philosophy is to run fast break [offense] and play up-tempo basketball. It’s been proven to work, and I coached one of the top two teams in scoring. I want to bring that exciting play offensively and then shut down some people defensively,” he says. Williams coached the Atlanta Dream team as either the head or assistant through three conference championships and three trips to the WNBA finals. Williams coached the University of Southern California women’s team to a national championship in 1983 with future WNBA greats Cynthia Cooper and Cheryl Miller. He also focused on coaching other WNBA teams, such as the Charlotte Sting and the Utah Starzz. “I enjoyed coaching [women] in my 10 years at Southern Cal, and then getting into the pro side of things,” he says. “It gives you more freedom just to coach and teach every day versus college, where you have to do a lot of recruiting and making sure players are in class. You do four to six months of coaching on the court and then time on evaluating the players and the draft after that.” His primary goal with the Shock players is to help them develop “that mental toughness as a team to know that you can win, you can build something and finish. I think a lot of these young ladies have been here to build something in a short amount of time, and now it’s time to take it to another level,” he says.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

The Shock has not fared well since relocating to Tulsa from Detroit in 2010. Over the last three seasons, the team’s record has been 29-107 with no trips to the playoffs. In each of the last seven years at Detroit, the Shock made it to the playoffs, and it won the WNBA championship three times. That record explains why Williams knows “the mental game is important, and we have to have that at the beginning. It’s not easy in this league to beat anyone, but we can build our mental toughness and face our opponents by having respect without fear.” In the off-season, Williams plans to “see some of the high school games, work on some youth programs for kids in the area and make some speaking engagements to motivate the players who have a dream to be in the WNBA.” With an emphasis on reaching out to the community, Williams believes he has much to offer Tulsa that goes beyond a winning pro basketball team. “I’m a guy who is fair, who gives a lot of energy, who really cares for the youth in the community and around the city,” says Williams. “I’m a person that knows relationships take energy, and that’s what I have to give to the team and to the city. I have to create my own success story in Tulsa. I’ve done that in Atlanta; and with day by day work by me and my team, we will make that happen [in Tulsa].” SHAUN PERKINS


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The State

3 QS

Shakin’ All Over

Seismologist Austin Holland discusses the recent rise in Oklahoma earthquakes. Although Oklahoma generally experiences few earthquakes, the state has seen a drastic increase in frequency within the past two years. This came as a surprise to everyone, including some scientists. Austin Holland, a survey researcher with the Oklahoma Geological Survey, shares his perspective. What’s causing the recent earthquakes in Oklahoma? Oklahoma has a long history of seismic activity. The first documented earthquake in Oklahoma occurred in 1882. Oklahoma has a long history of earthquake monitoring. The Oklahoma Geological Survey has operated a modern seismic network for 35 years and employed a seismologist to work with the data. Oklahoma has a greater potential for earthquakes than many places in the mid-continent. The largest earthquake we know to have occurred in Oklahoma happened on the Meers Fault about 1,300 years ago and was about a magnitude 7 earthquake. So clearly there is potential to have a large earthquake. Oklahoma has seen a dramatic increase in the number of earthquakes. This means that we are also seeing more earthquakes being felt by residents. We know that the earthquakes are in response to naturally occurring stresses. We don’t know whether or not fluid injection from oil and gas activities is having an appreciable effect on helping to release that naturally occurring stress as earthquakes.

Can these origins be traced to man-made causes? We do see some earthquakes likely triggered by man-made causes. There is a real challenge AUSTIN HOLLAND IS A SURVEY RESEARCHER in identifying which may be man-made and WHO MONITORS THE which are naturally occurring. The reason this STATE’S EARTHQUAKE is a challenge is that these oil and gas activities ACTIVITY. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS. have occurred for a long time in Oklahoma, and the earthquakes are occurring over very broad areas. In addition, there is very little data available to help address these issues because they have never been issues in the past. It is also very difficult to know what the conditions are deep within the Earth or to observe whether man’s activities have dramatically altered those conditions. We still continue to examine these issues, though. How likely is it that the number of earthquakes per year and the size of these earthquakes will increase? Seismologists cannot predict earthquakes, and so we have no way to know what the future holds. We don’t know whether this increase in earthquake activity will continue, or if things will begin to quiet down, but it is not unreasonable – given the current level of seismicity – to assume that the earthquakes will continue for some time with more events being felt by local residents. NATHAN PORTER

S TAT

63

In May 2013, Oklahoma residents saw several deadly storm systems tear through the Sooner state, spawning tornadoes that left billions of dollars in damage in their paths. Sixty-three tornadoes were clocked during this month last year, the third-highest tally for the month of May since the National Weather Service began keeping track in 1950. In May 2010, NWS reported 91 tornadoes touched down in Oklahoma, the most reported in any month since 1950; in May 2005, there were zero tornadoes reported, an anomaly for the peak of tornado season. The average number of tornado touchdowns in May is 22, with 1,410 having been recorded since 1950. – Jami Mattox

18

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014


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The State

SHOUT OUT

THE 1491s

RAINDROP TURKISH HOUSE HOSTS A WEEKLY FRIDAY NIGHT SOCIAL AT ITS BROKEN ARROW CENTER. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

CULTURE

Seeds Of Understanding

Y

Raindrop brings Turkish culture to Tulsa.

ou are invited. The Raindrop Turkish House welcomes everyone to enjoy traditional cuisine, art, music and dance. Raindrop goes beyond the role of a community center for local TurkishAmericans. The organization acts as an ambassador, encouraging friendships and conversation between cultures through programs that are open to all. Raindrop hosts Turkish language and history classes, cooking classes, water marbling classes and women’s coffee night discussions. “As the seat of the Ottoman Empire, Turkey has a history of multiethnic, multifaith inclusion,” says Raindrop spokesperson Omer Akdeniz. “We think by sharing and celebrating the diversity of our communities, everyone will understand one another better and be more enriched.” People seem excited to learn about the culture, he says. “We have also felt welcomed in the community. That has really helped us as an immigrant community to get settled and feel part of the city,” Akdeniz says. Many of Raindrop’s cultural events center around food and hospitality. “Because of the location of Turkey and its Ottoman past, we have a pretty diverse kitchen,” he says. “We are famous for our kebabs and our baklava.” For the past four years, Tulsans have gotten a taste of this Turkish fare at Raindrop’s biggest event, the Turkish Festival, this year on May

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

3. Last year, the free event attracted about 5,000 guests, who immersed themselves in the culture. “We bring artisans from Turkey,” says Akdeniz. “We have whirling dervish performances. There is a huge offering of Turkish food and crafts.” These education and entertainment events help Raindrop maintain its culture from within, as well. “We help Turkish-Americans to preserve their Turkish identities by providing them ‘home away from home,” says Akdeniz. “We are proud of our heritage and don’t want to lose the sights, sounds, flavors and values of our culture.” The organization also wants recent Turkish immigrants to feel comfortable in their new country. “That might be through English language courses or just helping them figure out something as simple as how and where to rent an apartment,” he says. Raindrop offers a great balance of services and celebrations that allow Turkish-Americans to thrive in their new country while maintaining their culture and passing it on to future generations. “The United States is such a great place because there are so many people from so many different places that have all shared pieces of their heritage,” Akdeniz says. “We want to add to that mix.” BETH WEESE

In April, the 1491s posted on their popular Facebook page that the American Indian comedy group would no longer make videos, and fans were quick to voice their disappointment. Then someone pointed out it was April Fools’ Day. “It’s all improv. We’re still making it up as we go along,” says Ryan RedCorn, one-fifth of the team known as the 1491s. The group of Dallas Goldtooth, Sterlin Harjo, Migizi Pensoneau, Bobby Wilson and RedCorn formed after they made an impromptu video in 2009 lampooning auditions for the wolf pack in The Twilight Saga: New Moon film, which had just been released. The collaboration worked, and the five have since continued to make sketch comedy videos, many satirizing alarmingly perpetual stereotypes of American Indians, some poking fun at the life and personalities of Indian Country. Some videos make strong points with subtlety: The “Smiling Indians” video conveyed its subjects as ordinary, happy people. It was viewed thousands of times on YouTube and brought the 1491s national attention. Together, they represent the Dakota, Muscogee (Creek), Navajo, Ojibwe, Osage and Seminole tribes; they are writers, poets, activists and artists. While three call Oklahoma home, two – Wilson and Goldtooth – live in Minnesota. None consider themselves comedians, but they’re unabashed fans of Jon Stewart, Dave Chapelle and Stephen Colbert, comics casting a critical eye on the day’s absurdities and hypocrisies with stinging humor. Through their video sketches, social media posts, live performances and speaking engagements, the members of the 1491s do the same. “It’s not rocket THE ONLY THING SAVAGE ABOUT THE science, but it does 1491S AMERICAN come with a certain INDIAN SKETCH amount of precision,” COMEDY GROUP IS ITS SATIRE. RedCorn says. – PHOTO COURTESY THE 1491S. Karen Shade


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The State

TULSANS FLOCK TO THE CHERRY STREET FARMERS MARKET. PHOTO BY KAREN SHADE.

S M A R T M OV E

Growing Healthy Habits Farmers markets help everyone access healthy food through SNAP benefits programs.

W

hen Mike Appel, owner of Three Springs Farm, became the first Oklahoma vendor to accept SNAP benefits at his farmers market stall, he was driven by a sense of social justice. “Fresh, local fruits and vegetables – we want these to be accessible to everyone. It should not be dependent on your income,” says Appel, who has accepted the federal benefits for his goods since 2005. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which helps low-income families purchase food, has been around in some form for years, but many local farmers have only recently begun

ICON

22

ASHER GELZER-GOVATOS

DAY OF THE ROOSTER

It’s billed as the oldest continuous annual festival in Oklahoma, and Broken Arrow residents will celebrate the 84th Rooster Days May 9-11. Roscoe, the official mascot of Rooster Days, has served as an ambassador for the festival for the past 83 years. Oklahoma Magazine: Tell me about the firstever Rooster Days. Roscoe: I was a wee one when the first Rooster Days happened, but I remember it fondly. Broken Arrow was a different town then, but I am so proud of how both the festival and the community continue to grow. Some traditions just don’t go away.

to accept SNAP as payment for fresh, locally grown goods. The practice appears to be catching on across Oklahoma. Appel notes that since 2010, the Cherry Street Farmers Market in Tulsa, where he sells his produce, has instituted a market-wide acceptance of the benefits system, and has seen revenue dramatically increase. According to Appel, his revenue from SNAP alone grew from $3,000 in 2010 to nearly $17,000 in 2013. In addition to these numbers, the Cherry Street market has raised private funds for a Double Up Food Bucks Program, in which the market matches up to $20 of SNAP benefits with additional tokens to be spent at the market. “The Double Up Food Bucks, though, can only be used for fruits and vegetables, so it’s an incentive program to get people to eat fresh fruits and vegetables,” says Appel. Even in markets without such mass coordination, more individual vendors have begun accepting SNAP benefits. Wanda Danley, coordinator of the Norman Farm Market, estimates that since SNAP was first accepted there three years ago, the number of vendors who accept the benefits has risen to nearly half, with the number increasing each year. Danley ties this rise in participation to a generational shift. “We are getting younger and younger people wanting to grow organically. I just think everybody is getting more and more aware of [the problems with] fast food and obesity,” she says. Appel, for his part, is dedicated to spreading the word about healthy eating. The Cherry Street Farmers Market is using advertising to reach the 80,000 or so Tulsa area residents who qualify for SNAP assistance. Appel has evidence from years of satisfied customers that people of all income levels in Oklahoma are ready for fresh, healthy food.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

OM: What’s your favorite event at the festival? R: Rooster Days is my festival, so I love every bit of it. It is fun watching the 5k run, and sometimes people even try to wear rooster hats to look like me. I will tell you, I sure do love the Ferris wheel – that may be my very favorite part of all! My friend tells me this year they are bringing a double Ferris wheel that goes 70 feet in the

air. Do you want to ride it with me? OM: Maybe next year. How have you aged so well? R: Well, aren’t you sweet! I like to think it’s my sunny-side-up outlook on life, along with avoiding becoming hen-pecked. – Jami Mattox


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organ Stanley announced today that John W. Cary III, CFA, a Senior Vice President, Financial Advisor, Portfolio Management Director in the Firm’s Tulsa Wealth Management office, has been named to The Financial Times’ 2014 list of America’s Top 400 Financial Advisors. The “Financial Times’ Top 400 Financial Advisors” is a select group of individuals who have a minimum of $250 million in assets under management (AUM) and ten years of industry experience. Qualified Financial Advisors were scored on six attributes: AUM, AUM growth rate, compliance records, experience, industry certifications and online accessibility. Financial Advisors also had to commit to complete anonymous quarterly sentiment surveys for the FT. “I am pleased that John W. Cary is representing Morgan Stanley Wealth Management on this list,” commented Greg Gangas, Branch Manager of Morgan Stanley’s Tulsa office. “This is a well-deserved recognition of John’s experience, professionalism and dedication to the needs of his valued clients.” Morgan Stanley is a leading global financial services firm providing a wide range of investment banking, securities, investment management and wealth management services. The Firm’s employees serve clients world-

wide including corporations, governments, institutions and individuals from more than 1,200 offices in 43 countries. For further information about Morgan Stanley, please visit www.morganstanley.com. Source: The Financial Times Top 400 Financial Advisors is an independent listing produced by the Financial Times (March, 2014). The FT 400 is based in large part on data gathered from and verified by broker-dealer home offices, and, as identified by the FT, reflected each advisor’s performance in six primary areas, including assets under management, asset growth, compliance record, experience, credentials and accessibility. The rating may not be representative of any one client’s experience and is not indicative of the Financial Advisor’s future performance. Neither Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC nor its Financial Advisors or Private Wealth Advisors pays a fee to The Financial Times in exchange for the rating. (c)2014 Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC. Member SIPC.

John W. Cary III, CFA, Senior Vice President Morgan Stanley 2200 Utica Place, Tulsa, OK 74114 918.744.4619 | john.w.cary@morganstanley.com


The State

THE INSIDER

A Long Time Comin’

An accomplished Tulsa musician releases his new album. When asked how long he’s been working on his first solo album, the impressive and entertaining Magic Pocket, Bill Belknap laughs heartily “Do you want the truth?” he asks. “I think Ed and I wrote one of the songs, ‘Bonjour, Monsieur, for Sure,’ in about 1987. I’ve just been writing over the years, and finally it came together as something I thought was more cohesive, because I was kind of writing all over the board. These songs, even though they are kind of diverse, fit together better than some of my other stuff; the last three or four I finished here at Loudoun Road, but that’s been over almost an eightyear period.” So it’s fair to say that Magic Pocket has been, as the Cecil B. DeMille movie promos used to say, years in the making. But that’s hardly all, or even much, of what Belknap has been up to over the years. The “Ed” he refers to is his longtime partner in Tulsa’s Long Branch Studios, Ed Robinson, who also plays keyboards on the new record. And Loudoun Road is the studio Belknap founded, with Robinson as an associate, following the demise of Long Branch in 2003. And even as Belknap and Long Branch were working on big ‘80s and ‘90s studio projects like the soundtrack for Francis Ford Coppola’s Rumble Fish and sessions with Gene Simmons and Bon Jovi, Belknap was also finding plenty BILL BELKNAP HAS WRITTEN SONGS FOR of work as a drummer with area bands – as well as with a national HIS LATEST ALBUM recording act. FOR NEARLY THREE “I started with a group called Fantasy in the ‘70s,” he remembers. DECADES. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT. “It was a bunch of Bartlesville boys, a Chicago kind of band with horns and stuff. Then I worked with Donna Williams and Fat Tuesday for a while, and I was the drummer for Dave Barber for a bunch of shows. Then it was Andy Gravity.” Coming along in the mid-‘80s, the band Andy Gravity not only became a popular Tulsaarea rock act, but also made its mark on, strangely enough, the Michael Jackson universe. In 1987, the Ideal company brought out a line of stuffed animals called Michael’s Pets, each accompanied by its own cassette tape. “On one side was a story about the animal, and on the other was a little song,” he explains.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

“Andy Gravity did the writing and the instruments and so forth, and we had different singers come in. Michael Jackson actually owned the publishing; I guess his family still does. “We did that for a company in L.A. called SEPP International. Our buddy, [former Tulsan] Mitch Schauer, was an animator and a producer, and he got us a lot of work with SEPP,” Belknap continues. “At one time, they were developing an animated version of Bonanza, and Ed Robinson and I did an actual Tulsa Philharmonic orchestration for a 10-minute trailer, which was a lot of fun.” In addition to Belknap and Robinson, Andy Gravity included Eskimo Joe’s owner Stan Clark on lead vocals, Rick Peale on guitar and Ron Flynt on bass. Flynt had returned to Tulsa after a half-dozen years with the influential L.A. power-pop band 20/20, which he’d founded with fellow Tulsan Steve Allen. Their first two albums, 1979’s 20/20 and 1981’s Look Out, both on the CBS subsidiary Portrait Records, made Billboard magazine’s album charts, and they recorded a third, Sex Trap, engineered and produced in L.A. by still another Oklahoman, Steve Ripley. “They were playing shows all over and had two minor hits, ‘Yellow Pills’ and ‘Nuclear Boy,’” notes Belknap. “Those were big hits in L.A., and they were popular in New York, but for some reason, they didn’t get across the country.” A dozen or so years later, however, Flynt and Allen would try again, this time with Belknap as a collaborator. It was the early ‘90s, and Belknap was working with, among other acts, the Larry Cagle Band. Featuring top-drawer musical comrades Pat Savage (guitar), Mark Snyder (bass), and Rick Morton (fiddle, guitar, mandolin), “that band rocked the country bars from Fayetteville to Pawnee, and all points in between,” he says. At about the same time, he and Flynt were crafting a duet project that attracted the attention of Warner Bros. Records. “We got some seed money from Warner Bros. to do a demo, and we did it at Long Branch,” he says. “Steve Allen was moving [from L.A.] to Nashville at the time. And one of them, I don’t know which one, thought of the idea of getting 20/20 back together, and got me in as the drummer. We got two albums out, 4 Way Tornado and Interstate, and toured the West Coast in ’97.” Like Belknap, both Flynt and Allen now have their own recording studios – in Austin and Nashville, respectively – and both show up on Magic Pocket. So do former Andy Gravity members Peale, Robinson and saxophonist Steve Bell, a later addition to the


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group. Other personnel on the record include guitarists George Barton and Jerry Shields, bassist Dean Demerritt and singers Cheryl Wright, Gwen Gomes and Mary Pinkly. In addition to lead vocals and drums, Belknap plays some keyboard, harmonica and bass, and he gets sole songwriting credit on most of Magic Pocket’s tracks; collaborators include Peale, Robinson and Belknap’s wife, Elizabeth. It’s a collection that runs from melodic pop-rock to a bit of reggae and R&B, with a distinct Steely Dan influence on a couple of the tunes. And while it’s indeed his first solo record, that statement’s a bit misleading, since Magic Pocket is only available digitally. In fact, that’s one of the major reasons it’s available at all. “Since everything has moved away from real hard-copy CD stuff, and you can actually release something electronically, I decided to pull the string and go for it,” he explains. “I think that’s the thing that pushed me over the top. I’d heard horror stories about people who had made a thousand CDs, and now they’re just stuck in their garage. “To be honest,” he adds, “I’ve spent quite a bit of money on it over the years.

Bill Belknap

© 2013 ℗ 2013 All Rights Reserved

I’ve paid everybody to play on it, except for maybe Ed and Rick Peale. I thought the [rest of the] money might be better spent in hiring some of these little outlets THE COVER OF MAGIC online to try and promote it.” POCKET, A NEW He also heeded the advice of Carl Caprioglio, whose ALBUM FROM BILL BELKNAP. Oglio Records released the two albums 20/20 cut in PHOTO COURTESY BILL the ‘90s. BELKNAP. “Carl said, ‘You know, Bill, if you’re not really a band, out there on the road, with an item to show people, it’s really hard to get people to buy CDs any more.’ He said they still buy ‘em in Europe, but in the States it’s pretty much gone electronic.” While Belknap has continued to perform, most recently with the Tulsa-based Boogie Boys, and says he’s “trying to get a new band started with Rick Peale and/or George Barton,” he doesn’t anticipate forming a group to support the new work. “I don’t foresee anything happening unless it really takes off,” he says. “Then I’d try to put a band together. The hardest part for me is drumming and singing – I can drum okay, and I can sing okay, but doing both at the same time…” He laughs again, adding, “I’m no Phil Collins, man.” JOHN WOOLEY

©2014 San Antonio Convention & Visitors Bureau.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

18822 San Antonio.indd 1

Magic Pocket can be downloaded at Amazon and iTunes, as well as Belknap’s website, www.loudounroadstudio.com.

3/21/14 11:24 AM


©2014 SAN ANTONIO CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU


The State OKLAHOMA BUSINESS

Oklahoma Home

The mortgage industry finds balance in the Sooner state.

T

he American dream of home ownership is alive and well in Oklahoma. Industry experts say the perception of a buyer’s market is giving way to the reality of a better balanced market where some sellers are able to profit. Oklahoma Association of Realtors President Mary Terry says Oklahoma’s real estate market is strong and steady, with the first quarter of this year seeing a distinct

upturn. “Inventory is down slightly, which makes it more of a seller’s market, contrasted to the buyer’s market we had been seeing due to foreclosures and short sales,” says Terry. “If you are thinking of selling your home, now is the time. Average days on the market for an Oklahoma home is slightly down, meaning it is taking less time to sell. Our average sale price is up by about six percent across the state from last year around this time.” Debbie Barbe, marketing director and vice president for Arvest Bank, agrees that some Oklahoma markets, once more, favor sellers. “We are starting to see the pendulum swing the other way, and, in some markets, we now have a seller’s market,” says Barbe. “Typically, a more normalized market has six months or less of available inventory. For example, in the Tulsa Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) we are experiencing an increase in closed transactions, and the listed inventory continues to dwindle, which bodes well for many sellers. This is creating more demand for fewer properties, so the sellers have an advantage. However, in the lower price ranges and in some other Oklahoma communities, the numbers are lagging behind but still trending in a positive fashion.” While home prices are on the rise in some areas, there is an old saying that applies: “Real estate is local in nature.” It is not accurate to generalize or lump the entire state together. Terry says she has seen the average sales price for the metropolitan areas in Oklahoma running from $155,000 to $167,000 and, for more rural areas, from $108,000 to $125,000. “The trend of home prices can vary greatly by state, city and even neighborhood,” says Barbe. “In general, we are seeing a slight increase in home values across the area.” However, Barbe adds, in February 2014, real estate research company RE Stats released a re

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

port showing the average home sales price fell 5.9 percent to $149,666 in the Tulsa MSA. Barbe attributes the recent price drops to several factors, including a higher quantity of lower-priced homes selling more than higherpriced homes and the fact that, historically, fewer sell during the winter months. In real estate, it’s all about location, and Barbe says it is no secret that obtaining a mortgage in a rural community can be much different than obtaining a mortgage in an urban area. She advises customers to work with a local or regional lender who understands lending in a rural area. For rural buyers, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development Loan, which requires no down payment, is a viable mortgage option. “From an underwriting standpoint, the largest difference between urban and rural lending has to do with the collateral valuation,” says Barbe. “Due to the density in urban areas, it is generally easier for an appraiser to find ‘comparable’ properties to use in determining property value. However, when lending in a rural area, the appraiser may have to expand their search to find a comparable property.” Fannie Mae, Barbe adds, recently provided some clarification and guidance on mortgage lending in small towns and rural communities stating the appraiser’s responsibilities to examine, analyze and explain market conditions and conclusions of appraisals. Whether it’s a city home, a place in the suburbs or a country homestead, mortgage viability in the state is upbeat, according to both Barbe and Terry. “Buyers benefit from continued low interest rates and favorable tax incentives like the mortgage interest deduction, making housing that much more affordable,” says Terry. “In a nutshell, Oklahoma’s home sales market is

MARY TERRY IS PRESIDENT OF THE OKLAHOMA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS. PHOTO COURTESY MARY TERRY.

strong, and we expect it to continue to grow as the economy grows. We are fortunate to live in Oklahoma.” TRACY LEGRAND


S

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Chamber members make #TulsaStrong Stronger. Together. Join us.

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The State

SCENE

Carnivale

IT WAS A PROPER MASQUERADE AS PATRONS DONNED MASKS AND DANCED THE NIGHT AWAY TO BENEFIT MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OKLAHOMA. THE EVENT, DUBBED “THE BIGGEST PARTY IN TOWN,” RAISED MORE THAN $1.2 MILLION TO AID THOSE BATTLING MENTAL ILLNESS IN OKLAHOMA.

BILLY SIMS, CHEENA PAZZO AND BARRY SWITZER

SUSAN THOMAS, JILL THOMAS AND BILL THOMAS

SUZANNE WARREN AND RANIA NASREDDINE.

TAMRA SHEEHAN, SHEILA BUCK AND DAVID SHEEHAN

TODD BROWN AND MONICA BASU DARCY AND JOE MORAN

MOLLIE AND J.W. CRAFT

FORMER GOV. DAVID WALTERS, RHONDA WALTERS AND BILL BULLARD WERE AMONG THOSE IN ATTENDANCE AT REACH FOR THE STARS, AN EVENT THAT RAISES FUNDS FOR YOUTH SERVICES OF OKLAHOMA COUNTY.

STEVEN BATTLES, BRITTA NEWTON, ERSIN DEMIRCI AND CHRISTINA FALLIN ATTENDED THE FRIENDSHIP DINNER, PRESENTED BY OKLAHOMA CITY DIALOGUE INSTITUTE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

MAYOR DEWEY BARTLETT, VICTORIA BARTLETT, KIM JACKSON AND BRENDAN JACKSON ENJOYED SWEET CRAVINGS, AN ANNUAL FUNDRAISER FOR THE MARGARET HUDSON PROGRAM.

BILL LOBECK, KATHY TAYLOR, JESSE BOUDIETTE AND MARK GRAHAM ATTENDED AN EVENT FOR THE TULSA AREA UNITED WAY’S EMERGING LEADERS SOCIETY.


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The State

SCENE

STEVE OWENS, BILLY SIMS, JOHN ROBBERSON AND JASON WHITE GAVE A BIG THUMBS UP TO OKC BEAUTIFUL’S DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS LUNCHEON. JOY RICHARDSON AND JANIE COMSTOCK ENJOYED OKC BEAUTIFUL’S DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS LUNCHEON.

CO-CHAIRS LAUREN POWELL AND CALVIN MONIZ POSE WITH TOP FUNDRAISER AMY GRAVLEY AT THIS YEAR’S TULSA’S NEW LEADERS, AN ANNUAL FUNDRAISER FOR CYSTIC FIBROSIS FOUNDATION – SOONER CHAPTER.

ANN DOMIN, TERESA BURKETT AND MATT EIDSON ARE READYING FOR TOP OF THE TOWN, AN ANNUAL FOOD AND BEVERAGE EVENT THAT BENEFITS CHILD CARE RESOURCE CENTER.

HONOREES JOY REED BELT AND SUSAN BERGEN, PICTURED WITH EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LISA SYNAR, WERE AMONG THOSE RECOGNIZED AT OKC BEAUTIFUL’S DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARDS LUNCHEON.

SARAH JANE CRESPO, RICHARD HILL AND TAMMY BRIGGS ENJOYED THE OKLAHOMA CITY BALLET GALA.

PAM AND CHARLES ADAMS ENJOYED THE LITTLE LIGHTHOUSE’S ANNUAL GARDEN PARTY.

RICHARD BOONE, ST. JOHN STREET PARTY FOUNDATION PRESIDENT, AND STREET PARTY CHAIRS JONO AND JENNY HELMERICH ARE READY TO CELEBRATE THE 21ST ST. JOHN STREET PARTY, WHICH WILL BE HELD JUNE 7.

ANDY KINSLOW, BLAKE EWING, LEAH ASHLOCK, DAVID OBERLE AND DIANE HEATON GATHERED AT THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY CATTLE BARON’S BALL BARON REVEAL PARTY.

TYLER AND MAGUIRE THOMAS, WES WELKER AND KAREN AND FRED HALL ENJOYED CLEATS & COCKTAILS, A BENEFIT FOR THE WES WELKER FOUNDATION.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

KARL HILLERMAN, DIANE KLEIN AND APRIL JACKSON ENJOYED THE SOUTH OKLAHOMA CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 2014 EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION BANQUET.

SAMARA TERRILL, LEXI LUX, JASON GRIFE AND BLAKE AND ALLISON LAWRENCE SIPPED FOR A GOOD CAUSE AT ARTINI, A FUNDRAISER FOR ALLIED ARTS.


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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

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The State THIS SECOND STORY RETREAT IS A LUXURIOUS PLACE FOR THE COUPLE TO RELAX. AN UNUSUAL ACCENT PIECE IS THE EBONY AND IVORY ART NOUVEAU CABINET WITH A BRONZE SCULPTURE INSIDE. BELOW: TWO ANTIQUE COW PAINTINGS HANG IN THE FORMAL DINING ROOM ABOVE A WHITE SHELL COMMODE.

L I V I N G S PA C E

Showcase For Treasures

Styles mingle well in this designer home.

C

Photography by Corbin See

arson and Marsha See live in a home that was born with a pedigree. Located in an historic area near downtown Oklahoma City, the couple’s Georgian-style home gives the impression of Old World tradition. Among the home’s claims to fame is it was built by designers of the Oklahoma State Capitol, Layton-Smith-Forsyth Architects. Ascend the cast stone porch, open the front door and you are in an art museum. A contemporary sculpture fashioned from canoe bark is an immediate eye-catcher. Continue the journey and experience a world of design styles and period furnishings. Some of the most famous are represented: 18thcentury French, Louis XVI, Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Ming Dynasty, Memphis-Milano and Modern. There’s a nod to Western decor with paintings by Taos masters Bert Phillips and Nicolai Fechin and contemporary artists John Moyers and Ned Jacobs. MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

As one of Oklahoma’s preeminent interior designers, Carson See doesn’t follow trends. The home reflects the couple’s zest for creating an eclectic showcase within the 5,000-square-foot, stately interior. The home is a travelogue – a global journey through hemispheres of unique furnishings and accessories. Every room reveals a different design period along with artifacts from sojourns abroad. The 1920s home has not always expressed its museum-quality stature. It had none of the amenities homeowners now expect when the couple purchased the home 25 years ago. “There was no air conditioning, dishwasher or laundry facilities,” See recalls. The plumbing and wiring would soon reveal their inadequacies. The Sees purchased the home knowing they faced months of renovation. “I lived in Nichols Hills for 12 years, and I wanted a big house with rooms proportioned for our lifestyle,” he says. Structurally, the home had exquisite bones. Few walls were removed, so the home’s architectural character remained intact throughout several renovations. Air conditioning was installed, plumbing updated and the original red tile roof was removed and a new one installed. See also painted the interior in soft paint colors he invented, including “Carson Beige” – his signature hue. These muted tones enhance the comfortable spirit of each room, providing a neutral backdrop for brilliant colors found in furnishings and accessories. For 30 years, See’s design studio was a fixture in Nichols Hills Plaza. A decade later, his desire to live and work near downtown prompted the purchase of a vintage drug store, now his studio. The Sees’ sons, Corbin and Ross, worked with their father while in high school. Now, both are partners in the family business, Sees Design. Corbin See’s wife, Sara, joined the team in 2004. The family creates cutting edge interiors, including a line of furnishings featured in David Sutherland’s prestigious Dallas showroom. With an interest in all things vintage, the couple enjoys adding unique heirlooms to their home. “I’ve collected art glass from Paris for years,” See says. “Whenever we travel, I find things I want to take home, especially if they are old, authentic, look 18th century or even modern.” Throughout each home renovation, the Sees have taken care not to disturb the home’s character. “Having done so much work on the home,

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

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I don’t know why I would ever want to move again,” See says, laughing.

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Editor’s note: Carson and Marsha See recently sold their long-time family home to their son, Corbin See, and have since moved to a 1930s Art Deco home in another Oklahoma City historic neighborhood. The family plans to continue celebrating holidays and gatherings in the old home. The Sees, no doubt, have plans for their new house in the works. M.J. VAN DEVENTER

1. THE FORMAL DINING ROOM FEATURES A MAHOGANY ART DECO DINING TABLE AND IS ACCENTED WITH HAND NAILED AND STAMPED NICKEL CHAIRS FROM INDIA. 2. THE UPDATED KITCHEN FEATURES GOLD LEAF PAPERED WALLS, BLUE-GRAY CEILING AND A COLORFUL MARBLE CENTER ISLAND ACCENTED BY AN ART DECO CHANDELIER. 3. AN ANTIQUE EMBROIDERED CHINESE SILK SCREEN SERVES AS THE BACKDROP FOR AN ORNATE DESK WITH ACCENTS OF GOLD AND ORMOLU. 4. THE FORMAL LIVING ROOM IS A SHOWCASE FOR CHAIRS THAT HAVE HISTORICAL DESIGN SIGNIFICANCE. 5. AN ANTIQUE VENETIAN PAINTED CHINA CABINET FROM ITALY FEATURES ELEGANT HEIRLOOM CUPS AND SAUCERS. 6. THE MIX OF ANTIQUES, HEIRLOOMS AND MODERN PIECES CREATES AN ECLECTIC FEEL IN THE SEES’ HOME. 7. AN IMPRESSIVE WILLIAM AND MARY SECRETAIRE IS AN ANCHOR PIECE IN THE SEES’ FORMAL LIVING ROOM. 8. AN HEIRLOOM MILANO VENETIAN GLASS CHANDELIER ILLUMINATES THE HEAVILY GILDED ANTIQUE DESK THAT IS A FOCAL POINT IN THE SPACIOUS LIVING ROOM.

MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

COLOR

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Sometimes the color you need is none at all.

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ELIE TAHARI LACE SHORTS, $228, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MARC BY MARC JACOBS QUILTED HANDBAG, $628, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

BCBGMAXAZRIA LACE JACKET, $338, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

TORY BURCH BASKETWEAVE HANDBAG, $525, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

BCBGMAXAZRIA NET TOP, $98, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


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The State

BEADED NECKLACE WITH VINTAGE PENDANT FEATURING BLUE, GREEN AND BLACK CRYSTALS, $130, ROPE.

TORY BURCH PATTERNED HANDBAG, $395, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

KATE SPADE BLUE STRIPED PLEATED DRESS, $398, MISS JACKSON’S.

STUART WEITZMAN OPEN-TOE FLAT THONG SANDAL, $285, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

L’AGENCE BLUE RUCHED DRESS, $450, ABERSONS.

TREND

Blue Skies

Springtime celebrates the cheery color in all shades and patterns.

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CLARE VIVIER BLUE MESSENGER BAG, $380, ABERSONS.

J BRAND ELECTRIC BLUE JEANS, $185, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

DIOR BLUE SUNGLASSES, $310, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

BAJRA ROYAL BLUE CASHMERE AND SILK SCARF, $325, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. SMYTHE BOLD STRIPED BLAZER, $595, ROPE.

IYOKO INYAKE BLUE SPECTACLE FRAMES, $565, HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR. FURLA SKY BLUE HANDBAG, $745, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

VERSACE BLUE MINI DRESS WITH BLACK STRAPS AND BUCKLES, $1,075, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

LES COPAINS PERFORATED LEATHER JACKET, $995, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.


UPCOMING EVENTS Managed by

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The State

DAVID AUBREY TRIPLE-STRAND PEACH NECKLACE WITH MULTICOLOR STONES, $112, MISS JACKSON’S.

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LAVAND TROPICAL PRINT SHORTS, $90, MISS JACKSON’S.

MARA HOFFMAN FLUORESCENT MAXI DRESS, $298, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

TORY BURCH PRINTED TOTE, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

REBECCA MINKOFF PATTERNED WEDGE SANDALS, $295, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

PHOTOS BY NATALIE GREEN.

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South Park East Licensed Alzheimer's Care 405.631.7444 A recommended site by South Oklahoma City residents

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The State

SWEET NAILS

Pastel nails are found in spring collections year after year, but they were even more prevalent on this season’s runways. Deborah Lippmann’s Spring 2014 collection, Spring Reveries, is six shades of both créme and shimmer candy-colored goodness. “Flowers in Her Hair” is a mint cream, while “La Vie En Rose” is a feminine and pastel shimmery pink. Essie’s collection, Hide and Go Chic, is a more playful twist. “Truth or Flare” is an edgy pale denim, and “Fashion Playground” is a unique pistachio shimmer. Sephora’s Formula X spring collection features even more amped-up shades such as “Inspiring,” a pearly turquoise, and “A Little Sexy,” a finely shimmered periwinkle.

BEAUT Y

She’s Got Legs The official start of summer is just around the corner, and that means fun in the sun. It also means it’s time to banish that winter-pale skin. Supergoop! SPF20 Gradual Self-Tanning Mousse protects skin while slowly adding a bronze glow. The green tea and cucumber smell is a welcome departure from other self-tanners that can give off a strong, unnatural scent. The olive tint appears over the course of hours and does not transfer to clothes or towels. From the drugstore aisles, Suave Professionals Gradual Self Tanner also provides a subtle and buildable glow in fair-to-medium and medium-to-tan. While bronzer can be part of a yearlong routine, the summer months invite deeper shades. NARS Laguna has a subtle shimmer and pigment free of an unnatural, orange cast. For those who prefer a cream formula, NARS Matte Multiples comes in a range of stunning shades for rosy cheeks or a golden glow. Covergirl truMAGIC Skin Perfector is a balm-form that comes in two shades: The Sunkisser, a bronzer, and The Luminizer for a subtle glow. Since tights are out of rotation for the season, turn to the classic Sally Hansen Airbrush Legs Leg Makeup for flawless, toned and tanned legs. LINDSAY ROGERS

A BRIGHT SMILE

A change in seasons and sun-kissed skin are the perfect excuses to whiten teeth. Newer teeth-whitening formulas work faster with more immediate results and without irritating sensitive gums. GO SMiLE 6 Day Double Action Whitening System works while you sleep and comes in con-

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

venient individual ampules. PRIME TIME SMILE, available at Walmart, comes in a pen form, works on stains and freshens breath. The sparkling mint flavor is ideal to take on-the-go and fits in a spring clutch. Colgate Optic White offers a huge range of products from its new whitening pen to toothpaste that features WhiteSeal™ technology to seal out new stains.


e c n e i r Expe ation Exhilar Ansel Adams (American, 1902-1984). Winter Sunrise, Sierra Nevada from Lone Pine, California, 1944. Gelatin silver print. Collection of the Museum of Photographic Arts; Gift of the Weston Gallery, Inc., 1985.036.002, ©2014 The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust

Feel the thrill of your heart racing and blood pumping on one of Fayetteville’s scenic trails. Plus, new trails on the Razorback Greenway are coming soon. Excite all of your senses in one place.

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3/21/14 10:59 AM


The State

YO U R H E A L T H

Family

Complications Infertility can cause pain and confusion for as many as one in eight couples.

I

nfertility can be a long, complicated journey. Those who know firsthand the struggles of infertility describe its physical, mental and emotional toll as both heartbreaking and hopeful. According to RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association, one in eight U.S. couples of childbearing age is diagnosed with infertility. However, through new research and technological advancements, couples have more ways to achieve a successful pregnancy. Dr. Eli Reshef, a reproductive specialist and medical director of INTEGRIS Bennett Fertility Institute, offers the following parameters for when couples may need assistance. “A fertility specialist – a reproductive endocrinologist, preferably board-certified – should be consulted if the couple has failed to get pregnant after one year of attempts if the female partner is under age 35, or six months if she is 35 or older,” he says. Reshef adds that a couple may need to see a specialist sooner if the woman has irregular menstrual cycles, blocked tubes (especially from a tubal ligation) or if there is knowledge of severe risk factors for the man, including a vasectomy. Dr. Stanley Prough, a fellowship-trained reproductive endocrinol-

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

ogist at Tulsa Fertility Center, also recommends that couples seek help early. “Some people will wait years before they visit a specialist, and during that time they may have lost their window of opportunity,” he says. “See a specialist sooner rather than later, and be open to more aggressive treatments.” Prough says everyone has a different version of success. “For some people, success can be adding to their family by having a child, while for others it can be learning what the problem is. In all of these cases, the people didn’t choose the path they are on – it’s been given to them, and it can be an extremely stressful journey,” he says. “There may be treatment options they do or don’t want to use, but they now understand what is going on.”

Causes Of Infertility

A couple may experience problems with fertility for many reasons. Infertility is often thought of as a woman’s problem, so many people are surprised to learn about the causes and prevalence of male infertility. Reshef explains that one-third of infertility is due to male risk factors, one-third to female risk factors and one-third to either a combination of the two or unexplained factors. “Male factor infertility may be due to infection, genetic causes, external conditions that adversely affect sperm – excess heat, testosterone intake, other anabolic steroids, high level exposure to pesticides, herbicides or paint thinners – or sexual dysfunction,


including erectile dysfunction and loss of sex drive,” he says. “Most male factors, however, are unknown.” Reshef cites the most common causes of female infertility as tubal disease (commonly caused by sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia), endometriosis, ovulation problems, including polycystic ovary syndrome, and cervical mucus abnormalities. Additional causes include genetics, obesity and stress due to excessive exercising, excessive dieting and lifestyle choices. He notes that many female factors, unfortunately, are also unknown. For both men and women, smoking can contribute to infertility.

The Effects Of Age

As the trend continues for women to wait until their 30s and 40s to have children, age and its role in fertility is an important discussion. “Age is a key factor in females,” says Reshef. “The number of eggs gradually decreases in women, reaching critically lower levels after age 35. Along with the reduction in eggs comes an increase in genetic abnormalities in the remaining eggs. Therefore, women over age 35 experience greater rates of infertility and more miscarriages and more children with chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. In short, women over age 35 who try to conceive face three major hurdles: getting pregnant, staying pregnant and having a healthy child.” For men, the chances of fathering a child with birth defects slightly increases over age 50. Still, with many celebrities drawing national attention for having a baby later in life, couples may make the assumption that pregnancy is easily achievable despite the odds. “If you see a star that is older who has had a baby, you have to consider their circumstances,” says Dr. Shauna McKinney, a fellowshiptrained reproductive endocrinologist at Tulsa Fertility Center. “They

have either had numerous opportunities due to their financial backing or they have used different methods to become pregnant which they have kept private.”

Fertility Treatments Offer Hope

With such long lists of reasons for why couples may not conceive, it’s clear why many feel discouraged. However, McKinney believes in the possibilities for every couple and speaks from a place of personal understanding. “The patients we see are often heartbroken. They are afraid that the thing they want most won’t happen,” she says. “At Tulsa Fertility Center, our doctors and staff are open in sharing our own fertility stories. We look at where they have been, what they have been doing and where they are going. It’s about shedding our clinical demeanor and realizing we’re all in this together, and that it’s a human journey.” Today, through advancements in reproductive medicine, a wide range of fertility treatments and options are available. Some women may benefit from fertility drugs to assist with ovulation or from laparoscopic surgery if endometriosis or tubal disease is a factor. Intrauterine insemination, frequently referred to as artificial insemination, may be suggested if there is a potential problem with the man’s fertility or complications with the woman’s cervix. The most aggressive procedures – and most expensive – include assisted reproductive technologies, such as the commonly known process of in vitro fertilization – mature eggs are removed from a woman, fertilized with a man’s sperm in a laboratory, and the developing embryos are implanted in the woman’s uterus. Couples may also consider using a donor egg, sperm or embryo. In some cases, a surrogate may be used in which a woman carries and delivers a child for another person or couple. REBECCA FAST

CANCER AND FERTILITY Being diagnosed with cancer is devastating. Individuals are faced with life-altering decisions, and for some people this includes decisions about fertility and family planning. Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy and surgery, can affect fertility and inhibit or complicate pregnancy. To help address this concern, Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) of Tulsa now offers an Oncofertility Preservation Program through a partnership with Tulsa Fertility Center. Cancer patients who are eligible can consider fertility options before beginning treatment. Options include embryo-, egg- and sperm-banking for patients and their spouses if individuals or couples want to have children in the future. Dr. Laurence Altshuler, a hospitalist, internist and director of oncology intake services at CTCA, is leading the Oncofertility Preservation Program and working to raise awareness on the topic. “We are currently trying to engage and inform the general medical community of this need. Most doctors in the community don’t see many young adults with cancer and may not think about the need for oncofertility,” he says. “Since CTCA only

treats cancer, we evaluate more young patients, so we are more focused than the general medical community on the need for oncofertility. However, we feel it is important to inform community doctors of this need since many of their patients may end up going to other clinics or oncologists that do not have such programs or may not refer to one.” If a patient doesn’t have an oncofertility preservation program readily available, Altshuler encourages patients to seek one out. “Many patients are scared when they get cancer and may not talk to their doctors about wanting children – they just want their cancer to be treated. But since cancer treatment has become more successful at prolonging life, it is necessary to address these issues before treatment,” he says. “Advancements in oncofertility treatment have made it very likely that a patient can preserve their fertility and have children after cancer treatment. Patients can be less

anxious once their fertility is preserved and thus concentrate on treating their cancer.” Those eligible to participate in CTCA’s program include females who are 40 years and younger and males 55 years and younger. However, because males over 55 can still have children, they can enter the program upon request. Altshuler emphasizes that patients within these age ranges and with any cancer type who want more children should consider oncofertility, “since most chemotherapies and radiation to certain parts of the body can cause disruption in fertility.” – RF MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The State

D E S T I N AT I O N

How Sound Travels

These 11 summer music festivals deliver on big names, tons of fun and the best of what host cities have to offer. With so much outstanding music coming out, it would be a shame to not take in a few concerts, and summer is buzzing with the hottest tickets. Music festivals bring the brightest stars and rising acts recording today and on tour to shrines of fun, outdoor revelry. Wade into summer music festivals and get your fix for exploration and adventure in the bold cities and towns that host them.

SEVENTH ANNUAL ROOTS PICNIC Saturday, May 31- Philadelphia, Penn. Line-up: The Roots, Snoop Dogg, Janelle Monae, The War on Drugs, Araabmuzik, Rudimental, Action Bronson, A$AP Ferg, Bad Rabbits, Biz Markie, Jhene Aiko, more How many hip-hop fans can you fit on the Festival Pier at Philadelphia’s Penn’s Landing? The answer is irrelevant, because they’re not actually on the pier, and the picnic that’s actually a one-day festival attracts an audiences that grows larger every spring, and The Roots haven’t hit their limit yet. www.rootspicnic.com

FIREFLY MUSIC FESTIVAL June 19-22 - Dover, Del. Line-up: Foo Fighters, Imagine Dragons, Beck, Outkast, Jack Johnson, Phantogram, the Lumineers, Pretty Lights, Tegan and Sara, Courtney Barnett, Local Natives, Arctic Monkeys, Iron & Wine, Sky Ferreira, more Bonnaroo may have been the inspiration, but the Firefly Music Festival has quickly developed its own identity as a premier summer music festival for the East Coast. Complete with camping, local partnerships and a nod to environmental friendliness, this festival prides itself on bringing top national acts to a stage nestled in a woodland setting and with an arcade tent planted somewhere among the fun. www.fireflyfestival.com

SLED ISLAND

June 19-22 – Calgary, Alberta, Canada

JANELLE MONAE PLAYS SEVERAL SUMMER FESTIVALS IN 2014, INCLUDING THE ROOTS PICNIC AND BONNAROO. PHOTO BY AIJA LEHTONEN, WWW.

Line-up: Neko Case, St. Vincent, Rhye, Spiritualized, Chelsea Wolfe, Blitzen Trapper, Rocket From the Crypt, Joel Plaskett Emergency, Mission of Burma, Touche Amore, more You’ll need your passport to join this northern escape for some of indie rock’s coolest acts. Calgary’s Sled Island is not really an island, but the festival hopes to inspire its audience by sending them into unusual venues for concerts and introducing new acts to the stage. Never heard the band Quaker Parents? Neither have we, but that’s okay. “This festival caters to people who aren’t intimidated by not knowing something,” states the website. www.sledisland.com

SHUTTERSTOCK.COM.

SUMMERFEST BONNAROO MUSIC AND ARTS FESTIVAL June 12-15 – Manchester, Tenn. Line-up: Elton John, Jack White, Kanye West, Vampire Weekend, The Avett Brothers, Skrillex, Arctic Monkeys, The Flaming Lips, Neutral Milk Hotel, Janelle Monae, Andrew Bird & the Hands of Glory, Lauren Hill, Wiz Khalifa, Nick Cave, more For four days, music revelers of all walks and ages witness a series of recording artists and performers in a variety of musical styles on a great outdoor stage – and no one ever, ever complains that the music is too loud. Considered one of the best festivals around for music, Bonnaroo also makes room for comedy, sustainability, crafters and children. Camp out to get the best experience. www.bonnaroo.com

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June 25-29 and July 1-6 – Milwaukee, Wis. Line-up: Bruno Mars, Lady Gaga, Brad Paisley, Outkast, Dave Matthews Band, Usher, Zac Brown Band, Ray LaMontagne, Melissa Etheridge, Bonnie Raitt, Matisyahu, Neon Trees, Airborne Toxic Event, The Head and the Heart, more Some outdoor festivals become grazing pastures when the last camper has rolled out, but Summerfest never really ends. The festival has been going strong since the


LOLLAPALOOZA 1970s at the Henry Maier Festival Park on the shores of Lake Michigan. Hosting close to a million people annually by attracting the biggest stars, “The Big Gig” shows no signs of drifting away. www.summerfest.com

ESSENCE MUSIC FESTIVAL July 3-6 – New Orleans, La. Line-up: Prince, Mary J. Blige, Jill Scott, The Roots, Lionel, Richie, Erykah Badu, Charlie Wilson, Tamar, Ledisi, Tank, more What began as an anniversary party for Essence magazine is just one year shy of its 20th anniversary of bringing in stars, legends and heroes to the New Orleans stage. Certainly, go for the music, but also stay for the great events and speakers, including U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters of California, Al Sharpton and Iyanla Vanzant. www.essence. com/festival

Aug. 1-2 – Chicago, Ill. Line-Up: Eminem, Outkast, Kings of Leon, Lorde, Arctic Monkeys, The Avett Brothers, Calvin Harris, Foster the People, Skrillex, Zedd, Spoon, Phantogram, Glen Hansard, Lykke Li, The 1975, Sebastian Ingrosso, more Lollapalooza began in 1991, the brainchild of Perry Farrell, lead singer of Jane’s Addiction. That being said, the festival has moved beyond its grungy beginnings to settle permanently in Chicago’s Grant Park and feature the best rock of all modes and varieties on radio and Internet. Grunge has been known to resurface at this outdoor fete, however, when rain turns the grounds to mud. www.lollapalooza.com

ABOVE: LOLLAPALOOZA 2013. PHOTO BY ASHLEY GARMON

QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE AT LOLLAPALOOZA 2013. PHOTO BY CAMBRIA HARKEY, COURTESY WWW.LOLLAPALOOZA.COM

PITCHFORK MUSIC FESTIVAL July 18-20 – Chicago, Ill. Line-up: Beck, Neutral Milk Hotel, Kendrick Lamar, St. Vincent, Grimes, Tune-Yards, Earl Sweatshirt, Sun Kil Moon, Danny Brown, more There’s something to be said for keeping things small, like the way Pitchfork Music Festival keeps the number of acts to around 40 and only hosts about 50,000 attendees from around the world. All right, so at least the festival keeps prices reasonable and focuses on local business and economy. www.pitchforkmusicfestival.com

NEWPORT FOLK FESTIVAL July 25-27 – Newport, R.I. Line-up: Ryan Adams, Nickel Creek, Mavis Staples, Band of Horses, Deer Tick, Jeff Tweedy, Jenny Lewis, The Milk Carton Kids, more When the world wants to know what’s up in folk music, ears have tuned in to this summer tradition since 1959. Pete Seeger, Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan helped put this ultimate tribute to music on the map back then, and fresh, new acts keep the festival viable and important to fans as well as the industry today. www.newportfolk.org

FAYETTEVILLE ROOTS FESTIVAL Aug. 29-31 – Fayetteville, Ark. Line-up: Lucinda Williams, The Wood Brothers, Darrell Scott & Tim O’Brien, Jay Farrar, Anais Mitchell, Ben Kweller, Tony Furtado, Willie Watson, Hurray for the Riff Raff, more Few places in this world are better suited to the sound of roots music than the city of Fayetteville, home to the University of Arkansas Razorbacks sports program 10 months out of the year and a mountain backdrop for this emerging festival on Labor Day weekend. Look for big names and local favorites at venues all around town. www.fayettevilleroots.com

BUMBERSHOOT Aug. 30-Sept. 1 – Seattle, Wash. Line-up: Death Cab for Cutie, Fun., MGMT, Kendrick Lamar, Bassnectar, Tegan and Sara, Alt-J, The Breeders, Deerhunter, Heart, more This Pacific Northwestern gem began in 1971 as a way to lift Seattle spirits during an economic free fall. Although it’s reinvented itself over the years, Bumbershoot is still one of the biggest music festival draws for the region and frequently defines the pace of entertainment and lifestyle for Seattle. www.bumbershoot.org KAREN SHADE MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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IF IT WEREN’T FOR OIL,

Tulsa might have remained just another small town by the river, and Oklahoma City would not be home to Tinker Air Force Base, the largest aircraft-maintenance complex and military-aviation logistics center in the world. But the cities thrived, and that growth would not have continued if not for aviation and aerospace – Oklahoma’s fifth-largest industry. The state is home to more than 500 aerospace- and aviation-related companies

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that provide 143,000 direct and indirect jobs with an estimated yearly economic impact of $12.4 billion. Aviation and aerospace continue to impact Oklahoma’s revenues and international presence with the latest high-flying accolades, including a spaceport in the far-western part of the state.

Past Predicts The Future

According to Tulsa Historical Society records, the prosperity of the post-World War II oil boom laid a foundation for the fledgling aviation industry. Many of Tulsa’s oilmen were flying enthusiasts, and World War II solidified the state’s importance as an aviation center. Pilots were trained at Spartan School of Aeronautics, and the Douglas Aircraft Co. built bombers in the mile-long Air Force Plant No. 3, completed in 1942 near the Tulsa municipal airport (later Tulsa Inter-


By Tracy LeGrand

The Sooner state’s friendly relationship with aerospace continues to create jobs and fuel the economy.

national Airport). McDonnell-Douglas and Rockwell International facilities would contribute to space programs and national defense. American Airlines built a major maintenance center, and SABRE reservation system relocated from New York to Tulsa. That oil boom was also spurred by a unique geographical circumstance that makes Green Country a natural nexus for transportation. Tulsa’s “centralized location facilitates cost-effective distribution and market access to all areas of the country,” says Dennis Altendorf, director of aerospace development and strategy for the Tulsa Regional Chamber. “Tulsa is a true intermodal city offering four forms of transportation – ground, air, rail and water. Tulsa offers air cargo service through three freight carriers at Tulsa International Airport, more than 50 local motor freight companies, rail service through two mainline carriers and four short-line carriers and year-round ice-free barge

service through the Port of Catoosa,” he says.

Names Big And Small

Aviation in Oklahoma is adorned with household names, beginning with Clyde Cessna’s aircraft testing in the 1910s. Before Will Rogers and Wiley Post died in an airplane crash in 1935, the pair made both individual and joint contributions to the industry, including the 1934 discovery of the jet stream. Aviation industry giants make Oklahoma home, including Boeing, Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, FlightSafety International, Spirit Aerosystems, Lufthansa Technik, The NORDAM Group, Helicomb MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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International, Southwest United Industries, L-3 Communications-Aeromet, Omni Air International, CSI Aerospace and, most recently, BizJet International, a completion center employing about 1,800, according to Aircraft Technology magazine. Tinker Air Force Base is the U.S. Air Force’s largest maintenance base. Also in the Oklahoma City area, the Federal Aviation Administration’s Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center is the core of the FAA’s operation and development center as well as the U.S. Department of Transportation’s financial-management center. In Tulsa, American Airlines Maintenance and Engineering Center is a major regional employer, providing more than 7,000 jobs. “Aerospace and aviation is one of Tulsa’s targeted industry sectors,” says Altendorf. “As a result, the Tulsa Regional Chamber aggressively markets the region to attract aerospace and defense companies. As for new companies moving to the area, we have been and continue to be in discussions with several companies looking at the potential of establishing operation in the region. “We also spend a lot of time on business retention and expansion efforts to grow the companies we have. Since the first of January, there have been two aerospace announcements – one involving BizJet International, which is planning to create 250 new aerospace jobs” Altendorf adds. “There are several other existing companies seriously considering expanding operations in the Tulsa area.”

Smaller Companies Pack A Wallop

The state’s largest cities are not the only hotspots for aerospace and aviation, says Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission Executive Director Vic Bird. “Oklahoma has 500-plus aerospace firms,” says Bird. “You’ll find pockets of aerospace companies in Ada, Duncan, Grove and Okmulgee – basically all over the state. Oklahoma has the big players, but many are very small businesses with as few as three employees. There are major success stories, like Pro-Fab and Valco Manufacturing, and many of these started in someone’s garage.” One such company is Ada-based General Aviation Modification Inc., says Bird. GAMI’s 150 workers service nonturbine, nonjet general aviation aircraft powered by gasoline. The GAMIjector fuel injector has equipped 22,000 engines to date and was named Aviation Consumer Magazine’s product of the year in 1996. “GAMI is developing new, unleaded fuel for piston-powered aircraft, and this is cuttingedge technology,” says Bird. “It is a real challenge to develop a reliable unleaded gasoline that can do the job.” GAMI President Tim Roehl says leaded fuel in aviation will eventually be banned by the Environmental Protection Agency. This will have a significant impact on the revenue of companies depending on piston aviation, as sales of those crafts already have decreased in anticipation of the ban. “The state does pretty well supporting aviation businesses, but we could really use some financial help in developing the unleaded general aviation gasoline,” says Roehl. “So far we’ve been able to move forward out of in-house cash flow, but not at the pace we’d like to. We’d like to find multimillion dollar resources for investment into this technology. We are in a unique situation as a small business with unique capabilities and have already done noteworthy things in the aviation piston industry. Now we have the opportunity to pull off something companies like Chevron, Shell and Phillips have been trying to figure out for the last 15 years.”

The MRO Economic Engine

“There are seven MRO centers – for maintenance, repair and overhaul – in the world,” says Bird. “Two are in the U.S., with one of those in Oklahoma. In the industry, we are known for the fact that we can keep them flying. To give you an idea on the importance of MRO, the U.S. Air Force introduced the B-52 bomber platform during the Eisenhower administration. Now, 60 years later, B-52s are still our country’s primary bomber. They are still viable because of private contractors such as Boeing and smaller ones like Valco. Older aircraft we rely upon for bomber missions are still flying because of the superior MRO in Oklahoma.” Tinker Air Force Base is the state’s largest single employer, with 27,000 jobs and a yearly economic impact of $3.4 billion, says Bird. American Airlines does its own maintenance, repair and overhaul in Oklahoma and also works on aircraft for other airlines. MRO drives the aviation industry. “We don’t manufacture aircraft like, say, Wichita, Kan., so we were less impacted by the

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recession,” says Bird. “Keeping older aircraft flying is the heart of our industry, and Oklahoma is extremely well positioned to continue to meet that need.”

“Qualifying companies may be eligible for up to twice the net benefit rate of the Quality Jobs program, or 10 percent of the taxable payroll of these new jobs, to be paid in cash on a quarterly basis,” Hackler says.

The Business Of Attracting Business

High-paying Jobs

Attracting aviation/aerospace businesses and the highly skilled workforce needed to operate them is an ongoing concern of many state business drivers, including the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. To that end, the Aerospace Industry Engineer Workforce Tax Credit was reinstated as one of Gov. Mary Fallin’s first actions in office. “With the tax credit, an engineer hired in aerospace is qualified to get up to $5,000 (in individual) tax credit annually for five years, as does their employer,” says Bird. Employers can receive a tax credit of 10 percent of an eligible employees’ compensation for the first five years of employment if that individual holds a degree from an Oklahoma college. The credit goes to five percent for employees who graduated from an out-of-state school. The employer can receive up to $12,500 per year for each employee. Bird notes that this tax credit also applies to experienced engineers moving into the state and not only to new graduates. “The older engineers that helped us win the Cold War are retiring in droves,” says Bird. “So we need to get older, skilled and experienced engineers as well as new ones just out of school.” Another state incentive, 21st Century Quality Jobs, was created to attract growth industries and sectors to the state through a policy of rewarding businesses with a highly skilled, knowledge-based workforce, says Donald R. Hackler Jr., deputy director-legal/public relations officer for the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. The program is based on the Quality Jobs Program developed in 1993.

Ten percent of the state’s economic output comes from aerospace/ aviation jobs, says Bird. One out of every 11 jobs in this industry has an average salary of $60,000 a year, almost double the annual average in the state of $33,000. One Oklahoma success story is Pro-Fab, an Oklahoma City firm with about 175 employees with contracts working for the U.S. Department of Defense on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Pro-Fab and other aviation firms need a highly educated, highly skilled workforce. “We have to have engineering talent,” Bird says. “That is why we passed the tax credit. Boeing moved workforce from Long Beach to here, and we’re so glad they did because of the economic impact

PREVIOUS PAGE ABOVE: A ROLLS-ROYCE TAY MK611-8 ENGINE ON A BIZJET INTERNATIONAL TEST CELL. PHOTO BY RANDY TOBIAS.

BELOW: HISTORIC PHOTOS OF OKLAHOMA AEROSPACE. THIS PAGE ABOVE: A NASA SPACE SHUTTLE IS CARRIED BY A 747 JET IN TULSA. HISTORICAL PHOTOS COURTESY TULSA AIR & SPACE MUSEUM.

BELOW: NORDAM MANUFACTURES AIRCRAFT PARTS AND EQUIPMENT. PHOTOS BY JOHN AMATUCCI.

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of engineers. In this case, 340 engineers were hired, and it cost the state $3.3 million in tax credit. But with an economic impact of $270 million, that was a very good investment. Engineering is at the core of any aviation/ aerospace success. The industry also needs skilled, well-paid workers like technicians and machinists to keep the industry viable.” ASCO Industries, headquartered in Zaventem, Belgium, took over the former Mercury Marine facility in Stillwater to manufacture components for commercial firms, including Boeing and Lockheed. Bird says this is due to Fallin’s annual trips to the Paris Air Show to tout the state’s aerospace acumen. Now, ASCO boosts Oklahoma’s economy by employing about 400 workers. MRO work requires skilled, educated workers. Bird credits the state’s education system, especially universities, CareerTech and Spartan, for producing a skilled workforce. However, more are needed if future needs are to be met. “We’re not like the energy industry, as aviation/aerospace doesn’t put out a lot of commercials or public awareness for this [educational] need,” Bird says. “We do have this favorable business climate going for us, though. More than 20 states have tried to copy our aviation incentives, such as our tax credits, but they just don’t quite match up to Oklahoma.”

Leaving Money on the Table

Bird would like to see more Oklahoma businesses profit from subcontracts and outsourcing work from large operations such as Tinker and American Airlines. “Tinker outsources about $5 billion a year,” says Bird. “We only keep about 10 percent of that in Oklahoma. We’re trying to change that, and seven years ago, the legislature started the Center for Aerospace and Defense Supplier Quality, which works out from the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission. So far, we’ve advised more than 250 smaller businesses in the state, free of charge, on how to land these contracts, and it has made all the difference for 30 businesses landing 372 contracts totaling about $46 million. It is complicated and expensive to learn how to do business with the (U.S.)

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Department of Defense or a giant company like Boeing or Lockheed. We’ve just begun to tap into that.” While many entities, such as chambers of commerce across the state, actively promote the important economic benefit of aviation and aerospace and support the industry in Oklahoma, Bird says more and specific leadership is needed. “We really don’t have a means to coordinate those efforts real well,” Bird says. “There is great support, and here is one example – the MRO national conference is coming up, and every year we’ll be there, and the Tulsa Regional Chamber and state organizations are there to support Oklahoma. But we don’t have a czar or a secretary of aerospace to coordinate a coherent strategy.” The industry does have one key supporter, however, says Bird. “Gov. Fallin is our number-one air-evangelist,” he says. “We’ve been very fortunate in my 12 years here with two governors who have been very understanding and supportive. But Gov. Fallin has just been so important in promoting aerospace in our state.”

Drones and a Spaceport

Oklahoma is a center for the development and testing of unmanned aircraft systems, which are commonly known as drones. “We are the only test site for Homeland Security, at Lawton,” says Bird. “Generally speaking, unmanned aircraft is a burgeoning industry with a lot of vitality in this state. Remotely piloted aircraft are here to stay, and many in the military predict that in 20 years there will be more unmanned aircraft in the nation’s airspace than piloted craft. There are great commercial applications, especially for cargo. Currently, a plane in Afghanistan can

be piloted from here UNMANNED DRONES in the U.S.” ARE BIG BUSINESS As if pulled from FOR OKLAHOMA, WHICH HAS THE ONLY the pages of science DRONE TEST SITE FOR fiction, the state HOMELAND SECURITY. BELOW: BIZJET boasts the Oklahoma INTERNATIONAL Air and Space Port, a PERFORMS REFUR13,000-foot comBISHMENTS AND MAINTENANCE ON mercial-spaceport AIRBUS CORPORATE runway near Clinton JETS AND BOEING in western Oklahoma. BUSINESS JETS. PHOTO BY PHOTOGRAPHIC This is the only site MEMORIES BY TAMMY AND in the U.S. National MEGAN. Airspace System offering a horizontal launch corridor, says Bill Khourie, executive director of the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority. The Oklahoma Air and Space Port is also a public use airport and a former strategic air command base. It hosts more than 35,000 military flight operations per year and boasts one of the longest runways in North America, at three miles long and 300 feet wide. “We host everything from military operations to civilian aircraft and are licensed to do space launches,” says Khourie. “We’re the only licensed space flight corridor that is not within restricted airspace or in a military operating area. We’ve also been a test site for unmanned craft operations.” A space launch from the flatlands of western Oklahoma is not a far-fetched scenario. “You have Virgin Galactic primed to offer suborbital space tourism,” says Khourie. “Another private company, Space X, was selected by NASA to take astronauts and cargo to the International Space Station. These and other uses will only increase in the future.”


REMEMB

MAY

20

One year later, survivors and rescuers look back at the May 20, 2013, tornado.

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BERING By Tara Malone Photography by Brent Fuchs

PLAZA TOWERS ELEMENTARY TEACHER LINDSIE WRIGHT PROTECTED STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL DURING THE DEADLY TORNADO.

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S

Some dates on the calendar remind us of the worst that can happen. Americans recall the destruction and terror of Sept. 11. Oklahoma residents will always remember May 3 – the first of two days in 1999 when more than 70 powerful tornados touched down all over Oklahoma and in parts of Texas and Kansas, killing 40 people in total. Now, May 20 has been added to that list. That notorious day – less than 24 hours after

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another storm destroyed central parts of the state – an EF-5 tornado struck the city of Moore, annihilating everything in its path. Another spring has arrived, and Oklahomans realize the risks of living in Tornado Alley. They make preparations – both physical and mental – and go on with life. Most continue their work, play and business with little thought of weather threats; some even relish the season and the occasional squall.

But last year, when the world watched via live television feed as a massive storm approached, struck and gutted Moore and southern parts of Oklahoma City, most felt helpless, horrified or both. And when the reports streamed out of the center of devastation – two elementary schools shredded, a horse farm leveled, homes and businesses gone, 24 human lives lost, hundreds injured – the threat was too present, too close.


For the community, the year since Monday, May 20, 2013, has been focused on rebuilding structures and lives. But it is certain, we won’t forget, and neither will those who witnessed it firsthand.

Tornado Emergency

David Andra remembers the first “big one.” Moments before the May 3, 1999, Bridge Creek-Moore tornado, Andra, now lead meteorologist for the National Weather Service office in Norman, issued the first official tornado emergency. The urgency of this warning – a desperate plea to the populace – predicated a potentially devastating weather event. Until May 20, 2013, the term hadn’t been used in Oklahoma for about a decade. “The phrase ‘tornado emergency’ is used to drive home the point that we’re likely dealing with a tornado of exceptional size and strength,” Andra says. “A tornado of this type poses an especially deadly threat, especially when thousands of homes, schools and businesses lie in its path.” For many Oklahomans, the day started off much like any other day. For Andra and his crew at the National Weather Service, however, the morning began with a meeting to coordinate plans for what they expected to be a dangerously busy afternoon for severe weather in central and southern Oklahoma. “Warm, humid days in the Oklahoma spring are often ripe for tornadoes,” Andra says. “On this day, the dry line, a boundary where storms often develop, was nearby. The change in wind with increasing height in the atmosphere was favorable for any storms that developed to rotate …We also felt that storms would develop sooner than often happens in May, and this brought an extra concern for schools and parents. “After storms developed, we were carefully scrutinizing Doppler radar information throughout the depth of the growing storms, looking for signs (that) they were organizing into rotating storms,” Andra continues. “Unfortunately, that happened swiftly.” The afternoon unfolded as the NWS predicted – quickly and brutally. For most Oklahomans, the rapid speed of severe weather development is usually not surprising. But even for those who were carefully watching the weather May 20, the rate at which the storms grew was shocking. As the system intensified, both NWS staff and viewers at home watched with familiar dread as a prominent hook echo developed on the radar. Andra says that as signs began to point at circulation near the ground, field observers confirmed their worst fears: A potentially catastrophic strike was aimed at the south Oklahoma City metro area. At 3:01 p.m., Andra issued a tornado emergency.

Heeke’s day progressed much as expected. By 1:30 p.m., two of her three patients had safely delivered, but as the storm loomed and intensified, one woman was still in labor. With the tornado headed for the nearby Warren Theatre in Moore, visitors, staff and patients were asked to move to the cafeteria to wait out the storm. Meanwhile, Heeke remained calm. “Again, I looked at this as another drill,” she says. “I was confident we were not going to have anything more than a bad hailstorm.” As the rest of the center took cover downstairs, Heeke, her staff and the patient were trapped on the second floor. The mother-to-be had been given an epidural before the storm and was unable to move. The facility’s emergency manager checked on them one last time before taking shelter himself. Heeke later learned that as he ran downstairs, he saw the tornado across the street. The birthing team took cover with their patient in the operating room, an interior area that was free of windows, covering the patient with blankets. A nurse administered medicine to slow down the woman’s contractions, fearful she would deliver as the tornado struck. “At that moment, a Code Yellow was called overhead,” Heeke says. “This means there have been mass casualties, and all employees are to be contacted to report to the command center. Bonny [a coworker] and I looked at each other and said, ‘Code Yellow, where?’ We still were in patient-care mode and sure the storm would pass…never thinking they were calling the code for us.” As wind began to crash through the vents and debris slammed into the building, Heeke realized this was not the average spring hailstorm. As she and her team draped themselves over their laboring patient, she says, “The wind sounded like a jet engine. The pressure changes made our ears pop. Then, the (operating room) door blew open, and the wall across the room from us was gone. At that moment, all I knew to do was talk to God.” And then it was over. “As we uncovered our heads, we realized the wall was gone, and we could see I-35,” she recalls.

“We also felt that storms would develop sooner than often happens in May, and this brought an extra concern for schools and parents.”

Code Yellow

DAVID ANDRA, LEAD METEOROLOGIST FOR THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NORMAN, SAYS HE EXPECTED A BUSY AFTERNOON WEATHERWISE ON MAY 20.

A resident of the Great Plains for six decades, Alyson Heeke is no stranger to violent storms. Only three years ago, the registered nurse was living in Piedmont, Okla., when she took cover from a massive tornado that damaged her home, destroyed much of her property and leveled the surrounding area. On May 20, Heeke was looking forward to her workday as the nurse manager in the Family Birth Center on the second floor of the Moore Medical Center. Three babies were scheduled to be born at the center that day, and despite the tornado alert the day before, Heeke was optimistic about her shift at the small community hospital she loves. Aware of the potential for dangerous weather, Heeke met with the facility’s safety officer to confirm plans should a tornado occur. Doctors advised patients not in labor to cancel their appointments. While Heeke felt prepared, she was not concerned; after all, the tornado the day before had passed them by.

‘Between the Screams, We Heard Prayers’

Lindsie Wright, like many Moore residents, had lived through the aftermaths of the 1999 and 2003 tornado outbreaks. Luckily, she had never actually been through one. She rememMAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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bers that on May 19, 2013, she was especially alert to the weather as an EF-4 tornado struck the nearby town of Shawnee. On the morning of May 20, she knew the day held a dark promise of more severe storms to come. When she dropped off her young daughter with the baby sitter, Wright sent along a small bag and her daughter’s bike helmet, just in case. Aware of the potential for severe storms, the fifth-grade teacher at Plaza Towers Elementary School says the day progressed as expected in her class. While parents emailed her an occasional weather update, she and her students watched a movie and collected textbooks. Wright wore her pink Plaza Towers t-shirt with the logo, “Keep Calm and Panther On.” At 2:36 p.m., Wright received an email from a concerned parent, warning that a large, rotating storm would arrive in Moore within 20 minutes. She began to move her students into the hallway, instructing them to crouch in the tornado position – head down, bottom up, hands over head. Almost immediately, Wright sensed another danger. “We sat in the hallway in tornado position for a few minutes when I remembered the large hail we had the afternoon before,” she says. “Because our hallway was lined with skylights, something in me started moving students into the restroom, away from the threat of falling glass and the anticipated large hail. Shortly after instructing the remaining fourth-, fifth- and some sixth-grade students and some teachers into the restroom stalls, I took my position at the open doorway to the restroom.” Wright soon received a text message from her husband stating he heard the tornado was already in Moore, and he could not make it to pick up their daughter before it struck. Wright replied: “It is. Pray for her.” And then it hit. “The sound of the children screaming as the tornado hit was something I will never forget,” Wright says. “Between the screams, we heard prayers. At one point, the teacher beside me, whose arms were locked with mine, was ripped from me. I was thrown into one wall, she into another. I opened my eyes to see where she was because I just knew she was gone. I remember thinking, ‘It has got to be over soon,’ and seeing tires and tree branches in the sky. “I yelled for the kids to keep their heads down and eyes closed. We (teachers) kept shouting reassurances – ‘It will be over soon.’ ‘We are okay.’ ‘Stay calm.’ At one point, an overwhelming sense of peace came over me. We were in the moment, and there was nothing we could do about it.”

“The sound of the children screaming as the tornado hit was something I will never forget.”

‘A Real Sick Feeling In Your Stomach’

A 28-year veteran of the Moore Fire Department, Fire Chief Gary Bird has been through several tornadoes. For him, the morning of May 20 began with a call from the Director of Emergency Management Gayland Kitch, informing him that there was to be an immediate weather conference for city officials. Bird met with the city manager, deputy fire chief and Kitch to video conference with meteorologist Rick Smith at the NWS in Norman. “After listening to the conference and all the explanations of just how it was developing, it didn’t look good,” Bird says. “Rick Smith was very concerned about this storm.”

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Bird rallied his firefighters and gave orders that all fire crews were to remain at their stations – leaving only for emergency calls – prepare for a possible tornado emergency and monitor the weather. That afternoon, his worst fears were confirmed as a monstrous tornado crossed Interstate 44 just west of his station. At that juncture, the fire chief made a difficult call. “We made the decision to take all of our

ALYSON HEEKE, BIRTH CENTER NURSE MANAGER AT MOORE MEDICAL CENTER, COACHED A WOMAN IN LABOR AS THE TORNADO RIPPED APART THE HOSPITAL.


equipment and leave and go south to just inside Norman city limits,” he says. “We made the decision to leave because the track this tornado was taking was definitely going through Moore, and we were going to need all of our equipment to take care of our citizens. We could not afford to lose over a fourth of our fleet. “This decision was not made lightly. We knew we could still get through traffic, we

knew where the tornado was, but we needed to move,” he says. In the immediate aftermath of the storm, Bird and his crews focused on search and rescue for victims trapped under debris. It is a day the chief will never forget. “The most difficult part of this is dealing with the loss of life, especially the children in the school,” he says. “When you have to report

to your boss a certain number of casualties, then, when you’re in a press conference and the numbers double, then, all of sudden they double again, you just get a real sick feeling in your stomach. Thank God it was just misinformation; the numbers never grew like reported. It could have been a lot worse, but the lives we lost were way too many.” MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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‘Their Eyes Are Always The Same’

Carla Young, regional mass care manager for the American Red Cross, says helping meet the needs of others puts joy in her heart. She began volunteering with the organization during the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995 and again during Hurricane Katrina in 2005. She is now a fulltime volunteer. “The phrase, ‘You get back more than you give,’ is not just a saying with the Red Cross,” Young says. “It is what happens when you volunteer with this amazing organization.” On the morning of May 20, Young and her crew of volunteers were already in disaster-response mode. Just the day before, the towns of Luther and Shawnee had been terrorized by a tornado outbreak. The new day brought predictions of more severe weather. Young and the other volunteers were on a weather watch while coordinating trucks of supplies and volunteers, shelter and food for the towns devastated the previous day. Like many Oklahomans that afternoon, Young watched the swift development of the super-cell thunderstorms – storms that were clearly headed for what Young calls “the Moore tornado path of the past.” She began calling her crews on the road, urging them to find a safe location out of the storm’s way. Cell phone service cut in and out before it cut off altogether, making it more difficult to reach the volunteers. Soon, she began to hear the sirens. “I have to say every person working at the Red Cross office that day was in our Emergency Operation Center watching the TVs, because every person was affected in some way,” she says. “Not only were we worrying about our crews in the field, but we ourselves had to take cover in the storm safety room at the Red Cross office on Northeast Sixth Street, across from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.” The tornado passed the Oklahoma City office, leaving it untouched. Young and her crew immediately began to coordinate relief efforts. “We knew this storm was big, and we knew we needed every resource we had to cover the first few days of the response,” she says. “As soon as the May 20 storm passed, the city-county emergency incident command was set up. The Red Cross was called to support the first responders on the scene in the Moore area.” Young sent emergency response vehicles loaded with snacks, water and coffee to the damaged areas and immediately opened shelters at St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church and the Moore Community Center. “When Red Cross was let into the main destruction zone, I heard over and over that there were no roads, no road signs, no landmarks left to let any of the volunteer crews know where they were,” Young says. “I was told repeatedly it was easy to get lost in the maze of debris. What was so disheartening was that debris was someone’s personal effects, their cherished items, everything they owned before the storm.” The most difficult part of the storm’s aftermath, Young says, were the eyes of the devastated. “It’s always the eyes of the disaster clients that are the hardest to take. One day, I got out of the office and went to Moore to the feeding kitchen at the Baptist church,” she says. “I was stopped by so many

“When Red Cross was let into the main destruction zone, I heard over and over that there were no roads, no road signs, no land marks left to let any of the volunteer crews know where they were.”

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people on the way in, just wanting to tell their story. You would think stories would be somewhat alike … what you find out during a disaster is every story and experience is different, and they need you to listen. But their eyes are always the same.”

‘It was So Very Eerie for Me’ Congressman Tom Cole, U.S. Representative for Oklahoma’s 4th District, remembers

MOORE FIRE CHIEF GARY BIRD MADE TOUGH BUT CRUCIAL DECISIONS ON MAY 20 THAT ALLOWED HIS CREWS TO BEGIN SEARCH AND RESCUE EFFORTS QUICKLY AFTER THE STORM PASSED.


clearly his first Moore tornado. “I watched one touch down when I was playing football as a kid,” he says. “It picked up my friend’s house and moved it about 100 yards with him in it. He was 5 years old.” Like others who have called Moore home for their entire lives, Cole and his loved ones were impacted by the 1999 tornado. “It’s just something people here live with and grow up with,” he says, “although it’s

been especially intense these past 15 years.” The morning of May 20 was Cole’s first legislative day back in Washington, D.C. Always on the alert for spring storms in his home state, Cole’s office closely monitored the weather. But it was during a meeting with another legislator that Cole saw his hometown on CNN. “I looked up and could see that the tornado had hit the laundry where I go, a mile from

my house,” he says. Cole skipped the scheduled votes in the House that evening as he desperately tried to reach his family and local staff to make sure they were all right and to get their personal assessments of conditions in the destruction zone. He then received a phone call from President Barack Obama. “It was so thoughtful on his part,” Cole says. “He said, ‘Tom, I know this is your MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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hometown. I want you to know that Michelle and I are thinking about you and your family and friends and praying for you. We will do everything we possibly can in this situation to help people on the ground.’” The president then named the resources already in motion to help the efforts of the state and affected communities. “People are critical about federal government, and that’s understandable,” Cole says. “But we

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are lucky to be Americans, because in times of disaster, the amazing resources of this country become available, and the executive branch immediately mobilizes. This is true of Tuscaloosa, Ala., Super Storm Sandy, Hurricane Katrina ... in this case, the President took a special interest.” When Cole and other Oklahoma legislators were able to return to the state – with airports closed, they resorted to commandeering a mili-

tary plane – the group took a helicopter over the path of the outbreak before surveying the damage on the ground. At Plaza Towers Elementary, their first stop, Cole was particularly shaken. “It was so very eerie for me,” he says. “I was a groundskeeper there when I was putting myself through college. It also was a polling place. I couldn’t count the number of times I’d been there. I knew every part of Moore there was to know; I’d lived there for 50 years. When


I saw the destruction, I literally could not tell where I was. No visual landmarks existed anymore. The destruction was just so utter. That was a gut-wrenching moment.” With the help of local, state and federal organizations and first responders, Cole worked vigorously to ensure the federal coordination for the disaster went as smoothly as possible. He also spent days amid the rubble of his hometown, speaking with fellow residents and helping with the cleanup efforts. One woman he met was sweeping debris from the slab of her safe room in the garage. She told Cole that she had won the federal lottery to pay for a storm room and that it had been completed three weeks before May 20. As another neighbor picked through the ruins of his home, Cole stopped to help and asked him what he was looking for. The man replied: “My truck.” Cole’s wife, Ellen, at home during the outbreak, rode out the monster storm in a neighbor’s safe room. The Coles had their own safe room, but it was only built to withstand an EF-3 or EF-4 tornado. After May 20, they purchased and installed one that could withstand an EF-5.

CARLA YOUNG WAS AMONG THE AMERICAN RED CROSS VOLUNTEERS, WHO HELPED DISPLACED MOORE RESIDENTS. RIGHT: U.S. REP. TOM COLE WATCHED THE DESTRUCTION OF HIS HOME TOWN WHILE IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

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The Transcendent

ALLAN

HOUSER The art world remembers the Oklahoma-born artist on the centennial of his birth.

T

BUFFALO HUNT, CIRCA 1992, BY ALLAN HOUSER. IMAGE COURTESY ALLAN HOUSER INC. AND FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART.

RIGHT: ALLAN HOUSER AS ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE AT DARTMOUTH COLLEGE IN 1979. PHOTO BY MATTHEW WYSOCKI, COURTESY ALLAN HOUSER INC.

By Karen Shade

eenagers gather along Gilcrease Museum’s broad, hallowed halls, after viewing the exhibit Form and Line, but the chatter dissolves when entering the gallery. Eyes adjust to the dim scene, but not quickly enough. And then, you encounter something sacred – rows of small shrines, faces, limbs. And the light falls upon each work of art, giving full effect to the name of its creator. By all accounts, Allan Houser was a humble, kind man who spent every spare minute in his art studio. He painted, drew and sculpted to such a degree that his prolific career astonished his family, colleagues and supporters. He received the esteemed Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship in 1947, the same year Thomas Gilcrease began collecting Houser’s work. He served as the artist-in-residence at Dartmouth College in 1979. In 1992, he became the first American Indian to receive the National Medal of the Arts; in the last decade of his life, he had major solo art exhibitions in Berlin, Tokyo, Paris and Vienna. “Those are all pretty remarkable achievements for any artist, but especially for this rural Apache farm boy who got this idea in his head that he could be a fine artist and proceeded to demonstrate that he was ... it’s an American success story,” says W. Jackson Rushing III. Rushing is the University of Oklahoma Adkins Presidential Professor of Art History and the Mary Lou Milner Carver Chair in Native MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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American Art. Rushing wrote Allan Houser: An American Master and says the artist’s story is about survival. If that’s true, Houser’s story is far from over. Like Gilcrease, museums across the states of Oklahoma, Arizona, New Mexico and others are honoring the late artist in 2014, the centennial year of his birth. While these exhibits tend to focus on different areas of Houser’s career, together they create a vivid picture of a complex individual who challenged notions of American Indian art by satisfying a need for creative independence. Whether teaching a class or by his inexhaustible example, Houser was an inspiration to those who knew him and to those who wish they had.

Pulling Roots

the 20-year-old farm boy set off for Santa Fe alone. “When he signed up, he thought he was going to learn Beaux Arts, learn to draw like Rembrandt, you know, make landscapes like (J.M.W.) Turner,” Rettig says, “but they took a very low-tech approach. They took a trade school approach to this classroom. That’s what the ... Indian school was. They wanted to teach these young students how to make a product, how to make something sellable.” Under the guidance of Dorothy Dunn, art instructor at the Santa Fe Indian School, Houser grew skilled in the flat, two-dimensional perspective of American Indian painting that became known as the “traditional style.” “Allan was kind of disappointed that they wouldn’t let him experiment,” Rettig says, “but he was very facile and very good at what he was doing. He was also the only Apache (in the class).” Despite style restrictions, Houser’s pieces were influenced by Remington’s Old West. “Not only technically were his pieces exceptional, but the iconography was different,” Rettig continues. “He was doing these Apache mountain spirit dances, he was doing these Apache chase scenes.” Houser and his work caught the notice of the U.S. Department of Interior, and in 1939, the young artist received

“It’s my understanding that Haozous means the ‘sound of pulling roots,’ or the ‘sound of pulling away,’” Rushing says. “Beautiful. Beautiful word.” Houser was born Allan Haozous on June 30, 1914, near Lawton to Sam and Blossom Haozous. He was the first person in his family born free since Geronimo and his band of Chiricahua Apaches surrendered in 1886 and were imprisoned at Fort Sill in western Oklahoma. He was about 5 years old when he began drawing, around the same time he attended a small school in the town of Boone, says David Rettig, curator of collections for Allan Houser Inc. in Santa Fe, N.M. The company is the Houser family business operation. “[Houser] told me that ... they didn’t have much. They had the farm,” Rettig says. “They didn’t have drawing paper and pencils at home, so he used to borrow sheets of notebook paper from school.” That lasted until Houser quit school at 13 to work the farm, although there was a brief stint at the old Chilocco Indian School near Newkirk, Okla., a few years later. He was a restless kid looking for a direction for his energies. One day, he found a book on the art of Frederic Remington – an artist of the American West who painted and sculpted – and Houser began replicating the drawings inside, Rettig says. Houser was only 14 or 15 at the time. His art education took a positive turn a few years later when he came across a flier on the wall of the Anadarko Agency Indian Affairs Office. It announced that painting classes would be starting at the Santa Fe Indian School. The young artist was eager for training, SACRED RAIN ARROW, 1988, IS so he wrote a letter and submitted ONE OF ALLAN HOUSER’S MOST RECOGNIZABLE WORKS. a few of his sketches to the school. PHOTO COURTESY ALLAN HOUSER INC. Houser was accepted, and in 1934,

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the first of five federal commissions to paint large murals. He also married and started a family, moving his wife, Anna, and his sons around the country for exhibition opportunities.

Many Journeys

In 1948, Houser was chosen for another commission from the interior department. The new commission, however, was different. It was not for another mural in a government office; this time, he was asked to produce a sculpture for the Haskell Indian School, now Haskell Indian Nations University, in Lawrence, Kan. Haskell had been given an eight-foot block of Italian Carrara marble, Rettig says, and both Houser and the department were concerned that he had never done much sculpture before, certainly nothing on this scale. “He didn’t have any tools, he didn’t know how to carve stone,” Rettig says. “He told me the first thing he did (was) he showed up out there in Lawrence and went to the head stonemaker and asked him what kind of tools and chisels he could borrow or find.” Houser began by taking a steam jackhammer to the marble. Eight months later, he finished Comrade in Mourning, which became one of his most famous sculptures and officially made him the first contemporary American Indian fine art sculptor. Years later, that first piece would be featured in a 2004 retrospective exhibition art show opening the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. There was a lot of interest in American Indian art in the 1920s to 1940s, Rushing says, and Houser was fortunate to catch the end of that period. But the 1950s saw the market for indigenous art and craft wane, and opportunities to show work declined. The trend continued into the 1960s. During that time, Houser found work illustrating books for children and young readers. He also began teaching at the new Institute of American Indian Art in Santa Fe. Between preparing for classes, teaching and family life, Houser made studio time to experiment and make art. Whereas early in his career he made watercolor and wash paintings using the imagery of the past, Houser now began looking at the forms of men, women and children and of the spaces around them. The lines were simplified, cleaner but had more weight, bearing and meaning. To his son – artist Phillip Haozous – Houser lived in another world the younger couldn’t understand as a


child. It would take years before he could see his father’s intent. “He was a native artist who refused to be limited by traditional things, was interested in the history of modern art, was interested in the art of the American West,” Haozous says. “He determined very much to be his own man as an artist, and that was inspiration to a couple of generations of younger artists who saw him as a father figure.” Haozous, president and CEO of Allan Houser Inc., says he and his four brothers, as they grew, had to find their own paths as artists, and Houser encouraged them. “He was so occupied in his art, you know, we weren’t real, real close to him until, as we got older, he began to accept us a little more. But he was ... in a place in his life where he was really moving forward, and we were kind of stumbling around in the dark,” Haozous says. Three brothers – Phillip Haozous, Bob Haozous and Roy Houser – went into the military. When he was released from duty, Phillip Haozous began working with his father in the studio, and they became closer. Like his brother, artist Bob Haozous took back their family’s Apache name and explored art and its boundaries. “My father was no less influenced by the rules of art-making than I am. He was told that being Indian was a historic identity and no longer valid, and (that) he should produce artwork that was market focused,” Bob Haozous says. “He immediately broke away from that simply because he was drawn to his natural creativity rather than the market needs, and that followed him his whole life.”

ABOVE: ALLAN HOUSER IN HIS STUDIO NEAR SANTA FE, N.M. PHOTO COURTESY ALLAN HOUSER INC.

LEFT: LARGE GA’AN DANCER IN THE GLOW OF A FIRE, 1994, BY ALLAN HOUSER. IMAGE COURTESY ALLAN HOUSER INC.

RIGHT: COMFORTING TOUCH, 1990, BY ALLAN HOUSER. © CHIINDE LLC. PHOTO BY WENDY MCEAHERN, COURTESY GILCREASE MUSEUM OF ART.

BELOW: STUDY FOR RECLINING FIGURE, 1992, BY ALLAN HOUSER. IMAGE COURTESY THE HOUSER/ HAOZOUS FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART.

Masterful Influence

As Houser moved through different teaching posts, his work changed, too. That evolution can be seen in pieces Houser created through the mid-1970s for Philbrook Museum of Art’s Indian Annual, a juried show of work by American Indian artists held between 1946 and 1976. “When Houser began his career, he was a painter and illustrator working in a way considered now as a traditional style in terms of both content – Apache people in traditional dress doing tasks of the day – but also in terms of the style of painting,” says Christina Burke, curator of Native American and Non-Western art at Philbrook. “The ‘flat style’ of painting became associated with painters in Oklahoma of the time and others who went through The Studio School at Santa Fe Indian School.” When he first began submitting his work to Philbrook’s Indian Annual, Houser turned in paintings of this style. But by 1968, his sculpture and drawing were beginning to consume his intense focus. His submission that year was a small ebony wood carving of an Apache

man’s with a single arm raised above him; he titled it Sacred Rain Arrow. “Later, he did a version in bronze that is now on the Oklahoma (vehicle) license plate, but it started off as this very abstract form in wood that was shown here in 1968 at Philbrook,” Burke adds. When Philbrook opens the exhibit Allan Houser: A Celebration on May 25 at its Philbrook Downtown gallery in Tulsa, the original wood carving will be part of it – on loan from

the Houser family. Abstraction had entered his work, and Houser was always looking inside and out. He looked to Europe and at such artists as Brent Kusee, Hans Arp and Jacques Lipchitz, each of whom was taking chances with their forms, like Houser. Houser took the narrative of American Indian tradition and applied simplified, clean aesthetics to his approach, Rettig says. Closer to home, his American Indian contemporaries has similar ideas. MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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The late Southern Cheyenne painter Walter Richard “Dick” West Sr. was also from Oklahoma and taught at Muskogee’s Bacone College for many years. During his career, West explored abstraction in his creative process and in his paintings, Burke says. Another peer, Oscar Howe, a Dakota artist from South Dakota, painted in the cubist style. In 1958, Howe stirred up the Philbrook Indian Annual with his submission. The judges determined that his work didn’t fit the then-working definition of Indian art. “Howe, understandably, got very upset,” Burke says, “and wrote a scathing letter back to the museum, basically saying, ‘Who are you tell Indian artists what Indian art is?’” The following year, the Annual added a nontraditional art category, and Howe took first place. “All of these guys – Houser, Dick West and Oscar Howe – were kind of pushing the boundarALLAN HOUSER ies and thinking outside (FRONT LEFT) ON THE JUDGING PANEL AT the box, painting outside THE 1951 PHILBROOK the box, carving outside INDIAN ANNUAL the box. They each had WITH OTHER JUDGES: WOLF ROBE HUNT their own style and own (FRONT RIGHT), ROYAL statements. They were of B. HASSRICK (BACK a generation where they ROW, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT), BLACKBEAR were saying, ‘Nobody BOSIN AND OSCAR can tell us what is native JACOBSON. art. We are making it up PHOTO COURTESY PHILBROOK MUSEUM OF ART. as we go along as our forefathers did as well,’” Burke says. Just as native people decades before incorporated imported glass beads procured by trade into their traditional dress and culture, Houser and his contemporaries were bringing new perspective and materials to the expression of Indian art in their time. By 1951, Houser was sitting on the judging panel at the Indian Annual. The last year he was involved was 1976. His influence was felt. “The Indian Annual show was not just about non-native people giving out prizes to native artists. It was native artists giving prizes to native artists,” Burke says. “…People like Houser were influential in terms of what they created, their own work, their own art. They were also influential in terms of being teachers and mentors … but he was also influential and impactful in terms of his critique of his peers of native artists, and that’s something that has not been explored.”

The Transcendence

Houser continued to paint through the 1970s, but when he retired from teaching in 1975 and took to his studio full-time, he was ready to wrest his ideas out of surfaces he had yet to fully explore. Painting was no longer the focus, and he put his energy into sculpting and, later, drawing.

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In the 19 years between his retirement and death, Houser created 90 percent of his sculptures, about 850 pieces. He constantly sketched out designs, leaving behind 239 sketchbooks crammed with drawings on every page. He then

created a series of large drawings, preferring the spontaneity of sketching and drawing to the extensive planning involved in painting, Rettig says. During that time his work received more attention from the public than he’d ever known, and his art was sought by institutions and collectors from around the world. “He was one of those native artists who transcended the category of ‘Indian’ or ‘native’ and was recognized at the national level and even international level as a great artist, regardless of his ethnic background,” Burke says. When Houser worked in his studio, it was “a peaceful place to be,” Phillip Haozous says. “He seemed always to be very calm, never excited, never bothered by anything. He just sat in his studio and just peacefully went about his work. I’d walk in, and then he’d just look over at me and smile. And then we’d talk a little, and I’d watch him work. It was very relaxing for me to see him at play.” Rettig remembers observing Houser sketching and the intensity he put into it. “With drawing, it was so beautiful to watch,” Rettig says. “He’d drawn for so many years ... that he made the most complex things look effortless. He’d take a piece of charcoal, and by just one gesture, he could create a line that had

so much nuance that he could define motion, he could define the fold in fabric, just never taking the charcoal off the paper.” In the last four years of his life, Houser created about 250 large charcoal and pastel drawings. While his design transitioned from representational to more modern and contemporary, Houser continued to be inspired by the Apache people and other tribes as subjects for his work. The subjects grounded him as his spirit explored the lines and directions of contemporary art beyond the American Southwest. “He broke away, but he was always with Indian people. He always maintained a very strong, indigenous sense of his identity and personality,” Bob Haozous says. Houser never forgot the history of his family and the Chiricahua, but like many from the generations before him, he didn’t speak of it. He used it to fuel his art, including a drawing of two young men in chains. “One presumes that they are, in fact, at Fort Sill, but even in their imprisonment, they sit upright,” Rushing says. “They’re very handsome, they gaze out toward the future without fear. It’s a remarkable drawing about survival.” Houser not only survived, but seemed to be at peace in his life and work. “His mother was very Christian,” Bob Haozous says, “and once, she asked him why he didn’t go to church, and he told her, ‘All I need to do is take a walk.’” Houser died Aug. 22, 1994. Phillip Haozous says his father was never one to explain his work, but that was part of what made Houser unique not only to American Indian art but art in general. He wanted to be a good artist, one whose work left an impression and room for the viewer to inwardly explore. “Even in the abstract and modern pieces, it’s up to everyone’s own impression what they get out of the piece,” says Phillip Haozous. Today, the Houser family compound – a multiacre property with a sculpture garden, studios, gallery space and living quarters south of Santa Fe – welcomes tourists to view Houser’s work and favorite scenery. “He had said he wanted to be known as one of the best ever in the world,” Phillip Haozous says, “and he was pleased with what he had done, but he was kind of sad that he had to leave ... Unto the end, he was inspiring.”


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According to a recent Center for American Progress report, no other state in the nation ranks as consistently bad as Oklahoma does. The report, “The State of Women in America: A 50 State Analysis of How Women are Faring Across the Nation,” presented it findings in the categories of economic security, leadership and health of women and families. Oklahoma ranks 48 out of 50. The high female incarceration rate, double the national average for more than a decade, places Oklahoma as the No. 1 state for women in prison. Also in the report, Oklahoma comes in dead last concerning women’s health issues, has the third-highest maternal mortality rate and is among the top 10 worst states for infant mortality. The state has the second lowest rate of obstetricians and gynecologists for its population of women, ranks third worst in the nation for domestic violence and has become a central hub for an increasingly alarming issue for women: human trafficking. “There are a lot of women in Oklahoma doing very well, and these women tend to work hard to try to raise all women up with them,” says Lou Kohlman, chair of the Oklahoma Commission on the Status of Women, a state advisory board. “We’re fortunate in that respect. If you’re a woman in Oklahoma, you may not feel like this is a bad place

CARMELITA SKEETER

Distinguished both locally and nationally for her expertise on a wide range of critical health issues and policies, Carmelita Skeeter has served as executive director of the Indian Health Care Resource Center in Tulsa for the past 25 years. As leader of the nonprofit organization, she has played a crucial role in building IHCRC into a comprehensive, quality healthcare facility since its beginning, as she strives to eliminate health disparities and improve the general health status of Tulsa’s American Indian community. A seasoned healthcare advocate, Skeeter says that in the time that she has been with IHCRC, the biggest issues she sees with women are poverty and lack of education, both of which have a tremendous effect on health. “I’m seeing third generations in families now. We have some very good stories of evolving, and then we have some stories that aren’t so good. A lot of times a family that

to live, but that may be because we just don’t see where we could be because we’re used to where we are. “It’s important to look at the larger picture, and look at the picture of what women in other states enjoy that we don’t even know we miss,” she continues. “For example, if you don’t realize what a difference it makes to have more women in your legislature, then you don’t necessarily understand why that’s important. Women in the legislature changes the nature of the conversation for women. There are different topics on the table, they’re considered differently, and this effects serious change. Policy makers talk a lot about family values, but not a lot of our policies reflect a real respect for women’s lives. If we had more focus on those things we’d see everybody in the state benefit.” While studies show that Oklahoma statistically struggles where women are concerned, in other ways it is also a good place for women to be. Kohlman emphasizes that a lot of good things happen here. “There’s some great conversations being had about women, and there are a lot of people working very hard to not only improve the lives of women, but also to draw more women into the conversation,” she says. “By bringing more women together to talk about these issues, we can change the nature of the conversation, raise more awareness and visibility within our communities, and make a difference.”

CARMELITA SKEETER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, INDIAN HEALTH CARE RESOURCE CENTER. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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is extremely poor continues (in poverty) for generation after generation. It’s hard to get out, and we see many, many single mothers in this situation,” Skeeter says. “We still live in a very male-dominant society. Men seem to have it easier making a living – they still earn higher wages than women do – and taking care of the children almost always falls upon the mother. This makes it much more difficult for women when it comes to making a living and raising children, especially if you’re a single mother,” she says. “We have women who come in that we’ve worked with who have continued their education, but there are always so many that are constantly struggling. We see the

entire spectrum, and I think it’s a reflection of what’s going on with all races of women across the state.” Despite progress made over the years with the availability of health services on the state and federal levels, Skeeter says that Oklahoma’s faltering statistics show there’s plenty of room for improvement, particularly when it comes to funding education and childcare. To educate the American Indian community on healthy lifestyles and habits, IHCRC partners with organizations to promote community gardens and farmers markets. It also offers classes on nutrition, health-conscious shopping choices and cooking so that clients can learn how to prepare healthy meals for

JAN PEERY

Having devoted her life and career to addressing women’s issues, Jan Peery is a strong advocate for all Oklahoma women, particularly those who have been victimized by domestic violence and sexual assault. As CEO of Oklahoma City’s YWCA for the past 10 years, Peery has made a substantial impact on raising the organization’s visibility within the city. With Oklahoma ranking third in the country for women killed by men, according to a 2013 study conducted by the Violence Policy Center, Peery says that now more than ever is the time to tell the story of domestic violence and its impact on the state. “We always want to think of the victims as someone else, someone not like us … but the truth is these women are everywhere, from all walks of life, economic backgrounds and races. They’re all of us,” she explains. “When you look at the statistics of violence against women in our state, you’ll see that this is happening everywhere. It’s in all of our schools, churches, businesses and neighborhoods. It infiltrates all aspects of our community. We have to look at the socioeconomic impacts it takes, and when we do this, you can’t help but see that our own families will eventually be affected by it. Everyone is affected.” Unifying partners from law enforcement, the U.S. Department of Justice and medical and forensic agencies, Peery fostered and developed the SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner) program for Oklahoma County.She also helped to establish the Oklahoma County Task Force on the Prevention of Domestic Violence and created the YWCA education department for the prevention of domestic violence and sexual assault.Through the department, thousands of children and adults in schools, churches, businesses and community organizations receive information and education on the sensitive issues surrounding sexual assault and family violence.

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themselves and their families. “I think that there are so many things going on in your life today that eating healthy meals takes time and planning, and believe it or not, this is something that many people have to learn to do,” Skeeter explains. “Many of our young, single mothers have no idea how to cook because they’re accustomed to fast food, which is quick and cheap,” she says. “Women play such a crucial role in family health. They are the primary caregivers in their families; if you start with women getting their own health in check, there is the opportunity to impact everyone else in her family. If mom’s healthy, everyone has a better chance of being healthy.”

JAN PEERY, CEO, OKLAHOMA CITY YWCA. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

“Education is key,” says Peery. “Through education, we can do the prevention work we need to help try to prevent rapes and dating violence and change the general attitudes towards victims of rape.” To keep operations and services running and moving forward, Peery implements fundraising efforts, such as the YWCA Oklahoma City’s recent capital campaign, which successfully reached its goal of raising $15 million. Funds will go toward the construction of a new shelter – a sanctuary for those trying to rebuild and heal – and will more than double

the number of beds available to those in need of shelter and a safe place. The current shelter is set to be turned into an extended stay facility that will give clients the time needed to work toward selfsufficiency. “We’ve really needed this – our shelter stays full – but I think that one of our biggest successes has been the increased level of awareness of who the YWCA is and what we do, so that more victims know that we are here and that they have a place to go for help,” CONTINUED ON P. 78 says Peery.


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DR. TERRY NEESE

In her early 20s, Dr. Terry Neese began her own service company, Neese Personnel. It was 1975, a time when women were not allowed to join the Oklahoma City Rotary business club or borrow money from a bank without a man’s signature, Neese says. “I couldn’t borrow money to start my own business, and I didn’t want to. I didn’t want to go into debt, but I was determined to not have my husband borrow money for me. I never looked at myself as a ‘woman entrepreneur.’ I was just an entrepreneur,” she says. The founder and CEO of the Institute for Economic Empowerment of Women has built a legacy of educating and empowering businesswomen on both the domestic and international fronts. Designed to foster the success of emerging female leaders in the business world, the IEEW is based on the foundation that women are key to the development and stability of business. Inducted into both the national and Oklahoma women’s hall of fame institutions, Neese is inspirational for her involvement with women in the areas of public policy and entrepreneurial education. The U.S. Department of State contacted her eight years ago about helping women in Afghanistan start and grow businesses. Through this opportunity, she created the Peace Through Business Program, which has educated and graduated more than 400 female entrepreneurs in Afghanistan and Rwanda. Skills in areas such as accounting, marketing and communications arm them with knowledge they need to start businesses and help other women. “These women have the ability and talent to start and grow nontraditional businesses,” Neese says. “We’re making huge strides. The women who have graduated from the program have developed into real leaders, and they’re advocating on behalf of issues that are important to the women in those countries.” The top 15 graduates will come to Oklahoma in July for mentorships with Oklahoma businesswomen across the state. Matched with women who own the same types of companies as they aspire to build – from mobile app companies and information technology to bedand-breakfasts or construction businesses – the graduates stay in their mentors’ homes and learn from them the duration of the visit. The teachers get something out of it, too. “What we’re experiencing with our Oklahoma women entrepreneurs involved in the program is that they are finding they learn more from them than the women learn from us,” Neese explains. “We become more emboldened as we mentor with these women. We better see and understand how much freedom we have; we’re prouder to be Americans. “We know that if we pass our knowledge

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DR. TERRY NEESE, FOUNDER AND CEO, INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

on to them, we are planting seeds in those countries, where more and more businesses will grow and thrive,” Neese says. “For us, it’s a

growing experience, but it’s also an empowering experience for all of the women entrepreneurs involved.”

MIMI TARRASCH, DEVELOPER AND DIRECTOR, WOMEN IN RECOVERY PROGRAM. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

MIMI TARRASCH

As the Developer and Director of the Women in Recovery (WIR) program in Tulsa, Mimi Tarrasch addresses the issue of high female

incarceration rates in Oklahoma with compassion. The program is a service offered by Family & Children’s Services in partnership with the George Kaiser Family Foundation.


Lisa Clark, Financial Advisor

Barbara Hess, Financial Advisor

Emily Cary, Financial Advisor

Tracy Emmons, Financial Advisor

Jane Mudgett, Financial Advisor

Abby Hubble, Financial Advisor

Brenda Jagels, Financial Advisor

Elizabeth Carson, Financial Advisor

Glenda Suchy, Financial Advisor

Vickie Sheen, Financial Advisor

LaDonna Giachino, Financial Advisor

Betty Nelson, Financial Advisor

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An intervention program for women arrested on nonviolent, drug-related charges, WIR is a prison alternative dedicated to reforming, educating, healing, counseling and rehabilitating female offenders. “We’ve been twice the national average since 1994. Why? I think it has a lot to do with the practice and laws that are in our state. I think that once a woman is involved in the criminal justice system, it’s really hard to get out or leave it. The (Oklahoma) Department of Corrections as an agency is certainly underfunded, and there are very limited services so, unfortunately, women don’t get the substance-abuse or treatment services that they need when they’re in prison,” she explains. “They wind up leaving the system with the same issues, and they might come back again, and we keep getting angrier and angri-

er at them, but we’re not providing them with services and solutions,” she continues. “I think that just perpetuates the problem. What happens as a result of that is that when they do leave prison they now have an existing felony. It’s harder to get a good job and good housing, and they end up in lower-paying employment. Oftentimes it’s easy to fall back into those old habits since they didn’t deal with their addiction or previous trauma.” To develop WIR, Tarrasch looked into the pathways that drive women into the criminal justice system, such as poverty, physical and sexual abuse, mental illness and barriers to education and employment. She designed the program to address their complex needs so that they can be treated and successfully re-enter society. Tarrasch says that 99 percent of the women in the program have experienced a

significant trauma in their lives. WIR helps them address these traumas, which can contribute to criminal behaviors. Addressing the intergenerational aspect is also critical. Children who have a parent in prison – especially a mother – are more likely to perform poorly in school, be prone to addiction and eventually become incarcerated themselves, she adds. “The cost to send a woman to prison for one year costs about the same as one year in WIR, yet there is a remarkable difference in the women coming out of prisons and the women coming out of WIR,” Tarrasch says. “It’s very exciting because we were originally funded for 25 women the first year. We met that 25 in the first four months. We are now serving 100 women at a time. These women are motivated and bright and articulate, and I am so moved by their stories and resilience.”

DR. FARIDEH SAMADZADEH

Actively working to increase interest of female students in science and math programs is Dr. Farideh Samadzadeh, a professor of computer sciences, who has taught gifted and talented high school students at the Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics in Oklahoma City for 20 years. With two of her advanced classes showing 66 percent and 75 percent female enrollment – numbers most colleges and universities would envy – she has made it her mission to encourage more female students to consider science and math as their college majors and ultimately help increase the number of Oklahoma women going into the fields of science, technology, engineering and math. “One of the biggest reasons there are so few women involved is that a lot of people think that there’s an impractical gender difference between men and women when it comes to science and math, and that’s not true at all,” she explains. “The ratio of girls to boys is almost equal every year at our school, so the young women are driven and talented and good at math and science. They enjoy it. Unfortunately, too many females don’t have someone telling them they can pursue a future in this area,” she says. Samadzadeh stresses the importance of active recruitment. In her introductory classes, she seeks out female students showing promise and explains what it takes to be successful in computer science and programming. “I tell them that they are some of the top students in my class. Initiating a personal conversation is often all it takes to give a girl the confidence she needs to advance. Then she signs up and inevitably ends up being one of the best students in those advanced CS (computer science) classes,” she says. “Women’s problem-solving abilities and

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DR. FARIDEH SAMADZADEH, PROFESSOR OF COMPUTER SCIENCES, OKLAHOMA SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND MATH. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

approaches are different from men’s. I’m not saying one is better than the other or superior or inferior, just different,” Samadzadeh says. “Women think in different ways, and that’s why it’s important in any field when you are doing

problem solving to have both women and men. What we are missing out on when we don’t have [both genders] solving problems together is a lot of great solutions and good ways at looking at problems.”


Hezinger’s Enterprises

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ith businesses on two ends of the spectrum, entrepreneur Brandi Hezinger has her hands full. Hezinger launched her first company, a high-end residential design company, Brandi Lee Designs, in 2000. Within the next decade, Hezinger moved Brandi Lee Designs to Florida to serve a larger market and added Hezinger Construction Inc., a road construction company that serves Oklahoma and Texas, hauling company S&Y Trucking Inc., and Soyaz Construction Inc., a remodel company that expands and supports her design initiatives. BeCare Life Services Inc., Hezinger’s latest endeavor, is a company that mirrors her own healthy lifestyle by creating, distributing and marketing all-natural products to support consumers in their health and beauty goals. Vanity Drink, BeCare Life Services’ first product to be released, has been touted as the beverage that preserves your prettiness with metabolism-enhancing and age-defying ingredients. Hezinger intends for Vanity Drink to be one of many products that cater to her target market, with others to be launched in the coming year. While launching Vanity Drink, Hezinger also brought one of the first blow dry salons to Tulsa, Posh Blow Dry Bar. Hezinger’s variety of experience and personal interests are certainly reflected in her diversity of endeavors. Her advice to other entrepreneurs is when you see an opportunity or have an idea, simply go for it. “Truly an advantage for me in business is elinda Traynor is the founder and CEO of AYUDA Assessment, Training, that I’ve never been afraid to at least try. I grewConsulting, and OQ Services, LLC providing these services to the oil and up with entrepreneurial parents who worked as gas construction industries. “Construction is my first love,” explains Melinda. a team together to build their businesses. See“As athat small girl, my grandfather would take me out, sit me on the seat of a D9G, ing that example instilled in me the lessons tie a rope around my waist as a safety belt, place huge ear protectors over my it’s going to be hard, but if someone else can do it, why can’t that person be you? Starting head, isand off we’d go!” That love of construction stayed with Traynor over the Brandihas Hezinger the hardest but most imperative step. Starting course of her twenty-three years in the field as she worked with non-profit trade. is what separates the doers from the dreamers.” says Hezinger.

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Hezinger's Enterprises

Soyaz Construction Inc., Brandilee Designs, Hezinger's Construction Inc., S&Y Trucking Inc., BeCare Life Services Inc, Posh Blow Dry Bar Inc.

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Katherine Magrini

Gardner Spring, Inc.

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estled quietly just northeast of downtown is one of Tulsa’s oldest companies. Owned by Katherine Magrini, Gardner Spring, Inc. has been manufacturing steel springs for 107 years. A Tulsa-based spring manufacturer supplying the original equipment manufacturing, industrial supply, and hardware industries, Gardner Spring celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2007. Gardner Spring was founded in Chicago in 1907, quickly making its mark as one of the country’s leading manufacturers of stock and specialty springs. “It was truly an honor to share our 100th year in business with the centennial celebration of the great state of Oklahoma,” says Magrini. Magrini, a Tulsa native, has been running the company since its relocation to Tulsa in the mid 1960s, and has been Gardner’s sole owner for more than 30 years. Her professional life has been a series of “firsts.” During the 1960s when Gardner Spring was still a part of the Barnes Group, Magrini was that company’s first female general manager. She was the first, and, for many years, the only woman member of the American

Hardware Manufacturers Association (AHMA). Magrini was also the first woman to join the Tulsa Area Manufacturers Association (TAMA). “I still remember how well I was treated back then,” Magrini recalls. “As the only woman in a male dominated industry, you’d think I would have had difficulties, but, honestly, I never did.” Gardner parts have found their way into everything from kitchen appliances to aerospace components, and business is booming. Recent years have seen the company expanding its customer base to Asia, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. Gardner Spring belongs to numerous professional organizations, such as Tulsa Area Manufacturers Association (TAMA), National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), North American Retail Hardware Association (NRHA), American Hardware Manufacturers Association (AHMA), and Spring Manufacturers Institute (SMI). Magrini is a member of the prestigious Committee of 200, an invitation-only organization of the world’s most successful business women.

Gardner Spring, Inc.

Katherine Magrini

1115 N. Utica Ave. Tulsa, OK 74110

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Cushenberry Agency

elinda Traynor is the founder and CEO of AYUDA Assessment, Training, or 30 years, Insurance Agency these has offered comprehensive Consulting, andCushenberry OQ Services, LLC providing services to the oil and insurance rates to policy holders inisOklahoma and explains Kansas. The agency's gas construction industries. “Construction my first love,” Melinda. priority is quality service to its customers. Always available to answer questions “As a small girl, my grandfather would take me out, sit me on the seat of a D9G, and provide assistance, the agents tailor policies to fit clients' specific needs. tie a rope around my waist as a safety belt, place huge ear protectors over my Providing comprehensive coverage and quality service to their clients will always head, off we’d go!” That love of construction has stayed with Traynor and over the beand the goal of the Cushenberry Agency. Diane Cushenberry is a property course of her twenty-three years in the field as she worked with non-profit trade. casualty agent who has been with the agency since 1997.

Cushenbery Agency Diane Cushenbery 918.665.8036 • 2251 E Skelly Dr. Suite 100, Tulsa

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McGraw Realtors

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t the urging of her husband and two sons, who are Tulsa builders, Belinda Tucker, a native Tulsan, retired from a 20-year teaching career and obtained her real estate license, placing it with McGraw Realtors. “The skills I acquired as an educator are great assets as a Realtor. I sincerely value the opportunity to facilitate the process of people achieving their goals: in this case, buying or selling a home,” she says. “Every client, every transaction brings its own unique set of characteristics. The common denominator in each, is the chance to provide clients with respect, knowledge, and successful results.” Belinda believes in the value of getting to know each client and how they envision their future in a new home. In this process, she personalizes her efforts to find or sell, not “just a house,” but a home. elinda Traynor is the founder and CEO of AYUDA Assessment, Training, She is a member of local, state and National AssociaConsulting, and OQ Services, LLC providing these volunteer services to oil and tions of Realtors and an active forthe Emergency gas construction industries. “Construction Infant Servies. is my first love,” explains Melinda. “As a small girl, my grandfather would take me out, sit me on the seat of a D9G, tie a rope around my waist as a safety belt, place huge ear protectors over my head, and off we’d go!” That love of construction has stayed with Traynor over the course of her twenty-three years in the field as she worked with non-profit trade.

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McGraw Realtors Belinda Tucker

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JuMar Services MCGRAW REALTORS GRAND LAKE

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uMar Services, owned and operated Mirabal ("sherpa") Training, helps compaelinda Traynor is the founder and CEObyofKari AYUDA Assessment, nies and individuals network smart leveraging LinkedIn. Kari doesn’t just Consulting, and OQ Services, LLC providing these services to the oil and "lead the way;” she empowers her clients through customized coaching and gas skill construction industries. is myopportunities first love,” explains Melinda. development strategies“Construction designed to create missed by most. From “As keynote a small speaking girl, my grandfather take me on-site out, sitworkshops, me on theJuMar seat ofServices a D9G,enengagementswould to customized and engages interactive programs. Services are designed tie arolls rope around myparticipants waist as a through safety belt, place huge ear protectors over my to help clients maximize the power of LinkedIn to build effective networking practices, head, and off we’d go!” That love of construction has stayed with Traynor over the expand brand awareness,years recruit andshe streamline development course of her twenty-three intop thetalent field as workedbusiness with non-profit trade. efforts as your business grows.

JuMar Services Kari Mirabal www.jumarservices.com • 918.200.9567

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MCGRAW REALTORS GRAND BA Med Spa & Weight LossLAKE

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elinda Traynor the founder and CEO ofand AYUDA Assessment, Training, A Med Spa is specializes in non-invasive minimally invasive procedures. Consulting, and OQ Services, LLC providing these services to the oilnonand In today’s fast-paced world, many patients are opting to have smaller, procedures to maintain their appearance. several Melinda. reasons why we gas invasive construction industries. “Construction is my firstThere love,”are explains not want to gograndfather under the knife, but for me mostout, of women it isthe as simple “Who has “As adosmall girl, my would take sit me on seat ofas, a D9G, the time or money to invest in, and then recuperate from, plastic or cosmetic surtie a rope around my waist as a safety belt, place huge ear protectors over my gery?” With procedures such as Ultherapy to tone, tighten and lift the skin of the face head, and off we’d go!” That love of construction has stayed with Traynor over the and neck; and Coolsculpting to selectively target and freeze unwanted pockets of fat, course her twenty-three years theoffer fieldpatients as shefaster worked withwithout non-profit trade. the of women at the BA Med Spaincan results the downtime.

BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Malissa Spacek

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

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MCGRAW REALTORS GRAND LAKE McGraw Realtors Grand Lake

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elinda Traynor is the founder and CEO of AYUDA Assessment, Training, iana Riley top real estate associate for McGraw Consulting, andPatterson, OQ Services, LLC providing these servicesRealtors to the oil and Grandindustries. Lake, was “Construction awarded 2013 is 15my MILLION Club in Volume Sales gas construction first love,” explains Melinda. overall at McGraw Realtors. She was also recognized for being in the top “As a small girl, my grandfather would take me out, sit me on the seat of a100 D9G, Realtors in Tulsa. Having had her license for 35 years, she has only been in the tie a rope around my waist as a safety belt, place huge ear protectors over my business since 2006. Born and raised on Grand Lake and from a real estate famhead, we’d go!” ThatGrand love ofLake construction haslisting stayed with Traynor over the ily,and her off specialty is South and she loves and selling waterfront course of her twenty-three years in the field as she worked with non-profit trade. and water view properties.

McGraw Realtors Grand Lake Diana Riley Patterson 918.629.3717 • dpatterson@mcgrawok.com

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Amy Kesner Counseling Services

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r. Amy Kesner has served in the field of mental health for more than 20 years. She earned her doctorate degree in psychology from Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center. Dr. Kesner practices in Oklahoma as a licensed professional counselor (LPC) as well as a drug and alcohol counselor (LADC). Her experience as a therapist expands several areas of interest, including grief and loss, addiction, family issues, trauma, depression and motivation for personal change. She has worked for 15 years with children who have been abused and neglected and are placed through the state in the Therapeutic Foster Care system. Dr. Kesner has provided alcohol and drug counseling for more than 20 years, including working through her private practice and providing services for DOC and drug court clients. Dr. Kesner also provides individual and group services to patients at Brookhaven Psychiatric Hospital in Tulsa. She has co-published one article with Steven Pritzker, Ph.D. in, ReVision: A Journal of Consciousness and Transformation titled "Therapeutic Horseback Riding with Children Placed in the Foster Care System.” Dr. Kesner started her own practice, Amy Kesner Counseling Services, in 2012 as she wanted to utilize her experiences to reach a broader audience as well as be more proactive in educating about the importance and relevance of mental health. Her practice provides counseling, life skills training, group support and training and development. A new endeavor she is currently pursuing is partnering with elinda Traynor is the founder and CEO of AYUDA Assessment, Training, another professional to start a mental health agency in Cleveland, Okla., to proConsulting, and OQ Services, providing these the oil and vide quality services to LLC rural communities. “I feel services it is not onlytomy purpose but passion to advocate for improved care. Mental health is in everything we do, it is gas construction industries. “Construction is my first love,” explains Melinda. the core of our existence from achieving personal goals, maintaining healthy “As a small girl, my at grandfather would take me out, sit me on the seat of a D9G, relationships, parenting, to how we manage ourselves in a traffic jam,” she says. tie a rope around my waist as acontinues safety belt, ear in protectors over my Dr. Kesner to findplace ways tohuge help those need and educate on topics relatedThat to mental and personal has growth by speaking various over engagehead, and off we’d go!” love health of construction stayed with at Traynor the ments and offering her services, professional opinion and experiences to help course of her twenty-three years in the field as she worked with non-profit trade. the community.

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Amy Kesner

PhD, LPC, LADC

Amy Kesner 18838 Amy Kesner.indd 1

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Special Advertising Section

PHD LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

How does compulsive behavior act like “the other man or woman" in a relationship? Any addiction or obsessive-compulsive behavior violates the boundaries of marriage by replacing the marital relationship with (the compulsion). This can be sex, food, alcohol, medicaCourtney Linsen- tion, etc. The person develops a love meyer-O’Brien, relationship with his/her compulsive PhD, LPC, MHR behavior over the course of time and chooses this affair over all other relationships. This preoccupation oftentimes becomes an obsession leading to addiction. It becomes and feels like “The other man or woman” hovering over the marriage. Feelings of betrayal, abandonment and emotional isolation are often felt by the supporting spouse, while rationalization, entitlement and denial are commonly experienced by the spouse who is struggling. It is important to understand that you cannot successfully achieve intimacy through isolation.

Courtney Linsenmeyer-O’Brien, PhD, LPC, MHR 1723 E. 15th St., Suite 250 Tulsa, OK 74104 918.639.0570 www.drcourtneyobrien.com drobrien@drcourtneyobrien.com

VETERINARIAN What are some helpful summer pet safety tips?

Dr. Rodney Robards

Summer is right around the corner. Pet owners must be aware that extra care must be given to make sure that their furry friends’ are healthy and safe. The extreme heat in Oklahoma can be much worse for our pets. Those with dark coats, geriatric or obese pets, and those with shorter muzzles require extra caution.

• Provide a sufficient amount of water for your pet at all times! If your pet is outdoors, make sure the water does not get too hot in their bowl. • Limit your dog’s sun exposure by walking them in the early morning and evening when temperatures are lower. • Pet fur acts as a sunscreen in itself, so the shorter your pet’s hair, the more susceptible they are to sunburn. Please consider before grooming, and if you must shave your pet, try to do it early in the summer, giving the hair time to grow out. • If your pet has short hair, pink skin and/or white fur, they will be especially vulnerable to sun damage.

BUSINESS BANKER What is net worth, and why is it important when applying for a business loan? One of the most important factors that our bank considers when evaluating a business loan request is whether the client has sufficient net worth to qualify for a loan. Net worth is a company’s equity or assets in excess Sean Kouplen of liabilities. This is the cushion a business uses to operate when their cash flow suffers. This cushion can be excess cash owned by the business or owners; it can also be equity and assets that can be turned into cash in tough times. We analyze the applicant’s financial statement to determine if the cushion is adequate. Sometimes, business owners mistakenly withdraw much of a business’ cash when things are good, and there’s no cushion available when times get tough. Business owners that have an adequate cushion demonstrate discipline in their finances, making them a great candidate for a business loan.

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Late March through August is Oklahoma’s tornado season. The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association reported 82 tornados in Oklahoma in 2013. Another busy season is predicted this year. While John Onorato most tornados will hit Oklahoma in May, now is a good time to make sure your properties are covered properly. $100 per square foot or more on Coverage A is a good rule of thumb to see if you have enough to rebuild. The value of the property or sales price of the home has nothing to do with rebuild costs. For example, a 2,000-square-foot home requires approximately $200,000 of Coverage A. Tornadoes can produce hail and hail damage is the most common loss to homes in Oklahoma. There is a separate deductible for wind/hail damage on most home policies. Wind/hail deductibles can vary greatly between insurance companies. Some have 5% wind/ hail deductibles. That means you could be out of pocket $10,000 on a $200,000 home. Deductibles as low as $1,000 flat are available with AAA Insurance. Ask your agent what your wind/hail deductible is before the season starts.

John Onorato AAA Insurance 6808 S. Memorial Rd., Suite 208 Tulsa, OK 74133 • 918.872.7100 www.insuringoklahoma.com john.onorato@aaaok.org

Sean Kouplen Regent Bank 7136 S. Yale, Suite 100 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.488.0788 www.bankregent.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT I have a small advertising budget. What is the quickest way to grow my business so I can increase my budget? Referrals are tremendously powerful and offer your business a chance to grow like no other. People would rather do business with people they Jessica Dyer know, or know of, than with strangers. After all, few things are more reassuring than a positive endorsement from someone you know and trust. Ask for referrals; there's nothing pushy about it. Getting a referral is the highest compliment you can receive, and people won’t give them to you unless you deserve it. One of the most powerful ways to elicit referrals is to give them generously yourself. Most people will appreciate the referral, and it may inspire them to respond in kind. Always thank someone who has given you a referral. Send them a note, keep them informed of your progress and maybe even treat them to lunch. Referrals, partnered with sharp advertising, creative marketing and smart social media can exponentially grow your business.

• Pavement and asphalt can get especially hot and burn your pet’s paws, which is why it’s best to walk your dog when it’s cooler out, or keep them on grass and sidewalk.

Rodney Robards, DVM Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital 2242 E. 56th Pl. Tulsa, OK 74105 918.747.1311 www.southernhillsvet.com

INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL

What should I keep in mind during this tornado season?

Jessica Dyer Emerge Marketing & PR 11063-D S. Memorial Dr. #445 918.925.9945 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

Can physical therapy treatment help my headaches? Generally speaking, there are three types of headaches that we may develop as we mature as adults.

Todd Petty, PT/CSMT

1) Tension type: The primary source of the headache is the muscular structures.

2) Cervicogenic type: The primary source of the headache is joints of the upper cervical spine with limitations in range of movement. 3) Migraines: The primary source of the headache is vascular or hormonal related. Physical therapy intervention has the best outcomes when dealing with the tension and cervicogenic types. Physical therapy treatments that reduce muscle tension and increase circulation affect tension type headaches successfully. The best physical therapy results are when treating cervicogenic headaches with manual spinal mobilization, modalities and progressive exercises. The prognosis of the cervicogenic headache is good due to the unique anatomy of the upper three vertebrae and lack of vertebral discs. Ask your physician to refer you for a PT evaluation to determine what type of headache you might have and if physical therapy can help.

Todd Petty, PT/CSMT Excel Therapy Specialists 918.398.7400 www.exceltherapyok.com Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


Special Advertising Section

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. HOSPICE CARE I am the main caregiver for my mom, who has Parkinson’s disease. She is living with us and the doctor has recommended that I get some help to relieve my stress. I know you work with many families in this situation. Any advice?

MARRIAGE COUNSELOR

How do I rebuild my partner’s trust after I have severely disappointed them? First, if you have violated your partner’s trust, you must care about their pain and show them you hurt because they hurt. Acknowledge that their hurt is warranted. Take responsibility Brad Robinson, for your hurtful actions and express LMFT a healthy amount of shame for your behavior. Then, reassure them that you will help them heal. This reassurance will take time and consistency on the part of the person who violated trust. But time does not heal all wounds. Consistent action and compassion heals wounds with time. It can also be helpful for the person whose trust was violated to ask for what they need in order to begin trusting you again. The injured party needs to understand what you were thinking when you violated their trust so you become more predictable to them. Situations like this are not hopeless. I’ve helped hundreds of couples rebuild trust.

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Caregiving is one of the toughest jobs you will ever have. While it can be very fulfilling to give back to a parent and care for them in their time of need, it can also be incredibly stressful and you can be in danger of burning out. I recommend you find a professional who can provide respite care once or twice a week so you can get errands done or get some much needed “R and R”. At Grace Hospice, we provide free respite care for our hospice patients and we have seen firsthand how beneficial it can be. If you would like more information on support groups and caregiver stress, you can call Grace Hospice at 918.744.7223.

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST I have heard good things about the new Coolsculpting procedure. What I can realistically expect from this procedure? Coolsculpting® is a great, new, noninvasive way to eliminate excess fat from the body by targeting and destroying fat cells in the treated area. Malissa Spacek The ideal candidate is someone who is within 25 pounds of his or her goal weight and has stubborn pockets of fat that they just cannot get rid of. With each treatment, a patient experiences a 20-25 percent bulk fat reduction in the area that was treated. For this reason, we always recommend two treatments, which ensure the optimal results that give a real “WOW” factor to our patients. For more information, call our expert staff at BA Med Spa today at 918.872.9999 for your complimentary Coolsculpting® consultation.

“Grace Hospice: Caring for patients and families in Northeastern Oklahoma for 15 years” Brad Robinson, CEO Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Marriage Solutions 2121 S. Columbia Ave Suite 301 Tulsa, OK 74114 918.281.6060 www.MarriageSolutionsTulsa.com

PROFESSIONAL CLEANING SERVICE What is the best method for removing pet stains from my carpet? Removing stains is the most effective way to eliminate pet odor. You should first place towels over any liquid and blot by stepping on them. Buy a bacteria/enzyme digester from a pet Amy Bates store to use on fresh stains. These digesters work slowly, so it is important to leave the solution on as long as the directions say and follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. Use enough solution to eliminate the urine that has penetrated through the carpet. Cover the area with plastic to make sure the spot does not dry out. As a final step, you should mix a solution of one cup of vinegar to a gallon of warm water and rinse the area. You should avoid using steam cleaners and make sure to invest in a high-quality pet odor neutralizer.

Amy Bates Merry Maids 5656 S. Mingo Road Tulsa, OK 74146 918.250.7318 www.merrymaids.com

Ava Hancock Executive Director Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT I keep hearing about this J.Hilburn Men's Clothier company, and I want to find out more about it. What is it?

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 South Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR

How can I boost morale around the workplace? I have a small company and it seems they get in a slump and it affects job performance.

Have you ever said to your wife or friend, "Man, I hate shopping," "I can't find anything I like," "It's way too expensive," or "It just doesn't fit Autumn Pohl correctly?" Then of course, after buying it because you need it, you more than likely will need to get it tailored, which only makes your purchase that much more expensive. To be honest, guys have the raw end of the deal when it comes to clothing. In comes J.Hilburn, a company that is revolutionizing the way that men shop. We are a customized Italian clothing line that offers so much more than the exceptional product. The clients who seek us are searching for a better experience all together, and that's just what we give them. We make it convenient by coming to you at a time that works best for your schedule. We design the wardrobe from many details, from fabrics, stitching, collars, pockets, etc. The fit is made just for your body based on the personal measurements we take. Finally, once ordered and delivered, we bring the product to you and ensure the fit and satisfaction.

Often, the focus of mental health falls on the individual. However, mental health affects everything we do. If the Amy Kesner, PhD, overall mood of a workplace is negaLPC, LADC tive, it spreads to others and takes a toll on job performance. We spend most of our lifetimes at our job, so it is important that we find ways to enjoy it or look forward to being there. Recently, several studies found that a sense of meaningful work is good for the worker and for a company, that even employees in somewhat tiresome jobs can find a variety of ways to give their work more meaning. Impressing upon employees how valuable they are and the importance of the job they do can make it feel more meaningful to them. Give praise even for small tasks, make the workplace more enjoyable and do creative lunch break days. Pay attention to the decor of the office environment, as it does affect overall mood. Allowing for ample break times, as long as duties are completed, also encourages the morale of employees, as they feel you value their ability to care for their needs during a day.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

Amy Kesner All Things Psychological 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505 Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

FOOD, DRINK AND OTHER PLEASURES

GUESTS TOAST A FINE TABLE AT STONEHORSE CAFÉ’S TULSA TEA, A TEA SERVICE OF SCONES, TEA SANDWICHES AND SAVORY BITES AND SWEETS. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCOTT.

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Tea With A Twist Stonehorse Café invites you to its uniquely Tulsa teatime.

hen Stonehorse Café & Market owner Tim Inman and manager Amelia Eesley began looking for new ways to draw customers in during the afternoon between the café’s lunch rush and dinner, a longtime English tradition seemed the perfect fit. After three years of brainstorming, research and trial runs, Stonehorse’s by-reservation-only Tulsa Tea officially kicked off earlier this year. Held Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., Tulsa Tea has quickly become a favorite with Stonehorse guests. They can indulge in fresh-baked scones, a scrumptious assortment of sweet and savory treats, champagne, specialty cocktails and a variety of fragrant teas procured from Metropolitan Tea in Tulsa. “It was Tim’s idea to make different things in bite sizes,” says Eesley, adding that the menu items, all of which are made in-house, include gluten-free options. “People have been really impressed with the food, and they want to try all of the different teas.”

A vacation to England in 2013 provided Eesley with the perfect opportunity to research ideas for the Tulsa Tea project. While she was in London, Eesley attended several teas and returned to Tulsa armed with ideas, many of which have been incorporated into or expanded upon for the Tulsa Tea afternoons. “Ours is not a classic English tea – it’s a tea with a twist,” Eesley says. Helping to put that Tulsa twist on afternoon tea, Stonehorse pastry chefs Morgan Barkley and Amara Gray frequently rotate tea menu selections and tailor them according to which fruits and vegetables are in season. “We’ve had a lot of comments on the tea menu – people are amazed that we make things that small,” Barkley says, adding that the tiny treats are prepared fresh each tea day, with many of them going into the oven just as guests arrive. Some of those tiny-but-tasty teatime treats include orange spice scones studded with black currants, mini red velvet cupcakes with cream-cheese icing, coconut-chocolate rochers, chocolate financiers, MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste madeleines with lemon curd, strawberry Bavarian tarts, chicken salad profiteroles, goat cheese served on puff pastry with red bell pepper tapenade, deviled eggs, lox served on fennel crackers with cream cheese, red onion and fine herbs and prosciutto-wrapped asparagus spears.

FAV E S

MAMAVECA’S LOMITO SALTADO IS A PERUVIAN FAVORITE WITH FAMILIAR TOUCHES.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

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MEGAN MIERS

Mamaveca Mexican & Peruvian Restaurant

You could go to any restaurant offering burritos, tacos and other staples of the Mexican food menu. Or, you could discover that there’s more to dishes from south of the border than quesadillas and refried beans. Mamaveca Mexican & Peruvian Restaurant has impressed Norman and the Oklahoma metro area with its Peruvian menu that includes varieties of ceviche and seafoodbased dishes flavored with saffron, pepper sauces and traditions from the South America country. Mamaveca owners William and Monica Chunga, who are from Peru, spice up their menu with surprising takes on Chinese-style fried rice, sautéed noodles and tempura classics. And yes, there are Mexican classics such as tacos, fajitas and chiles rellenos, often served with sides of fresh sliced tomatoes, avocado, seasoned rice and refried beans. Ordered with a cool mango margarita or ice-cold Mexican beer and followed with the flan, dining at Mamaveca is a Latin American dining experience that many guests will remember well after the tab is paid. 2551 W. Hemphill Drive, Norman. www.mamavecasrestaurant.com – Karen Shade

The bite-sized treats are perfect for sharing and allow guests to sample each item as well YOU’VE NEVER as take extras of their favorites, Barkley says. EXPERIENCED THE Guests also receive descriptions of teas and DECADENT TEA TIME – COMPLETE Stonehorse’s signature cocktails. A typical WITH TEA, SWEET tea menu will include green, black, white, AND SAVORY BITES, FRENCH-PRESSED mint and Darjeeling tea varieties, Eesley says, TEA AND COCKTAILS noting a particular guest favorite, Lychee – LIKE YOU’LL FIND Congou, a leafy black tea infused with the AT STONEHORSE CAFÉ. flavor of lychee fruit. Rather than being the stuffy, formal affair that some people picture when thinking of teatime, Tulsa Tea is designed to be a relaxed, fun event, ideal for both small get-togethers or group events such as birthdays, baby showers and business meetings, Eesley says. “We’re really excited about the Tulsa Tea project,” she adds. “It’s a fun way to spend an afternoon.” 1748 Utica Square, Tulsa. www.stonehorsecafe.com

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

LAMBRUSCO’Z TO GO’S SIRLOIN SALAD. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

THE BUZZ

Lambrusco’Z To Go

Nancy Bruce, the owner of Lambruso’Z to Go in Tulsa’s Brookside neighborhood, was looking forward to retirement. She even made an exit strategy – a five-year plan to divvy up her duties among her employees – after operating the popular Tulsa eatery for almost 30 years. That changed, however, when about three years into that five-year plan, a friend showed her a property in downtown Tulsa. As soon as she walked into the space, it spoke to Bruce. Lambruco’Z in downtown Tulsa was born, and the new location opened in March in the Blue Dome District. Since 1985, Bruce has prided herself on serving lunch-hour favorites, dips, fresh-made sandwiches and salads, cookies and other favorites that one-up the average deli. “We want to be able to offer our downtown customers the same menu items that they have come to expect so that they can grab their lunch and head back to work,” she says. The downtown menu is the same as Brookside’s, but the process has been streamlined to accommodate the busy downtown lunch rush. 114 S. Detroit Ave., Tulsa. www.lambruscoz.com – Jill Meredith


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Taste

W H AT W E ’ R E E AT I N G

Barbecue Knotty Pine Barbecue Back in the early 1940s, Knotty Pine was a rough bar in a tough part of town, and David Woodard’s grandmother used to carry a blackjack to club unruly drunks. But the delicious barbecue soon became known citywide, and crowds of eager eaters kept the drunks at bay. Every day, the line of hungry patrons snaked out the door and down the block. Woodard’s first childhood memory is of stacking sheets of paper used to wrap the ‘cue. He was 5 years old, and the stack seemed to reach the ceiling. Today, Woodard helms the legendary Tulsa barbecue at a new location. “We want the old Knotty Pine regulars back, but we also want their children … and their grandchildren,” he says. The regulars are glad to find beans, slaw and the famous secret sauce made the way they were a half-century ago. And the ribs, pulled pork, ham and brisket are even better. Working with Travis Jackson, a former chef at Polo Grill, Woodard and his wife, Brittany Woodard, discovered a way to improve the flavor. The meat is brined for 24 hours, then smoked daily. New sides, such as gumbo, tabouleh and chili, have made their way onto the menu, along with appetizers such as wings, hummus and homemade desserts. 6161 S. 33rd West Ave., Tulsa. www.knottypinebbq.com – Brian Schwartz

OWNER DAVID WOODARD SERVES UP HEAT AND SMOKY-SWEET SPICE AT KNOTTY PINE BARBECUE. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

Onion Burger Robert’s Grill One day out of the year, the onion burger is placed on a pedestal, and the town of El Reno celebrates its existence by cooking one weighing more than 750 pounds. Lore tells us that El Reno’s Fried Onion Burger Day Festival was born when a local proprietor mixed onions into ground beef and patted it out to make it look bigger. It was the Great Depression, and meat was expensive, but onions were not. The result became a local favorite and tradition carried into today by small-town diners like Robert’s Grill. Route 66 favorite and long-time establishment Robert’s Grill has a basic menu of burgers, coneys, fries, tots, chili and sandwiches. What’s not advertised is the “show” – customers get to watch as the cook throws beef patties on the grill with fresh-cut onions and smashes them together before building the burger on a bun. With this kind of flavor, the onion burger deserves all the kudos it gets; and with each order, Robert’s Grill keeps building its hard-earned reputation for simple goodness. 300 S. Bickford Ave., El Reno. 405.262.1262 – Karen Shade S I M P LY H E A L T H Y

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PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS

Sweet On Mom

Every Mother’s Day, we celebrate all the wonderful women in our lives. Whether she’s a spouse, mother, grandma, mentor or friend, show her she’s appreciated by making her something delicious and guilt-free. Take advantage of the fresh, juicy berries abundant at farmers markets and grocery stores. Full of antioxidants, vitamins and other essential nutrients, strawberries pack a nutritional punch. Besides being low in calories and high in fiber, strawberries contain flavonoids, known to help fight heart disease. And along those lines, strawberries contain antioxidants that can potentially prevent strokes because they stop blood clots from forming. Those same antioxidants are also helpful in preventing cancerous tumors from forming.

ROBERT’S GRILL SERVES UP A CLASSIC FRIED ONION BURGER.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

Eating strawberries can help regulate blood pressure, blood sugar and lower cholesterol. Indulge you moms – their hearts will be appreciative in more ways than one. – Jill Meredith

Chilled Strawberry Soup 3 c. 1 c. ½ c. 3-4 tbsp. 1 tbsp. ¼ tsp. ¼ tsp.

fresh quartered strawberries fat-free evaporated milk light sour cream honey balsamic vinegar lemon zest orange zest Low-fat whipped topping or light sour cream and strawberry slices, for garnish

Combine all ingredients except garnish in a food processor or blender and blend until smooth. Strain soup through a fine mesh strainer to remove seeds. Repeat this step to remove as many seeds as possible. Chill soup for at least eight hours or overnight. Serve in small bowls. Garnish as desired.


Best In State

The Made in Oklahoma Wine, Beer and Food Festival has the goods on all things local.

A

gritourism” is a word that catches a lot of attention, particularly when tours of local wineries are involved. But the Made in Oklahoma Wine, Beer and Food Festival celebrates the variety and expanse of products grown and produced in the state. The festival, which takes place at Midwest City’s Reed Conference Center and Sheraton

and other items – handmade or manufactured on a slightly larger scale – you can’t get anywhere else. Guests at the festival will find an assortment of goods for the pantry as well as the rest of the home, including salsas, popcorn, fudge, jellies and jams, jewelry, fine art, wood-carved gift items and more, Voice says. The festival again will feature the Great Grilled Cheese Challenge: Masterminds of Melt contest in which at least six contestants are chosen to create inventive grilled cheese sandwiches. Other events include the Wine & Palette art class, in which participants

A REPRESENTATIVE OF WOODS & WATERS WINERY AND VINEYARD IN ANADARKO POURS WINE SAMPLES AT LAST YEAR’S MADE IN OKLAHOMA WINE, BEER AND FOOD FESTIVAL.

THE POUR

The Big Squeeze

Taste

FOOD EVENT

Juicing has become popular in recent years. Whether used for detoxing or as meal replacements, it’s a great option for people on the go. Luckily for downtown Tulsa’s bustling workforce, there is a brand-new juice bar for that fact-paced bunch. In February, Sam and Jennifer Johnson opened Jennifer Juice in the lobby of the Philtower Building. They built a large kitchen in order to serve not only retail customers, but also to produce pure juices and blends in bulk for distribution to select restaurants and bars. The Johnsons moved to Tulsa from New York City in April 2013, but Sam Johnson is an Oklahoma native. “The core of what we do is press juice from fresh vegetables and fruit that we source as locally as possible,” he says. “We typically press between 12 and 15 different juices each week, and the lineup varies seasonally.” Juices are served as bottle blends and cocktail-style in shot glasses at the bar. “Raw juice had become very popular in NYC over the past several years, and Jennifer became interested in it,” he continues. “Finding nothing like it in Tulsa and impressed by Tulsa’s farmers markets, we thought the time and place was right.” 472 S. Boston Ave., Tulsa. www.jenniferjuice.com – Jill Meredith

PHOTO COURTESY MIDWEST CITY CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU.

Midwest City Hotel, brings together representatives of Oklahoma wineries and breweries along with local artists, merchants, cooks and items with a distinctive Oklahoma identity. In its third year, the festival takes place from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, May 31. “The entire purpose of the festival is to increase awareness of Oklahoma’s agritourism. One of the things that we’ve done is try to focus on wineries that grow grapes here,” says Melanie Voice, special events and marketing manager for the Midwest City Convention & Visitors Bureau. Agritourism invites consumers to appreciate locally produced and grown products by taking them to where it all starts. The festival promotes that appreciation for local vineyards and wine producers, but that initial focus has since expanded to highlight locally made beers, locally grown produce

are given a canvas, paint and a glass of wine to enjoy; cooking demonstrations; the Go Green Oklahoma Sustainability Fair; Cruisin’ with Cops Open Car, Truck and Motorcycle Show; and live music and entertainment all day long, thanks to a partnership with the Oklahoma Film and Music Office. There are advantages to buying Oklahoma-made goods. “When you have things that are mass produced – this is my opinion – it often loses flavor or craftsmanship,” Voice says, but locally made items are often created with attention to detail and with great care. Plus, it helps the state economy. “Everything is turned right back into our state,” Voice says. “Who doesn’t want to help their own state – where they live, thrive and work?”

JENNIFER JUICE BRINGS FRESH-PRESSED RAW JUICE TO DOWNTOWN TULSA. PHOTO BY BRANDON SCOTT.

KAREN SHADE MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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WICKED IS FLYING BACK TO TULSA

JUNE 18 – JULY 6

TULSA PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

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Entertainment G R E AT T H I N G S T O D O I N O K L A H O M A

LYLE LOVETT & HIS ACOUSTIC GROUP WILL SHAKE UP THE BRADY THEATER. PHOTO BY MICHAEL WILSON, COURTESY BIG HASSLE MEDIA.

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Don’t Touch His Hat

Lone Star maverick entertainer Lyle Lovett goes acoustic at Brady Theater.

singer of the renown and repute of Lyle Lovett could stand on stage alone for an hour humming, and it would still be worth checking out. Lovett puts more in five bars of music than some recording artists fit into an entire deluxe edition. So when the man who usually travels with His Large Band decides to scale it down with an acoustic ensemble for his latest concert tour, it’s enough to make Lyle’s Lovettes and the rest of his massive fan base inwardly squeal. Yes, sometimes in Houston, less is more. A four-time Grammy Award winner with numerous other awards to his name, Lovett titled his latest album Release Me, and it features the curious blend of toe-tapping rhythms, quirky lyrical touches and influences from soul, jazz and other music genres, which have become

Lovett’s hallmarks. When he’s not paying homage to one of his musical heroes, recording contributions to cool tribute compilations or making appearances in films and on TV, Lovett is endearing himself to appreciators of fine songwriting and good music by tipping a hat to classic country, swing and more. As the song goes, “That’s right, you’re not from Texas, but Texas wants you anyway.” How can you turn that down? Tulsa loves Lovett, who returns to town for an acoustic show at 8 p.m. Thursday, May 8. Lovett plays the Brady Theater, 105 W. Brady St.; doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $45-$65 and are available by phone at 866.977.6849 and online at www.bradytheater.com. KAREN SHADE

MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY Casino Hotel, Newkirk. www.ticketstorm.com

Third Eye Blind May 4 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net Dillinger Escape Plan May 4 The Conservatory. www.ticketstorm.com Gavin DeGraw

May 6 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Gavin DeGraw

www.bradytheater.com

Lyle Lovett

PHOTO BY ANDREW ECCLES, COURTESY ZACH THEATRE.

PERFORMANCES

bradytheater.com

Give Our Regards to Barry It’s been a long kiss goodbye, yet it seems to have arrived too soon. Signature Symphony says farewell to its founder and outgoing artistic director and conductor Barry Epperley, who will lead the orchestra one last time at 8 p.m. Thursday, May 22, at the Cox Business Center, 100 Civic Center, Tulsa. The night will include dinner and live and silent auctions as well as a proper roast for Epperley by friends and colleagues. And who better to raise a glass to the symphony and Epperley than Broadway legend and Tony Awards winner Bernadette Peters, the night’s magnificently in-tune entertainment? Tickets and sponsorships to the dinner event and night’s show are available. The event is also fundraiser. For more, visit www. signaturesymphony.org.

May 7 Brady Theater.

May 8 Brady Theater. www.

Radney Foster

www.bluedoorokc.com

Wolfmother

cainsballroom.com

May 8 The Blue Door.

May 9 Cain’s Ballroom. www.

Brandon Jenkins May 9 Grady’s 66 Pub, Oklahoma City. www.ticketstorm.com

Theatre Tulsa’s The Sound of Music

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey

May

9 Guthrie Green. www.guthriegreen.com

Travis Tritt May 9 Osage Casino, Hominy. www.osagecasinos.com Colt Ford

May 9 Diamond Ballroom. www. diamondballroom.net

Los Lonely Boys

May 9 River Spirit Casino. www.riverspirittulsa.com

Puddle of Mudd May 10 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com Steel Panther

PERFORMANCES Handel’s Messiah

May 1 Professional soloists and musicians of the Herbert W. Armstrong College Choral Union perform the unabridged version of Handel’s masterpiece at Edmond’s Armstrong Auditorium. www .armstrongauditorium.com

Race

May 1-4 Theatre Pops presents David Mamet’s play about a wealthy white man accused of raping a black woman and the diverse defense team he hires to defend him. Presented at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.myticketoffice. com

The Neverending Story

May 2-4 American Theatre Company brings Michael Ende’s fantasy story of a bullied boy who becomes

May 10 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

the champion of a magical world to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center stage. www. myticketoffice.com

Carmen May 2, 4 The tension runs high in the great opera of lust and duty presented by Tulsa Opera at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.tulsaopera.com Native American Play Festival May 8-18 Mary Kathryn Nagle’s Manahatta is this year’s featured original play presented by the Oklahoma City Theatre Company at its annual celebration of new voices, staged readings and much more at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okctheatrecompany.org

OKC Philharmonic: 1812 Overture May 10 The Oklahoma City Philharmonic season goes out with a boom at Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www. okcphilharmonic.org

Sister Act

Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE at the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

musical of Maria and the Von Trapp family in 1930s Austria to the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. www.theatretulsa.org

Other Desert Cities

May 16-June 7 Carpenter Square Theatre presents Jon Robin Baitz’ drama of a writer returning home and his soon-to-be-published memoir recalling happenings his family would rather forget. www. carpentersquare.com

Summer Jam Concert Series May 17 Vocalist Angie Stone and Mint Condition bring neo-soul to the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall stage for the first of several summer concert shows. www.okcciviccenter.com Give Our Regards to Barry May 22 This big gala night at the Cox Business Center features Broadway legend Bernadette Peters in an evening’s salute to Signature Symphony artistic director and conductor Barry E p p e r l e y o n h i s r e t i r e m e n t . w w w. signaturesymphony.org

May 13-25 A struggling singer witnesses a crime and goes into hiding in a nun’s habit in the hilarious musical based on the Whoopi Goldberg comedy film. The touring production plays at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center (May 13-18) and the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall (May 20-25). www. celebrityattractions.com

May 28-June 1 Canadian actor Charles Ross delights with his fun show combining the Star Wars film trilogy into one hour and all by himself at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www. okcciviccenter.com

The Sound of Music

Vox Novus: 15 Minutes of Fame Concert May 29 Living Arts of Tulsa presents

May 16-24 Theatre Tulsa brings Rodgers & Hammerstein’s beloved

One-Man Star Wars Trilogy

Move: Live on Tour

May 29 Brother and sister dance team Julianne and Derek Hough bring a new dance production to the Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

15 one-minute acoustic performances by different

composers and performed by 15 different singers and ensembles. www.livingarts.org

IN CONCERT Griz

May 1 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Needtobreathe

www.bradytheater.com

May 2 Brady Theater.

YelaWolf

May 2 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Slaid Cleaves

www.bluedoorokc.com

May 2 The Blue Door.

TobyMac, Skillet, LeCrae

May 2 Zoo Amphitheatre. www.thezooamphitheatre.com

Anti-Mortem May 2 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net Woody Guthrie Center Anniversary Weekend May 2-4 Terri Hendrix and Lloyd Maines, John Fullbright, Jimmy Webb, Parker Millsap, Slaid Cleaves, Samantha Crain, Sam Baker, Jimmy LaFave, James McMurtry at Woody Guthrie Center and Guthrie Green. www. woodyguthriecenter.org

Lynyrd Skynyrd, Big & Rich

May 2-3 Rollin’ Thunder Rally, OKC Downton Airpark. www.rollinthunderrally.com

Phil Vassar

May 3 Osage Casino, Pawhuska. www.osagecasinos.com

Terri Hendrix with Lloyd Maines May 3 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Lynyrd Skynyrd

May 3 First Council

Red Dirt Round-Up

May 10 Randy Rogers Band, Casey Donahew Band, Kevin Fowler, Cadillac Three. BOK Center. www. bokcenter.com

John Fullbright

May 10 Mitchell Hall Theatre, University of Central Oklahoma. www. ticketstorm.com

Gooding

May 10 Bricktown Music Hall. www.bricktownmusichall.com

The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger May 10 ACM@UCO. www.acm.uco.edu

Queens of the Stone Age

May

14 Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.com

Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers May 14 B r i c k t o w n M u s i c H a l l . w w w. bricktownmusichall.com

Paul Thorn

tulsamayfest.org

May 15 Tulsa Mayfest. www.

One More Time: A Tribute to Daft Punk May 15 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Grieves

May 15 The Conservatory. www. ticketstorm.com

The Band Perry May 15 The Joint, Hard R o c k Tu l s a H o t e l & C a s i n o . w w w. hardrockcasinotulsa.com Iced Earth

May 16 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

Foreigner, Styx, Don Felder May 16 Zoo Amphitheatre. www.thezooamphitheatre.com Brit Floyd May 16 Brady Theater. www. bradytheater.com


through Ozark Mountain country that begins in Mountain View, Ark. www.syllamosrevenge.com

Phillips 66 Big 12 Baseball Championships May 21-25 College PHOTO BY VICKI FARMER, COURTESY WWW.JOHNFULLBRIGHTMUSIC.COM.

baseball teams battle it out at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark for top honors in the conference. www.big12sports.com

Will Rogers Stampede PRCA Rodeo May 23-25 The 67th annual rodeo is

back for another Memorial Day weekend with great events planned for the Will Rogers Stampede Arena in Claremore. www. willrogersstampede.com

OK River Run & Dog Jog May 26 Grab your four-legged pal and head to Wiley Post Park, Oklahoma City, for a 5k run and 3k dog jog event for the organization A New Leash on Life. www. newleashinc.org NCAA Women’s College World Series May 29-June 4 Oklahoma City All

Sports Association and the University of Oklahoma host the 2014 tournament of women’s softball at the ASA Hall of Fame Stadium, Oklahoma City. www.okcallsports.org

FAMILY The Somewhat True Tale of Robin Hood May 1-4 Robin Hood and his

IN CONCERT

pals take a comic romp through Sherwood Forest with Clark Youth Theatre at Henthorne Performing Arts Center. www.cityoftulsa.org

Woody Guthrie Center Anniversary Weekend The year has gone by faster than a hummingbird on Red Bull, and the Woody Guthrie Center is about to celebrate its first anniversary with a weekend of music and big names. Terri Hendrix and Lloyd Maines will be joined by Erin O’Dowd and Kristen Hemphill for the Women in Recovery benefit concert at 7 p.m. Friday, May 2, at the WGC, 102 E. Brady St., Tulsa. Admission is a donation of at least $12 to the organization rehabilitating women and families. The next two days will find John Fullbright (pictured), Jimmy Webb, Parker Millsap, Slaid Cleaves, Samantha Crain, Sam Baker, Jimmy LaFave and James McMurtry on the center and Guthrie Green stages along with a visit from Hanson and book events. Concerts, lectures and more will take place Friday, May 2-Sunday, May 4. To see details about WGC events and prices, visit www.woodyguthriecenter.org. Shelley King Trio

Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

May 16 The Blue

Rodney Carrington

May 16 Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa. com

Chris Cagle

bluedoorokc.com

Blood, Sweat & Tears

May 23 Rivers Spirit Casino. www.riverspirittulsa.com

Backwoods Bash 2014

May 23-26 The

Nuns, Native Lights

OKC Thunder

R. Kelly

May 17 Chesapeake Energy Arena. www.chesapeakearena.com

www.tulsashock.net v. San Antonio May 2 v. Minnesota May 23

OKC RedHawks

Buffalo Killers

Dave Matthews Band

Mirror Travel

May 17 The Conservatory. www.ticketstorm.com May 17 Tulsa Mayfest.

Paper Bird May 18 Bricktown Music Hall. www.bricktownmusichall.com Peter Furler Band, Steve Taylor & The Perfect Foil May 19 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com

Doe Eye

May 21 The Conservatory. www. ticketstorm.com

Dave Matthews Band

Center. www.bokcenter.com

Eagulls opolis.org

May 21 BOK

May 21 Opolis, Norman. www.

Ian Moore

bluedoorokc.com

May 22 The Blue Door. www.

annual music and camping festival at Prue on Keystone Lake features great local and regional bands. www.backwoodsbash.com

Rocklahoma

May 23-25 Headliners are Kid Rock, Five Finger Death Punch, Staind, Twisted Sister, Seether and more on the outdoor stage near Pryor. www.rocklahoma.com

Chicago

May 24 The Joint, Hard Rock Tulsa Hotel & Casino. www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Tulsa Music Festival May 24 The Tulsa Symphony puts on a symphonic rock show at the Guthrie Green with We the Ghost, Steve Liddell and others. www.tulsamusicfestival.com

Skrillex

May 23 Zoo Amphitheatre. www. thezooamphitheatre.com

Jason Boland & The Stragglers May 23 Cain’s Ballroom. www.cainsballroom.com May 23 The Blue Door. www.

www.okcredhawks.com v. Round Rock April 28-May 1 v. Memphis May 6-9 v. Colorado Springs May 10-13 v. Omaha May 27-30 v. Memphis May 31-June 3

Tulsa Drillers

www.tulsadrillers.com v. Arkansas April 29-May 2 v. Springfield May 12-15 v. Bedlam games May 16-17 v. NW Arkansas May 18-19 v. Frisco May 27-29 v. Midland May 30-June 1

Oklahoma City Energy

Oklahoma Defenders

Tom Skinner and Susan Herndon

fenders.com v. Dodge City May 10 v. Salina May 17

May 24 Osage Casino, Skiatook. www.osagecasinos.com

Kishi Bashi

May 25 Bricktown Music Hall. www.bricktownmusichall.com

The 1975

May 28 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Jack White

May 29 Cain’s Ballroom. www. cainsballroom.com

Stoney LaRue May 30 Diamond Ballroom. www.diamondballroom.net

www.energyfc.

com v. Los Angeles May 10 v. Richmond May 16 v. New York May 31

Jamey Johnson

May 25 The Blue Door. www.bluedoorokc.com

Dolly Parton May 22-23 The Joint, Hard R o c k Tu l s a H o t e l & C a s i n o . w w w. hardrockcasinotulsa.com

Bill Hearne

www.nba.com/thunder

Tulsa Shock

May 17 Osage Casino, Bartlesville www.osagecasinos.com

www.tulsamayfest.org

May 31 Brady

v. TBA (NBA playoffs)

Tracy Lawrence

Bob Schneider

The Naked and Famous

Theater. www.bradytheater.com

SPORTS

May 16 Vanguard Music Hall. www.thevanguardtulsa.com

May 17 Bricktown Music Hall. www.bricktownmusichall.com

May 31 Osage Casino, Tulsa. www.osagecasinos.com

www.oklahomade-

Oklahoma City FC

www.oklahomacityfc.com v. Ft. Worth (Red River Cup Finals) May 2 v. Tulsa Athletics May 25

Tulsa Athletics

www.tulsaathletics.com v. Liverpool (Red River Cup Finals) May 2 v. TBA (Red River Cup Finals) May 3 v. Liverpool May 30

Tour de Tulsa

May 3 Join the Tulsa Bi-

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day Thru May 9 Judith Viorst’s popular children’s book is brought to the stage in an Oklahoma Children’s Theatre’s production. www. oklahomachildrenstheatre.org

Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That

cycle Club on the 28th annual cycling tour of Tulsa and Green Country in a variety of distances and for all skill levels. www.tulsabicycleclub.com

Zombie Bolt Mud Run May 3 As if zombies weren’t enough – the annual 5k this year will feature mud obstacles on the course in Luther. www. zombiebolt.com

Toad Suck Daze Festival

Cowboys of Color Rodeo

May 3 The invitational rodeo event features all the big categories – including bull riding, steer wrestling and barrel racing – at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.cowboysofcolorrodeo.com

Tulsa Pontiac Nationals & BOP Challenge May 3 Hosted by the Indian

National Pontiac Club at Tulsa Raceway Park. 918.798.2765

Central 4D Barrel Racers

May 3-4 Competitors race for a purse and honors at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.central4d.com

Color Me Rad 5k

May 10 The colors run as fast as participants in this fun, colorful 5k at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.colormerad.com

Color Vibe 5k May 10 Tulsa lets the color fly at the fun 5k run at Expo Square. www. thecolorvibe.com Central Youth Rowing Championships May 10-11 Top junior row crews from

nine states (including Oklahoma) compete in Oklahoma City’s Boathouse District for the opportunity at the 2014 USRowing National Youth Championship. www.boathousedistrict.org

Type May 9-10 Farm animals wage a campaign of peaceful protest using an old typewriter when the farmer declines their request for electric blankets. www.tulsapac.com The Secret Garden May 9-18 The Junior League of Oklahoma City presents a week of fun at the Myriad Botanical Gardens Children’s Garden, including a screening of the film based on the Secret Garden youth book, theatrical performances, crafts, children’s activities and more. www.oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com Junior Fishing Derby

May 24 Bring your pole, bait and game to the contest at Cane Creek State Park in Star City, Ark., for children 15 and under only. www.arkansas.com

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey: Legends May 31-June 1 The

circus summons mythical and mysterious creatures – a unicorn, a mammoth and more – in this show of legends that also features amazing circus performers and entertainment at the BOK Center. www.bokcenter.com

ART The Carmen Art Exhibit

Full Moon Run

May 17 Get in a good run on this favorite evening 5k run and walk event that includes a party at the finish line at Veterans Park, Tulsa. www.riverparks.org

May 1-30 Featuring work by artists of the Oklahoma Society of Impressionists on exhibit at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center gallery. www.tulsapac.com

Oklahoma Warrior Dash May 17 Only the bravest attempt the obstacle course run in Inola, but everyone ends a mud-spackled winner. www.warriordash.com

Allan Houser: On the Roof May 1-July 27 Six abstract bronze sculptures by the famed Oklahoma artist go on exhibit at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art roof terrace as part of a regional focus on the late Apache artist on the centennial of his birth. www. okcmoa.com

Syllamo’s Revenge Mountain Bike Challenge May 17 The 10th annual race invites all who would tackles the 50-mile ride

MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

97


Entertainment

Paul Gauguin, Matisse, Cezanne, Degas, Picasso and Derain – are part of this collection of the late CBS founder and on exhibit at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Ark. www.crystalbridges.org

Rendezvous Artists’ Retrospective Exhibition and Art Sale Thru July 13 Gilcrease Museum has the goods when it comes to contemporary Western art – the annual exhibition and art sale are back with great works by featured artists Greg Beecham and Ross Matteson among many others. www. gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Beauty Within

PHOTO COURTESY OSU ATHLETICS.

Thru Sept. 7 The work of Hopi artist Charles Loloma – including jewelry, drawings, ceramics and prints – is part of this look at his innovative use of materials and technique at Philbrook Downtown. www. philbrook.org

Spring in the Square at Utica Square

SPORTS

Totemic Taxonomy

NCAA Women’s College World Series There’s the pitch, the swing and another year of softball action headed your way when the NCAA Women’s College World Series returns to the ASA Hall of Fame Stadium, 2801 N.E. 50th St., Oklahoma City. Series champions the University of Oklahoma beat out Tennessee during last year’s finals. Who will take the series this year? Will the Sooner women make another successful run up the bracket to face another worthy adversary? The NCAA Women’s College World Series takes place Tuesday, May 29-Sunday, June 4. Go to www.ncaa.com to view team rankings, play schedules, stadium information and ticket purchase options, including all-session tickets, qualifier packages, promotion nights and more. Outfield flex tickets are also available for $15 per session. The series is sponsored by Oklahoma City All Sports.

5 x 5 May 2 This show of small-scale works creates big impact for art collectors and the TAC Gallery in the Brady Arts District. Show runs through May 24. www.tacgallery.org

bition in the fall in London, brings her sculpt u r a l w o r k s t o 1 0 8 C o n t e m p o r a r y. www.108contemporary.org

Wendeline Matson and David Gooden Thru May 2 New paintings on

Chasm

Near Abstractions: Works by Garry Noland May 2 Opening reception

Art in Mosaic

sculpture on exhibit at M.A. Doran Gallery. www.madorangallery.com

will be May 2 at the Zarrow Center for Art & Education. Exhibition runs April 25-June 1. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Biting the Apple 2014: Man Made May 2-3 Oklahoma’s premier erotic arts show returns for a weekend of provocative works with sumptuous foods, performing arts and work across all media at the Individual Artists of Oklahoma Gallery. www.iaogallery.org

Occupied: Narciso Arguelles

May 2-22 Living Arts of Tulsa exhibits photographic artwork documenting Latino culture and Native American people. www.livingarts.org

Thru May 3 Artist Liz Roth’s series of large, complex paintings of the Grand Canyon invites study and comment at the Hardesty Arts Center. www.ahct.org

Thru May 3 The Hardesty Arts Center exhibits contemporary mosaic works by Oklahoma artists Jacqueline Iskander and Brooks Tower, each working in unique materials and techniques. www.ahct.org

Allan Houser and His Students Thru May 11 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum honors the late Apache artist on his 100th birthday with an exhibit of his work as well as those by artists he mentored. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org

Unexpected

Thru May 11 Philbrook Downtown takes a look at vernacular photography from the collection of Marc Boone Fitzerman. www.philbrook.org

Walter Ufer: Rise, Fall, Resurrection Thru May 11 The National

Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum mounts this unflinching exhibition of work by the artist who helped found the Taos Society of Artists and was overlooked in his own time for his political views and issues with alcoholism and indebtedness. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Edward S. Curtis Photogravures Thru May 11 The National

Zombie Bolt Mud Run

Latino in Tulsa: A Bi-cultural Experience May 2-22 The latest art show

at Living Arts of Tulsa reveals Tulsa’s diverse Latino population and the plethora of talent. www.livingarts.org

Naomi Wanjiku

May 2-June 29 The multimedia artist, who had her first solo exhi-

98

Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum exhibits work donated to the museum by John Wayne and by the famous photographer of the American West featuring portraits of Native American chiefs. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec: Album Thru May 11 Philbrook Museum of Art features the drawings of French contemporary designers and brothers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec. www.philbrook.org

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

Tulsa ArtCar Weekend

May 15-17 You’ve never seen such moving art like these fascinating creations on wheels for Living Arts of Tulsa. www.livingarts.org

Chuck Webster

Thru May 16 The visually playful work of the New York artist recalls the abstractions of Paul Klee and Matisse; and the work is on exhibit at Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center. www.oklahomacontemporary.org

Allan Houser Drawings: The Centennial Exhibition Thru May 18 The Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art in Norman shares in the tribute of the Chiricahua Apache artist on the centennial of his birthday with a showing up his drawings, some of which eventually became sculptures, paintings and illustrations for books. www.ou.edu/fjjma

The Art of Jason Cytacki

Thru May 23 Duncan’s Chisholm Trail Heritage Center exhibits work by the contemporary Western artist. www.onthechisholmtrail.com

Art 365

May 23-Aug. 9 The innovative work of five Oklahoman artists (working through the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition) go on exhibit at the Hardesty Arts Center in Tulsa. www.art365.org

Our People, Our Land, Our Images Thru May 25 Look at North America, South

America, the Middle East and New Zealand through the eyes of photographers indigenous to those lands with works revealing connections to land and culture in a new exhibit at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. www.ou.edu/fjjma

Robert Indiana: Beyond LOVE Thru May 25 Explore the American artist’s influential, bright and bold Pop art work at the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas. www.mcnayart.org

Allan Houser: A Celebration

May 25-Nov. 2 Philbrook Downtown features the paintings of the Oklahoma artist, part of a regional celebration of the late Apache artist on the centennial of his birth year. www.philbrook. org

24 Works on Paper May 31-June 28 The collaborative show between Individual Artists of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition goes up at the Tulsa Artists Coalition Gallery. www.ovac-ok.org Ansel Adams: An American Perspective Thru June 1 Nearly 60 pho-

tographs of landscapes by one of the most well known and respected American photographers go on exhibit at Oklahoma City Museum of Art. www.okcmoa.com

Brett Weston: Land, Sea and Sky Thru June 1 The Oklahoma City Museum of Art celebrates the recent gift from Christian Keesee of 150 photographs by Weston, who used close-ups and abstracted detail to turn ordinary objects and landscapes into fascinating images. www.okcmoa.com

Identity & Inspiration

Thru June 29 Philbrook Downtown showcases pieces from Philbrook Museum of Art’s collection of American Indian art with historic and traditional works as well as contemporary pieces. www.philbrook.org

Opening Abstraction

Thru Sept. 15 Artists Peter Froslie and Cathleen Faubert present a show interpreting people’s relationship to objects and symbols at Science Museum Oklahoma. www.sciencemuseumok.org

Focus on Favorites Ongoing A new Gilcrease Museum exhibit will highlight the treasures, art, artifacts and historical documents cherished in the museum’s collection and reflective of the American experience. www.gilcrease. utulsa.edu

CHARITABLE EVENTS 24th Business Excellence Dinner May 1 Junior Achievement Tulsa honors Jeff Reasor and celebrates with a cocktail reception, silent auction and dinner at the Cox Business Center to support its scholarship fund. www.tulsa.ja.org

Broadway & Brew

May 2 Join Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma for an event with unique beers, great food and entertainment at the Myriad Botanical Gardens to benefit the company’s Lyric Understudies program. www. broadwayandbrew.com

The White Party No. 7: Havana Nights May 2 Dress in your downy-white

best for the dance gala supporting Family & Children’s Services at the Vault. www.fcsok. org

Man & Woman of the Year Grand Finale May 2 The Leukemia & Lymphoma

Society gala celebrates the state’s rising leaders in philanthropy. www.mwoy.org/ok

Teen Associate Board Charity Auction May 2 Infant Crisis Services’ teen

Thru June 29 Philbrook Downtown presents an exhibit of abstract works in a variety of manifestations in Tulsa’s Brady District. www.philbrook.org

board hosts a night of live and silent auctions at Oklahoma City Farmers Public Market to benefit the little ones served through the organization. www.infantcrisis.org

Form and Line: Allan Houser’s Sculpture and Drawings Thru June

Philbrook Wine Experience May 2-3 Sip and savor distinct wines from around the world at the Philbrook Museum of Art’s social and wine-tasting weekend, one of the largest in the nation. Philbrook Grand Wine Tasting is May 2; Philbrook Vintner Dinner & Auction is May 3. www.philbrook.org

29 One of many institutions across the state celebrating Houser’s 100th birthday, Gilcrease Museum exhibits work of the Chiricahua Apache artist. www.gilcrease.utulsa.edu

Making Change Thru June 30 The National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum sharess groundbreaking coin designs by sculptors Laura Garden Fraser and Glenna Goodacre and the impact on currency. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org The William S. Paley Collection: A Taste for Modernism Thru July 7 More than 60 paintings, drawings and sculpture – created between 1880-1940 by

Run for the Roses May 3 The hats are as magnificent as the cause in this Kentucky Derbythemed benefit at Expo Square’s Pavilion for the Tulsa Boys’ Home. www.tulsaboyshome.org Great Strides Walk

May 3 The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s annual activity outing is a fun, family-oriented event promoting health and cystic fibrosis research and awareness at Route 66 Park, Oklahoma City. www.cff.org/chapters/ okc


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Entertainment

ART

Walk MS Oklahoma City May 3 Join the National Multiple Sclerosis Society at Oklahoma City’s Wild Horse Park. www. nationalmssociety.org Hope Gala May 3 “Run for the Roses” this year with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Oklahoma City’s inaugural gala at the Cox Convention Center. www.jdrf.org March for Babies

May 3 Support the March of Dimes and healthy babies at the Myriad Botanical Gardens. www.marchforbabies.com

Metropolitan Auto Dealers Association Golf Tournament May 5 Golfers take a swing at Oklahoma City’s Twin Hills Golf & Country Club to help the Car Dealers Care Foundation raise money for education, scholarships, storm relief and other charitable causes. 405.706.7484

Tulsa Boys’ Home Golf Classic May 5-6 The 34th annual fundraiser for Tulsa Boys’ Home tees off with snacks, drinks and prizes through the day at Patriot Golf Club in Owasso. www.tulsaboyshome.org

Breast Cancer Shootout

May 6 Join the sport shooting at Quail Ridge Sporting Clays in McLoud for the Oklahoma Project Woman, funding breast health screenings and other essential services for low-income women. www. oklahomaprojectwoman.org

Goodwill Annual Awards Luncheon May 6 Outstanding individuals and organization are honored by Goodwill Industries of Tulsa at the Marriott Tulsa Hotel Southern Hills. 918.584.7291

Gutter Dance 11

May 8 Go for the strike with the J.D. McCarty Center at Sooner Bowling Center in Norman to help out the center’s camp scholarship fund for children with developmental disabilities. www.jdmc.org

Go Red for Women Luncheon

May 9 Enjoy a special luncheon at Expo Square’s Central Park Hall with great company to support the American Heart Association and the prevention of heart disease and stroke in women. www. goredforwomen.org

Ostrich Egg Breakfast 100

May 10 Break-

fast is served at Oklahoma City Zoo with omelets made to order with a side of fun. www.zoofriends. org

The CF Golf Classic

May 12 Presented by Lexus Champions for Charity and Lexus of Tulsa, enjoy a day of golf at Cedar Ridge Country Club and help the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. www.cff.org/chapters/tulsa

Chip in for the Arts Golf Tournament May 12 Players chip in and putt for

Oklahoma’s cultural community and Allied Arts at the Oklahoma City Golf & Country Club. www. alliedartsokc.com

Rhinestone Cowboy

May 15 Glitz up the boots and a pair of jeans for a night of entertainment and fun with the Volunteers of America at the Renaissance Hotel. www.voaok.org

Allan Houser Centennial The Oklahoma-born artist earned a reputation as an innovator of not just American Indian art, but American art, too. Whether painting, drawing or sculpting and carving, the late Houser has received a lot of posthumous attention on the 100th anniversary of his birth. The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum continues the show Allan Houser and His Students through Friday, May 11 (www. nationalcowboymuseum.org). Form and Line: Allan Houser’s Sculpture and Drawings ends June 29 at Gilcrease Museum (www.utulsa.edu/ gilcrease). The Oklahoma City Museum of Art presents Allan Houser: On the Roof May 1-July 27 (www. okcmoa.com). Philbrook Museum of Art opens Allan Houser: A Celebration May 25-Nov. 2 (www.philbrook. org). Allan Houser Drawings: The Centennial Exhibition ends May 18 at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art (www.ou.edu/fjjma). Born to Freedom: Allan Houser Centennial continues through Dec. 31 at the Oklahoma Historical Society (www. okhistory.org). The Oklahoma State Art Collection at the Oklahoma State Capitol continues Allan Houser at the Capitol: A Legacy in Bronze through Dec. 15 (www.arts.ok.gov).

Polo Club of Tulsa. www.tulsacenter.org

Great Strides Walk May 17 Help the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation find a cure for cystic fibrosis with a walk at Centennial Park. www. cff.org/chapters/tulsa 2014 Promise Ball: A View to a Cure May 17 An elegant evening brings

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation supporters together with auctions and a message at the Cox Business Center. www.jdrf.org

Fore the House Celebrity Golf Classic May 18-19 Tulsa Sports Charities

welcomes Barry Switzer, Eddie Sutton, Billy Sims and other sports celebrities to benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Tulsa at Cedar

Fandango

May 15 Take a bite for history at this fundraiser at the Homestead & 1889ers Museum benefiting museum preservation. www.harnhomestead.com

William Booth Society Annual Benefit Dinner May 15 The Salvation Army Tulsa Area Command welcomes former first lady Laura Bush and her daughter Jenna Bush Hager as this year’s keynote speakers at the dinner at Cox Business Center. www. uss.salvationarmy.org

Tulsa Opera’s Carmen

Go Red for Women Luncheon May 16 Enjoy a special luncheon at the Skirvin Hilton Hotel with the American Heart Association to support the prevention of heart disease and stroke in women. www.goredforwomen.org Remembering John May 17 The Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa celebrates the late John H. Williams at Harwelden Mansion. www.ahct.org Center Polo Classic

May 17 Enjoy the sport of kings with tailgating, fashion, champagne and divot stomping with the Center for Individuals with Physical Challenges at the Arrowhead

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

Ridge Country Club. www.tulsasportscharities. org

Operation Art

May 19 Students and artists collaborate on works, which will be displayed at Mayfest and auctioned May 19 at Tulsa’s Circle Cinema to benefit school scholarships. www.operationaware.org

Hope & Honor Invitational

May 19 Heartline holds its tournament at River Oaks Golf Club in Edmond. www.heartlineoklahoma. org

Home Run for the Homeless

May

22 Tulsa celebrities play ball at ONEOK Field for the audience in the annual game fundraiser for the Tulsa Day Center for the Homeless. www. tulsadaycenter.org

30 Years, One Night: Le Festa Bianca May 23 Okla-

cap on for the challenge that includes a live auction of items, dinner and entertainment at the Cox Business Center and aids Family & Children’s Services. www.fcsok.org

COMMUNITY Green Country Arabian Classic May 1-4 Green Country Arabian Horse Association’s annual show displays the finest of the breed at Expo Square. www.gcaha.org

Red River Classic Morgan Horse Show May 1-4 The stalwart Morgan horse

breed is showcased at this annual show at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.redriverclassic. com

Bixby BBQ ‘n Blues Festival

May 2-3 Go hog-wild at this favorite barbecue picnic with live entertainment at Bixby’s Washington Irving Park. www.bixbyrotarybbq.com

Downtown Edmond Arts Festival May 2-4 Get the Edmond experience in a single day at this festival that also promotes the area’s artists and creativity. www.downtownedmondok. com

Germanfest May 2-4 The German American Society of Tulsa strikes up the polka band on the lawn of the GAST Building along with German food vendors, activities, entertainment and more. www.gastulsa.org Ozark Birders’ Springtime Retreat May 2-4 Enjoy a weekend of bird-watching, guided walks and more fun in the Ozarks in Bull Shoals, Ark. www.arkansas.com

Rose Rock Music Festival May 2-4 The town of Noble hosts a weekend of music from Parker Milsap, Travis Kidd, Allen Williams Band; a parade, car show, great food; carnival and great fun. www.nobleok.org 33rd Annual Toad Suck Daze May 2-4 Celebrate spring with arts and crafts, local and national entertainment, the world-famous Toad Suck Races and anything you can eat on a stick in Conway, Ark. www.toadsuck.org

homa Shakespeare in the Park celebrates a milestone with an Italian-inspired gala of wine, hors Queens of the Stone Age d’oeuvres, music and silent auction at the Dunlap Codding Building in Oklahoma City. www.oklahomashakespeare. Tulsa Turkish Festival May 3 Stop com in for Turkish treats, music and fun at the culHarwelden Awards Gala May 27 The tural festival at Tulsa Raindrop Turkish House in Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa honors artists Broken Arrow. www.raindropturkishhouse.org and arts supporters at Harwelden Mansion. El Reno Fried Onion Burger Day www.ahct.org Festival May 3 Take a bite out of the biggest Palmer’s An Evening with the burger you’ve ever seen at the 26th annual Pioneer Woman May 29 Author, Food tribute to El Reno history with “grascar” races Network star and Oklahoma resident Ree and other entertainment in downtown El Reno. Drummond is the guest of honor at the gala at www.elrenoburgerday.wordpress.com the Cox Business Center benefiting substance Restoring Harmony Powwow abuse treatment services at Palmer Continuum May 3 This outdoor powwow at Tulsa’s Westside of Care. www.palmertulsa.org YMCA supports the Indian Health Care Resource Iron Gate Founders’ Dinner May Center and is a growing favorite for competitive 29 Iron Gate recognizes those who have helped American Indian dancers. www.ihcrc.org the organization feed the homeless in Tulsa with Living with Diabetes Expo May a special event at Trinity Episcopal Church. www. 3 Learn more about diabetes at this event for irongatetulsa.org patients, caregivers and supporters hosted at the Eye of the Beholder May 29 J. Claudette Marriott Tulsa Hotel Southern Hills by the AmeriGallery holds a cocktail- and wine-tasting and can Diabetes Association. www.diabetes.org art viewing event benefiting Prevent Blindness Kolache Festival May 3 Czech heritage Oklahoma. www.preventblindnessok.org is celebrated with a parade, traditional dancing, Relay for Life May 30 Run for American polka music and food on Prague’s Main Street. Cancer Society to raise money for research to www.praguekolachefestival.com cure cancer and educate communities about preventing it. Relay takes place at the Guthrie ONA Coin & Currently Show May 3-4 The Oklahoma Numismatic Association hosts Green. www.relayforlife.org/tulsaok annual coin show for collectors at Oklahoma Purple Sash Gala May 31 Held at the its State Fair Park. www.okstatefair.com National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, the YWCA Oklahoma City’s gala night includes Toy & Doll Show, Oklahoma dinner, elegant fashions, wine and auctions of Springtime Train Show May 3-4 The unique items. www.ywcaokc.org 38th annual toy and doll show for collectors Brainiac Ball May 31 Get your thinking features the 2014 train and hobbyists show at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.boxcar3.com


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Entertainment

Schools and Tulsa Public Schools students. www. foundationfortulsaschools.org

American Cowboys Traders Days May 22 Vendors from ‘round these parts bring all things Western and more to Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore. www.willrogers.com

Chuck Wagon Gathering & Children’s Cowboy Festival May 24-25 Giddy up for the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum annual festival of Western fun. www.nationalcowboymuseum.org

PHOTO COURTESY UTICA SQUARE.

Sooner State Sieger May 24-25 The International All Breed Canine Association brings tail-wagging competition to Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.iabca.com

Philbrook Wine Experience

R.K. Gun Show www.rkshows.com

Edmond Jazz & Blues Festival

COMMUNITY

Summer’s Fifth Night Memorial Day means spending time outdoors with friends, good music and food every Thursday night at Utica Square. The 23rd annual Summer’s Fifth Night concert series kicks off Thursday, May 29, just ahead of the big weekend with the Mid-Life Crisis Band playing classic rock. The scheduled continues: Pop Machine, June 5; Light Opera Oklahoma, June 12; Bop Cats, June 19; Admiral Twin, June 26; Mary Cogan, July 3; Starr Fisher Ensemble, July 10; Luxtones, July 17; Usual Suspects, July 24; Red Dirt Rangers, July 31; Traveler, Aug. 7; Jeff Shadley’s Mad Men of Swing, Aug. 14; Jessica Hunt Band, Aug. 21; Grady Nichols, Aug. 28. Concerts are from 7-9 p.m. every Thursday and are free to the public. For more, visit www.uticasquare. com. May Fair Arts Festival

May 3-4 Fine art and fun are perfect together at this spring tradition featuring festival food vendors, fine artists, crafters and entertainment at Norman’s Andrews Park. 405.321.9400

Metcalf Gun Show

May 3-4 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.metcalfgunshows.com

Cinco de Mayo Festival

May 3-4 Tulsa’s Hispanic and Latino community celebrate big with cultural festivities. www. tulsahispanicchamber.com

Kayak Campout May 3-4 Bring your own kayak to Arkansas’ Lake Ouachita and camp out to get the most out of the area’s geology, history and wildlife. www.arkansasstateparks.com Oklahoma Renaissance Festival May 3-June 1 The Castle in Muskogee opens the gates to knights, ladies, wandering troubadours, ornery pirates and more. www.okcastle.com

Salsa De Mayo

May 5 Dip in to this festival showcasing Mexican restaurants serving up chips and salsa. Event includes a burrito

eating contest and inflatables for kids to enjoy at the Mabee Center. www.mabeecenter.com

Frank W. Abagnale

May 8 Oral Roberts University hosts a visit and talk with the security consultant and former con artist made famous in the 2002 film Catch Me If You Can and portrayed by Leonardo DiCaprio. www.mabeecenter.com

Boots & BBQ Festival

May 9-10 Follow your sniffer to great barbecue at Claremore’s Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs for delicious fun, music. www.claremorereveille.com

Rooster Days Festival

May 9-11 This year’s festival celebrates Broken Arrow’s Rose District as it remembers the city’s small-town beginnings with carnivals, music and more. www. roosterdays.com

Oklahoma Wagons Ho

May 9-11 Exciting wagon races take place in Tulsa’s backyard featuring outlaw races, buckboards, mules and more in Skiatook. www.oklahomawagonsho.com

Stilwell Strawberry Festival May 10 Head to Adair County for free strawberries and cream, a parade, live music and activities all

to celebrate Stilwell’s favorite crop. www. strawberrycapital.com

Tabouleh Fest May 10 Have another helping of tabouleh, the specialty cuisine of Bristow, rich in Lebanese heritage, on Main Street. www.bristowchamber.com Breeder’s Invitational

May 10-24 The cutting-horse competition features teams demonstrating riding skills at Expo Square. www. breedersinvitational.com

Mayfest

May 15-18 Music and theofarts are on Kings Leon full exhibit in downtown Tulsa for a favorite festival featuring arts and crafts vendors, food vendors and great concerts. www.tulsamayfest.org

www.uticasquare.com

Nuyaka Creek Winery Spring Wine Festival May 17 The wine notes

coming from Bristow are better than ever at this tasting featuring wines from around the state. www.nuyakacreek.com

OKC Gun Show May 17-18 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okcgunshow.com Indie Trunk Show

May 17 See what local crafters, artists and hobbyists in business have to offer of handmade goods and vintage, repurposed items at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.indietrunkshowokc.com

Blue Dome Arts Festival May 16-18 A new logo and commitment to presenting Tulsa’s diverse arts scene is what this fun, emerging festival is all about in the Blue Dome District in downtown Tulsa. www.bluedomearts.org

Hop Jam 2014 May 18 Tulsa music trio Hanson hosts the inaugural festival with live music, local brewers and food trucks in the Brady Arts District as the group launches its own craft beer. www.thehopjam.com

Spring in the Square

Thru May 18 The 41st annual event transforms the historic Sherman House with specially decorated rooms and benefits the Foundation for Tulsa

May 17 Find yourself at Utica Square among artists demonstrating their work and vendors with plants, flowers and home décor along with activities for children.

Designer Showcase 2014

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May 24-25 Head for Edmond’s Stephenson Park, where you’ll hear great blues and jazz acts and e n j o y f o o d a n d f e s t i v i t i e s . w w w. edmondjazzandblues.org

Tulsa Round-Up Dog Shows

May 24-25 The Mid-Continent Kennel Club of Tulsa shows outstanding examples of breed as well as agility, ability and rally at Expo Square. www. tulsakennelclub.com

Metcalf Gun Show May 24-25 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.metcalfgunshows.com Paseo Arts Festival May 24-26 Get your walking shoes on for Oklahoma City’s Paseo Arts District ‘s festival of all things creative, from fine artwork to bluegrass music and the performing arts. www.thepaseo.com Senior Star Round Up

May 25 Western swing rules the dance floor at Cain’s Ballroom with LIFE Senior Services. www.seniorline.org

SunFest May 30-June 1 Oklahoma’s biggest outdoor picnic is back at Bartlesville’s Sooner Park for a weekend of fun. www.bartlesvillesunfest.org Gem Faire May 30-June 1 Vendors set up displays of jewelry, gems, precious stones, jewelry supplies and more at Expo Square. www. gemfaire.com Summer’s Fifth Night May 29-Aug. 28 The Mid-Life Crisis Band opens up a new summer of live music every Thursday evening at Utica Square. www.uticasquare.com Redbud Spectacular Horse Show May 29-June 8 One of the biggest horsing events in the state gets underway as the Oklahoma Quarter Horse Association sets up for a week-plus of clinics, classes and competitive riding at Oklahoma State Fair Park. www.okqha.org

Made in Oklahoma Wine, Beer & Food Festival May 31 Oklahoma agritour-

Mommy Maids

ism’s best in state-grown and made foods, beers and wines are spotlighted at the Reed Conference Center in Midwest City. www.madeinoklahomafestival.com

Gift Certificates Available!

Grand American Arms Show May 31-June 1 Oklahoma State Fair Park. www. grandamericanarmsshows.com

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To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

918.938.8222 www.mommy-maids.com

Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at.

OKMAG.COM

OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR

or email to events@okmag.com.

“It’s hard to compete with a Mom’s touch.” 102

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SPECIAL PROMOTION

Vintage Tulsa

T

The second annual Oil Barons Ball will celebrate the spirit of the 1940s.

he Tulsa Historical Society will host its second annual Vintage Tulsa: Oil Barons Ball at the historic Travis Mansion in June. Steeped in the rich history of Tulsa, the Oil Barons Ball celebrates the spirit of the 1940s, an important time of unprecedented growth for Tulsa. “We’ll take a look back to the time when courageous Tulsans of the Greatest Generation led us to victory in World War II and our city made its indelible mark as one of the country’s most desired places to work and live,” says Michelle Place, executive director of the Tulsa Historical Society. The impact of the world at war stretched beyond the battlegrounds. Fear, uncertainty and family separation were commonplace

during the 1940s. “It was a time of self-sacrifice,” says Place. “Yet, there was a great sense of community and patriotism. Everybody was working for the greater good. We are going to celebrate that sense of community.” Tulsa, like many other cities, mobilized on the home front and engaged in the war effort, adds Place. “We were training combat nurses, and we were producing lots of oil for the war,” she says. Hoping to continue the success of last year’s event, Place says this year’s Oil Barons Ball will carry on the reputation the event gained as one of the most fun fundraisers in Tulsa. “Last year, the tickets were sold out

three weeks before the event,” says Place. “Sponsorships and tickets are available now (for this year’s ball), but there is a limited number.” The Travis Mansion – originally built in 1919 by Tulsa oilman Sam Travis and his wife, Julie Travis – provides the perfect backdrop for the evening. The event begins with signature cocktails that toast the Tulsa of then and now. Guests will be treated to an elegant sit-down dinner. Afterward, the party moves into the Vintage Gardens where guests will enjoy the music of Dave & the Wavetones. “You can swing the night away on our starlit dance floor,” says Place. “We are working hard to make sure the event has something for everyone,” says Susan Peterson, co-chair of the event. “For many, the Oil Barons Ball is their first introduction to the Tulsa Historical Society. We want to introduce ourselves to a new generation.” Don’t worry if dancing isn’t your thing. Co-chair Adam Peterson says the after-party bar will be stocked with a variety of beers, scotch and cigars. Proceeds from the Oil Barons Ball benefit the Tulsa Historical Society’s education program, particularly programs for educators teaching students about Oklahoma and Tulsa history. “Our program initially focuses on third grade students. It’s the first time students begin learning about Oklahoma and Tulsa history,” says Place. “Students and teachers are also preparing for the new third-grade reading and Common Core requirements. We want to provide plans that help combine reading and history with little or no preparations for teachers to incorporate into the classroom.” LINDSAY CUOMO

VINTAGE TULSA: OIL BARONS BALL TULSA HISTORICAL SOCIETY BOARD DEVELOPMENT CHAIR TONY JEZEK WITH OIL BARONS BALL COCHAIRS SUSAN AND ADAM PETERSON.

Saturday, June 6 at Travis Mansion

For sponsorship opportunities and other information, call 918.712.9484.

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

MAY 2014 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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In Person

The Open Spaces

H

Shawnee native Krista Tippett explores faith and ideology as producer and host of radio’s On Being.

er radio show On Being commands an international audience, yet Krista Tippett, who grew up in Shawnee, left Oklahoma with no such ambitions. The popular weekly NPR show is unique for its discussions about science, religion, spirituality and ideology, bringing listeners of all beliefs together. Although she didn’t plan on a career emphasizing issues of faith, “so much goes all the way back to the First Baptist Church in Shawnee,” she says. “Church wasn’t a place you went to each week – it was in the air you breathed.” From Shawnee she went to Brown University in Providence, R.I., before heading to Bonn, Germany, to study on a Fulbright Scholarship. Eventually, she returned to the U.S., and by then, Tippett became increasingly interested in the role of religion in individual and public life. “In this culture, we get raised to be advocates for our religion or politics or for any idea of what we presumably know,” she says. “We don’t get so skilled in the delightful experience of just being curious.” That curiosity sparked the creation of Speaking of Faith in 2003. The program’s name was changed to On Being in 2010. “It’s just amazing and surprising how interesting almost everybody’s religious life is, how everyone has a story – even the most non-religious person – and also how we pay so much attention in public life to religious values and certainties,” she says. Tippett has a degree in divinity from Yale University, has received numerous awards – including a Peabody Award – and is the author of Speaking of Faith and Einstein’s God, a collection of essays based on her interviews. If she could interview anyone past or present, that person would be Albert Einstein. “He was not religious in any kind of traditional way, but he had a really interesting spiritual sensibility,” she says. “He had ideas that were profound and speak to modern people about curiosity, about our capacity to wonder and our reverence for mystery.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MAY 2014

“The truth is, he might [have been] completely ornery and a terrible interviewee,” she says, “but I love the thought of it.” If she could interview Einstein, Tippett says she would start by asking the same question she asks all her guests: “Was there a religious background to your childhood?” This question, Tippett says, “plants people in their searching place, their soft place. I want the first question to sink people down into the depths of who they are. You have to start there. If you start from a combative place, it’s very hard to get out of that, and the mode they’re in will shape the conversation.” Tippett’s skill as a host is in proportion to her willingness to listen and ponder the defining questions all people face. “Everybody I knew was part of this Southern Baptist tradition with so many givens that people seemed to agree on,” Tippett says of her childhood. “As a teenager, I had a lot of questions, not doubts or critique. But I was fascinated in what was going on in the text and what it didn’t say, what it left open.” Tippett lingers willingly in these metaphorical open spaces with her On Being guests, but as a SHAWNEE NATIVE grandchild of a Baptist preacher, KRISTA TIPPETT IS THE she wasn’t always encouraged to HOST OF ON BEING, A WEEKLY RADIO SHOW ask her questions. THAT AIRS ACROSS “My grandfather was not all THE NATION ON NAthat big on those open spaces,” TIONAL PUBLIC RADIO STATIONS. Tippett says. “They weren’t what PHOTO BY PETER BECK. he wanted to talk about, and I was always aware of that.” Questions, curiosity and help from a drama and debate coach in Shawnee have aided Tippett in becoming one of the most recognized radio personalities today. With a program broadcast on more than 330 public radio stations in the U.S. and globally via podcast, Tippett is perched to continue that ever-reaching discussion of humanity and tell the stories of people, mind and spirit. “My father was adopted, so there weren’t any stories on his side of the family,” she recalls. “Some of my passion for storytelling comes from the absence of stories, the fact that delving into the stories was not such a part of my life.” They are now. SHAUN PERKINS


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IT DOESN’T JUST EXHILARATE, IT DOMINATES.

THE UNRELENTING

2014

GS F SPORT

LEXUSOFTULSA.COM | 918.665.3987

May 2014 Oklahoma Magazine  

MOORE ONE YEAR LATER: A community in recovery Allan Houser

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