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VOTE NOW FOR 2016 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM MARCH 2016

ANNIVERSARY ISSUE SPRING FASHION • HOME & GARDEN


The University of Tulsa

Presidential lecture series Sponsored by The Darcy O’Brien Endowed Chair Presents

Elaine Pagels March 24, 2016 7:30 p.m. Donald W. Reynolds Center 3208 East 8th Street

Elaine Pagels

Princeton Professor Elaine Pagels is known for her role in disproving the myth that the early church was a unified movement. A Harvard graduate, Pagels has received Rockefeller, Guggenheim and MacArthur Fellowships. Pagels’ findings were published in The Gnostic Gospels, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and National Book Award. The New York Times called it “The first major and eminently readable book on Gnosticism benefiting from the discovery in 1945 of a collection of Gnostic Christian texts at Nag Hammadi in Egypt.” Pagels also authored NYT bestsellers Revelations: Visions, Prophecy and Politics in the Book of Revelation and Beyond Belief: The Secret Gospel of Thomas. Other books include The Origins of Satan and Adam, Eve and the Serpent. Her next book, Why Religion?, is slated for a 2018 release. She has appeared in Time, The Atlantic, Vogue, The New Yorker and Newsweek’s “Women and Power” issue.

Free to the Public

book signing to Follow lecture

utulsa.edu/Pls

The University of Tulsa is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action institution. For EEO/AA information, contact the Office of Human Resources, 918-631-2616; for disability accommodations, contact Dr. Tawny Taylor, 918-631-2315. To ensure availability of an interpreter, five to seven days notice is needed; 48 hours is recommended for all other accommodations. No tickets or registration required. Please call 918-631-2309 for event details. TU#16023


Features March

2016 Oklahoma Magazine  Vol. XX, No. 3

49 Three Unique Homes and Gardens

Everyone has a different idea of their perfect place to get away from it all while staying in their own home. We look at three unique settings Oklahomans have chosen for their own garden and pool areas, each customized to their specific needs.

56 Creating a Sustainable Lifestyle

From increasing your use of renewable resources to decluttering your lifestyle, Oklahoma Magazine looks at ways you can create a more sustainable, less stressful lifestyle. Tips like using sustainable landscaping methods will not only help the environment, but could cut down on the time you spend on lawn care.

Oklahoma Magazine travels to Royce Myers Art Ltd. to showcase spring’s hottest styles in a setting both striking and uniquely Oklahoman.

MARCH 2016

To celebrate our 20th anniversary, Oklahoma Magazine looks back at the past 20 years and talks to some of the Oklahomans who have helped make them great.

SPECIAL SECTION 84 Summer Camp Directory

expanded articles and stories that don’t appear in the print edition.

MORE PHOTOS: ON THE COVER:

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Want some more? Visit us online. MORE GREAT ARTICLES: Read

VOTE NOW FOR 2016 THE BEST OF THE BEST AT WWW.OKMAG.COM March 2016

70 20th Anniversary

Spring Fashion

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE CELEBRATES 20 YEARS OF PUBLICATION WITH A TRIBUTE TO THE TULSA AND OKLAHOMA CITY SKYLINES.

View expanded Scene, Fashion, Taste and Entertainment galleries.

MORE EVENTS: The online calendar of events includes even more great Oklahoma events.


M MMOGRAMS SAVE LIVES. In the fight against breast cancer, early detection is your most powerful ally. Using advanced digital mammography, the physicians and radiologists at the St. John Breast Center can detect breast cancer at its earliest stages; when it is most treatable and survivable. And our same-day appointments at select locations and extended hours make it as convenient as possible.

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Departments

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

13 The State

Following 13 productive years in the nation’s capital, former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating and first lady Cathy Keating return to their home state and are looking forward to being with their family and friends, the Oklahoma City Thunder and a simpler way of life.

16 18 20 22 24 26

Happenings Culture Sport OK Then The Insider Oklahoma Business

29 Life & Style

From tips on tools and trends to advice regarding plants that have been tested to survive Oklahoma’s varied soil conditions and unpredictable weather, some of the state’s garden gurus share tips on what you can do now to yield the best results in your spring and summer garden.

32 34 38 42 44 46

Art Living Space Style Destination Your Health Scene

13

91 Taste

Located in the historic Braniff building in Downtown Oklahoma City, Kitchen No. 324 is a seasonally-inspired café and craft bakery. With a focus on fresh ingredients, the café serves breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner using classic preparation techniques and new flavors and ingredients.

94 95

Local Flavor Three for One

97 Entertainment

Inspired by James Cameron’s recordbreaking 2009 blockbuster Avatar, Cirque Du Soleil presents one of its most stunning productions to date. This month, Toruk The First Flight brings its breathtaking choreography to the BOK Center stage.

98 Calendar of Events 103 In Tulsa/In OKC

104 In Person

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PICTURED LEFT TO RIGHT:

Jack, Henry and Miles

Early in their second pregnancy, Allison and Steven Terrill learned one of their twin boys was unusually small. One was in the 98th percentile for growth, the other at negative three percent. Despite the odds against him at birth, tiny Miles weighed in at 1.4 pounds and was, amazingly, breathing on his own. For 81 days, the physicians and staff in the Henry Zarrow Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) provided 24/7 specialized care for the little guy they called Miracle Miles. “There’s no way I can adequately express how wonderful the physicians and staff are,” said Allison. “We couldn’t possibly be more grateful to that wonderful group of people.” Today, Miles is a busy two-year-old. Even though he is still a bit small for his age, he’s gaining on his twin Henry and big brother Jack every day.

saintfrancis.com/childrenshospital


OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA Hair Cuts & Styling Color Hair Extensions Lash Extensions Nail Care Skin Care Spray Tan Waxing Injectables Laser Therapies Weight Loss

PRESIDENT AND EDITORIAL DIRECTOR DANIEL SCHUMAN

OKLAHOMA

PUBLISHER AND FOUNDER VIDA K. SCHUMAN MANAGING EDITOR JUSTIN MARTINO ASSOCIATE EDITOR LAURIE GOODALE

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ELIZABETH WOZOBSKI, JOHN WOOLEY, TARA MALONE, MEGAN MORGAN GRAPHICS MANAGER MARK ALLEN

Waxing Studio Body Waxing for Men and Women Expert Brow Care

3410 S Peoria • Center 1 www.jaraherronsalon.com • 918-742-3223

9168 S Yale Ave, Ste 150 Tulsa, Oklahoma 918-982-2362 www.lovewaxstudio.com

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Rick BARTow Things You know But cannot Explain

Through April 24, 2016

GRAPHIC DESIGNER BEN ALBRECHT DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST JAMES AVERY CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS NATALIE GREEN, BRENT FUCHS, CHRIS HUMPHREY, NATHAN HARMON, SCOTT MILLER, DAN MORGAN, BRANDON SCOTT, DAVID COBB

CONTACT US ADVERTISING INQUIRIES: ADVERTISING@OKMAG.COM EVENTS AND CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS: EVENTS@OKMAG.COM QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT CONTENT: EDITOR@OKMAG.COM ALL OTHER INQUIRIES: MAIL@OKMAG.COM

Oklahoma Magazine is published monthly by Schuman Publishing Company P.O. Box 14204 • Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 918.744.6205 • FAX: 918.748.5772 mail@okmag.com www.okmag.com Subscriptions are $18 for 12 issues. Mail checks to Oklahoma Magazine P.O. Box 14204 Tulsa, OK 74159-1204 Copyright © 2016 by Schuman Publishing Company. Oklahoma Wedding, The Best of the Best, 40 Under 40, Single in the City, Great Companies To Work For and Oklahomans of the Year are registered trademarks of Schuman Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission from the publisher is strictly prohibited. All photographs, articles, materials and design elements in Oklahoma Magazine and on okmag.com are protected by applicable copyright and trademark laws, and are owned by Schuman Publishing Company or third party providers. Reproduction, copying, or redistribution without the express written permission of Schuman Publishing Company is strictly prohibited. All requests for permission and reprints must be made in writing to Oklahoma Magazine, c/o Reprint Services, P.O. Box 14204, Tulsa, OK 74159-1204. Advertising claims and the views expressed in the magazine by writers or artists do not necessarily represent those of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Company, or its affiliates.

Organized by the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon. Support for the exhibition is provided by the Ford Family Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, Arlene Schnitzer, the Coeta and Donald Barker Changing Exhibitions Endowment, The Harold and Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation, a grant from the Oregon Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency, the Ballinger Endowment, Philip and Sandra Piele, and JSMA members.

2016

Member

IN

OKC

IN

Rick Bartow, Deer Spirit for Frank LaPena, 1999, acrylic on panel, 24" x 24", (detail), Private Collection, ©Rick Bartow

TULSA

TU is an EEO/AA institution.

Exhibition season title sponsor is the Sherman E. Smith Family Charitable Foundation. Support also provided by Mervin Bovaird Foundation, C.W. Titus Foundation and M.V. Mayo Charitable Foundation.

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BE THE BEST. LAHOMA K O

the

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GAZINE

Vote now for Oklahoma Magazine’’s The Best of the Best!!!

LET TER FROM THE PUBLISHER

I

n the last 20 years, Oklahoma Magazine has evolved from a single magazine to a media company that focuses on telling Oklahoma’s stories in a variety of ways. Readers who enjoy reading about Ma Cong in this issue can also go to www.okmag.com and watch his interview with Julie Chin, including exclusive internet-only content. If you are more interested in fashion, there is a behind-the-scenes video showing the making of our spring fashion feature on our website. We are active on social media, providing more ways than ever to talk to us and let us know what is important to you. However, our magazine remains firmly at the heart of what we do. Whether you choose to pick up a copy of our magazine from one of the more than 600 distribution locations or take advantage of our digital edition from your laptop, tablet or phone, you are receiving the same content. Oklahoma Magazine has always been focused on discussing topics that are most important to you. Each year, you can find features exclusive to Oklahoma Magazine such as Top Doctors, Super Lawyers and Great Companies to Work for. You can find the best of Oklahoma in our pages, whether it is our 40 under 40 feature, highlighting some of the top individuals in our state, or our Best of the Best feature, where our readers decide the greatest Oklahoma has to offer. This year, we will be launching Faces of Oklahoma, a new section profiling industry leaders and companies that will spark the interest of our readers. We will keep that same dedication to providing the best content to you over the next 20 years and beyond, and providing it in a variety of ways compatible with every reader’s tastes. No matter what direction technology takes, magazines will always matter. This is why Oklahoma Magazine remains committed to telling you the stories that matter to you. Our goal is to create valuable content no matter the delivery method, and I want to thank our staff, our freelance writers and photographers for creating that content; our loyal advertisers for supporting us in our mission; and of course, you, our readers. More than anything else, you are the reason for our success. Vida Schuman Publisher and Founder

BY CASTING A BALLOT, YOU HAVE A VOICE IN THE YEAR’S MOST ANTICIPATED ISSUE.

VISIT OKMAG.COM

TO VOTE For Advertising opportunities emAil Advertising@okmAg.com cAll 918.744.6205

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INTEGRIS AND

MAYO CLINIC.

EXCELLENCE. WORKING TOGETHER. INTEGRIS is proud to bring you Oklahoma’s first collaborative relationship with the world-renowned Mayo Clinic. INTEGRIS physicians can now work directly with Mayo Clinic physicians and scientists on complex diagnosis and treatment plans, ensuring you always have access to the latest medical knowledge.

Excellence. Working Together. integrisok.com/mayoclinic

(405) 951-2277


OKMAG.COM

SPRING FASHION VIDEO

March kicks off the warmer season, bringing along with it the latest fashion trends for the spring and summer months. Oklahoma Magazine has you covered with a selection of the hottest fashions available from the state’s premier shopping destinations. This year, Royce Myers Art Limited sets the stage for our six-page fashion feature as our models go on a local art shopping spree, trying to find that perfect piece for a new apartment. Be a part of the team and see the work that goes into our elaborate photo shoots with our web exclusive behind-the-scenes video only at OKMAG.COM.

OK

CLOSING THOUGHTS WITH TULSA BALLET’S MA KONG

Known for its breathtaking performances that feature some of the most talented dancers in the United States, Tulsa Ballet is a fixture in the Oklahoma arts scene. Television’s Julie Chin visits Tulsa Ballet and sits down with world-famous choreographer and former dancer Ma Kong. Learn what fuels Kong’s passion for dance, what creatively inspires his choreography and hear about exciting upcoming Tulsa Ballet performances. Visit OKMAG.COM to see the interview and watch more insightful video content.

SEPTEMBER 2016

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S TAY CONNECTED

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Vaginal Health

Dr. Melanie R. Blackstock, M.D. 6465 South Yale Ave. Suite 310 918.236.3064 www.monalisatulsa.com

Look who’s talking about it.

“It” can be vaginal dryness, itching or burning, and it happens to a majority of women after menopause. Now there’s something you can do about it that is clinically proven to bring long-lasting relief. With the MonaLisa Touch laser treatment, vaginal health is restored due to new collagen, elastin and vascularization. This quick, in-office treatment requires no anesthesia and results in virtually no downtime. Thousands of women have been successfully treated since 2008—and now, millions more don’t have to suffer. That’s something to talk about.

Dr. Blackstock and her staff cordially invite you to attend an open house on Tuesday, March 22nd. Please RSVP by calling our office at 918.236.3064. This is a great way to learn about the Mona Lisa Touch.

MonaLisa Touch is a trademark of DEKA M.E.L.A. Srl – Calenzano - Italy.

©2015 Cynosure, Inc.


Fighting

CANCER

With Healthy Decisions

You have the power to shape a healthier lifestyle. These choices can build cancer-resisting habits for today and in the future.

To reduce your risk of colon cancer, experts recommend eating no more than 18 oz (cooked weight) of red meats per week.1

More than one drink a day for women (two for men) can increase the risk of mouth, pharynx, esophageal and breast cancer.2

MEASURE PORTIONS Managing portions helps you maintain a healthy body weight.

The Vital Role of Nutrition in Fighting Cancer Cancer treatment can affect your appetite, sense of taste and ability to absorb the nutrition you do consume, which can lead to complications in your treatment.

Malnutrition can impact your immune system.

DRINK SMART Choose water over sugary drinks and limit your alcohol consumption.

Heather Holladay Breast cancer patient since 2011 Cancer Treatment Centers of America® No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results.

EAT GREEN Choose plant foods to “crowd out” unhealthy choices such as processed food and red meat.

“My naturopathic doctor and my nutritionist balanced my diet and balanced my supplements to help with the side effects during and after chemotherapy.”

The suggested serving size of meat is 3 oz (ideally poultry or fish), which is about the size of a deck of cards.

Cancer patients are at an especially high risk of neutropenia, in which the immune system is depressed and unable to fight even routine infections.

Malnutrition can impact your treatment schedule. If you become undernourished and too weak, treatment may need to be temporarily delayed until you regain your strength, thereby stalling your overall progress toward being cancer-free.3

Proper nutrition can help ease side effects. Some basic foods that we all have in our pantries can be effective in combating cancer treatment side effects. For instance, did you know that eating foods rich in soluble fiber may decrease symptoms of diarrhea?

GET MOVING Focus on having fun. Set goals and monitor your progress. Change up activities to keep it fresh.

Atlanta

30 minutes of physical activity every day is all that is needed to make an impact on your health.

FORTIFY YOUR FIGHT If you have been diagnosed with cancer, it’s important to realize that nutrition will play a vital role in your fight against the disease.

Avoid a “one-sizefits-all” approach— the best types of food to eat can depend on the type of cancer you’re fighting.

To learn more about the power of integrative cancer care, visit cancercenter.com or call 888-568-1571.

Chicago Philadelphia Phoenix Tulsa

References: 1. “Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective.” American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund, http://www.aicr.org/reduce-your-cancer-risk/recommendations-forcancer-prevention/recommendations_05_red_meat.html. 2. “Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity and the Prevention of Cancer: a Global Perspective.” American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund, http://www.aicr.org/reduce-your-cancer-risk/recommendations-forcancer-prevention/recommendations_06_alcohol.html. 3. “Nutritional screening and early treatment of malnutrition in cancer patients.” The National Center for Biotechnology Information. Lidia Santarpia, Franco Contaldo, and Fabrizio Pasanisi, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC3063880/. 4. “Diet and Physical Activity: What’s the Cancer Connection?” American Cancer Society, http://www.cancer.org/cancer/ cancercauses/dietandphysicalactivity/diet-and-physical-activity.

© 2016 Rising Tide


State

ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA

Homecoming

Former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating and first lady Cathy Keating return to Oklahoma.

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

A

lthough former Gov. and first lady Frank and Cathy Keating moved to the nation’s capital following the inauguration of former Gov. Brad Henry in 2003, in some ways they never really left Oklahoma. “I know we’ve been away, but it never seems like we’ve been,” Mrs. Keating says. “Our home has never been further than our hearts, and our hearts are in Oklahoma.” Now, the Keatings are set to return to their home state after 13 productive years in Washington. During their time in the nation’s capital, Gov. Keating spent eight years with the American Council of Life Insurers as president and CEO of the lobbying and trade group. After his term at ACLI ended, the couple considered moving back to Oklahoma but decided to stay in Washington a bit longer. Gov. Keating went on to serve as president

and CEO of the American Bankers Association, another trade and lobbying organization in Washington. During their time in Washington, the couple was very active in the capital’s community, at one point drawing from their firsthand experience with disaster as governor and first lady during the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing to co-chair a $15 million national campaign to make the city prepared for disaster. Despite an active life in the District community, the former first couple never forgot their home state. “We stayed involved in the Oklahoma community because it is home,” Mrs. Keating says. The former first lady in particular returned stateside on a regular basis. Over the years, she continued to serve on the board of directors for Express Employment Professionals, an Oklahoma-based staffing com-

pany. (Although no longer employed by the company, she continues to chair its nationwide charitable giving operations.) She also spent much of her time over the past several years traveling frequently to Oklahoma to care for her mother, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, both Keatings remained involved with the Salvation Army in Oklahoma City and with the Red Cross in both Oklahoma City and Washington. This latter organization was especially important to the couple, according to Mrs. Keating, because “they were so critical to helping Oklahomans get back on their feet after the bombing.” “We’re not doing the heavy lifting on projects, but have been back and forth for several events to support our friends and organizations in Tulsa and Oklahoma City that have made such a difference in people’s lives,” Mrs. Keating explains. MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

13


The State

Although both husband and wife grew up in Tulsa and visit family and friends there ly-friendly community than Oklahoma City.” frequently, they plan to make Oklahoma City Both are excited to be returning to a city their permanent home. Now that the couple that, after several MAPS initiatives, Project will be back in Oklahoma full time, there’s a 180 and the arrival of professional basketball, lot they are looking forward to. Much of that is all at once comfortably familiar and excitappeal lies in their fond memories of a simpler ingly new. way of life. “We arrived at the Governor’s Mansion “I love the easy commutes, the clear skies, in Oklahoma City in January 1995,” Mrs. the friendliness and the thunder,” Gov. KeatKeating remembers. “MAPS 1 was a little ing says, not specifying if he is referring to over a year old – nothing had started yet. The the sound of Oklahoma storms or the profesbombing could have paralyzed the city longer sional basketball team that arrived during his than it did. We might not ever have gotten hiatus in Washington. “It’s an easy decision off our knees, but business leaders coalesced to come back. I went to college, worked as an and swore not to be defeated. So now we’ve FBI agent and for Presidents Reagan and Bush watched Oklahoma City evolve, and it’s so and for the insurance and banking industries in exciting. Both OKC and Tulsa pop up on Washington. But at one point in your life, you everyone’s top 10 lists: most desirable, most want to go home. I want to see my children affordable, best family places to live, best culand grandchildren. tural cities … it’s amazOklahoma just has a ing. And our best friends natural flow for us.” in the world are in OklaMrs. Keating homa City.” agrees. “I look forMrs. Keating plans ward to an easier to continue her work as way of life. Life is chair of EEP’s philanjust easier in Oklathropic division as well homa. It’s easier to as with the Annie Oakley go to the grocery Society at the National store, where there’s Cowboy and Western not as long a line. Heritage Museum. The sensibility is “The Annie Oakley easier, the city is Society recognizes signifimore affordable, cant leadership roles womthe traffic is beten have played in settling ter. In Washington, the West and our country,” I have to plan an she says. “It’s important hour in advance to that those women are recmeet Frank downognized.” town for dinner! Drawing upon his past We finally get to go experience in housing and – Cathy Keating urban development, Gov. to Oklahoma City Thunder games and Keating recently accepted other sports events. a position on the executive And OKC and Tulsa have become big hubs for committee of the Terwilliger Foundation, which entertainment – some of the most famous enis working to develop new federal housing politertainment is coming there. That will be fun. cies. In addition, he will serve as a senior partner It’s coming home to life as it always has been, at Holland and Knight, an international law firm with a modern twist. with offices across the United States, Mexico and “We always missed our families,” she conColombia. tinues. “Most of our family members live in “It’s going to be fun,” he says. “I’ll be flying Oklahoma. Secondly, we missed our friends. around, but I’ll have my days in Oklahoma City. Third – it’s just the air we breathe. You know, Most important of all, I’ll get to spend time with there’s just something special about Oklahoma. our kids and grandkids.” You wake up and it’s friendly, warm and He recognizes that, having been away for welcoming. It’s easy to live in a big city. It’s more than a decade, some things will be differaffordable. You walk down the street and actuent. ally meet people you know.” “I’m coming home with less hair, and more of “I look forward to being able to ride in car it’s gray,” he jokes. pools,” Gov. Keating laughs. “To a life that’s But some things never change, according to endearing and fun. Watching my grandkids’ Mrs. Keating. sports, plays and dance competitions. Cathy “Since we were both 16 years old, both of is the best grandma! I have written four chilour driver’s licenses have said ‘Oklahoma,’” she dren’s books and am working on a fifth. It’s says. TARA MALONE fun to come home, and there’s no better fami-

“The Annie Oakley Society recognizes significant leadership roles women have played in settling the West and our country. It’s important that those women are recognized.”

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

THE ANNIE OAKLEY SOCIETY Cathy Keating serves as the national chair of the Annie Oakley Society at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City. This group of female leaders and philanthropists recognizes female leadership and the pioneering spirit while providing much-needed support for the museum. Objectives of the organization include: • Raising funds to build and sustain state-of-theart educational exhibits, facilities, programs and outreach services to teach children, teachers and families from around the world about the rich history of the American West. •

Honoring a contemporary woman each year with The Annie Oakley Award in recognition of distinguished success, passion for excellence and leadership.

Celebrating the accomplishments of individuals who “aim high” as trailblazers in their communities, by demonstrating leadership and the entrepreneurial spirit of the West. For more information on the Annie Oakley Society and how to become a member, visit www. nationalcowboymuseum.org.


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The State

HAPPENINGS

OKLAHOMANS GET A LITTLE IRISH

Gear up in your favorite shade of green and get ready to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day around the state. Oklahoma City hosts their annual downtown St. Patrick’s Day Parade on March 12. Settle in with family and friends to watch Irish step dancers and listen to traditional Irish music. Complete your St. Patrick’s day in downtown Oklahoma City with the Bricktown St. Patrick’s Day Block Party at the corner of Sheridan and Oklahoma Avenue. If you plan to spend your time celebrating St. Patrick’s Day in Tulsa, check out the 34th Annual St. Patrick’s Day 5K Run through Brookside on March 12. On the big day itself, be sure to pencil in a visit downtown for McNellies’s St. Patrick’s Day Celebration, Arnie’s Bar’s 60th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Celebration and Woody’s St. Patrick’s Day Celebration with a few thousand of your closest friends. If a quieter celebration is more up your alley, pack up the car and make a trip to Shamrock, located in Creek County. Although there are no official holiday celebrations, visit the small town to get a glimpse of this former oil boomtown.

THE “LOVE” OF THE IRISH

While Ireland may seem a strange place to see a statue thanking a Native American tribe, the creation of the art is the result of an act of kindness more than 150 years ago. The statue, which is on display in Bailic Park in the town of Middleton located in Ireland’s County Cork, depicts nine 20-foot, stainless-steel eagle feathers. The statue thanks the Choctaw tribe for making a donation to help the country during the Great Irish Potato Famine of the 1840s. Despite the oppression faced by the Choctaws in the recent years before the famine, they raised $170 to send to the starving Irish people – equivalent to close to $5,000 based on today’s currency. The Choctaws were one of the Five Civilized Tribes removed from their land and forced to complete a 500-mile trek to Oklahoma in the 1830s – the Trail of Tears. The Choctaws felt a connection with the Irish people because of this hardship. The $111,000 compassionate work of art, titled “Kindred Spirits,” was completed by Cork sculptor Alex Pentek last year. The color “Neon Slime Lime” has been deemed the 2016 “color to avoid” according to a global panel of designers. This obnoxious shade of fluorescent green was the landslide winner per Spoonflower.com – a custom fabric and wallpaper site. A panel of 270 fabric designers located in over 15 countries has named “Neon Slime” this year’s color to shun for décor, design, fashion and anything else. Appropriately enough for this time of year, “Screaming Leprechaun Green” was one of the suggested names for the winning color. Unfortunately, it didn’t make the cut – but it still remains a catchy title.

SCREAMING LEPRECHAUN GREEN

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

GREEN FLASH

GREEN ECHO PEACH FLASH

GREEN ICED COFFEE FLASH

NEW COLORS FOR SPRING

In honor of spring, give your wardrobe a color refresh. The experts at Pantone have announced the newest colors for spring, including Green Flash – perfect for your St. Patrick’s Day outfit. Other colors sure to make a hit range from Peach Echo and Buttercup to Iced Coffee.

LIMIT YOUR PATTY’S DAY CHEER

According to recently released recommendations, Britain’s Chief Medical Officer has advised both men and women to limit their alcohol intake to 14 units per week – about six pints of beer or four large glasses of wine. It was noted that even this amount of consumption still carries a low risk of liver disease or cancer. While some studies have noted that drinking red wine is good for the heart, British officials are saying that this only applies to women over age 55 – the greatest benefit coming from drinking no more than about two glasses a week. For more information, visit huffingtonpost.com.

SUN, SAND & SPRING BREAK

Tired of only dreaming of sun and sand? U.S. News and World Report has shared their ideas for the best spring break destinations to help make those dreams a reality. Miami Beach took the number one slot, followed by South Padre Island, Cancun, Puerto Vallarta and the Bahamas. Rounding out the top 10 also include Jamaica, Puerto Rico, San Diego, Cabo San Lucas and Daytona Beach, Florida.


The State

N

Light and Love

Night Light Tulsa builds relationships through aid and understanding.

ight Light Tulsa meets under the bridge at Maybelle Avenue and Brady Street every Thursday night to serve the homeless and low-income communities. It was inspired by a similar event in Portland, Oregon called Night Strike. Sarah Grounds and her husband Jason saw a documentary about the 12-yearold program around the same time their friend and co-founder Ansia Jackson served there during a mission trip. “We felt pulled to do something like that here in Tulsa,” Grounds says. “We had a desire to step outside of our comfort zone and be impactful in our community.” It remained a desire for a year more until a request from their son revived their plan. He asked to spend his eighth birthday helping the homeless instead of having a party. “He wanted to invite friends and go downtown, hand out lunches and spend time visiting with people,” Grounds says. “It ended up being a great birthday and further ignited our passion to build relationships and serve others.” The next week they invited people from their church to help give out meals, and many expressed an interest to serve more often. The

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

founding group sat down to work out what it would take to hold the event on a regular basis. Two months later, they hosted their first official Night Light Tulsa event on September 19, 2013. The group offers far more than a warm meal. In addition to food, they provide clothing, hygiene products, foot washing, haircuts, manicures and books. They also have a prayer station for those who want to take part and a kid zone where the younger visitors can play, read and color. They also have volunteers serve as hosts and hostesses who spend time with guests and get to know them. “While we do many things to bring relief, our main goal is to build relationships,” Grounds explains. “We desire to encourage others by providing them with dignity, by seeing them when others look away, by providing relief to those that are struggling, by being a friend to the lonely, by raising awareness about the poverty and mental illness and by mobilizing kindness. We value all people because they matter.” The location the group selected plays a vital role in the success of the event. “We knew we wanted an outdoor location. There are many that are not allowed in shelters for one reason or another,” Grounds

says. “There are also those with mental illness that feel very uncomfortable in an enclosed space. The bridge allows us to serve in an open-air environment that is not restricting or imposing. It provides a block party atmosphere that people can enjoy being a part of. We also chose this specific bridge because it was located between the city shelters and a low-income neighborhood. It allows us to work with more than one population.” The organization operates completely through donations of both goods and time. They have about 60 to 100 volunteers each week, although that number tends to drop with the temperature. Grounds says anyone is welcome to volunteer, adding that they try to accommodate many comfort levels. All one has to do is show up at 6:30 p.m. under the bridge. “We are thankful for the volunteers that have stepped up over the past 2 1/2 years,” she says. “They have made the bridge what it is. It makes you proud to know there are so many around you that will step out and give dignity and hope to others. We are excited to see what is ahead of us knowing there are so many great people looking for ways to serve others.” BETH WEESE

PHOTO BY DAN MORGAN.

CULTURE


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The State

SP ORT

OK Croquet

OKWU students discover croquet is more than a backyard pastime.

F

or many, the mention of croquet is more likely to conjure thoughts of a farcical game played in Alice in Wonderland with flamingos and hedgehogs than the traditional sport played with mallets and polymer balls. In his 34 years as library director at Oklahoma Wesleyan University, Wendell Thompson was more likely to encounter the Lewis Carroll representation of croquet than a collegiate competition. In his free time, however, he became very familiar with the sport. “I received a brochure in the mail at the library saying that if you want to learn how to play croquet, come to LaFortune Park in Tulsa on Tuesday evenings, and we’ll teach you how to play croquet,” he says. “So I went. I went every Tuesday for a whole summer that first year, and I’ve been going every Tuesday all summer ever since then for 22 years.” That dedication served him well. Thompson has won three national croquet championships and, eight years ago, he introduced croquet to the students at OKWU. Those years of experience did not only make Thompson a great player, it made him a great coach. Each April, he takes eight students to the Merion Cricket Club in Haverford, Pennsylvania to compete in the collegiate national championship. In the months leading up to the competition, the students practice hard to master a sport many have likely never played before they met Thompson. “We went every Saturday in the spring semester – every Saturday morning – to LaFortune Park, which is 100 miles round trip, to practice for about four hours,” he says. “Even when weather was really cold we went anyway because we wanted to be totally ready. And we were.” They were indeed. In seven years of competing, they have already taken home three championship trophies. “We compete at the NCAA level against the U.S. Naval Academy, St. John’s University, Princeton University, William & Mary, State University of New York and Case Western Reserve,” he says. “They thought, ‘Well, you’re a small school. You don’t have a chance against us.’ So, we go up there, and the first year we go up there we win the championship. They were totally shocked.” The OKWU croquet team works so hard to be the best that sometimes their toughest competition is each other. “The one thing that happened in the 2013 and 2015 is all four of my teams made the final sixteen,” Thompson explains. “And then three of my teams made the final eight. And then two of my teams made the final four. And then two of my teams were 20

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

in the final two. So we actually ended up playing each other for the championship.” Thompson says the students always want to come back and compete year after year. It is college, though, and eventually the players graduate from Wesleyan. No matter how many new faces there are, the team always finds a way to persevere. “I had seven freshmen and one sophomore in 2015,” he says. “I was doubtful as to how competitive we would be, but we get up there and we won the whole thing. We won the national championship with freshmen.” Perhaps more impressive than that is how Thompson manages to get freshmen to keep signing up for a sport that has been waning in popularity. A recent study from the Croquet Association in England suggests that by 2037 croquet may no longer be played at all if young people do not develop an interest in it. Here in Oklahoma, Thompson is doing his part to ensure this does not become a reality. “I talked to our academic vice president and set up this croquet as a one hour for credit class,” he says. “A lot of them sign up because they just want something else to do. They play a little bit, and they get real interested, and then they get very, very interested in it.” The opportunity to travel is also a draw for the students. “We put the students up in a luxury hotel; we eat out at fine restaurants,” he explains. “After the competition, I take them to see the Liberty Bell and other historical sites in the Philadelphia area. I have also taken them to Times Square a couple of times. I make it a really attractive thing to do so they really want to do it.” Although the 2015 championship team was comprised of only men, Thompson believes that one of the great things about croquet is it lends itself to gender equality. “I like it because it is the only truly co-ed sport where men and women compete on an equal basis,” he says. “There is not a women’s division and a men’s division. We all compete together. I like that aspect because in a lot of sports it requires speed and strength, but in croquet, it requires accuracy and strategy.” BETH WEESE


The State

OK THEN

The Ames Crater

W

A very small town is home to the most prolific oil wells in the state, all thanks to a very big meteor.

ith a population of only 200 people, Ames, Oklahoma may have more oil per capita than any other place on Earth. The city sits on the edge of the Ames crater, an unusual formation that is home to the most prolific oil wells in Oklahoma. A single well, one of many in the crater, was producing 200 barrels of oil each hour when first struck. It was a gusher ten times over. The entire story is memorialized at the Ames Astrobleme Museum, a small cinder-block structure with panels and a video that tell the story of what the locals call “Ames Hole.” It’s open and accessible 24/7. The richness of the crater was discovered by Continental Resources and its CEO, Harold Hamm, the museum’s primary benefactor. “I’m from the Ames area,” says Bert Mackie, museum volunteer and amateur geologist. “People started asking me about this amazing well being right there. People started asking about the meteor. So I got with Mr. Hamm and asked if he could lend me some of his geologists to come up with a billboard on each side of Ames to explain what happened. And Mr. Hamm, always thinking bigger than I, said, ‘Build a museum.’” Nobody officially tracks the museum’s attendance, but school buses can be seen rolling up to it every weekday, and there always

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

seems to be a small crowd there. This is, after all, at eight miles wide and two miles deep, one of the largest astroblemes in the world. It’s also the only museum in the world devoted to an oil crater. Continental Resources drilled the first well in the crater in 1991. The results were amazing and merited further investigation. The company started with some seismic work and followed up by tunneling down through the soil. It discovered the meteor that started it all, roughly 1,000 feet in diameter. “Some people thought it was an extinct volcano, but they pretty soon realized that material from outer space was there and that it had to be a meteor crash,” says Mackie. When it hit 450 million years ago at roughly 75,000 miles per hour, the meteor turned over the soil (and the sea, as the area was still underwater), somehow creating a more oil-rich region. The museum, Mackie says, is worth seeing. “The original oil well they drilled in that crater was one of the most prolific oil and gas wells ever formed in Oklahoma,” he says. “It produced about 200 barrels an hour. I don’t know what it’s producing today, but it’s still going strong. All around that crater there are many good wells. They’ve found some major strikes in that area. They’re projecting that they’ll bring about 25 million barrels of oil out of that crater and about 100 billion cubic feet of natural gas.”gas.” PAUL FAIRCHILD


I

Billy Parker Legendary broadcaster may have retired but is far from being forgotten.

’ve known Billy Parker for maybe 30 years now. I’ve been around him in all sorts of situations, and I’ve watched what he usually does when someone starts telling him what a big deal he is. “When I was a kid,” he’ll say, “my dad told me to stick my hand in a bucket of water. Then he told me to take it out. “‘See that?’ he said. ‘You didn’t leave no impression at all.’” I suspect that piece of folk wisdom had a profound effect on young Billy. It may go a long way toward explaining his humility, which is so sincere that those who only

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

know him from his public persona figure it has to be an act. Many years ago, I was one of those people. My new wife and I had just left the Oklahoma City area, where I’d been teaching English and American Literature at what is now Rose State College. We’d moved to Rogers County, where I grew up, with a plan for me to live in the country and write for a living. It ‘soon became evident, however, that I was going to have to do something to supplement my writing income – which, as the great novelist Raymond Chandler put it in one of his Philip Marlowe detective novels, was busy trying to crawl under a duck.

PHOTO COURTESY SHAWN WILSON.

The State INSIDER

So, I became a disc jockey on KWPR, a 1,000-watt station out of Claremore that had recently been taken over by a family from New Mexico named Warren. Their assumption of ownership coincided with the rise of the rock ‘n’ roll- and pop-influenced dancehall country made popular by the 1980 film Urban Cowboy, a circumstance reflected in our playlists. The records we spun were country, country-pop, and country-rock. And, as “The Voice of the Will Rogers Metroplex” (our tagline), we were carving out a pretty nice little niche for ourselves. We were not, however, the 50,000-watt country-music flamethrower KVOO, which lay about 30 miles down the highway from us and less than a tweak down the AM dial – from KVOO’s 1170 to KWPR’s 1270. KVOO was exactly what its call letters stood for: the Voice of Oklahoma. Because of the way radio patterns worked in those days, it was actually the voice of much of the country beyond Oklahoma as well, covering a big swath of America with its powerful signal. Legendary for being the station that popularized a new and vibrant musical amalgam known as western swing back in the 1930s, thanks to the daily broadcasts of Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys, KVOO had also been home, early in their careers, to the likes of western-movie superstar Gene Autry and radio icon Paul Harvey. While I was at KWPR, KVOO had several terrific deejays on its payroll. But the undisputed star was Billy Parker. A former front man for Ernest Tubb’s Texas Troubadours, Billy continued to play and record successfully even as he held down a top-rated overnight show that would bring him multiple Disc Jockey of the Year awards from both the Academy of Country Music and the Country Music Association. If you lived around Tulsa in the 1980s, you at the least knew who Billy Parker was and what he stood for, not the least of which were the endearing country-star qualities of public humility and gratitude. One day, KWPR’s station manager, Mike Warren, came back from some sort of a radio meeting in Tulsa singing Billy’s praises. “What a great guy,” he told me. “We had a really good visit. And you know, John, he treated me like an equal.” Since Billy’s latest single, a spot-on evocation of honky-tonk ambience called “(Who’s Gonna Sing) The Last Country Song,” was then rising on the national charts (his 13th song to do so), and his station had


50 times the power of ours, I figured Billy was just being nice. Later, I found out I was mistaken. After having moved to the country to write, I instead found fulltime employment as a writer 50 miles away in downtown Tulsa. For the next 23 years, I’d make the 100-mile drive daily and sometimes on weekends, doing entertainment-related stories and interviews for the Tulsa World. Of course, that gig brought me in touch with Billy Parker, and we got to know one another. It didn’t take me long to realize that Billy was one of the most sincere and self-effacing guys I’d ever met. He was not a phony. He was not too good to be true. He was a good man, and that was the truth. We shared a love for western-swing music, and one day when I was at the station interviewing him for a story, he asked me to come into the studio with him and spin some swing records. After about the third song, and without consulting me, Billy said, “Well, folks, if you’d like to hear John and me do some of this western-swing music once a week, why don’t you give us a call and let us know?” As I remember it, in the next five or ten minutes we had something like 80 calls. And so the program Wooley Wednesday was born. It sure was fun while it lasted. Once, the veteran saxophonist Glenn “Blub” Rhees called in from his hospital bed to let our listeners know he’d been sick but that he planned to be on hand for the upcoming Bob Wills birthday celebration at the Cain’s Ballroom. Then he proceeded to relate a common but messy lower-intestinal problem he’d had for the past nine days. There were no tape delays, so his non-euphemistic description went out over the air. It was followed by a live spot for Roy & Candy’s Music with Roy Ferguson, himself a musician who’d worked extensively with Glenn. Billy and I were already having problems keeping our composure; we lost it completely after the first sentence that came out of Roy’s mouth: “Kinda sounds like ol’ Blub needs some cheese, don’t it?” Another time, one of our older listeners was having a big wedding anniversary and asked us to play Marty Robbins’ “My Woman, My Woman, My Wife” and dedicate it to his spouse from him. We got out a Robbins’ greatest-hits LP and cued up the disc – unfortunately, one cut away from where it should’ve been – and over the airwaves rang another Robbins hit, “Devil Woman.” Billy and I complemented one another. He was the guy who’d actually done it, touring and sharing stages with the likes of Bob and Johnnie Lee Wills and many, many others. I was the four-eyed writer with the grad-student perspective. The show worked because of our love for the music and, by that time, our love for one another. We managed to keep Wooley Wednesday going through a couple of ownership changes, but finally, like all things, our on-air partnership had to end. I’m happy to say that we have remained great pals to this day. Once again, I’ve buried the lead in this column; in fact, I’ve saved it until the end. I probably should’ve started by telling you that Billy Parker retired from broadcasting in December, a fact that was the original catalyst for this piece. On the other hand, there will never be a time when Billy Parker won’t deserve to have something written about him, so it really doesn’t make any difference why I’m doing it now. In a time when the radio business is overrun with Lilliputians, my friend Billy will always and forever remain a gentle, genial giant. I’m proud to be able to write these few words about him. JOHN WOOLEY

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The State

STUDENTS ENJOY A POPULAR YOGA CLASS AT TULSA’S SALT YOGA STUDIOS. PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

OK BUSINESS

Strength and Serenity Yoga, Pilates and barre continue to draw fans for its mind-body benefits.

Y

oga, Pilates and barre, along with variations of the three, continue to gain popularity and have become more mainstream. Many people are making these practices their go-to workout or using them to complement their current fitness routine. For those passionate about these exercises, the increased interest is easy to understand. The benefits include building muscle strength, improving flexibility and balance, and promoting a mind-body connection to support a calm mental state. Keri Edwardes is the director of instruction for Tulsa’s Salt Yoga studios and the manager of the south location. She believes yoga makes people happier and calmer and provides tools to help manage the everyday stresses of life. “When you start practicing yoga you realize what you have been missing,” Edwardes says. “You can change the way you move and experience life in the body you’re in. So often people feel tight and trapped in their body, or they see their body as a cage and limited. It doesn’t have to be that way. You can have complete freedom in your body – freedom to move in every direction and with ease for your whole life.” She highlights how yoga can improve your body’s functionality. Bending to pick

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

something up off the floor, reaching something on a high shelf or twisting to grab something behind you can be easier with a flexible spine, hips and shoulders. At Salt Yoga, the studios feature infrared heat panels that help warm the body and enable you to stretch deeper into a pose. While focusing on the movements, Edwardes says there’s not much room for “mind chatter.” “You find yourself in a meditative state because you’re focusing on your breath, where the breath is accessing in your body, on holding the pose and on staying calm in the pose,” she says. “You’re also recognizing discomfort, agitation and impatience and sitting and breathing through it. The next thing you know, you’re drenched in sweat and getting stronger and more flexible. With all of this you enter into a state of mind that is focused on the mind, body and spirit connection. It’s amazing.” Janet Crockett, aquatics and specialty class coordinator for the Health Zone at Saint Francis, explains it as “putting the mind to the muscle.” “If you’re doing a crunch in a Pilates or yoga class, it’s more than just a crunch,” Crockett says. “It’s about keeping the body in a neutral position or trying to maintain a natural alignment of the back while you’re doing the crunch. So it’s not just the big

muscles, the abdominals, that we’re working. We’re also taking all the little muscles that we use while we’re doing that particular exercise and reteaching how to use them. And that’s going to help us in our daily activities, as well as improve performance elsewhere – whether it’s walking, playing tennis or doing CrossFit.” Crockett believes education is essential in understanding the multitude of benefits from these exercises. For instance, while many people may be hesitant to try a Pilates reformer, a machine with springs and pulleys that create resistance, it’s an option that can help almost anyone. “The reformer can either challenge you or assist you in the movement,” she says. “The reformer’s springs have different tensions, so for someone who is deconditioned, the springs can assist their movement, or if someone is an athlete and wants more of a challenge, we can add more resistance.” The Health Zone offers beginner classes for yoga, Pilates and barre, and Crockett encourages everyone to give them a try. “I always tell people to try it one time, and if it doesn’t work for you, then at least you tried,” she says. “But nine times out of 10 they will find some benefit to doing it.” REBECCA FAST


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Life & Style

A M A P TO L I V I N G W E L L

OKLAHOMA CITY’S MYRIAD GARDEN CENTER IS A GARDENER’S PARADISE. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

Gardening Gurus Tell All

T

Tips, tools and trends to create gorgeous gardens.

here’s very little that is pretty about a winter garden unless it snows. Occasionally, a brilliant red cardinal will fly in, giving the dreary scene a fleeting dash

of color. Yet winter’s waning days are perfect for planning the spring/summer garden you hope to create. You’ve probably already perused new seed catalogs, sparking ideas about flowers or veggies to plant. What can you do now to yield the best results in your spring and summer garden? We’ve asked some of Oklahoma’s garden gurus to offer advice to help you create a garden worthy of envy from friends and neighbors. Steve Smith, garden guru for Tulsa’s Southwood Landscaping and Garden Center for 20 years, says soil preparation is the first step toward a successful show. That involves using natural ingredients and organic fertilizers. You may even need to shake up the ground by rototilling. If you’re eager to start planting, Smith says,

“Now is the time to plant bigger trees and shade trees. March is perfect for planting pansies. Mid to late April is prime time to plant all other flowers.” Planning a vegetable garden? Smith says it’s crucial to have your soil tested. Oklahoma State University’s Cooperative Extension Service has county office staffers who can help with this chore. “Vegetable gardens thrive when the soil is mixed with mulch or mushroom compost,” Smith notes. “Map out your garden on graph paper before you plant and allow space for growth,” Smith says. “The Tulsa Extension office has space charts available. Keep your garden simple. Start small to avoid gardening frustration.”

Tips From A Veteran Gardener

Barry Fugatt, director of Tulsa’s Linnaeus Teaching Garden in Woodward Park, echoes Smith’s tip about garden size and spacing. “Carefully consider the size of garden ap-

propriate for you,” Fugatt suggests. “Gardens require maintenance. Often, we plant more garden than we can reasonably care for. One of the biggest mistakes I see in garden planting is overcrowding – not spacing plants properly. Eventually this leads to excessive pruning and poor plant performance.” Plan for four seasons. “Many gardens are interesting during spring, but fail to impress during fall and winter months,” Fugatt says. “Summer color is enhanced by adding summer blooming perennials. Shrubs with gold, silver or red foliages add summer interest. Fall and winter gardens are more interesting with fall berry-producing plants like deciduous hollies and serviceberry.”

Public Gardens Yield New Ideas

Oklahomans are fortunate to have numerous public gardens providing a wealth of ideas for creating a beautiful residential garden. Tulsa’s Linnaeus Teaching Garden celebrates its 10th anniversary June 1 and is a perfect setting for gleaning ideas. Run entirely

MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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M.J. VAN DEVENTER

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

OKLAHOMA CITY’S MYRIAD GARDEN CENTER. PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

TIPS FOR YOUR GARDEN

Barry Fugatt, who launched Oklahoma’s Master Gardener program 30 years ago, has several tips for people looking to improve their garden: • Consider using lots of native trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants. “Often native plants are better equipped to thrive in our hot climate,” Fugatt says. •

Pay attention to traffic patterns during garden planning. Walks and paths define and organize garden space and move visitors through a garden in logical, creative ways.

Great gardens have design features that have eye-capturing appeal. Focal points may include plants with great architectural features or hardscaping, including fountains, garden art, decorative pots and urns.

The most interesting gardens appeal to all of our senses, including taste and smell. Look for opportunities to include colorful, tasty plants like Rainbow Swiss Chard and highly scented old world roses.

Plan for wildlife. Gardens are more enjoyable when birds, butterflies and other wildlife are present. Lots of annuals and perennials attract butterflies. Some trees and shrubs, like hawthorns, provide birds with food and shelter.

Ideally, great gardens include spaces for outdoor living and entertainment. “Gardens are meant to be used – lived in – and not simply looked at,” Fugatt says.

PHOTO BY NATALIE GREEN.

Life & Style

by volunteers under Fugatt’s direction, this garden is open in Woodward Park from March to early December. The three-acre setting includes a picturesque, koi-filled meandering pond, herb, vegetable and orchid gardens and an architecturally inviting tree-lined walkway leading to a sheltered oasis. Fugatt says the garden “is at its peak in mid-May, when there’s the most color in the garden.” The Linnaeus garden is adjacent to the Tulsa Garden Center and the Rose Garden, which is getting a spring facelift. It also has been chosen as an All American Rose Selection display garden, one of only two in Oklahoma. The other is on the branch campus of Oklahoma State University in Oklahoma City. “The selection process for creating such a trial garden is stringent,” Fugatt says. He will be watching the performance of each rose species to see how they perform in Oklahoma’s mercurial climate. “There’s a lot of trial and error in a garden,” Fugatt says. “At Linnaeus, if a plant doesn’t perform, it gets jerked.” Also worth visiting for ideas is Tulsa’s Botanical Garden, the lush gardens at Philbrook Museum of Art and Gilcrease Museum, which offers a breathtaking view of the Osage Hills. Tulsans are eagerly awaiting the completion of A Gathering Place along Riverside Drive, designed to rival New York City’s Central Park. Oklahoma City’s Myriad Garden Center is a gardener’s paradise. The center also offers a garden school. Also worth seeing is the Will Rogers Garden Center and the sprawling grounds at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. Muskogee is well known for Honor Heights Park, especially during its April Azalea Festival. The Papilion, a butterfly house and a raised bed garden, each featuring a different theme, are also HH Park features. The grounds at OSU’s Stillwater campus are beautifully manicured. OSU’s Botanic Garden and the Bustami Plant Farm, reflecting the owners’ exotic plant travels, are also worth seeing. Don’t forget to rely on the staff at your favorite nursery for garden tips, trends and advice. Retail nurseries are eager to help you plan and nurture your home garden. OSU’s Extension Service offers a wealth of information for garden gurus. Particularly helpful is the pamphlet touting Oklahoma Proven annuals, shrubs, trees and perennials. These are all plants that have been tested to survive Oklahoma’s varied soil conditions and its ever-changing weather.


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Life & Style

Inspired By Heritage

M

Artist J. Nicole Hatfield uses her art to tell stories.

y culture fires me up when I’m painting,” Norman painter J. Nicole Hatfield says. “In our native culture, a lot of times, we did storytelling. We did it verbally and with art. We’ve been doing it for thousands of years. Just being able to tell a story about our ancestors really inspires me. Our people inspire me. Our ceremonies inspire me. Our language inspires me.” A native Oklahoman, Hatfield often turns to her Comanche and Kiowa heritage for subject matter. Growing up Apache exposed her to plenty of material. The Kauffman and Associates Native Art 4 Health Campaign 2015 featured her piece Cheyenne Girl. The projection exhibit has put Hatfield on the walls of buildings across the country from Seattle to Tampa, Florida. Hatfield prefers acrylics on canvas, but she doesn’t shy away from other media. She’s currently working on a mural on the Lacey Pioneer building in Anadarko. It was inspired by a Cheyenne proverb: “A nation is not conquered until its women’s hearts are on the ground.” “We’re probably halfway finished with it,” Hatfield says. “That’s been a really big project. The people in the mural are real

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

people. These are our ancestors. A lot of my work is based off of old photos of Native people. I paint them to show them honor and to give them a voice.” Her loose usage of color combined with a liberal application of white gives her artwork a ghostly feel. It leaves viewers with no doubt that they’re seeing figures from the past, while the color gives them substance, makes them real and lifts them out of their graves. She artfully adds a spirit of newness to the past while retaining the integrity of her subjects. She frequently incorporates tribal language into her paintings to keep American Indian languages alive. Hatfield’s work is frequently on display at the University of Oklahoma’s Oscar B. Jacobson House Native Art Center and the Comanche National Museum and Cultural Center. She’s also a favorite of collectors at the Indigenous Fine Art Market. She enjoys live painting at Oklahoma City’s Paseo Art Gallery. She recently placed second in the 2D painting division at the Artesian Arts Festival and the 2015 Comanche Nation Fair. The 32-year-old artist attended one semester at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe but is largely self-taught.

She began painting at 15 years old, when an art class released a world of creativity. “If anybody knows me, they know that when I was younger I never expressed myself verbally,” she says. “I just kept everything in. I would be sitting somewhere drawing. That’s just how I expressed myself. I think I was probably about 15 when I had my first art class in high school and I was introduced to paint. Our art teacher gave us the freedom to do whatever we wanted. I just went off from there. I put everything into my canvas or whatever it is I’m working on.” Hatfield has no exhibits planned for the immediate future. The mural in Anadarko and traveling to follow the Kauffman project are keeping her plenty busy. “I really enjoy what I do. Art is my passion. It’s what I love. It keeps me alive. I do art for my people, and I feel like art has helped me throughout my whole life,” she says. “I’ve struggled with things, but the art is healing. It’s medicine to me. I’m always painting, all the time. I also feel that it’s important for the Native youth to carry that art tradition on. That type of storytelling is as important as the verbal stuff. We need to carry our traditions on.” PAUL FAIRCHILD

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

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Life & Style L I V I N G S PA C E S

Out With The Old In with a soft, new palette. Photos by Nathan Harmon.

A

fter Monica Coombs’ husband passed away, she began thinking about giving her two-story, Tulsaarea home a much-needed facelift and interior makeover. Running her husband’s business was quite consuming, yet it gave her time to consider a new look for her home. “I knew I wanted to lighten up the home and give it some custom touches I had wanted since it was originally built,” Coombs recalls. “I like to entertain. Now I feel like the house is open and airy, more inviting.” Lori Sparkman, owner of Fifteenth and Home, remembers that first meeting with Coombs. “A design client of mine referred Monica to me. She came by Fifteenth and Home just to meet and chat. I could tell she was really ready to make a big change. I also sensed some anxiety about how to go about it. “Fortunately, she had great ideas, photographs and a clear vision of what she wanted the end result to look like. I knew my job was to guide her through it, and make sure the choices met the criteria for her vision.”

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LEFT: A DEMILUNE-SHAPED CHEST ANCHORS THE ENTRY AND THE CURVING STAIRCASE LEADING UPSTAIRS. ABOVE: THE SHOJI WHITE WALLS ARE A PERFECT LIVING ROOM BACKDROP FOR CLASSIC FURNISHINGS.

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Life & Style

Coombs’ home was traditional in design but begged to be updated with a lighter color palette and opened up for a fresher look and easier entertaining. The interior now looks contemporary and upscale. “Contemporary design can get such a bad rap,” Sparkman says. “It’s often thought of as shiny lacquer, chrome, leather and very cold. I knew that was not Monica’s vision. We incorporated a variety of materials.” Sparkman also juxtaposed design periods. A soft color palette contributed immensely to the fresh look. “The toughest part was choosing paint colors. I really wanted to nail the look she was after, which was a very light, peaceful, cool palette,” she notes. “I also wanted to have a nice balance of layers, textures, coolness and warmth.” The chosen colors included Sherwin Williams Shoji White for all walls and trim, Aloof Gray for the master bedroom and bath, and Gray Matters for kitchen cabinets. “The cabinets turned out so amazingly beautiful that the Jay Rambo Co. added the color to their standard selections,” Sparkman says. To achieve that textural mix, Sparkman used varied fabrics: wool, leather, velvet and Belgian linen. Lucite, tile, antique brass and textured woods also star in this remodel. There is a birch wood, carved deer head over a custom chest, a lighthearted nod to the men in Coombs’ family who hunt. Sparkman says the greatest change was “tearing out walls, ripping up floors and replacing all lighting. We took the kitchen and master bath back to the studs. Dave Trebilcock, our contractor, reconfigured these spaces to open them up. “The master bath was completely changed to include a large all-glass shower and a freestanding tub. Everything felt very dark and heavy the first time we saw the home. Dave, Monica and I collaborated closely every step of the way. “The major challenge in any renovation project is rarely the physical aspects like moving walls or raising ceilings,” Sparkman adds. “For me, it’s having the end result exceed the client’s expectations. My most important design challenge is to edit, place and mix the new with the existing. The final product is not an expression of my taste, but an interpretation of my client’s.” Sparkman savors the memory of showing Coombs the new look in her old home. “She walked in the front door, I handed her a welcome cocktail and gave her the grand tour of her new, completely different home,” she says. “That’s the favorite part of what I do. And working with Monica was so much fun.” M. J. VAN DEVENTER

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Life & Style

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

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Life & Style

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Life & Style D E S T I N AT I O N S

International Glamping More companies are offering trips that blend remote locales with first-class service.

W

hat is “glamping”? Glamping is glamorous camping; a travel trend that allows the adventurer to experience remote areas without the rustic accommodations. Imagine hiking through the Alps, dove hunting in Argentina or exploring a remote jungle but with an occasional glass of wine or private dinner served to you. Hike up the mountain while

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

a sherpa carries your baggage. Float on the Amazon River, but in a luxury riverboat in staterooms with huge window views, tour guides and gourmet chefs. Go on an African safari and cover rough and natural terrain, interact with a tribe but return to your luxury tent. There are numerous programs that offer glamping. National Geographic, Backwoods Adventures and Trek International Safaris are just some recommendations. Depending

on your interests, you can find customized programs perfect for your needs. One particular destination offered through Backwoods Adventures is a hike through three countries that cover the Alps: Italy, France and Switzerland (Mont Blanc). A step above camping, you sleep in a lodge rather than a tent, and you receive three meals a day. A sherpa carries your bags, and cars are also available to help transport hikers if needed. One must still prepare rigorously with workouts


in order to experience thrilling, challenging physical tasks on the hike, but comfortable lodging and tasty food await you along the way. Hunters can enjoy a luxury dove-hunting trip in Argentina and other locations through Trek International Safaris. La Portenita Lodge employees pick up their guests and transport them to the lodge where gourmet meals, classic Argentine barbecues, legal Cuban cigars and Scotch whiskey await. Picnics with hammocks are the setting for bonding while the staff washes your boots and clothes and drives you to and from the daily hunts. Aqua Expeditions hosts a riverboat trip excursion with tour guides and luxury accommodations. The Amazon River and the Mekong River are two options. Imagine an itinerary of sailing on the Amazon River, getting to see wildlife up close, interacting with a tribe and returning to a gourmet dinner or relaxing spa and private screening room on the riverboat. Other examples of glamping to consider: dogsledding in Alaska, heli-hiking in Canada or Alaska, caving in Puerto Rico, mountain-biking through European countries, sea kayaking off Baja Mexico and hiking/ cycling/kayaking on the Trans-Canada trail are options to satisfy various interests. “Mushing” is a term for traveling on a dog sled. The program provides full exterior clothing and boots. You will experience incredible mountain vistas while enjoying delicious cuisine at the Tokosha Mountain Lodge. Canadian Mountain Holidays provides the heli-hiking adventures. Aventuraspa.com shows an excellent video for caving in Puerto Rico. Backwoods Adventures covers a range of glamping with a particular multi-adventure trip in Costa Rica. The self discovery that travelers experience on glamping trips is inspirational. The physical and mental rewards from these trips are truly enriching. Bonding with fellow travelers has taught many “glampers” that they prefer experiences over acquisitions in their lives. If you are interested in a day excursion and not an extended adventure, consider zip-lining or whale-watching. Both can be found either domestically or internationally. Whether mountain hiking, hunting in the countryside or sailing on the Amazon River – your head in the clouds or your feet in the water – you can touch the earth’s miraculous physical features in luxury and style. GINA MICHALOPULOS KINGSLEY

MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Life & Style

YO U R H E A L T H

Probiotics

Introducing good bacteria to the body may have health benefits.

T

he word “bacteria” usually brings to mind a harmful organism that can damage the body and cause sickness, but this idea is not entirely based in science. The truth is the body is both full of and covered by an array of different types of bacteria and other microorganisms that are considered good bacteria and assist the body in certain types of functions. When the populations of these helpful microorganisms decrease, it can be helpful to replace them through the use of probiotics. Probiotics is a term used in relation to a wide range of products from yogurt to lotions to supplements in pill form. But the World Health Organization simply defines a probiotic as a live microorganism that is intended to have a health benefit. “Our bodies are full of bacteria, both good and bad bacteria,” says Dr. Aneri Gupta, a physician with OU Physicians Family Medicine. “Probiotics are believed to be good bacteria that can help keep our lower gastrointestinal tract – our gut – healthy,” she says. These good bacteria already exist in the body. Using probiotics can potentially increase these helpful organisms and regain balance in the body. Probiotics can include a wide variety of different types of bacteria and yeasts. According to the National Institutes of Health, the most common types are from the groups Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. These broad groups include many specific types of bacteria. Dr. Aaron Fieker, a gastroenterologist at St. John Medical Center, explains that when taken for the correct reasons, probiotics can help reduce intestinal inflammation, promote the balance of the microorganisms living in the gastrointestinal tract and block the effects of harmful or pathogenic bacteria. “They also help with nutrition in breaking down certain food products and help reduce intestinal sensitivity,” he says. Because of these properties, some evidence has shown probiotics to be useful in

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

preventing or treating conditions such as diarrhea caused by infection and the use of antibiotics, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease, allergic disorders such as eczema and hay fever, certain oral health problems, colic in infants, liver disease, the common cold and other conditions. However, it is important to note that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved any of the health claims of probiotics. More research is still needed, with the main challenge being the sheer number of different kinds of microorganisms and understanding what role each plays in the human body. “Our gut microbiome is made up of over 500 different species of bacteria and treating with one or two different species in probiotic formulations may or may not be effective,” Dr. Fieker said. “Different strains of bacteria have unique effects on gut physiology, and one probiotic will not treat all gastrointestinal illnesses.” Though probiotics have been shown to be very safe, causing few, if any, side effects, patients should always discuss a new supplement with their doctor before taking it. This is especially true for anyone with underlying health issues. Though the effectiveness of probiotics is not entirely proven at this time, there are many studies being conducted to learn more about how they work in the human body and how they can be used most effectively in the future. “Probiotics are under considerable research,” Dr. Gupta said. “Although the body’s complex microbial ecosystem is not entirely understood at the present, there is strong scientific consensus on the benefits of using probiotics in addressing certain medical states or conditions.” She suggests trying a probiotic out for a month or two after discussing it with your doctor to see if it helps in your overall health. BONNIE RUCKER


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Life & Style

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

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Three

Garden/ Pool Areas

3S e t t i n g s e u q Uni By M. J. Van Deventer Photos by David Cobb.

There is no single correct design for a garden or pool area. As areas meant for relaxation, each one can be as unique as their owners, suited for different purposes and personalities. We look at three different areas: a tropical garden oasis, a prairie paradise and a pool house built to create a vacation home in a couple’s backyard, each completely different and uniquely beautiful. MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Three Gardens, Three Lifestyles

William Hawk creates a tropical showplace in a rural setting. Can a sprawling five acres in rural Oklahoma City become a secluded tropical oasis? William Hawk’s garden is proof such a garden can be created. Hawk has been interested in gardens and horticulture since childhood. His greatgrandfather was a land run homesteader. Hawk worked in his parents’ vegetable garden and his mother loved flowers. “I’m just carrying on a family interest,” Hawk says. “On my first visit to this property, I was inspired by the abundant trees, the elevations and raised beds providing panoramic views.” What he created during the past three decades is a tropical paradise. Lush gardens surround his country home and vast, sprawling lawn. Prolific perennials add brilliant color and texture. Hawk, an anesthesiologist, says, “My profession requires attention to precise detail, timing and sequential planning. Likewise, a garden demands the birth of an idea, enhanced by creative planning and strategic implementation. I plan and nurture my garden, then watch as nature brings the idea of my garden to reality.” His magnificent water garden draws the greatest attention from Hawk’s visitors. It brims with numerous exotic plants, koi fish and tropical guppies, and Amazon and Victoria lily pads hosting turtles and frogs. “The lily pad is an oasis,” Hawk says. “I enjoy all my property but my favorite view is from the upper level of the yard, looking down on the lily pond. When I stand there I feel like I’m in the tropics.” A striking variety of contemporary sculptures add personality to the gardens, some reflecting Hawk’s travels to exotic locales. In spite of the secluded location, the garden is easy to find. Who could miss the large green metal sculpture of a hand concealing Hawk’s mailbox at the entrance to his private haven? Hawk tells garden enthusiasts: “Follow your passion for plants. Experiment. Find what works for you and your yard. Plant what you think is beautiful, then build on plants that do well for you.”

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Tulsa Firm Creates A Country Oasis

The challenge to create an open prairie vista from a once wooded landscape destroyed by fire. When professional landscape architect Derek McCall first saw the 26-acre property near Mannford, it still bore traces of a devastating fire that swept through this area in August 2012, taking out homes and destroying natural vegetation. What McCall encountered on that initial visit was heavily charred Post Oak and Blackjack Oak trees. Arborists decided to remove many of those damaged trees, changing the once wooded landscape to an open prairie vista. Fortunately, the fire hopscotched over the owners’ two-story home. McCall’s first visit confirmed the design challenge facing him. The homeowners hired McCall’s firm, DRM Design Group, to create an extensive master plan. That included adding a pool with an infinity edge, spa, multilevel deck overhanging the pond, a covered outdoor patio, outdoor kitchen, bars, pavilion, rustic fire pit and entry gate. “A spring-fed stream passes through the property on its way to Keystone Lake,” McCall explains. “A section of the stream was dammed to create a large pond as a natural firebreak and provide family recreational opportunities.” A bridge over the stream was a major requirement of the homeowners. With a large family, they wanted the bridge for photo-ops and access to future walking trails through the prairie. “The infinity edge pool created the illusion of the pool disappearing into the pond,” McCall says. Large sandstone boulders, once circling the pond, are now accents near the pool and spa. Since family events include more than 30 guests, multiple gathering areas were created around the property. The family dines on the upper deck overlooking the pond or relaxes on the lower level by the pool with a waterfall to their backs. “The deck cantilevers over the pond, brimming with perch, bass and catfish,” McCall says. “The lower deck also was designed for fishing and boarding paddleboats, which their grandchildren love.” This project gave McCall an opportunity to use his multiple design talents. “Creating a new environment that fits into the surrounding site and designing spaces for family entertaining needs was a satisfying challenge for me and our staff,” he says. MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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OKC Pool House

Designers create a pool house as a vacation getaway. A Nichols Hills couple steps into their pool house and are instantly on vacation. That was the idea they presented to interior designers Corbin and Ross See. As the brothers began planning the project, they considered the home’s original design. It was built in the 1970s by the late Raymond Carter, whose California contemporary homes still grace Nichols Hills. In keeping with Carter’s style, the pool house reflects a sleek vacation home, with a neutral palette and unusual textures. The pool house is a haven for relaxing and poolside entertaining. “There’s a refreshing feeling in the pool house,” Corbin notes. “It has a hint of a Los Angeles vibe,” which is exactly what the clients wanted. The pool has a white brick privacy wall, accented with cedars. The patio floor of Pennsylvania bluestone resembles flagstone and continues through the living/kitchen area. The upscale design inspires awe, while suggesting casual comfort. Floor-to-ceiling windows, covered with sheers, overlook the pool. Twelve-foot high ceilings of aged, stained teakwood feature cedar beams with a whitewash glaze. A skylight enhances recessed lighting in the beams. The fireplace wall invites conversation. The owners found a photo in Veranda magazine and asked Corbin and Ross to mimic it. Two walls of the living area/kitchen are fashioned of this stacked rock. While the main room is only 450 square feet, it has a cozy sitting area with chairs upholstered in the Sees’ 1818 furniture line. A reproduction of an antique Moroccan rug anchors the seating area. Minimal accessories mark the conversation areas. The rectangular dining bar and kitchen area is adjacent to this entertaining area and reflects minimalist design. Bar stools are of bamboo and woven rawhide. The kitchen cabinets with a waterfall edge are white oak stained to resemble statuary marble. Black marble graces the kitchen island countertop. The bedroom/bath guest area is near the kitchen. The bathroom continues the textural surprises. The pool house was completed in 2013, and Corbin and Ross treasure the free rein they had to create a pool house that allows this couple to go on vacation with a quick journey from their back door to the poolside.

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MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Creating a Sustainable Lifestyle A collection of tips for the environmentally conscious. By Megan Morgan

TRANSITIONING TO TOMORROW’S FUELS

Renewable energy sources seem to be the way of the future, but how can we begin to use them now?

I

t is a fact that fossil fuels are finite. “Our supply may last 50, 100 or 500 years, but at some point in the future, they will be exhausted,” says Oklahoma Renewable Energy Council (OREC) President Greg Adams. “At that point, Mother Nature will have imposed a 100 percent renewable energy standard. The sooner we start making that transition, the longer our fossil fuels will last and the easier that transition will be. OREC tries to assist, accelerate and encourage that transition.” Renewable energy sounds like the way of the future, but it does require some upfront investment. So why should everyday Oklahomans consider alternative, renewable energy sources for their own homes? “Long-term cost savings, an independent source of power and a reduced environmental footprint,” Adams answers. The OREC conducts monthly meetings that address current events, developments and legislation that affects the renewable en

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ergy industry in the state. The group also provides a resource guide for homeowners and landowners, and supports statewide energy conferences. The mission of the Oklahoma chapter is both local and large-scale. “We believe that Oklahoma needs to aggressively develop its renewable resources to spur economic development (particularly in rural areas), improve the environment and preserve our state’s position as a net electricity exporter,” Adams says. “Oklahoma is blessed with abundant natural gas and renewable energy, and we believe these complementary energy resources represent the future of clean domestic energy supply.” Currently, there are several different sources for Oklahomans. One source is geothermal heat pumps, which Adams says pay off the quickest out of all the other alternative energy sources. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, these heat pumps have been in use since the 1940s. These pumps “use the constant temperature of the earth as the exchange medium instead of the outside air temperature,” making them more efficient.


In addition, the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (headquartered at Oklahoma State University) states that while a ground-source heat pump costs more than a conventional system, “energy savings quickly offset the initial difference in purchase price” due to this system’s low operating costs. Solar energy is another alternative source. There are two different types of solar energy available to homeowners: PV and thermal transfer. PV is short for “photovoltaic” and is defined as devices that “generate electricity directly from sunlight via an electronic process that occurs naturally in certain types of material, called semiconductors” by the Solar Energy Industries Association. According to Renewable Energy World, advantages of PV systems include little maintenance and almost no chance of freezing or overheating. Thermal transfer systems, on the other hand, use the sun’s light to create heat instead of converting the sun’s light into electricity. Adams says that while both PV and thermal transfer systems require low maintenance, there is a long payback for the initial investment. But Oklahoma is also famously known for its “wind sweeping down the plains,” right? So why not capture this energy and put it to use?

“Small wind [as an alternative renewable energy source] is dependent on the wind resource of the local area,” Adams says. Oklahoma’s State Impact, a reporting project of National Public Radio member stations, found that wind energy is especially expanding in western parts of the state, and

“The transition to renewable sources of energy will be much easier if we accomplish it over a longer period of time.” Oklahoma Renewable Energy Council President Greg Adams that Oklahoma is ranked in the top ten for wind “availability” and generation. Oklahoma is a very energy-aware state, Adams says, which makes the job of the Oklahoma Renewable Energy Council easier

and more difficult at the same time. “Landowners generally understand contracts, royalties and production percentages, so we’re not starting at square one with them. And legislation has been relatively friendly until recently,” Adams says. “On the flip side, there has been some unwarranted ‘you’re-stealing-my-slice-of-the-pie’ mentality that has been challenging.” But while there are some challenges, including public perception and cost efficiency, Adams says that investing in renewable energy sources is always worth the effort. “The transition to renewable sources of energy will be much easier if we accomplish it over a longer period of time. That means starting now,” Adams says. Overall, it takes some patience in order for the initial investment in renewable energy to pay off. “In general, renewables are in the five-to 15-year payback range, but there are so many factors effecting individual installations,” Adams says. But, if a homeowner is not ready to make the switch, there are still easy ways to conserve energy around the house. A “negawatt” is a negative megawatt, or a megawatt of saved energy, and Adams says average homeowners have several options to increase “negawatts,” including investing in improved insulation, caulking and window coverings.

MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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10 SMALL WAYS TO GO GREEN When it comes to the environment, little steps can still make a big difference.

It isn’t necessary to overhaul your lifestyle in order to live in an environmentally conscious way. Here are 10 small steps towards living a “greener” life.

Shut it down.

One very small way to save energy is turning off your computer at night. The U.S. Department of Energy reports that even though there is a small energy surge when a computer starts up, “this small amount of energy is still less than the energy used when a computer is running for long periods of time.” If you hate waiting for your computer to boot up the next day, set a timer for it to turn on automatically a few minutes before you use it.

Have a bright idea.

Go fluorescent and save on your energy bill. Energy Star reports that compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) use 75 percent less energy than traditional light bulbs, and that “if every home in America replaced just once incandescent light bulb with an Energy Star qualified CFL, we should save enough energy every year to light 3 million homes and prevent greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those from about 800,000 cars.”

Less is more.

Purge and organize your home (and office) to save on future expenses. When you know where your things are, you’re less likely to purchase things you already have. Owner of Organized Living Anne Spero adds that when you are organized, you’ll feel “as if burdens have been lifted” and “a renewed sense of peace and motivation.” (See “Minimize Your Things, Maximize Your Life” for more.)

Get smart.

Board Chair for U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) Oklahoma Craig Immel says one way to live smarter and greener is to invest about $250 in a Wi-Fi-enabled smart thermostat. “New thermostats allow you to easily manage your heating and cooling system to make sure your home is comfortable when you are there, and that you are not wasting money when no one is home,” Immel says. “Heating and cooling costs are usually about

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50 to 70 percent of the average home’s utility bill, so these thermostats pay for themselves pretty quickly.”

Ditch your wheels.

Instead of using your own personal vehicle, try public transportation once a week, or hit the streets on your bike. You’ll save money on gas and get some exercise.

Chill out.

Wash your clothes in cold, or even warm, water. The Alliance to Save Energy states that almost 90 percent of the energy consumed by a washing machine goes to heating water, and that “each household that makes the switch to cold-water washing eliminates about 1,600 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions a year.”

Keep those clippings.

Executive Director of Keep Oklahoma Beautiful Jeanette Nance says homeowners should think twice before bagging their grass clippings. “Let the grass clippings decompose in your yard rather than bagging them and sending them off to the landfill,” Nance says.

Lighten your load.

Reducing your junk mail and unnecessary mailings cuts down on wasted paper. Homeowners can pay nearly every utility bill online now, and often by simply changing your bank account settings, you can also replace paper account statements with the online version. (Just don’t forget about tip #1 when using your computer!)

Spread farmer love. When you buy local produce, your food doesn’t have to travel so far. The website eatwild.com lists over 25 farms that meet their criteria for producing grassfed meat, eggs and dairy products in Oklahoma.

Fill ‘er up.

Run the dishwasher only when it’s full to conserve water. Or better yet, commit to handwashing your dishes once a week.


MINIMIZE YOUR THINGS, MAXIMIZE YOUR LIFE

M

ost houses have a junk drawer or a similar dumping ground for items that seem to have no place. But what do you do when that designated space grows and becomes overwhelming? Time to simplify and get organized. Minimizing your belongings and putting everything in its place can also create a happier, healthier lifestyle. Certified professional organizer and founder of Organized Living in Tulsa Anne Spero says it is a known fact that clutter causes stress. “I see firsthand over and over how stressful being disorganized is for my clients’ lives and relationships,” Spero says. If disorganization increases stress, does simplification create happiness? Spero says yes. “Paring down your belongings of unneeded, unused and unloved items does relieve depression symptoms, which increases productivity and gives you the time to do things you enjoy,” Spero says. “Letting go of ‘stuff’ gives you more control and it provides more space. You will spend less time looking for things, and family members know where things are located, so the whole family benefits.” In addition to creating a more peaceful and controlled environment, organization can make you healthier. “Since stress affects people physically, decluttering will also improve their health,” she says. Integrative medical practitioners suggest that purifying your environment gives you more energy and improves the digestive system in addition to clarifying the mind. But before you can experience the physical and mental benefits of organization, you must commit to a decision. To get organized, first you must minimize your possessions. The Becoming Minimalist blog lists benefits of owning fewer possessions such as spending less, making your home easier to clean and giving you more freedom. Spero says that deciding to purge is a huge first step. But don’t buy more things right away to help you simplify! “One of the things I encourage is not to run out and buy a bunch of cool containers – yet. Containerizing comes after the sort-and-purge phase and, if done too soon and without knowing what to get, the containers often become part of the clutter,” Spero says. Deciding what exactly is clutter can be tricky though. Spero suggests asking yourself these questions about unnecessary items: Does this bring value and joy to my life? Do I love it? Do I use it? “Most of my clients begin in an extremely overwhelmed state, so these questions are a good start to narrow their thinking,” Spero says. Once you’ve minimized your belongings, then the true organization can begin. It should be easy to access commonly used items, and they should be kept near where they are used. Every thing should have a place, but not necessarily have its own container. The minimizing and organizing process is not easy, but, in the end, the tough decisions are still worth it for almost everyone who decides to purge and simplify, Spero says. “Clients feel so good about themselves after a successful organizing session,” Spero says. “The joy they experience is unmatched, and I often see tears and hugs.” Minimizing your belongings can also add to a sustainable lifestyle. When purging, unneeded but functioning items can be donated. Or host a yard sale and sell items online. You also won’t be as likely to make the mistake of purchasing something you already own if you know what you have and where everything is in your home. If a lack of motivation is holding you back, Spero recommends thinking about the process in terms of what you want to surround yourself with. “The only things you want around are what you use and what you love,” Spero says. “The rest is clutter.”

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Art Show and Sale

50 Nationally Renowned Artists March 5th and 6th 2016 Saturday 10am-5pm • Sunday 11am-4pm

Renaissance Tulsa Hotel www.natureworks.org


DAWN OF A NEW LAWN

W

Is the grass greener on the side of sustainable landscaping?

hen considering ways to be environmentally conscious, what could be “greener” than utilizing your own front and back yards? Whether you are considering largescale or simple changes, there are many ways to incorporate sustainable landscaping methods into your own lawn maintenance. If you dread mowing your lawn, Jeanette Nance, executive director of the nonprofit Keep Oklahoma Beautiful, has good news. For sustainability reasons, Nance says homeowners might want to think twice about the typical green expanse. “Traditional lawn care practices that use lots of additional water, fertilizer and herbicides are not sustainable choices – not to mention that, per hour of use, a gas-powered mower puts out several times more pollution than a car,” Nance says. “There are great advantages to designing a landscape that reduces the amount of lawn that needs mowing.” So how can you reduce the size of your grassy lawn? Adding a home vegetable

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garden is one idea. “Your food can’t get any more local than your backyard, and that garden bounty is nutritious, fresh and delicious,” Nance says. “And many vegetable plants are also very ornamental. Okra blossoms, in particular, are stunning – and okra loves our hot Oklahoma summers.” Another way to reduce lawn maintenance, as well as create a more sustainable and environmentally conscious space, is to think local. Landscape architect Connie Scothorn is the owner of the landscape architecture firm CLS & Associates, LLC in Oklahoma City. Within the past decade, Scothorn says her firm has used native and drought-tolerant plant materials on most projects. For the average homeowner, Scothorn recommends starting small by planting a native tree. Native trees include oaks, elms, maples, southern pine and juniper. Oaks and junipers specifically


THE LOVE

AFFAIR

WITH THE

AMERICAN YARD

Even in the age of the smartphone and television show binge watching, nine out of ten Americans think it is important to have a home surrounded by a yard that is well-maintained and nicely landscaped, according to a 2015 report by the National Association of Landscape Professionals. An online study that took into account the opinions of over 2,000 U.S. adults age 18 years and older determined:

75%

feel that it is important to spend time outside in their yards.

83%

think having a yard is important.

90%

of those with a yard think it is important that it is also wellmaintained.

91%

also want to live in an area where they can see or walk to nice landscaping.

71%

think it is important that their neighbors have well-maintained yards.

84%

agree that the quality of a home’s landscaping would affect their decision about whether or not to buy a home. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CLS & ASSOCIATES, LLC , OKLAHOMA CITY.

are also beneficial for the environment. “Our native oak trees support the life of more bugs, caterpillars, birds and butterflies than any other tree,” Scothorn says. “Junipers also support many different types of wildlife and there are so many different types, from groundcovers to large trees.” Native plants generally require less maintenance on the part of the gardener. In addition to trees, Scothorn recommends certain local perennials for Oklahoma soil: coreopsis, sages, coneflower, goldenrod, spiderwort and gaillardia. “They are frequently thought of as wildflowers, but they can be planted as individual plants also,” Scothorn says. Yuccas, with flower stalks that can reach over five feet tall, require no irrigation at all. The butterfly weed has also received attention lately in sustainability conversations, Scothorn says. “The butterfly weed is the host plant for monarch butterflies and very attractive to bees and beneficial insects. These native plants are diminishing because of farming and development, and there has been a recent decline in the monarchs,” she says. In addition, the ability to purchase local trees and plants is now much easier than it once was. “Only a few years ago, there weren’t a lot of native plants available in the market, making them difficult to find and use in the landscape,” Scothorn says. “That is not true anymore; many native plants are commercially available at local garden centers. They provide beauty, color, seasonal interest, shade and nourishment to our wildlife.” But landscaping doesn’t have to be all about trees and flowering plants; Oklahoma is, after all, a part of the grasslands. “I personally think the native grasses are Oklahoma’s best plants,” Scothorn says. “They are very deep rooted, giving them the ability to survive our temperature and moisture extremes. Plus, they are just beautiful when they blow in the wind.” Other ways to make small, sustainable changes to your yard include using compost to improve soil, paying attention to the weather and using water only when needed, and replacing plants that don’t survive with only occasional watering, Scothorn says. Pesticides should also be set aside. “People should learn to love insects and caterpillars and put away the pesticides. These ‘pests’ almost never hurt us and they are an important source of food for the birds,” Scothorn says. For those interested in redesigning much of their lawn, xeriscaping might be the answer. The Botanic Garden at Oklahoma State University describes xeriscaping as a design practices that “minimizes water use in a garden through careful plant selection, grouping plants with similar water needs and reducing water loss through use of mulches.” Many people mistake xeriscaping as rocky or barren, but Nance of Keep Oklahoma Beautiful says this is a misconception. “Xeriscaping is a great option for homeowners because it’s low maintenance and sustainable,” she says. “Too many people think that xeriscaping has to be sparse, but there are so many options and people can create lush and vibrant landscapes that are also drought-tolerant and don’t require extra fertilizers or pesticides.” To learn more about sustainable landscaping options and get state-specific advice, visit Keep Oklahoma Beautiful’s website and reach out to county extension offices and local gardening clubs. MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Art of Style

The

The spring 2016 canvas of style includes bold hues, classic presentations and tailored fits. Photography by Nathan Harmon.

RIGHT: AKRIS PUNTO MESH MOTO JACKET, $1,190, AKRIS PUNTO SLEEVELESS KEYHOLE TANK, $395, AKRIS PUNTO MIMI PLEATED PANTS, $495, ALEXIS BITTAR ENCRUSTING ORBITING HOOP EARRINGS, $175, MIU MIU MINI MATELASSE LEATHER TOTE, $1,590, JIMMY CHOO MESH STRAPPED SANDALS, $925, BALLIETS. LEFT: SAKS FIFTH AVENUE COLLECTION MULTI PLAID SPORT SHIRT, $188, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE 5 POCKET COTTON PANTS, $138, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE COLLECTION CREWNECK SWEATER, $178, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE COLLECTION NUBUCK PENNY LOAFERS, $248, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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PHOTOGRAPHED ON LOCATION AT ROYCE MYERS ART LTD. HAIR STYLED BY SHAWNA BURROUGHS, JARA HERRON SALON. MAKEUP BY RACHEL SCHWARTZKOPF. MODELS PROVIDED BY LINDA LAYMAN AGENCY.


LEFT: SAMUELSOHN SHARKSKIN SUIT, $1,350, CARROT AND GIBBS POCKET SQUARE, $50, JZ RICHARDS TIE, $125, PANTHERELLA SOCKS, $35 ALAN PAYNE DEERSKIN CAP-TOE SHOES, $300, DAVID DONAHUE DRESS SHIRT, $135, TRAVERS MAHAN. RIGHT: LA PETITE ROBE DI CHIARA BONI ONESHOULDER RUFFLE-DETAIL GOWN, $950, JIMMY CHOO REBEL SOFT MINI CLUTCH, $1,075, ALEXIS BITTAR ELEMENTS DELPHIAN BLACK-MOTHER OF PEARL EARRINGS, $295, ALEXIS BITTAR METAL EDGE CUFF, $185, ALEXIS BITTAR TRIPLE BAND RING, $125, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. NOT PHOTOGRAPHED: JIMMY CHOO CLAUDET 100 LAMÉ SANDALS, $850, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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RIGHT: BRUNELLO CUCINELLI GREY BLAZER, $3,245, IRIS VAN ARNIM WHITE SILK TANK, $280, PIAZZA SEMPIONE WHITE PANT, $470, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI BAG, $2,345, DANA KELLIN MOSS AQUA EARRINGS, $1,250, NARCISO RODRIGUEZ BLACK FLATS, $595, ABERSONS. MASUNAGA GMS SUNGLASSES, $500, HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR. LEFT: RAG & BONE BLUE SHIRT, $225, J.BRAND KHAKI JEANS, $250, COMMON PROJECTS SLIP-ON, $442, ABERSONS. LEISURE SOCIETY 24K GOLD SUNGLASSES, $910, HICKS BRUNSON EYEWEAR.

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LEFT: MAIYET CREAM SILK BLOUSE, $595, MAIYET SKIRT, $750, LANVIN PEARL-STUDDED LEATHER PUMPS, $845, RENE ESCOBAR SILVER CHAIN NECKLACE, $3,500, THE ROW CLASSIC 5 BAG, $2,850, ABERSONS. RIGHT: ARMANI BLUE BLAZER, $1,295, ARMANI WHITE DRESS SHIRT, $245, PT01 GREY SLACKS, $425, COMMON PROJECTS CHUKKA SUEDE SHOES, $425, ABERSONS. MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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LEFT: LES COPAINS STRIPE JACKET, $1,265, LES COPAINS STRIPE PANT, $790, LES COPAINS BLACK BLOUSE, $745, MANOLO BLAHNIK PATENT LEATHER T-STRAP SANDAL, $795, ALEXIS BITTAR CRYSTAL ENCRUSTED NECKLACE, $235, LES COPAINS BLOUSE, $745, ALEXIS BITTAR GOLD DANGLING EARRINGS, $325, JIMMY CHOO RILEY LEATHER & SUEDE SATCHEL, $1,375, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. RIGHT: JACK VICTOR NAVY CAMO BLAZER, $798, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE COLLECTION PINK SHIRT, $175, ADRIANO GOLDSCHMIED SLIM STRAIGHT PANT, $178, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE BY MAGNANNI LEATHER PENNY LOAFERS, $478, SAKS FIFTH AVENUE.

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Capturing 20 years of history is a daunting task. Over that time, Oklahoma Magazine has published 240 issues, each filled with stories that define Oklahoma. We’ve collected some of the biggest events from the past 20 years, ranging from news that impacts a year to the events that changed our lives forever. MMMBop

Oklahoma Magazine first hits the stands.

1997 POP CULTURE

Netflix is founded and offers customers an online movie rental platform.

Proud Okie

Oklahoman Garth Brooks, one of the world’s best-selling artists of all time, graced the cover in July, the same month he was getting ready to perform in Tulsa at the old Drillers Stadium before an August 7 concert in New York City’s Central Park. He told us then, “It would break my heart to hear someone say they weren’t proud that I’m an Okie.” In January 2015, Brooks and wife Trisha Yearwood returned to perform seven sold-out shows at the BOK Center. Brooks had helped cut the ribbon when the BOK Center opened, and fans had eagerly awaited his return to the stage in Tulsa.

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Tulsa’s Hanson brothers are interviewed after their world-wide success with the hit song “MMMBop.” Today the brothers have various ventures (musical and non-musical) in the Tulsa area. They host their annual Hop Jam festival in downtown Tulsa and have entered the beer market with their Mmmhops brew.

1998


“I love Oklahoma because of the people. They are the most friendly, down-toearth people I’ve ever met. They are always ready to lend a helping hand and give an encouraging word.” -Reba McEntire

Oklahoma Magazine debuts our annual Best of the Best competition in June. Readers cast their vote to tell us about their favorites in various categories, ranging from restaurants to dry cleaners to pediatricians.

Take The Train Country-music legend Reba McEntire invited readers into her home as we profiled the Oklahoma-born superstar. McEntire continues to be one of the biggest names in country music and has sold over 56 millions albums worldwide.

1999

The Heartland Flyer train service began connecting Oklahoma and Texas through a venture between Amtrak and the Oklahoma Department of Transportation. Hop on, sit back and enjoy the journey from Oklahoma City to Ft. Worth.

2000 Oklahoma Magazine first profiled a young Kristin Chenoweth after she won her first Tony Award. The Broken Arrow native has gone on to star in Wicked, The West Wing and Glee. In 2012, the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center honored the star by naming a theatre after her.

The Outdoor Symbolic Memorial of the Oklahoma City National Memorial is dedicated on April 19, the fifth anniversary of the bombing. The OU Sooners capture the College Football National Championship with a victory over Florida State at the Orange Bowl.

MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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ANNIVERSARY

YEARS

“I love Oklahoma for its people and our Western and Native American heritage. After two terms as mayor of Tulsa, I continue to see compassion, leadership and integrity throughout our state. Oklahoma is a cultural and geographical gateway to so many great things about America, and I’m proud to call Oklahoma home.”

The Oklahoma Capitol dome is completed and dedicated. The structure of the building was designed to support a dome as early as the initial completion date in 1917, but various factors prevented it. A 17-foot tall, 6,000-pound sculpture named “The Guardian,” by Enoch Kelly Haney, sits atop the dome.

-Dewey Bartlett, Jr., Mayor of Tulsa

POP CULTURE

In pop culture, Chandler Bing falls asleep in a work meeting, only to find out he has been transferred to Tulsa. The episode aired October 3 and scenes of Tulsa made appearances throughout the rest of the Friends season.

2001

2002 In November, we spoke with Tulsan Tim Blake Nelson actor and star of O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Southern Hills Country Club hosts the 101st U.S. Open. Retief Goosen won the tournament, putting an end to the reign of Tiger Woods, who had previously captured four consecutive major tournaments.

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Oklahoma Magazine honored the lives lost and the public servants that worked to make communities safe in the aftermath of 9/11.

In November, we examined the endeavors to bring both the Skirvin Hotel in Oklahoma City and Mayo Hotel in Tulsa back to life. Today they are both thriving centerpieces of their respective downtowns.


Million Dollar Elm

“I love Oklahoma because the people have always been so kind and welcoming. The metropolitan areas offer big city amenities without being too big. And last, I love Oklahoma because nature and wide-open spaces are so plentiful and easy to access.”

The Osage Nation opened its 25,000-square-foot Million Dollar Elm Casino just west of Tulsa in Sand Springs. The casino’s name refers to an important chapter in the tribe’s history. During the early 1900s oil boom, oil lease auctions were conducted under a prominent elm tree near the Osage tribal building in Pawhuska. On Nov. 11, 1912, 18 oil leases were sold in the neighborhood of $1 million, forever giving the tree its Million Dollar Elm name. The casino provided more than 160 jobs, and the facility was designed for future expansion.

Gary Shaffer, CEO, Tulsa City-County Library

The Oklahoma Aquarium opened its doors to the public on May 28, 2003. Today, check out creatures that call Oklahoma waters home in the Aquatic Oklahoma feature or learn more about the world’s waters in the Aquarium’s various exhibits.

2003

:-)

2004

POP CULTURE

The latest cell phone craze was text messaging. Popularized by teens and busy professionals, texting represented a whole new way of communicating via cell phone using a sort of shorthand. While grammarians were thinking text messaging would become the downfall of the English language, according to Cricket more than1.2 billion messages were sent by June 2003.

VISION 2025 UPDATE

The Vision 2025 Arena and Convention Center Oversight Committee named the team of local and national architectural and engineering firms to design a new 18,000-seat downtown arena and renovate the existing Maxwell Convention Center. Revenues from the Vision 2025 tax package funded the $183 million project.

Cain’s Ballroom was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The venue has continually been a contender in world rankings and in 2015, Pollstar ranked Cain’s 17th in the world among club venues. MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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ANNIVERSARY

YEARS

“Oklahoma is the only place that could ever be home for me. It has a unique history. It was settled by people who came here with very little but their hopes and aspirations. In a single lifespan, those who came before us created something special. No state has a stronger community ethic where we care about each other and help each other. We are always among the top states in the nation in terms of what we give to charitable and philanthropic causes. Our care for each other is symbolized by the way in which we take care of each other in times of natural disaster. This special spirit makes me optimistic about the future of Oklahoma. Our destiny is in our own hands. I think most of us know that the wisest thing we can do to assure our future is to build great families and to provide the best education and training for the next generation.”

David Boren, President, University of Oklahoma

POP CULTURE

Tulsa’s New Mayor

More and more Oklahomans were showing up and doing well on national reality television shows. John Paul Merritt, Oklahoma City, The Bachelorette; Dr. Scout Cloud Lee, Stillwater, Survivor: Vanuatu; Michael “Cowboy” Ellis, Durant, Big Brother 5; Carrie Underwood, Checotah, American Idol; Kahlen, Broken Arrow, America’s Next Top Model; and Jason Meadows, Calera, Nashville Star.

DECEMBER 2006

December 2006

2005

Kathy Taylor was elected as the 38th mayor for the City of Tulsa on April 4. Prior to taking over as mayor, she had served as Oklahoma’s Secretary of Commerce and Tourism. Taylor boasted an extensive business background, having spent more than a decade in the transportation industry. Her goals were to make the city safer, reach economic potential and improve the quality of life for all citizens.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE

’Tis the Season

2006

36 pages to ring in the holidays Holiday Shopping • People • Art Gifts • Home • Fashion

Year-End Finances

Get your dough in check with financial advice from the pros and lessons in banking and taxes

A GUIDE TO THE BEST RESTAURANTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Thousands of Oklahomans are hot on the trail of our state’s antique treasures

Tulsa’s smArt Deco

How Green Are We?

RED CROSS TURNS 100

Women of the Cloth

The Face of Autism

Cover Dec.indd 1

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE

Workforce Woes Caught in the Crosswalk Why Do Kids Join Gangs? Recollections of an NFL Star The Great Declawing Debate Backstage at the Opera These Seniors Aren’t Retiring

www.oklahomamagazine.com

www.okmag.com

September 2005

September 2005

Vintage Oklahoma

Oklahoma Music From salsa to swing, we’ve rounded up 25 of your favorite Oklahoma musicians

Physician Directory

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11/13/06 11:59:52 AM

The Tulsa Chamber began looking for ways to attract and retain young talent to the metro area and to develop next-generation leadership. Focus groups, research and looking at similar organizations from different cities all helped to establish Tulsa Young Professionals.

The Tulsa chapter of the American Red Cross celebrated a century of saving lives, humanitarian programs and disaster relief. Oklahomans have benefited from the state’s Red Cross chapters in the aftermath of tornadoes, floods, fires and the Murrah Federal Building bombing in Oklahoma City.


OU - Oklahoma’s Leader in Excellence

• In 2015 OU became the first public university in U.S. history to be ranked No. 1 in freshman National Merit Scholars enrolled.

• OU is the only Big 12 university to be named in the top 10 of the most impressive historic college campuses in the nation.

• OU was awarded the prestigious Davis Cup for the third consecutive year in recognition of its record-setting enrollment of United World College international freshmen. OU is the only public university to ever be awarded the Davis Cup.

• The OU Honors College is one of the top 25 programs at a public university in the nation based on A Review of Fifty Public University Honors Programs. Also on the list are the Echols Scholars Program at the University of Virginia; the College of Literature, Science and the Arts Honors Program at the University of Michigan; and Honors Carolina at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

• OU is the only university in the nation, public or private, whose students have won Goldwater, Mitchell, Truman, Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright and National Security Education Program scholarships in the same year. • This year’s freshman class is the academically highest ranked in OU history and in state history at a public university with an average 26.4 ACT for incoming freshmen. • OU is the only Big 12 university to be selected as having one of America’s 25 most beautiful campuses. • OU’s fall-to-fall retention rate this year for freshmen is at a university all-time high of 86.1 percent.

• With construction underway, OU will become one of the first public universities in the country to build residential colleges for upperclassmen and women, patterned on those at Yale, Oxford, Harvard and Cambridge in England. The living/learning communities will become the cornerstone of the undergraduate experience. • The One University Digital Initiative allows OU faculty to develop digital alternatives to high-cost textbooks, translating to an annual savings of almost $500 per student in textbook costs.

The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

- The Pride of Oklahoma


ANNIVERSARY

YEARS

100 Years of Higher Learning In Oklahoma

POP CULTURE

Tulsa’s

BOK Center Special Edition:

Education Alley Oop Turns 75

The Land of Moo’s time-traveling caveman Alley Oop, officially burst into America’s consciousness 75 years ago this month, when the first Oop comic strip was launched thanks to the strip creator, V.T. Hamlin. Alley Oop continues to attract millions of readers throughout the world under the knowing guidance of Tulsans Carole and Jack Bender, who took over the strip in the ‘90s.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE

in Great Neighborhoods A Look Inside Four Gorgeous Abodes

Oklahoma

on Film The Sooner State on the Silver Screen

Lord of the Ring A Broken Arrow Man and His Next Knockout

www.okmag.com

Spring Fashion Wardrobe Essentials for the Season

Living with ALS

What is Lou Gehrig’s disease?

Vote for The Best of the Best 2007 online at www.okmag.com Cover fMARCH.indd 3

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June 2007

MARCH 2007

March 2007

Fine Homes

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101 Culinary Delights that Cater to Your Cravings

The Fire Ant Invasion

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Alley Oop!

OK, Let’s Eat!

AUGUST 2008

Oklahoma Celebrates its Centennial Year (1907-2007)

Grand Opening:

www.okmag.com

Tulsa celebrated the opening of the BOK Center, an architectural project of historic significance to the city, with a ribbon cutting and an open house on August 30. Bank of Oklahoma paid $11 million for naming rights to the 565,000-squarefoot arena for 20 years.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE

2007

BOK Center

August 2008

Apple released the new, much anticipated iPhone in June, a wireless device with an oversized iPod screen, e-mail and a touch screen display. Phones were becoming smarter and increasingly aiding in both business and everyday life. More Americans were using wireless communication devices than ever.

6/21/07 4:47:05 PM

Travel Guide Excursions near and far Expert advice Exciting lake activities

Native Pride

Devon Energy

Oklahoma City-based Devon Energy announced plans to break ground on a new headquarters – an amazing 54-story, 9 million-square-foot, $750 million skyscraper. At 925 feet tall, the building is the tallest in Oklahoma, surpassing the BOK Tower in Tulsa.

Oklahoma Indians who changed the world

Golf Pro Tips

Lessons learned on the links

Tulsa After Dark

Riding shotgun with the police

Plus

• Wedding Trends • Senior Care Facilities • Doctors Making a Difference

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Cities Battle the Bulge

Mayors from all over the country are challenging citizens and communities to take control of their health. On New Year’s Eve 2007, OKC Mayor Mick Cornett put his city on a diet, challenging citizens to lose a million pounds in 2008. Tulsa mayor Kathy Taylor was also out to enhance Tulsa’s citywide fitness and health initiatives with the ongoing Mayors’ Fitness Challenge. Team Taylor in Training was one initiative by the Mayors’ Fitness Challenge to encourage children to live a healthy lifestyle. Students from a Tulsa high school and middle school trained with the mayor for the annual Tulsa Run.

David Cook

The King of Cuisine

OKC native and celebrity chef Rick Bayless’ passion for Mexican culture and cuisine has led him down a unique and wonderful career path, becoming America’s most respected aficionado of Mexican cooking.

Former T-Town resident David Cook was looking forward to life after winning American Idol with a debut solo album due out in November.

Ma Cong

Pictured in a Dior suit, Tulsa Ballet principal dancer and choreographer Ma Cong was honored by Oklahoma Magazine as one of its People With Style.

Michael Jackson died 6.25.09

2009

“Being an Oklahoman means that we embrace the same tirelessness and steadfastness of those who came before us. Our forefathers and mothers dreamed dreams and sought partnerships which would make our communities better places to live. They built schools, hospitals, roads, water systems and brought electricity to all corners of the state. They thought music, dance, visual arts, theaters and performing arts centers were important. Someone made it possible for us to have churches, libraries, parks, zoos and museums. Oklahomans took ownership of their communities with a sense of purpose and vision. “We ALL must learn the lessons of the past starting with: life has never been easy. History has always been made up of bullies, land grabbers, unfair labor practices, impoverished neighborhoods, sickness and uncertainty. We often find ourselves in situations beyond anyone’s control. Yet, the human condition calls us to respond with perseverance and the hope of a better day for future generations. “We have to teach our children that education, clean water, and safe neighborhoods are important. They must learn that communities are better places with a variety of arts and cultural experiences. And it is our responsibility to help them imagine what their neighborhood, their town, their state, nation and world could be when they choose to participate and work for good. “Oklahoma’s future is much like our weather. Tomorrow may bring an ice storm, tornado, or sweltering temperatures. But the next day will be filled with a clear blue sky and we can face whatever comes singing, ‘Oh, what a beautiful morning, oh, what a beautiful day…’”

Michelle Place, Executive Director, Tulsa Historical Society

Bank of Oklahoma executive vice president Jim Huntzinger believes the state’s unemployment numbers will rise, but low oil prices will help consumers save more.

NBA Thunders into OKC The league’s newest team stormed the Ford Center for its inaugural first season.

Richter Scale Day

The earth was moving under Oklahoma’s feet more than 50 times each year. Geologists from across America joined together on April 26 to celebrate the official scale used to record those seismic seizures that rock our world.

In Good Hands

Saint Francis Health System was flourishing under the guidance of CEO Jake Henry Jr. Jake Henry Jr., CEO of Saint Francis Health System.

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ANNIVERSARY

YEARS

“I love Oklahoma because of the people of Oklahoma; grounded in solid values of faith, perseverance and loyalty. They are the strength of our state and a model for our country.”

Steve Gentling, Mayor of Guthrie

The Country King

Carrie Underwood

Oklahoma’s country superstar returned to her home state, appearing to sell-out crowds at the BOK Center in Tulsa and the Ford Center in Oklahoma City.

Sky’s No Limit

FALL FASHION OKLAHOMA’S

GREENEST CITY

SPECIAL SECTION

ACTIVE YEARS

www.okmag.com www.o .o

Despite the recent woes in the automobile industry, Lexus of Tulsa opened its new 79,000-squarefoot dealership this month. The new home for Lexus is more like a resort with the comforts of home, boasting wall-to-wall wireless connectivity, a gym and personalized lounges.

Kristin Chenoweth

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In January, the Tulsa Convention Center celebrated their grand opening after an 18-month, $50.5 million renovation of this hallmark building in downtown Tulsa. Funded by Vision 2025, the expansion and overhaul of the facility greatly increased the city’s chance of attracting large conference-style events to the area, creating a greater economic impact to the city. 78

SEPTEMBER 2010

A New Home for Lexus

Batter Up!

On Nov. 2, Mary Fallin made history by becoming the first female elected governor in the state of Oklahoma. Fallin vowed to make Oklahoma’s business environment and education her top priorities.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE

2010

Madam Governor

September 2010

After 65-plus years, the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) were finally recognized for their service during WWII. Tulsans Betty Ferrol Riddle and Elizabeth “Betty” Smith were two of the female pilots awarded the Congressional Gold Medal by President Barack Obama on March 10 in Washington, D.C.

Oklahoma native and country music superstar Toby Keith talked to Oklahoma Magazine about success, politics and making a difference. With a catalog of 17 studio albums and at least one No. 1 hit every year since 1993, Keith was named Billboard’s No. 1 country artist and country songwriter of the decade.

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

The opening of ONEOK Field marked a new chapter in Tulsa’s love affair with baseball. Not only did the long-anticipated stadium give the Drillers a new home, it also brought renewed hope for revitalizing the Greenwood area and downtown Tulsa. Populous, the architecture firm that designed ONEOK Field, worked hand-inhand with Manhattan Construction to design and build the park. Sponsorship from ONEOK helped with funding.

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Managed by

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT BOKCenter.com 1-866-7-BOK-CTR Arby’s Box Office

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ANNIVERSARY

YEARS

“My love for Oklahoma is based on a magic I’ve felt in the land since the first time I stepped on the red dirt of the state all the way back in the very early 1970s. Oklahoma, and particularly Tulsa, resonates within me.”

House of Cast

Phyllis Cast, Author

Broken Arrow’s award-winning mother/daughter duo P.C. and Kristin Cast coauthored the successful House of Night teen vampire series. With more than 12 million books in print in more than 35 countries, the novels have been a steady presence on the New York Times bestseller list.

OklahOma magazine

completely different as an author when your readers believe that your characters are actually real. It’s a very strange experience – and when it involves the paranormal, things sometime kick over to the side of uber weird.” Unusual feedback or not, it’s all in good humor, and the authors believe that anything encouraging people to read is positive. They’ve even received emails from parents reporting that their books have helped to open channels of communication with their children. The Casts don’t give much attention to negative energy, despite some local and nationwide criticism of House of Night content. The series is currently the most banned book in Texas public schools, because of sexual content and nudity, but Cast doesn’t read reviews – good or bad – and stays off of chat sites and blogs that aren’t hers. “I’d say that we’re in good company with To Kill a Mockingbird in some places and with some schools,” she says. “I never intended to write something that everyone approves of. That would just be ridiculous. I agree with Ray Bradbury in Fahrenheit 451: ‘If they give you ruled paper, write the other way.’” Adhering to that mindset of thinking outside the lines and staying true to the self is, in a sense, an extension of Cast’s affection for female empowerment and encouraging women of all ages to tap into their strong inner goddesses. “Women need to listen to their instincts. We are told too often from a young age to do what society expects you should do,” she says. “I believe that you should always listen to what your instincts are telling you and find your true path in life, even if it’s not always what parents or society thinks it should be. If women listened more to themselves and less to other people, we’d have even more leaders who are women.”

The University of Tulsa’s long-anticipated Roxana Rozsa and Robert Eugene Lorton Performance Center opened this month with a grand gala event on Sept. 15. This represented the latest milestone in the colorful history of music and the performing arts at TU.

Straight Shooter

Miranda Lambert was the current reigning female country vocalist of the year, had married MIRANDA LAMBERT long-time love and fellow country star Blake Shelton, and was enjoying the biggest year of her “i don’t know how anyone can life amidst the last leg of her write young9adult literature without having been constantly around lots headlining tour, The Revolution of teenagers.” Continues.

2011

Reinventing Roy

Country superstar and Tulsan Roy Clark was still a universal artist that had never quit reinventing himself throughout his then 65-year career.

OklahOma magazine | May 2011

ICONS

OKLAHOMA’S

Oklahoma GREAT Magazine GARDENS Spring brings lush life to Oklahoma’s celebrates its countryside and also to several gardens around the state that are open to the public. 15th year. DIT YE AR ERS 15TH ANNIV

MARCH 2011 011

ION

the chance to view the natural beauty of the Osage Hills, enjoy wildlife trails and see 300 ornamental and shade trees. www.ocbg.org

T

he Myriad Botanical Gardens and Crystal Bridge Tropical Conservatory reopened in April, OKLAHOMA an opening thatMAGAZINE coincided with | the 2011 Festival of the Arts, says Allan Storjohann, Myriad Botanical Gardens

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Spring Fashion sculptural art and nature elements are located throughout the gardens. The Crystal Bridge has been restored to its MARCH 2016 namesake with all-new acrylic panels for a “clear” appearance and a spectacular new LED lighting system bringing color and March cover.indd 13

ROOM X ROOM

• Lendonwood Gardens. Lendonwood Gardens is a six-acre botanical garden near Grand Lake. Visitors can explore verdant pathways that meander through more than 1,200 different types of plants, including the largest collection of rhododendrons in the Southwest, 500 varieties of daylilies and 25 varieties of dogwoods. Six distinct gardens

2/24/11 11:51:36 AM

Local Hero

EXCLUSIVE: The Sooner State’s Kevin favorite athlete, Kevt in Durant’s actions on Duran and off the court had earned him a special LOVE THE place in the hearts of GAME OKIES THAT GO THE Oklahomans. Since DISTANCE being drafted second overall in the 2007 NBA draft, Durant had averaged more NARCOPOLIS OKLAHOMA’S DIRTY than 25 points per game and led the Oklahoma City Thunder to be a contender for the league finals for years to come.

6

www.okmag.com

• Oklahoma State University Botanical garden. The headquarters garden for A LOOK BACK AT Oklahoma Botanical 15 YEARS OF Garden & Arboretum ALL THINGS OKLAHOMA is composed of 100 acres just west of the Oklahoma State University campus in Stillwater. It includes the Oklahoma Gardening studio set, the turf and nursery research centers and Centennial Grove. The Headquarters Garden feature more than 1,000 species of herbaceous and woody plants. www.osubotanicalgarden.okstate.edu/

THE SPORTS ISSUE

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE

The Myriad Gardens in Oklahoma City celebrated their grand opening following a $42 • Tulsa Garden Center/Linnaeus Gardens. Located in Woodward Park, Tulsa Garden million renovation project that VOTE FOR THE BEST OF THE BEST 2011 ONLINE AT OKMAG.COM Center resides in an historic building housing an estimable library on grounds included athe completion of a downtown Oklahoma City landmark reopens featuring scores of plant and flower after aayear-long renovation. children’s play area, dog park species. Beautiful Linnaeus Gardens is a demonstration/teaching garden and source and a plaza that will be home of inspiration and education for the entire community. www.tulsagardencenter.com to an ice skating rink. Maureen • Oklahoma Centennial Botanical Garden. Just seven minutes northwest of downtown Heffernan was named the founTulsa, the still-developing Oklahoma dation’s first full-time director. Centennial Botanical Garden permits visitors

MAY 2012

Renaissance At Myriad Gardens

Myriad Gardens

2012 May 2012

The State

www.okmag.com

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Th

NOVEMBER 2011

november 2011

I’m sounding too old, Kristin will cross it out, “I always did the summer reading programs write, ‘Are you crazy lady?’ in the margin and at the library. When we were super broke and fix it for me.” mom was going to college, I used to win gift Now 24, Kristin has ventured out to write certificates to Mazzio’s pizza for reading so her own novels on the side after her short many books, and that’s how we went out to story for Harper Teen’s vampire anthology had eat,” Kristin says. “It was always weird for me publishers both foreign and in the U.S., asking when other kids would tell me at school that Y her to turn it into a trilogy. they didn’t read SaR had read only one book Ror iVe a nn because it15was mandatory, or even that they hated reading.” Going With Instinct An avid reader of numerous book series as Currently at work on the highly anticipated an adolescent, Kristin found herself turned off FUTURE Destined (book 9 in the House of Night series, of young adult fiction because teenagers were set for FORWARD release in November), the Casts are not portrayed accurately. WHATʼS NEXT FOR well into their groove and work together very She believes her mother’s insight and intuLIFE ON THE easily. itiveness, born of experience with teens, gives ARKANSAS RIVER? “People ask us the relationship question all Cast an advantage over many other authors the time – but it’s been just us two for so long, who are disconnected from the realities of teen so we’ve always been close. Working together life. hasn’t really affected us, except now with the “She taught for so long and heard their conbook tours we get to take really cool road trips versations and figured out what wasIMPORTʼS importantRISE TO THE OKLAHOMA STARDOM together,” Cast says. to them,” Kristin explains. “I don’t think most While doing their book tours together, the people really get teenagers unless they are surCasts have not only gotten closer, but they’ve rounded by more than one type of teenager for more than one day, and I don’t know how anyone can write JUST young adult literature without DESSERTS having been constantly around SCRUMPTIOUS lots of teenagers, all the time.” SWEET TREATS More than just a sounding board, Kristin serves as the House of Night teen voice editor – a vital role that Cast EXCLUSIVE: says began accidentally when OKLAHOMA’S her daughter was home for a SUPER LAWYERS also discovered the eccentricities and extremes semester early in her own college career. of many fantasy fiction fanatics. “I was writing, and my ‘70s teenager voice “We get a lot of fans who tell us that they started coming out. I could hear it as it was are vampires or know them and are friends happening, so I would yell at Kristin down with them, and sometimes we can’t tell if the hall and ask what was the right word to they’re being serious or not, but a lot of the use,” Cast remembers. “Then after three or time they are,” Kristin says. four times of doing that, I realized it would be “We’re big fans of a lot of authors, so easier if I just wrote the whole manuscript and we’ve been on the reader side of thinking then gave it to her later to see if I messed up that, ‘I wish this world was real, or that these one of those words. Now I don’t really worry characters were real,’” Cast adds. “But it’s at all about how old I’m sounding because if

Curtains Up

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THE

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“Oklahoma’s history of oil and gas and risk-taking made us a great state. We shared a belief in possibilities and in creating a state of which we could all be proud. One of the pivotal moments in our history and the development of our state was the connecting of Chicago to Los Angeles through Tulsa via the US 66 Highway Route 66. This iconic road, featured in songs, the 1960s television series Route 66, and the 2006 Pixar movie Cars continues to gain interest and attract visitors from across the country and around the world - and Oklahoma, with more than 400 miles, has the most miles of Route 66 of any of the eight states that it crosses. Future development of this iconic road, the first all-paved highway in the nation, and associated landmarks, will drive cultural tourism and economic development for our state for many years to come!” Ken Busby, Executive Director & CEO, Route 66 Alliance

A Master of Detail

The Plan Man

Oklahoma Magazine sat down for an exclusive interview with Thomas Boone (“T. Boone”) Pickens and discussed his plans for himself and the nation. At 84, he was still hard at work. Born a child of the depression in Holdenville, Pickens is viewed in Oklahoma as an influential factor in the ascent of Oklahoma State University, where his name graces a stadium and other campus sites. He has given more than $500 million to his alma mater, split almost evenly between athletics and academics. His passion for OSU is legendary.

2013

Internationallyrenowned Tulsa interior designer Charles Faudree created a fabled career by perfecting the style of French country and delivering it to homes all over the world. Oklahoma Magazine looked back on his illustrious life and talked to some of the people who admired him.

POP CULTURE

What Does the Fox Say?

It’s a Wrap

Celebrating Guthrie

Oklahoma folk music icon Woody Guthrie would have turned 100 years old this year. Tulsa celebrated Guthrie’s life, music and cultural impact with its Woody Guthrie Centennial Celebration, March 5-11.

August: Osage County, the film that brought stars like Julia Roberts and Meryl Streep to northeast Oklahoma opened in theaters this month. The movie was filmed at the Boulanger House, a historical landmark just north of Pawhuska during the summer and fall of 2012. Oklahoma playwright Tracy Letts garnered the 2008 Pulitzer Prize in Drama for his script and, together with director John Wells, helped bring the film version to life.

MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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ANNIVERSARY

YEARS

The Legacy of Wrath

Seventy-five years after its publication, John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath and the resulting nickname of “Okie”continued to influence Oklahoma. The publication brought to life the horrible working and living conditions of migrant farm workers and others who left the state for California in the 1930s.

Remembering May

One year later, survivors and rescuers look back at the May 20, 2013 tornado. An EF-5 tornado struck the city of Moore, annihilating everything in its path and resulted in 24 human lives lost and hundreds injured.

Dine and Dash

The popularity of food trucks in Tulsa and Oklahoma City had exploded. Lured by the easy access to great food, many diners were finding their meals just a short stroll up the sidewalk.

A Gathering Place

The George Kaiser Family Foundation and its community partners announced plans to build a 100-acre park along the Arkansas River. The foundation donated ownership of A Gathering Place to the Tulsa River Parks Authority in what is believed to be the largest gift to a public park in U.S. history.

2014 Toasting the Arts

Noted for its diverse exhibitions and permanent collection, Tulsa’s Philbrook Museum of Art celebrated 75 years of excellence, growth and philanthropy with the 2014 wine experience, the largest fundraising event in Oklahoma and among the nation’s top 10 wine events.

Advocates & Activists

Oklahoma Magazine focused on six Native Americans from across the state who had enacted dialogue and change through their work.

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

20 Objects That Shape Oklahoma

From Native American art and relics to dinosaur bones, Oklahoma museums were in abundance and teeming with fascinating artifacts, works of art and structures that have influenced the state’s short history and continued to mold its identity.


“When I first came to Tulsa 21 years ago I saw the potential of this great community. Today I am experiencing the materialization of our capabilities. It took longer than I expected, but the outcome will far exceed my imagination! First was Oklahoma City, praise its citizens and leaders for what they have done with the community. And now is Tulsa time.”

POP CULTURE

Adele’s “25” sells more than 3 million copies in a week. The title of her next album might include a few more zeros.

Marcello Angelini, Artistic Director, Tulsa

No timeline of Oklahoma would be complete without noting the contribution made by Native American tribes to the state’s culture, history and economy. In 2015, Oklahoma Magazine reported Oklahoma’s 38 federally recognized tribes bring more than $10.8 billion of revenue to the state each year. Analysis by the Steven C. Agee Economic Research and Policy Institute at Oklahoma City University reported that tribal government and business operations directly employ more than 50,000 people and support a total of 87,174 full-time jobs in the state.

OCTOBER 2015

2015

The Impact of Native American Tribes in Oklahoma

October 2015

Oklahoma announced plans to build the Route 66 Experience, a 22,00-square-foot center with hands-on, interactive displays. The $19.5 million center, funded by a capital campaign, will celebrate one of the nation’s most famous highways and is scheduled to open in 2018. The project is being spearheaded by the Route 66 Alliance.

Dr. Nazih Zuhdi A legacy of discovery and saving lives

BEST DOCTORS 309 Physicians, 59 Specialties

5 HEALTH ISSUES

To the future and beyond!

Affecting Oklahomans

RECORDING

STUDIOS RECORDING PROGRESS

MAY 2015

May 2015

FABULOUS KITCHENS AND BATHS PLUS THE YEAR’S HOTTEST TRENDS

A Marital Milestone

JUST ONE MORE SLICE Find the perfect pies in Oklahoma

RIDE

FOR THE

BRAND

Oklahoma’s cowboys have a rich heritage

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A WOMAN’S WORLD Five females changing the conversation

4/14/15 2:52 PM

POP CULTURE

“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” released. It gave hard-core fans something to do on a Friday night for the first time.

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Supreme Court justices set off a flurry when they legalized same-sex marriage in the Sooner State on October 6. Mary Bishop and Sharon Baldwin, of Tulsa County, who challenged Oklahoma’s same-sex marriage ban just after it was passed overwhelmingly by state voters a decade ago, were among the first to get a license and wed. According to the Williams Institute at the University of California School of Law, there were more than 6,100 same-sex couples living together in Oklahoma at this time.

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Brewing Success

In recent years, Oklahoma has become home to a number of successful breweries. In our July issue, we looked at five breweries that plan to be part of Oklahoma’s future for years to come.

MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Summer Camp Directory

Summer Camp Directory

J

Find the right summer camp for your child.

ust because school is out for the summer doesn’t mean that your child can’t continue to explore and learn. With spring upon us, now is the time to start checking out what some summer day camps have to offer. Be it art, stage performance, a competitive sport or simply enjoying warm weather and the great outdoors with new friends, you are sure to find the perfect fit for your child to ensure the creation of summer memories that will last a lifetime. This year consider giving your child an alternative to sitting in front of their Facebook page or a television screen. These safe and affordable camps provide options for a fun and educational summer for boys and girls of any age.

Camp Incredible

Camp Incredible consists of six one-week day camps offering exciting themed classes that combine learning and fun. Students will explore and learn while having incredible summer adventures. Camps are offered at University School at The University of Tulsa for children age 4-years-old to the 8th grade. The camps are coed and will run June 6-July 1 and July 11-22 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. For more information, contact Shelly McCollum at 918.631.5060, email campincredible@utulsa.edu or visit www.utulsa.edu/uschool.

Camp Monte

Monte Cassino School, located at 2206 S. Lewis Ave. in Tulsa, will host Camp Monte, a coed day camp for children of all ages (pre-K through 8th grade) in June and July. Campers can choose from a selection of both full and half-day adventures that include everything from performing in plays to competing in athletic events to conducting eye-opening science experiments – art, academic and athletic skill camps are available. For more information, contact Caitriona Harris at 918.746.4190, email at charris@montecassino.org or visit www.montecassinoschool.com/campmonte.

Camp Raven

Riverfield Country Day School’s Camp Raven is a coed day camp nestled on 120 wooded acres west of the Arkansas River in Tulsa. We motivate and encourage campers, preschool through 12th grade, to explore, learn and have fun. This year’s camp is scheduled for

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

May 24-August 12, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. (extended hours are available). For more information, contact Ric Breig at 918.446.3553, email rbreig@riverfield.org or visit www.riverfield.org.

Camp Shalom

Camp Shalom – a summer of fun and lifetime of memories. Camp Shalom, located at 2021 E. 71st St. in Tulsa, offers 10 weekly sessions. Campers, 3-years-old through kindergarten, have weekly themes; 1st-6th graders have over 50 specialty camps to pick from; 7th-10th graders participate in the CIT (counselor in training) program. These coed camps will be offered May 31-August 5 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Before care starts at 7:30 a.m. and after care ends at 6 p.m. For more information, contact Martha Kelley at 918.495.1111, email at mkelley@jewishtulsa.org or visit www.csjcc.org.

Gilcrease Museum & Zarrow Center’s Summer Art Camp

Mark your calendar for an exciting summer art camp adventure in Tulsa. Custom design a special art experience with eight weeks of morning and afternoon classes to choose from. Students will explore the Brady Arts District and participate in fun, extra activities such making glass art at the Tulsa Glass Studio. Daily shuttles to Gilcrease will be available for inspirational museum visits. A supervised lunch for full-day students will be included. Coed camps will run weekly, June 13-August 5, at Gilcrease Museum (children ages 5-6) and Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education (children ages 7-12). Morning classes are scheduled for 9 a.m.-noon, with afternoon classes scheduled for 1-4 p.m. Both full-day or half-day slots are available. For more information, contact Cindy Williams at 918.596.2774 or visit www.gilcrease.org.

Holland Hall Summer Programs

Holland Hall, located at 5666 E. 81st St. in Tulsa, hosts a variety of programs every summer that are open to the Tulsa community. These activities include academic, athletic, artistic and just-for-fun campus activities. Coed day camps will run June 1-July 22 for children age preK-12th grade. For more information, contact Debbie Almohandis at 918.481.111 or visit www.hollandhall.org/ summerprograms.


The world is theirs to explore. The advenTure begins aT holland hall.

Follow the journey on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram @HollandHall

HollandHall.org


SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

University School

Call for a Tour

CAMP RAVEN Join us on our 120-acre wooded campus complete with two gyms, athletic fields, barnyard, splash pad, hiking trails, and picnic areas.

Pre-School–12th Grade

Summer Camp

May 24–august 12 COME CHECK US OUT! 918-631-5060 • www.utulsa.edu/uschool

Educating Gifted Students

Since 1982

The University of Tulsa is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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Gilcrease Museum and the Henry Zarrow Center for Art and Education

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5-6 years old at Gilcrease Museum • 7-12 years old at Zarrow Center Prices per week Half-Day Classes: $100 members; $125 not-yet members All-Day Classes: $200 members; $250 not-yet members Registration and payment are required. Members-only registration begins March 1. General public registration begins March 21. Register online at gilcrease.org/summercamp.

The University of Tulsa is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action institution. For EEO/AA information, contact the Office of Human Resources, 918-631-2616; for disability accommodations, contact Dr. Tawny Taylor, 918-631-2315.

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2/2/16 11:27 AM


SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

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Yes, at Monte Cassino we’re known as “the saints,” but it’s not simply a moniker students instantly acquire after enrolling, it’s an honor and a tradition students have earned for 90 years.

Now is the time to for the 2016-2017 secure your child’s school year spot at Rejoice Christian Schools for the 2016-2017 Call today for a personal tour at: 918-272-7235 academic year. We anticipate increased enrollment, so don’t delay make plans to reserve your spot at RCS now!

So for all reasons people have been choosing Monte Cassino for 90 years (nationally recognized academics, access to teambuilding athletics, community representation), our unique, creative Catholic social skills programs are what sets us apart then and now from our academic competitors. More importantly, it will set your son and/or daughter apart as well.

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From the first day of Monte Cassino classes in 1926 to today, being a Saint is tantamount to what is important in being successful: hard work, respect for others, a passion to overachieve, a strong moral compass, and the ability to make good day-to-day decisions.

918.742.3364 | MonteCassino.org

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE PROFESSIONALS ROOFER What are some ways I can prevent my chimney from leaking? This is a popular question during the rainy season. The chimney is an intricate component of the roof system. It is primarily made up of flashing, counter flashing and of course shingles. RICKY HANKS

The main thing we need to establish is that the flashing is intact, as well as the counter flashing. There are specific lapping and under lapping methods to follow when installing these flashings. Most roofing contractors should install ice and water shields as an extra precautionary when dealing with flashing on the chimney. Finally, at the top of your chimney, a contractor will probably recommend installing a saddle to divert water around the chimney. It is not recommended that one gets on the roof to check the chimney, so it is advised that you have a qualified professional do so for you.

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INSURANCE PROFESSIONAL Is my home covered for earthquakes? Earthquakes are happening more frequently in Oklahoma and becoming more intense. According to the Oklahoma Geological Survey, our state experienced 585 earthquakes with a magnitude of 3.0 or greater in 2014; a RUSS IDEN 163% increase from 2013. “Am I covered?” is the most common question after any earthquake. Unless you’ve specifically asked for earthquake coverage, it is likely you’re not covered. Earthquake coverage is a special endorsement to most homeowners' policies. This endorsement can also cover damage to homes from other ground movement other than settling. Also important to note, some companies are excluding earthquakes related to oil & gas activities. Rates for this endorsement can vary substantially, depending on your homes’ value and construction, with deductibles ranging from 2% to 5%. This means a $200,000 home could have a $10,000 deductible or more for earthquakes. It’s catastrophe insurance, and with more earthquakes happening in our state, it is a wise investment. If you have questions on earthquake coverage or other insurance questions, call a AAA agent near you.

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FINANCIAL ADVISOR How do I let go of emotional investing patterns? 1. Focus on the long-term. Remind yourself of what your long-term financial goals are, and ask if making a change would help you reach them. 2. Root out unfitting investments. Some investments may not “fit” with your overall goals. Portfolios need pruning on a regular DAVID KARIMIAN basis to perform at their best. CFP®, CRPC® 3. Strive for a balanced portfolio. Portfolios often need to be rebalanced over time. Ensure you are comfortable with the amount of risk. Make sure you’re aware of how company stock options may impact your overall investment strategy. 4. Be consistent. Automated investing makes consistency easy, and can be a way to help minimize the effects of market volatility in a portfolio. 5. Embrace diversity. You’ll be in a better position to hang on to a sentimental favorite if your portfolio is diversified. Diversity may provide balance in the event one or more sectors are down. 6. Sell when the time is right. It may be advantageous to sell poorly performing stocks now. If you’re unsure about it, consult a financial professional. 7. Request a portfolio review. Defer to the experts for an objective review of your portfolio, with an eye to performance and your financial goals.

David Karimian, CFP®, CRPC® Karimian & Associates A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise 7712 S. Yale Ave. Suite 240 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.388.2003 • David.x.Karimian@ampf.com www.KarimianAdvisors.com

PR & MARKETING CONSULTANT What is a white paper, and why is it important to my marketing strategy? You are a credible and reliable authority in your industry, and it’s important to position yourself as an expert. A white paper will help spread the word. A white paper JESSICA DYER is more than just a sales tool; it is a contribution to your industry. A well-executed white paper provides relevant and accurate information on a timely, industry-specific topic. It becomes a useful reference tool for your colleagues and customers, providing quick and factual information. It is important to remember that white papers are not based in opinion, they are always factual, with the sole intention of educating readers and helping your audience make decisions. They should be limited to one or two pages. Think of it as a lunch and learn on paper, providing your customers with bite-size information in an easily digestible format. A well executed white paper will not only become an effective sales tool, but will position your company as an authority in your industry, enhancing your overall marketing efforts.

Jessica Dyer, Emerge Marketing & PR 539.777.6087 Jdyer@emergempr.com www.facebook.com/EmergePR

WEIGHT MANAGEMENT SPECIALIST Winter will soon be over and with summer swimsuit season right around the corner what treatments are available to get rid of stubborn fat? FDA-approved Coolsculpting® is the non-invasive procedure available today that uses cooling technology MALISSA SPACEK to target and destroy fat cells, giving you a permanent solution. Coolsculpting® can be done in as quickly as one hour with no downtime and lasting results. Our patients begin to see a noticeable reduction of fat in as little as three weeks and continue to see improving, long-lasting results for up to three months following a treatment. This procedure is ideal for those looking to get rid of a little extra in their tummies, love handles, bra fat, arms, and thighs! To schedule a complementary consultation to learn more about Coolsculpting® call today at (918)872-9999.

Dr. James R. Campbell D.O. and Malissa Spacek, Founder BA Med Spa & Weight Loss Center 500 S. Elm Place Broken Arrow, Oklahoma 74012 918.872.9999 www.baweightspa.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY I’ve developed heel pain during marathon training. What may be going on and can therapy help? Generally, medical providers will diagnose this as plantar fasciitis, however, other muscles and soft tissue may be involved. The typical approach to care is oral anti-inTIM MINNICK, PT flammatory medication, injections, ice, stretching, arch supports, shoes that minimize pronation and ankle strengthening exercise. This approach may help solve the problem some of the time, but I often see patients who continue to have pain even after this course of care. I certainly use some of these treatments, but often include a more aggressive approach including dry needling and ASTYM (Augmented Soft Tissue Mobilization), especially if the problem is chronic in nature.

Tim Minnick, PT Excel Therapy Specialists 2232 West Houston, Broken Arrow, OK 918.259.9522 www.exceltherapyok.com

Views expressed in the Professionals do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma Magazine, Schuman Publishing Co. or its affiliates.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

To be included in the Professionals, call 918.744.6205. HOSPICE CARE

LEGAL SERVICES What is an “Abstract of Title”? An “Abstract of Title” is a compilation of all legal documents which comprise the history of a tract of real estate, to reflect the current state of title. An abstract of title commences with the “root of title”, which is the first legal document recognizing BRAD BEASLEY the tract of land, and all documents thereafter filed. An abstract of title is prepared by an abstract company which will certify that it includes all pertinent documents as of a certain date and time. Abstracts of title include conveyances (deeds), liens, mortgages, leases, assignments, judgments affecting the tract, releases, real estate taxes and assessments. After reviewing an abstract of title, an attorney will render a title opinion setting forth the state of the title, the current record owner and any exceptions to such title.

AVA HANCOCK

My mother has been battling cancer for three years now and her health has recently declined to the point where the doctor is recommending hospice care. My mother would like to remain in her own home. Is it possible to have hospice care at home?

Absolutely. Hospice care is all about making the patient as comfortable as possible and that means providing the care in a place that is most beneficial to the patient and his or her family. About 80 percent of all hospice patients do receive care in their home or a senior living facility. At Grace Hospice, we have a team of experts who will work with your family and your physician to create a specialized plan of care. Please call Grace Hospice at 918-744-7223 and we will be happy to provide you with more information.

“Grace Hospice: Caring for patients and families in Northeastern Oklahoma for more than 15 years”

Bradley K. Beasley Boesche McDermott LLP 110 W. 7th St., Suite 900 Tulsa, OK 74119 918.858.1735 (Direct Dial) 918.583.1777 telephone 918.592.5809 facsimile

PERSONAL TRAINER How do I stay away from dehydration? Dehydration is the excessive loss of water from the body. An average adult should drink 64 to 96 ounces of water every day. Carbohydrate, juice and electrolyte drinks are good hydrators as well. RequireJOHN JACKSON ments vary with activity and age; most active people need two times the average amount. A good way to measure is to drink a 12-ounce bottle every hour, and if hot, increase to a bottle and a half each hour. The hours after exercise are the most important for replenishing depleted fluids. Talk to a health professional to help you choose which brand of hydration is going to be best for specific carbohydrate (sugar) and water needs.

John Jackson, Personal Trainer St. John Siegfried Health Club 1819 E. 19th St., Tulsa, OK 74104 918.902.4028 jljackson70@hotmail.com

Ava Hancock Grace Hospice of Oklahoma 6400 South Lewis, Suite 1000 Tulsa, OK 74136 918.744.7223 www.gracehospice.com

MEN’S STYLE CONSULTANT I want to look a little different from the other guys at my office that have style. What are ways to change it up without looking like I am trying too hard? If you read anything from me, you know that I’m always encouraging others to establish a personal style. It’s just a big AUTUMN POHL part of developing that individual character. Today, when it comes to clothing style for men, there are many ways to look unique. If you check out style blogs or even just catch a glimpse of the commentators from the game over the weekend, you will notice that it’s all in the small details. An idea would be something simple, like adding a pop of color to your pocket square or having a different design between your pocket square and your tie. How about trying out a new way to knot your tie? Try the Trinity knot or the Eldredge knot. Both very fresh looks can jazz up any suit. One of my favorite small details is matching the color of your shoe laces to your dress shirt. It’s a very soft detail that pulls a look together as if it was a fully finished look. Note that women do notice those details and appreciate the fact that you took the time to care. Don’t overthink your style. Do what comes natural and enjoy your individuality. Be inspired, but always be you.

Autumn Pohl Independent Style Consultant J.Hilburn Men’s Clothier 918.407.4024 www.autumnpohl.jhilburn.com Autumn.pohl@jhilburnpartner.com

BUSINESS COACH I promised myself that this would be the year that I would start my own business, but I am terrified of failure. What should I do? This is such an awesome question and something all entrepreneurs experience. Here are some tips for AMANDA FRANCES moving through the fear: 1. It's ok to be afraid. It is normal to feel anxious or overwhelmed at the thought of starting your business. This is a good thing. It means you’re expanding your comfort zone. Feel the fear. And then do it anyway. 2. Start before you are ready. You will never feel completely ready. You will never know every single thing about your chosen field. Start anyway. The learning curve will feel less steep as you go. 3. Stay positive. You will likely find the thought floating through your mind that says, “Who am I to do this? What will people think?” Observe the thought, but resist fixating on it. Create a more positive affirmation to repeat instead. Example: “My product/services is needed. Not everyone will like it, but not everyone has to. I believe in my work. I choose to more forward each day, boldly.”

Amanda Frances Business Coach for Women Entrepreneurs amandafrances.com amanda@amandafrances.com

LICENSED PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR What is the difference between mental health and mental illness? Does one mean you are sick and the other healthy? Great question! Unfortunately a stigma continues to exists in our society that taking care of your mental health may equate to having mental illness. Everyone manages their mental health daily, whether they call it that or not. The AMY KESNER, way in which an individual navigates through PHD, LPC, LADC various situations in their life, parenting children, communication in a relationship, having patience through road construction, dealing with a crowded supermarket, are all influenced by one's mental health. For example, if you are tired or cranky, you may snap at a spouse, friend, co-worker or child; when stuck in traffic you may start to feel aggressive and angry. It is important to identify these changes and continue to be open to learn ways to manage stress, improve parenting, communication, or address relationship issues. Not all of life's challenges may require the assistance of a therapist but when you identify that you have negative patterns in your behavior, emotions or moods, a therapist may be able to help you identify root causes or negative thinking patterns and offer suggestions on how to make positive changes. Many people are feeling as if there is currently a lot of negativity in our world - it is even more critical to maintain good mental health practice to stay calm, patient and focused. Please do not be afraid to reach out to a mental health professional for any issue as they are trained to help with a lot of life stressors, not just mental illness.

Amy Kesner Keystone Counseling & Therapeutic Services 5500 S. Lewis, Suite 5505, Tulsa, OK 74105 918.691.2226 www.amykesner.com dramykesner@gmail.com MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Taste

F O O D, D R I N K A N D O T H E R P L E A S U R E S

Fresh, Local Flavor in Downtown OKC

PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

Kitchen No. 324 provides something for everyone while focusing on fresh, local food.

L

ocated in the heart of the Business District in Oklahoma City, you can look out of your tableside window at Kitchen No. 324 and suddenly feel like you’re enjoying a latte in the middle of New York City. From the beautiful upscale plates to the sophisticated urban view, Kitchen No. 324, part of A Good Egg Dining Group, brings a little bit of what life would be like in the Big Apple to Oklahoma City.

“Kitchen [No. 324] is all about bringing our downtown neighborhood fresh choices and unexpected offerings – from colorful fare and comfort to baked goods and local coffee,” says Aly Clark, brand manager for A Good Egg Dining Group. Known especially for its freshly baked bites and quality brunch, Kitchen No. 324 is a weekend morning hotspot. Everything on the menu is baked every morning at 4 a.m., so every meal is served fresh.

With their signature Joenuts (their take on Cronuts, a croissant-doughnut pastry) and their wide selection of breakfast dishes, Kitchen No. 324 is the perfect place to meet for a breakfast meeting or to get your friends together to start the morning in delicious style – served from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday for all late risers. However, if you aren’t a breakfast person, Kitchen No. 324 has a wide selection of

MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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lunch and dinner salads and entrees that can satisfy any daytime craving. No one can go wrong with their hand-carved petite filet, but they also have entrees ranging from chicken pot pie to cauliflower steak. Kitchen No. 324 also has a variety of handmade sandwiches to make any lunch break more enjoyable. They serve traditional sandwiches, like their “Hand-Carved BLT,” but they also have sandwiches that are served with a Kitchen No. 324 twist, like the “Really Fancy Grilled Cheese” – a sourdough sandwich pressed with smoked cheddarjack cheese, poblano-peach preserves and fresh thyme. Perfect for this time of the season! Kitchen No. 324 provides kids’ meals. Priced at $5.99, the kids’ meals include pasta, veggies, chicken fingers and grilled cheese sandwiches. All kids’ meals are served with the choice of fresh fruit, sweet potato chips or a salad. The atmosphere and fresh food has helped Kitchen No. 324 gain a dedicated following. “We are so thankful to have such wonderful and loyal customers at Kitchen 324,” Clark says. “We see many faces come in and out of our doors, but we have a select group of regulars that we see four and even five times a week!” You can visit Kitchen No. 324 at 324 N. Robinson in Oklahoma City. – Janelle Archer

KITCHEN NO. 324 STARTS BAKING AT 4 A.M. TO PROVIDE A FRESH SELECTION OF PASTRIES. PHOTOS BY BRENT FUCHS

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PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

COSMO CAFÉ

Philip and Miranda Kaiser opened the Cosmo Café and Bar 12 years ago. Seven years ago, they moved to their current location at 33rd Street and Peoria Avenue. “We wanted to be in a neighborhood that is walkable and has a close sense of community,” says Kaiser. “Brookside offers both.” Cosmo Cafe is not their first endeavor in the business. They opened their first restaurant in 1996 in Jerusalem, Israel. Their experience has guided the café to success, with Miranda supervising the kitchen and Philip taking care of the business side. “We like to think of ourselves as eclectic international,” Kaiser says. “Our menu ranges from Indian bruschetta to Cuban goulash to Israeli hummus. We tried to make the atmosphere reminiscent of the European cafe or English pub; a place where people from all backgrounds and generations feel comfortable.” Kaiser says the Italian nachos and turkey and avocado sandwich are very popular. Their extensive gluten-free menu is also a hit with many guests. It’s not just about the food, though. “We offer a full bar and we specialize in unique variations of the cosmopolitan as well as our original seasonal cocktails,” he says. “We also serve a wide variety of coffee drinks, teas and hot chocolates – and we make a mean Bloody Mary.” 3334 S. Peoria Ave., Tulsa. – Beth Weese


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L O C A L F L AV O R

Taste

A Priest and a Vintner

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s an Episcopal priest, the Rev. Bob Wickizer works magic in people’s lives, dealing with their emotional and spiritual needs. As a winemaker, he focuses on alchemy, the chemistry of time, temperature and nature’s ingredients. As a vintner, he hopes his vineyard yields the fruit so vital for producing wine. Several paths led Wickizer to his dual roles as a priest and co-owner of Muskogee’s Pecan Creek Winery with Dr. D. I. Wilkinson. He grew up in Springfield, Missouri in a family that savored wine. “I had my first glass of wine at a family dinner when I was 12,” Wickizer recalls. Wickizer and Wilkinson opened the winery in April 2013, planting more than 500 grapevines. Wickizer is the winemaker; Wilkinson, a pediatrician, handles the viticulture. Dr. Wilkinson particularly enjoys “the farmer aspect” of growing grapes. “Some grapes grow down – like the Chambourcin and Vignoles. Others, Merlots and Cabernet Sauvignons, grow upward, requiring different trellises. You have to train them on the cordon wire as they grow. It’s a lot of hard work but fun and interesting, too,” he explains. Wickizer’s background has served him well. He has a master’s degree in physics and says, “I was finishing my doctoral dissertation when I decided physics was not my calling. I threw my dissertation in the trash, moved to the Silicon Valley and worked for 20 years, developing medical imaging equipment.” In that setting, he became familiar with such noted vineyards as Ridge, Mondavi and Charles Krug. The Muskogee landscape hardly resembles California, but the setting on Fern Mountain Road is yielding 1,200 cases, or 14,000 bottles, of wine a year. In 1995, Wickizer had another epiphany about his life’s direction and enrolled in the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He has been the rector at Muskogee’s Grace Episcopal Church since March 2010. His business partner, Dr. Wilkinson, is among his parishioners. As a vintner, Wickizer’s physics background has been valuable. Touring the 3,750 square foot winery, located in a spacious garage behind his home, he shows the massive wooden barrels

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OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

and steel and plastic tanks holding the fruits of his labor. He’s learned to deal with evaporation, a winemaker’s constant nemesis. “The early day monks who made wine believed it was angels stealing their share of wine,” Wickizer laughs. “It was evaporation.” He’s also found oxygen is wine’s enemy after fermentation, learned the need for filtering micro-organisms out of wine, tackled yeast settlement in tank bottoms and discovered sanitation’s crucial importance. Here, cleanliness is next to Godliness. Surveying tanks with fermenting wine, Wickizer says, “There’s 3,000 gallons of wine in the tanks right now and more than 1,200 plants in the vineyard.” When possible, Oklahoma grapevines are used. Also featured are French-American hybrid Chambourcin and Vignoles grapes, European Merlots and Cabernet Sauvignons. Pear and blackberry dessert wines are available, with raspberry wine planned this spring. While Wickizer and Wilkinson continually try new techniques for making wine, Wickizer says, “I like to make wine because it’s a challenge. I never back down from a challenge.” There’s also romance in making wine, he says. “I love people, and it’s fun to do something people can enjoy. Wine gladdens the heart, according to Psalm 104:15.” For Wickizer, there’s also passion. Perusing his descriptions in tasting room brochures, the effusive words flow freely. Of the 2014 Estate Vignoles, similar to a Sauvignon Blanc, Wickizer wrote, “Vignoles are light bodied. This is truly a wine of passion and presence. The light sunshine iridescence slowly shimmers on your palate for a long enjoyment.” As a vintner, Wickizer’s passion goes beyond enticing descriptions. He’s also an astute marketer, placing wines with approximately 50 area retailers. He also believes the vineyard’s mission is to give back to the community with employment, teaching opportunities and special events. “It’s important to teach the next generation more than the value of wine,” Wickizer says. “We want to teach them the basics of hard work, integrity in all things, and how to follow one’s passion.” M. J. VAN DEVENTER

PHOTOS BY DAN MORGAN.

Dual roles enhance Muskogee winery owner’s mission.


THREE FOR ONE

ALL ABOUT CHA

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

With over 60 different types of coffees and teas, All About Cha Stylish Coffee & Tea is a great place for tea lovers to explore new types of tea or to enjoy their favorites. With a very comfy setup, it is easy to sit in a cozy chair with a pot of one of their many teas and study, read a book or make progress in work. Typically open until late into the night, All About Cha is a great place to relax or be productive long after work hours are over. “Out of all of our teas, our most popular are the sweet potato teas,” says Edmond location manager Daeil Yi. “The Goguma Latte and the Goguma Green Tea Latte are what most customers love.” All About Cha doesn’t only serve drinks. They also have a wide variety of food and desserts available every day too. All About Cha is certain to satisfy any tea or food craving you may have. 13925 N. May Ave. and 7300 N. Western Ave. in Oklahoma City; 3272 S. Broadway, Edmond; 202 S. Cheyenne Ave., Ste-A, Tulsa. – Janelle Archer

In a charming brick house on Harvard Avenue, sisters Sara Creed-Piper and Susan Blair share their passion for tea with the public. “We grew up with tea, and it’s just something that I and my sister have always loved,” says Creed-Piper. When the two opened Dragonmoon Tea Company, they weren’t sure Tulsans were ready for a dedicated tearoom. So they used their skills, honed from years of working as chefs, to come up with a unique menu that would draw in guests. “We started out with a smaller menu, but we’ve gradually increased it,” she says. “We make everything virtually from scratch.” This includes their desserts. “We’re well-known for our chocolate chip croissant bread pudding, but we do so many other things – different cookies, different cakes that you don’t see in other places,” she says. “Personally, I think we make probably the best desserts in the city.” A tearoom cannot be without tea, however, and they carry more than 85 varieties for people to taste and take home. 1927 S. Harvard Ave., Tulsa. – Beth Weese

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER.

DRAGONMOON TEA COMPANY

PHOTO BY BRENT FUCHS.

URBAN TEAHOUSE

Urban Teahouse carries a wide and eclectic selection of teas that are available as custom beverages or loose leaf tea. The many options include white, green, oolong, black and yerba maté teas. “Some of our traditional teas include Japanese Gyokuro, Taiwanese Iron Goddess of Mercy and Chinese Bai Mu Dan,” says Kristy Jennings, the owner/operator. For those uptown residents who have a craving for tea and community there is also a location in the uptown area. Urban Teahouse is modeled after traditional Asian teahouses, Jennings says. “It’s where people meet daily to discuss news, hear the updates of the town

and each other’s lives,” says Jennings. “Tea has always been a connector and I wanted that to be Urban Teahouse’s feel.” It’s a place everyone is welcome. “From the tattooed biker to the delicate elderly person, from students studying to people having meetings or getting to know each other,” says Jennings. “Our staff goes above and beyond for our customers. Our goal is to make every interaction in the teahouse a positive one, from creating an amazing custom drink for you, helping pick out a perfect gift for someone or shipping tea to you.” 7518 N. May Ave., Oklahoma City. – Sharon McBride MARCH 2016 | WWW.OKMAG.COM

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Entertainment

G R E AT T H I N G S TO D O I N O K L A H O M A

E

Pandora’s Box

Toruk brings a taste of the 2009 motion picture to the stage.

nvision a world occupied by people with blue-pigmented skin. No, this isn’t a performance by the famed Blue Man Group. Inspired by James Cameron’s record-breaking 2009 blockbuster Avatar, Cirque Du Soleil presents one of their most stunning productions: Toruk - The First

Flight. Toruk is set thousands of years before the events depicted in the film, as told by a Na’vi narrator. The journey itself comes alive courtesy of Cirque du Soleil’s jaw-dropping standards of choreographed acrobatics. Toruk is Cirque Du Soleil’s most extensive venture into narrative storytelling and serves as a prequel to the phenomenon that is Avatar, recreating the breathtaking world of Pandora and the Na’vi, its native population, in more dimensions than what we saw on the big screen. The production follows a pair of Na’vi youths coming of age in a quest

that sends them around the planet to save the all-important Tree of Souls from destruction and their people from annihilation. In the end, they must confront the dreaded Toruk, a giant, flying predator whose menacing shadow repeatedly terrorizes the Na’vi. The show marks a change from Cirque’s du Soleil’s usual production, trading its poetic themes for a more story-driven setting. But you can expect breathtakingly choreographed fight scenes and battles that will keep you on the edge of your seat. If this prequel to the 2009 film isn’t enough, then the sequels will definitely have you rapturing in blue. Yes, James Cameron has announced the first of three sequels, simply titled Avatar 2. The film is set for release in 2017. Toruk – The First Flight leaps to Tulsa at the BOK Center, 200 South Denver Ave. with six shows March 24-27. Tickets start at $35.

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PERFORMANCES • IN CONCERT • SPORTS • FAMILY • ART • CHARITABLE EVENTS • COMMUNITY

COURTESY OF CELEBRITY ATTRACTIONS.

Entertainment

Calendar

PERFORMANCE

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella The 2013 Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella, appears live at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall for a limited engagement March 22-27, followed by performances March 29-April 3 at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. The revival of the 1957 musical premiered on Broadway in March 2013, received rave reviews from The Hollywood Reporter and was nominated for nine Tony Awards, winning one for best costume design. The stage production featured some new twists and turns by writer Douglas Carter Beane, known best for his screenplay To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar, with direction by Mark Brokaw and choreography by Josh Rhodes. The musical was originally produced for CBS, starring Julie Andrews as Cinderella, and had an audience of more than 1 million people – the largest television audience in history at the time. The show has been remade several times, including a 1997 television performance for ABC. Fans and critics alike applauded this Disney production, starring the iconic Whitney Houston and Brandy Norwood as Cinderella, for its diversity in casting. The continuous remakes and adaptations prove that Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella is truly an American treasure. See the Tony Award-winning costumes and experience, once again, the resonating storyline as the production rolls into the Sooner State. For ticket pricing and more information, visit www.celebrityattractions.com.

PERFORMANCES Chang Mu Dance March 1-2 Korean history unfolds as the Chang Mu Dance Company uses innovative choreography to reflect on the thought and lifestyle of the contemporary world. www.tulsapac. com  Beethoven’s Fifth March 3 The Polish Baltic Philharmonic dazzles in Edmond as they present an all-Beethoven program. www.armstronauditorium.org  University Theatre/Opera: Eugene Onegin March 3 Go on a journey as OU’s Symphony Orchestra recounts the tale of the bittersweet love story of Eugene Onegin. www.ou.edu  School of Music - Opera: Serse March

3 Presented by UCO Opera and the UCO Symphony Orchestra, this operatic masterwork features Persian Emperor Xerxes and his misadventures in love in the midst of an invasion of Greece. www. mitchellhalltheatre.com  RENT March 4-5,12-13 One of theatre’s best musicals, and winner of the Tony Award for Best Musical, RENT has become a pop culture phenomenon with songs that resonate in your soul. www.tulsapac. com  Preparation for the Obsolescence of the Y-Chromosome March 4-5 In this production, Michelle Ellworth poses the question: Are we on our way to becoming a single-sex species? This production investigates rumors about the implications

Madea On the Run

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of the Y- chromosome’s reputed decline with fascinating choreography. www. tulsapac.com  Tulsa Opera: A Streetcar Named Desire March 4,6 See this dramatic tale of a destitute and distraught woman who seeks refuge with family and is soon exposed as a ruined woman with revelations that complete her descent into madness. www.tulsapac.com  Bernadette Peters March 5 Bernadette Peters boasts three Tony Awards, two Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe, three Emmy nominations and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Peters performs live at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center. www.brokenarrowpac.com  Grieg’s Piano Concerto March 5 Enjoy classical music at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcciviccenter. com  BulletsOverBroadway:TheMusical March 8 Written by Woody Allen, Bullets Over Broadway is the story of a young playwright who, in desperate need of financial backing for his next show, accepts an offer he can’t refuse from a mobster looking to please his showgirl girlfriend. www.tulsapac. com  An Evening with Lyle Lovett & Robert Earl Keen March 9 Composer, singer and actor, Lyle Lovett performs alongside musician Robert Earl Keen in a phenominal acoustic concert. www.okcciviccenter. com  Madea On The Run March 11 Tyler Perry’s most popular play arrives at Tulsa’s historical Brady Theater. www.bradytheater.

his music and leaves an indelible legacy in just four short years. www.tulsapac. com  The Flick March 11-12, 13, 18-19, 20 Enjoy this 2014 Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy-drama as it tells the story of three employees in a rundown movie theater. www.tulsapac.com  TSO Classics: Beneath The Score Mahler’s Reserrection Symphony March 12 Presented by the Tulsa Symphony, the conductor of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra, the extraordinary Benjamin Zander, returns to conduct Mahler’s magnificent Symphony No. 2.  www. tulsapac.com  Madea On The Run March 13 Everyone’s favorite mischievious aunt is at it again in Tyler Perry’s outrageously funny stage play. www.okcciviccenter.com  Three Colorful Trios March 15 This concert will include Emil Hartmann, Serenade for Clarinet, Cella and Piano in A Major; Aaron Jay Kernis, Trio in Red for Cello; and Johannes Brahms, Piano Trio No. 1 in B Major. www.brightmusic.org  KristinChenoweth March18-19 Oklahoma native and Emmy and Tony Award-winning singer and actress charismatically takes center stage, performing with her uniquely virtuosic style. www.okcciviccenter.com  Tulsa Ballet: Masters of Dance March 18-20 An eclectic Tulsa Ballet sampler featuring highly acclaimed works by three of Europe’s most esteemed choreographers, including Classical Symphony by Yuri Possokhov, Petit Mort by Jiri Kylian and Rooster by Christopher Bruce. www. tulsapac.com Tulsa PAC Cinderella March 22-27 Rodgers and Hammersten’s Tony Award-winning Broadway musical Cinderella arrives at the Oklahoma City Civic Center Music Hall. www.okcciviccenter.com  Duo Amal March 22 See the fabulous pianists Yaron Kohlberg and Bishara Haroni as they finesse the crowd with their virtuous piano skills. www.tulsapac.com 

Silverstein

com  Signature Pops: Broadway Blockbuster March 11-12 Spend an evening with songs from Wicked, The Phantom of the Opera, Annie, Jersey Boys, The Sound of Music, Chicago, Cats, The Lion King, A Chorus Line and more performed by a trio of New York’s top vocalists. www. ticketoffice.com  Peppa Pig Live! March 12 The kids are going to love this live production of Nick Jr.’s Peppa Pig.  www.bradytheater.com  Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story March 11-12, 17-19 Relive the story as musician Buddy Holly crosses racial barriers with

Galileo LIVE! March 24 Dive deeper into selected works from the exhibition through this curatorial presentation accompanied by string quartet music inspired by the stars. Songs will include a range of classical and rock standards. www. ou.edu  Cirque Du Soleil March 24-27 Inspired by the the blockbuster movie Avatar, Cirque du Soleil evisions a world beyond imagination. www.bokcenter.com  Tracy Morgan: Picking Up The Pieces Tour March 26 After his near-fatal car accident in 2014, Tracy Morgan is back


IN CONCERT GaryClarkJr. March1  www.cainsballroom. com  Jon Pardi March 3  www.cainsballroom. com  Billy Currington March 3  w w w. hardrockcasinotulsa.com  Brian McKnight March 4  www.riverwind. com  Tallows March 4  www.thevanguardtulsa. com  Monte Montgomery March 4  www. bluedoorokc.com  All About A Bubble March 5  www. thevanguardtulsa.com  Yellow Claw March 6  www.cainsballroom. com 

ART

Galileo’s World: An Artful Observation of the Cosmos In 1610 Galileo Galilei published Sidereus Nuncius, or Starry Messenger. The book provided an account of his telescopic work, including his observations of the moon and his discovery of mountains on Jupiter. Presented by the University of Oklahoma, An Artful Observation of the Cosmos explores the close relationship between art and science for much of the modern era. The exhibit combines art from the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art’s permanent collection with books from OU’s History of Science Collections. Also on display is a replica of Galileo’s famed telescope from the Museo Galileo in Florence, Italy. The exhibit contains three sections, allowing visitors to view the world’s cultural fascination with Galileo’s theories. Renaissance dissertations on optics and linear perspectives take over the first section. The second section begins with significant responses to the Starry Messenger and culminates with the 1960s and 1970s Apollo missions. The exhibit concludes by exploring Galileo’s Theory of the Cosmos. An Artful Observation of the Cosmos is part of University of Oklahoma’s Galileo’s World series, and is on display at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art until April 3. For more information, visit www. ou.edu/fjjma.

COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA’S FRED JONES JR. MUSEUM OF ART

like he never left with an all-new stand-up show. www.winstarworldcasino.com  Dual Pianos Ragtime: Ezequiel Palleja and Bryan Wright March 29 Witness the brilliance of pianists Ezequiel Palleja and Bryan Wright as they play pieces from famed composers including Scott Joplin, James Scott and Charles L. Johnson. Palleja has performed ragtime for more than 50 years in his home country of Argentina and performed in the U.S. at the West Coast Ragtime Festival and San Antonio Ragtime Festival. www.tulsapac. com  Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella March 29 The classic tale of Cinderella is brought to life in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Tony Award-winning Broadway musical. This lush production features an incredible orchestra, jaw-dropping transformations and all the moments you love. www.tulsapac.com  Kaleidoscope Dancers in Concert March 31-April 2 See a one-of-a-kind dance performance featuring new and innovative choreography from UCO faculty and guest artists. www.uco.edu Oklahoma City Civic Center

Geoff Muldaur March 30  www.bluedoorokc.com  Hollow Earth March 30  www.thevanguardtulsa.com  Yonder Mountain String Band March 31  www.cainsballroom.com  Styx March 31  www.hardrockcasinotulsa. com 

Carly Rae Jepsen

SPORTS OKC Thunder  www.nba.com/thunder 

Carly Rae Jepsen March 7  www. cainsballroom.com  Papadosio March 9  www.cainsballroom. com  Don Williams March 10  www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com  Walter Silas Humara & The Silos March 10  www.bluedoorokc.com  Rodney Carrington March 11  www. bokcenter.com  Chuck Cannon March 11  www.bluedoorokc.com  Wolfmother March 12  www.diamondballroom.net  Joe Jack Talcum March 12  www. thevanguardtulsa.com  Winter Jam March 12  www.chesapeakearena.com  Robert Plant & The Sensational Space Shifters March 13  www.cainsballroom. com  Winter Jam March 13  www.bokcenter. com  R5 March 15  www.bradytheater.com  SpringFlingWithCageTheElephant March

18  www.bokcenter.com  ChrisTrapper March18  www.bluedoorokc. com  Nightwish March 18  www.diamondballroom.net  ZZ Top March 19  www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com  Tribute to Joni Mitchell March 19  www. bluedoorokc.com  The Cult March 19  www.bradytheater. com  UNDEROATH March 22  www.cainsballroom.com  The Wonder Years March 24  www. cainsballroom.com  Locust Groove March 26  www.diamondballroom.net  Travis Tritt March 26  www.riverwind. com  Tech N9ne March 30  www.cainsballroom. com  Mayday Parade & The Maine March 30  www.diamondballroom.net 

v. LA Clippers March 9 v. Minnesota March 11 v. Portland March 14 v. Houston March 22 v. Utah March 24 v. San Antonio March 26 v. LA Clippers March 31 OKC Blue   http://oklahomacity.dleague. nba.com/  v. Santa Cruz March 4 March 5 v. Santa Cruz March 10 v. Reno March 22 v. Bakersfield March 25 v. Texas v. Rio Grande Valley March 29 v. Rio Grande Valley March 31 Tulsa Oilers  www.tulsaoilers.com  v. Missouri March 18 March 19 v. Allen March 29 v. Colorado March 30 v. Colorado OU Men’s Basketball  www.soonersports. com  v. Baylor March 1 OSUMen’sBasketball  www.okstate.com  v. Texas March 4 TulsaMen’sBasketball  www.tulsahurricane. com  v. USF March 5 OKStateHighSchoolBasketballChampionship March 3-5, 10-12 Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www.okstatefair.com  St. Patrick’s Day 5K March 12 The 34th Annual St. Patrick’s 5K Run, presented by RunnersWorld Tulsa, will benefit Special Olympics Oklahoma and Tulsa. The route

willbeginonBrooksideonPeoriainTulsa. www. sook.org  Bellator MMA March 4 The exciting hard-hitting action of Bellator MMA returns to WinStar World Casino and Resort. www. winstarworldcasino.com  Big 12 Women’s Basketball Championship March 4-7 The road to the NCAA Women’s Tournament will once again go through Oklahoma City as Chesapeake Energy Arena hosts the 2016 Big 12 Women’s Basketball Championship. www. chesapeakearena.com  Tulsa Dog Training Club AKC Agility Trial March 18-20 Mustang Arena at the Expo Square. www.exposquare.com     

ART Grace Grothaus Grimm - Brilliant: A Light Show Thru March 3 Grothaus Grimm’s solo show features the artist’s unique multimedia artworks complete with changing light conditions, noise effects and visual references to the history of still lifes, while Brilliant provides a meditation on the many-layered references to light in contemporary art.   ArtCore Studio Thru March 10 Study different areas of art, including installation, performance, video art and music. Each student is encouraged bring their own unique ideas and skill and apply them to the final project. www.livingarts.org  Wounaan Baskets from the Rainforest of Panama Thru March 27 Explore the culture of the Wounaan Indians of Panama. The Wounaan Indians are some of the finest basket weavers in the world. Using the Chunga palm and other plant materials, they weave multiple culturally unique baskets depicting plants, animals, insects and geometric patterns. www. mgmoa.org  Doel Reed Thru March 27 The Philbrook Museum exhibits 20 paintings, drawings and prints by Oklahoma printmaker turned Taos artist, Doel Reed. www.

philbrook.org  Galileo’s World: An Artful Observation of the Cosmos Thru April 3 Through the Starry Messenger, Galileo reported his discovery of four satellites of Jupiter and mountains on the moon. www. ou.edu/fjjma  Harwelden Award Exhibit Thru April 3 Featured in this exhibition is information about each winner, as well as selected original works by local high school students. www.ahhatulsa.org  Oklahoma Dance Film Festival Thru April 17 The 2016 film selections, submitted by artists from around the world, are presented on monitors and projected in a specially built viewing pod in the Hardesty Art Center. www. ahhatulsa.org  Rick Bartow: Things You Know But Cannot Explain Thru April 24 Through 100 pieces, including a broad selection sculptures, paintings, drawings, prints, mixed media work and giant pastels, this exhibit examines the unexplainable. www.gilcrease.utulsa.org  Honeybadgers by Blair Thurman Thru May 1 The Oklahoma City Museum of Arts displays the works of one of the most popular contemporary artists today. Inspired by totem poles created by indigenous people of the Pacific Northwest Coast of North America, Blair Thurman adds his signature colored neon lights to the traditional design. www. okmoa.com  The Essence of Things Thru May 1 This exhibition celebrates simplicity in design through pieces of furniture, articles of clothing and basic utensils. In addition to these object, photographs and video will round out the offerings of architecture, fashion and art. www. philbrook.org  Revision Contemporary Navajo Weavings from the Pam Parrish Collection Thru May 8 This exhibition showcases 22 of the more than 60 major weavings donated to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum over the

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COURTESY OF CHESAPEAKE ENERGY ARENA

Entertainment SPORTS

CUTLINE NEEDED

Big 12 Women’s Basketball Championship The Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City hosts the Big 12 Women’s Basketball Championship on March 4-7. This is the second time the arena will host the championship, which will continue to be played there through 2019. Since the tournament began, Baylor leads the conference with seven championships that include five straight championships from 2011-2015. Seeding for the tournament will be based on regular season records. With highly competitive teams, this year’s Big 12 Women’s Basketball Championship is certain to be one of the hottest events in Oklahoma. For more information on ticket prices and the schedule, visit www.chesapeakearena.com.

past three years by Pam Parrish. www. nationalcowboymuseum.org  Art. Craft     Posed & Composed: Portraits of Women from the Permanent Collection Thru June 1 This exhibition of 12 portraits by eleven American artists covers the period from just before World War I through the early 1980s. www. okcmoa.com  Off The Wall Thru June 5 Discover Thomas Breeze Marcus’ larger-than-life murals and paintings in this Philbrook Downtown exhibit. www.philbrook.org  Japanese Painted Screens and Scrolls Thru June 26 Step into the Edo Period of Japan through painted screens and scrolls of beautiful landscapes and scenes of daily life and seasonal activities.  www.philbrook.org  Showing the Hand of the Artist: The Draftsmanship of William R. Leigh Thru June 26 Gilcrease Museum showcases one of the largest collections of works by Leigh, numbering nearly 1,300 pieces. The collection includes an intimate look into the artistic process. www. gilcrease.utulsa.org  Summer Wheat: Everything Under the

Sun Thru Aug. 12 Oklahoma City native Summer Wheat creates an immersive experience that includes painting and sculpting.   Our City, Our Collection: Building the Museum’s Lasting Legacy Thru Aug. 31 Celebrate the many extraordinary gifts that have made the Oklahoma City Museum of Art one of the premiere collecting institutions in central Oklahoma.  www.okcmoa.com  EugeneB.AdkinsCollection Ongoing Relive the Native American journey through an impressive collection of paintings, prints, jewelry and pottery. www.okcmoa.com  On Common Ground Ongoing Explore the richness of the common experiences involving the land, its plants and wildlife, the people in their daily life. www.gilcrease. utulsa.org  Reinstallation of the Permanent Collection of Western and Native American Art Ongoing Explore the breadth and diversity of the American West with a focus on art from Arizona, New Mexico and Oklahoma, in addition to art of Mexico and the North American arctic. www. ou.edu/fjjma 

Rent

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CHARITABLE EVENTS Somewhere in Tulsa Gala March 3 Join RSVP Tulsa and travel back in time to a Chicago speakeasy of the 1920s. Enjoy fine cocktails, food and entertainment from the period while supporting our volunteer services for seniors. www.rsvptulsa.org  Eat Local March 3 An evening of cuisine from local eateries, live music, auctions, rafflesandmore. www.rebuildingtogethertulsa. org  Harwelden Awards March 4 The Tulsa Arts Council honors artists, students and arts supporters that encourage Tulsa’s creative spirits. www.ahhatulsa.org  CASA Casino: Party Like It’s1922! March 4 Enjoy dinner, live and silent auctions, a Kendra Scott jewelry pull and casino at the downtown Tulsa Hyatt Regency. www. tulsacasa.org  Hike for Healing March 5 Join The Tristesse Grief Center for its annual 5k and Memorial Mile. Run the trail through Turkey Mountain or walk the Memorial Mile in honor of your loved one. Runners receive a shirt, a race bib and a bag of special wellness items. www.thegriefcenter.org  Gospel, Grits & Gershwin March 5 Enjoy Booker T. Washington High School’s annual fundraiser at Greenwood Cultural Center that benefits students and faculty.  www. btwfoundation.net  17th Annual Dreambuilders’ Gala March 5 The 17th annual dinner event will feature silentandliveauctionsplusotherentertainment andhighlightsoftheorganization’sworks. www. tulsahabitat.org  Sapphire Celebration March 5 Make plans to join the Riverfield community to enjoy dinner, dancing and silent and live auctions. Attire is black-tie optional. In keeping with the “Under the Blue Moon” theme, guests are strongly encouraged to wear shades of blue. www.riverfield.org  Broadway Bash March 5 Celebrate Theatre Tulsa’s 93rd year serving the Tulsa community through arts, education and volunteerismatAloftHotel.  www.theatretulsa.

from around the country come to The Golf Club of Oklahoma to participate in this annual tournament. www.sook.org  Souper Sunday: Mardi Gras March 13 Enjoy all you can taste soups, breads and desserts from area restaurants, as well asasilentauctionwithhundredsofitems www. tsha.com  Citywide Baby Shower and Young ProfessionalsParty March19 Youngprofessionals make collecting diaper, toys and other donations fun while supporting Emergency Infant Services. www.eitulsa.org  Black Canvas March 25 Some of the town’s best chefs whip up a great feast for the senses at the Cox Business Center, using a few surprise ingredients. www. blackcanvastulsa.com  Adult Child Charity Doubles Tennis Tournament II March 26 This year’s tournament, benefiting those in need in impoverished countries in the Western Hemisphere, will bring golfers to LaFortune Park.Twodivisions,beginnerandintermediate, allow more players to enjoy the event.  www. foodforthepoor.org/tennis  JA Business Success Series Luncheon March 30 The Business Success SeriesisanopportunityforJuniorAchievement to feature speakers who share important perspectives on topics relevant to business people in the community.  www.jaok.org  Iron Gate Founders’ Dinner March 31 The soup kitchen feeding the homeless and hungry in Tulsa recognizes those who have helped Iron Gate carry out its mission. www.irongatetulsa.org  TU Newman Center Society Dinner March 31 Join The University of Tulsa in honoring all past chaplains on the TU Campus. Benefiting the students and programs of the St. Philip Newman Center at The University of Tulsa. www.tu-newman.org 

COMMUNITY History of Rock N Roll in Tulsa, Part I March 1 Learn about the great history of rock ‘n’ roll in Tulsa from those that help

Gary Clark Jr.

org  Sip For Sight March 5 The grand gala event raises funds for Prevent Blindness Oklahoma. www.preventblindnessok.org  Fur Ball 2016: THE GREAT CATSBY March 7 Enjoy a night of fun while contributing to Oklahoma Alliance for Animals’ mission to end Oklahoma’s pet overpopulation problem, promote responsible pet ownership and ensurethehumanetreatmentofanimals. www. animalalliance.org Kingpins for Kids March 9 Operation Aware of Oklahoma hits the Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge with games and music for supporters. www.operationaware.org  Dance of the Two Moons March 12 Put on your finest, whimsical ‘70s cocktail outfit and get ready for a night of fun and elegance. www.ihcrc.org  Bowl-a-thon March 12 Have fun at SheridanLaneswhilehelpingTulsayouth. www. jaok.org  American Airlines Charity Golf Tournament March 12 More than 200 golfers

make it. Starting from the earliest years of the ‘50s and continuing on through current times, this look into Tulsa’s rock ‘n’ roll past will be held in two separate four week sessions. www.woodyguthriecenter.org  OK Avant Garde: Spoken Word March 3 Listen to poets and writers as they read their works at Living Arts in Tulsa. www. livingarts.org  Just Between Friends Thru March 5 This show brings together a wide variety of consigners so you can find the best deals on clothing, toys and supplies for kids, home decorations and much more. www. tulsa.jbfsale.com  Artcore Studios Thru March 10 Study different areas of art, including installation, performance, video art and music with local artists Jessica Davenport at the Living Arts in Tulsa. www.livingarts.org  Ewomen 2016 March 19 Mabee Center. www.ewome.net  Oklahoma Ducks Unlimited March


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4-5 Enjoy special games, raffles and a luncheon and dinner banquet with live and silent auctions with fellow members, volunteers and anyone wanting to know more about Ducks Unlimited at Oklahoma City’s Bricktown. www.ok.ducks.org  Oklahoma City International Auto Show March 4-6 This show gives the state a chance to see the newest and brightest stars on the auto market. Appearances this year include 2016 model debuts, a classic car show, special events, vendor booths, activities for the kids and more. www.okcautoshow.org  Almost Ready to Cruise Car Sale & Swap Meet March 4-6 This swap meet features more than 150 vendors from across Oklahoma and surrounding states selling car parts, vehicles and other auto-related accessories.  www. arccconline.org  Timed Event Championship March 4-6 Witness as Guthrie’s Lazy E Arena plays host to the Timed Event Championship, an annual event that features the top 20 PRCA cowboys in the world championship title. www.lazye.com  Momentum OKC March 4-7 The Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition will feature the best work made by young Oklahoma artists at Momentum, an exciting multimedia, interactive art event. www.ovac-ok.org  Underground Monster Carnival March 5 This carnival-themed convention features a costume contest, prizes, a haunted/special FX exhibit room, B-movie style filmmakers and fun workshops. www.undergroundmonstercarnival.com  Peoria Stomp Dance March 5 This cultural dance event of the Peoria Tribe is an exciting display of slow, stomping steps set to rhythm. Head to this Miami event to enjoy Native American heritage in a festival atomosphere complete with old-fashioned cake walks and raffles. www. peoriatribe.com  Bob Wills Birthday Bash March 5 Each year the Cain’s Ballroom celebrates the birthday of “”The King of Western Swing,”” Bob Wills. Celebrate and honor one of America’s most innovative and amazing musicians with plenty of music, dancing and Western swing. www.cainsballroom. com  HistoricNeighborhoodWalkingTour March 5 Join a Muskogee historian for a group tour through the Sadler District and Capital District of Muskogee to learn about the area’s unique African American history, including the legendary lawman, Bass Reeves. www.okieheritage.com 

COURTESY OF HARD ROCK CASINO TULSA

INCONCERT

NatureWorks Art Show & Sale March 5-6 If you love nature, landscape and wildlife artwork, you won’t want to miss this exciting art event that features more than 50 top artists and sculptors from 23 states. www.natureworks.org  Women in Art March 6 Learn more about some of the fascinating female artists in Crystal Bridges’ collections. www. crystalbridges.org  Walkin’ On Chalk Arts Festival March 6 Visit Altus, Okla. for artists of all ages to compete for cash and prizes.  www. mainstreetaltus.org  RV Super Show March 10-13 The annual RV Super Show, held at Oklahoma City’s State Fair Park, features hundreds of RVs on display from central Oklahoma’s premier RV dealers. www.okcrvshows.com  Greater Tulsa Home & Garden Show March 10-13 Find everything you need for your home and garden including useful tips and new products at the Greater Tulsa Home & Garden Show at Tulsa’s Expo Square. www.tulsahba.com 

Posed & Composed

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Grand Lake Boat & Sport Show March 11-13 Find a wide array of boat dealers, RV dealers and miscellaneous sport vendors at the Grand Lake Boat & Sport Show in Grove, Okla. www.grandlakefun. com  2nd Friday Circuit of Art March 11 A monthly celebration of the arts in Norman, connects the downtown arts district with outlying galleries, performance halls and Campus Corner.  www.2ndfridaynorman. com  Outdoor Sporting Expo March 11-13 Take a walk on the wild side at the Outdoor Sporting Expo in Claremore. The three day hunting and fishing expo features exhibits on hunting, fishing, travel and leasure. www.visitcalremore.org  St. Paddy’s Party March 11 Wear green and celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in downtown Claremore. www.visitclaremore.org  Southeastern Oklahoma Wildlife Expo March 11-13 Hunting and fishing enthusiasts will love the special hunting and fishing seminars presented at the event, including archery and skeet shooting demonstrations. Visit this event in McAlester for a showcase of hunting and fishing supplies and techniques, complete with a fish pond and plenty of hands-on exhibits for kids. www.cityofmcalester. com  Oklahoma Youth Expo March 11-18 See Oklahoma youth compete with the best livestock their generation has to offer at the Oklahoma State Fairgrounds. www. okyouthexpo.com  Spring into Summer Craft Show March 12 Stillwater hosts the Spring in Summer Craft Show which features handmade items from more than 80 vendors.  www. pcexpocenter.com  Cleveland County Craft Show March 12 Enjoy home decorating, handmade, seasonal and specialty items presented by over 90 crafters in Norman. www. clevelandcountyfair.org  Oklahoma City Reptile & Exotic Animal Show March 14-15 This event features

ZZ Top Since their debut release, titled ZZ Top’s First Album, in 1971, the blues-rock band ZZ Top has become known for its blues roots and humorous motifs, selling more than 50 million records worldwide. The band, comprised of Billy Gibbons, Dusty Hill and beardless drummer Frank Beard, became famous for their MTV videos in the ‘80s; started off the ‘90s with a cameo appearance in the movie Back To The Future 3; and was inducted into the coveted Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004. Late last year, the iconic band announced their return to the road with their 2016 Hell Raisers tour. Don’t miss your opportunity to see ZZ Top live in concert at the Winstar World Casino and Resort in Thackerville on March 18; at the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Catoosa on March 19; and at the Firelake Arena in Shawnee on April 15. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit w w w.hardrockcasinotulsa. com.

Walkin’ On Chalk Arts Festival

vendors offering reptile pets, supplies, feeders, cages and merchandise as well as live animal seminars and frequent raffles for coveted prizes. www.okstatefair. com  OKC Home & Outdoor Living Show March 18-20 Find innovative products, new ideas, practical advices and great deals in remodeling, home improvement and decor with hundreds of experts all under one roof. www.homeshowokc.com  Green Country’s Midsouth Tackle & Hunting Show March 24-27 Knock your home improvement list out of the park at Oklahoma’s largest home and garden products trade show w with more than 500 exhibitors. www.exposquare. com  Tulsa Flea Market March 26 The Tulsa Flea Market features antiques, collectibles, memorabilia, vintage items, primitives, records, furniture, crafts, jewelry, books and much more. www.tulsafleamarket. com 

TulsaFest March 29 The Oklahoma Restaurant Association hosts this annual event at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa. This popular festival will feature a luncheon, educational sessions and the popular TulsaFest Culinar y Tasting.  w w w. okrestaurants.com 

To see more events happening around Oklahoma, go to

OKMAG.COM Submissions to the calendar must be received two months in advance for consideration. Add events online at OKMAG.COM/CALENDAR


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A PINCH OF GREEN

O’City St. Patrick’s Day Fest Parade

If you’re looking for some “luck of the Irish” fun on St. Patrick’s Day, take your friends and family to downtown Oklahoma City for a top-notch, very green parade. For more than three decades, the O’City St. Patrick’s Day Fest Parade has celebrated this beloved Irish holiday as it winds through downtown Oklahoma City. The parade begins Saturday, March 14 at 11 a.m. Grab something festive and green to wear and venture downtown to enjoy live music, tasty beer, food and fun for everyone!

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Kristen Chenoweth In Concert

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Bullets Over Broadway: The Musical

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Oklahoma-born and Emmy- and Tony Award-winning singer/actress, Kristin Chenoweth takes the stage to entertain Oklahoma City. Throughout her illustrious career, Chenoweth has starred in some of America’s most popular television shows that include The West Wing, Pushing Daisies and Glee. Chenoweth is also remembered for her role as Glinda the Good Witch in the Broadway performance of Wicked, which earned her a Tony Award nomination in addition to her Tony Award-winning performance in You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown. Not only is Chenoweth an accomplished actress and Broadway performer, she is also a veteran of the concert stage, selling-out crowds across the globe, making national headlines following her stunning renditions of Hollywood’s most beloved songs from classic films. Kristin Chenoweth performs at the Oklahoma City Civic Center, 201 N. Walker Ave., March 18-19 at 8 p.m.

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CLOSING THOUGHTS

With Ma Cong

Although he retired from dancing three years ago, Tulsa Ballet’s Resident Choreographer Ma Cong has stayed as busy as ever in recent years. Cong, who had a 13-year career as a dancer, moved to Tulsa in 1999 and performed as a dancer with the Tulsa Ballet before being named the company’s resident choreographer in 2009. In the past year alone, he has choreographed for the National Ballet of China and Queensland Ballet in Australia, as well as Tulsa Ballet. Cong has also created original works for Houston Ballet, BalletMet, Ballet Florida, Richmond Ballet and Ballet Nouveau Colorado, among many others, and was invited to perform Melodia, his original work, at the Grand Gala for Peasaro International Choreographic Festival in Italy and later at the Miami International Ballet Competition. In an interview with Oklahoma Magazine’s Julie Chin, Cong shares his thoughts on…

…his hopes for the future.

I really, really enjoy creating works. I just created my first full-length ballet last year. I hope I will be able to create more full-length ballets, and I hope I will be able to continue to produce more wonderful works for the audience. I also hope I will get more opportunities to travel more to different areas, different companies, and to have communication with other companies, not only for myself, but as part of Tulsa, and to be able to bring our Tulsa culture and Tulsa Ballet to the outside world.

…the future of the Tulsa Ballet.

I think we’re doing wonderfully, and our artistic director, Marcello Angelini, has an incredible vision for the company. We’re in the middle of the capital campaign which is going to help us grow into something really great. In 10 years, we hope we’ll be one of the top leaders of national ballet. Hopefully in the future, Tulsa Ballet will be traveling internationally more often and we can build more incredible productions. I think that’s Marcello’s vision, and we all follow him in trying to achieve this company’s goal.

…the growth of ballet in Oklahoma.

I have been here 16 years, more than 16 years … I have seen the growth of the people who are interested in ballet. I hope more people will be more involved with arts, and they will really come to see ballet as something really, really important to their lives.

...his free time.

I really enjoy cooking. I think that’s kind of my therapy. Sometimes me and my partner love to entertain people. We just invite friends over, have a glass of wine; chatting about life and catching up on stuff, things we haven’t been talking about, what we’re missing from each other. I think that’s my favorite thing to do, really.

…places he’d like to visit.

…how Tulsa has grown since he first moved here in 1999.

I’ve been here 16 years, so I’ve seen the growth of Tulsa. It was just incredible, really. I just started to grow to like Tulsa so much that every time I’m traveling outside it’s like “You know, I want to go back home to Tulsa.” I just think that the city is definitely growing almost every year, and every year I look at Tulsa it’s completely different. Visit okmag.com to see a video of the full interview. 104

OKLAHOMA MAGAZINE | MARCH 2016

PHOTO BY CHRIS HUMPHREY PHOTOGRAPHER

There are some other countries I really really do want to visit, I think, such as the Netherlands. I really want to visit the Netherlands, and also I really want to visit Switzerland and, of course, England. I’ve never been to the [United Kingdom], and many friends have been telling me “you have to visit the UK.”


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